Destroy Evangelical Cult

 

Last night I dreamed  God wants me to destroy the Evangelical Cosmology, because it is hurting many people, and condones the Nashi movement. This the first of several posts.

Children are too young to be indoctrinated into any Christian Cult.  This is a new cult, that does not follow traditions. Homophobic  Evangelical Propagandists have entered the earthly political arena  and are hell-bent on getting children to surrender to the Republican party that was co-founded by my kindred, John Fremont. Jesus and Paul told the early christens to forsake worldly things, because the kingdom of God is coming, soon. When it was a no-show, many sects were formed with new approaches.

The children above are competing with one another. They are performers trying to please the pastor and their parents for an ambiguous reward from a heavenly father that can be mistaken for a world leader, many who claims Jesus is speaking through them.

Jon ‘The Nazarite’

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evangelicalism

Evangelicalism (/ˌiːvænˈdʒɛlɪkəlˌɪzəm, ˌɛvən-/), evangelical Christianity, or evangelical Protestantism,[a] is a worldwide, trans-denominational movement within Protestant Christianity which maintains the belief that the essence of the Gospel consists of the doctrine of salvation by grace through faith in Jesus Christ‘s atonement.[1][2] Evangelicals believe in the centrality of the conversion or the “born again” experience in receiving salvation, in the authority of the Bible as God‘s revelation to humanity, and in spreading the Christian message. The movement has had a long presence in the Anglosphere before spreading beyond it in the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.

Its origins are usually traced to 1738, with various theological streams contributing to its foundation, including English Methodism, the Moravian Church (in particular its bishop Nicolaus Zinzendorf and his community at Herrnhut), and German Lutheran Pietism. Preeminently, John Wesley and other early Methodists were at the root of sparking this new movement during the First Great Awakening. Today, evangelicals are found across many Protestant branches, as well as in various denominations not subsumed to a specific branch.[3] Among leaders and major figures of the evangelical Protestant movement were John Wesley, George Whitefield, Jonathan Edwards, Billy Graham, Harold John Ockenga, John Stott and Martyn Lloyd-Jones. The movement gained great momentum during the 18th and 19th centuries with the Great Awakenings in the United Kingdom and the United States.

The United States has the largest concentration of evangelicals in the world. Based mostly in the Bible Belt, US evangelicals are a quarter of the nation’s population and politically important.[4] In the United Kingdom, evangelicals are represented mostly in the Methodist Church, Baptist communities, and among evangelical Anglicans.

Evangelicalism, a major part of popular Protestantism,[b] is among the most dynamic religious movements in the contemporary world.[5] While evangelicalism is on the rise globally, developing countries have particularly embraced it; there it is the fastest growing portion of Christianity.

On April 9, 2012, I received an e-mail from Kendall W. Corbin, the brother of my long term friend, Edward Malcom Corbin. Their father was the head of the Mayo Clinic and has two citations in Who’s Who. Kendall Brooks Corbin, married Eryl Portia Wallace, the daughter of Emilie Susan Cavanagh, who married Robert Bruce Wallace. Portia descends from the infamous William Wallace, and it looks like, Robert Bruce. But what I am interested in is Portia’s kinship to Francis Cavanagh, a member of the Plymouth Brethren.

At Ed Corbin’s house I read about twenty pages on the Cavanagh family containing letters which mentioned the Plymouth Brethren throughout. Those papers Ed owned, got missplaced. When I spoke to Kendall on the phone, he said he would look for them. but, having just moved, this might take awhile.

“Francis Cavenagh (1810‐1875) and his wife Susan Prince (1812‐1885) were
parents of: (1) William Cavenagh (b. 1840), who became a banker; (2) Frank (most
likely Francis?) Cavenagh (b. 1842), who became a Plymouth Brethren missionary
on the Shetland Islands;”

There exist much controversy about the Brethren and their ties to John Darby who is being accused of inventing the Rapture Tribulation – now considered a heresy. He based this new religion on the visions of a fifteen year old girl kin to members of the Brethren – who may have owned the God Gene.

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Van der Zwann Indicted

Dutch Citizen, Alex Van der Zwann ‘Of the Swan’, was recently married to Eva Khan, an artist. She took lessons from a Russian artist who did a painting of a Dutch royal with windmill – and eye between two horns. He rendered a Rena type, also.

Rachel Maddow asks who had Alex on their BINGO card. Well, I did, if you consider Belle and her mother Van der Turin, and, the Swan Brethren. This is a billionaire and a woman artist, tale. She did not marry for money. How about love, or, a bloodline? Rachel has spent most of her show on Alex, whose wife is pregnant. He does not want to be in jail when his child is born, so, he pleaded guilty – and cut a deal?

Wiley studied in Russia and may have slimed the cote of arm of a Swan Brethren. Who is in his circle of artists. Who were his early backers?

Jon

“Life in art is about me. I’m twenty-two, I do art, as long as I can remember. In Moscow, I went to art school at the Anglo-American school on Beregovoe, took painting lessons from Alexander Egorov (his canvases are in the Russian Museum and the collection of the Valaam Monastery). When it was time to enter the university, I already exhibited at the online auction Oily Oil, about my work wrote the magazine AD. My mother and I stopped at three British art schools: Central Saint Martins, Goldsmiths, University of London and Kingston University.”

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/mueller-files-new-charge-russia-probe-against-lawyer-accused-lying-n849566

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/11/23/shoshana-and-the-swan/

https://rosamondpress.com/2017/03/18/orange-order-of-the-swan-brethren/

Manafort and Gates were also working on behalf of Tymoshenko’s rivals, including ousted president Viktor Yanukovych. The New York Times reported in September that Manafort arranged for Skadden to do the work — and that prosecutors were asking questions about it.

The lawyer’s father-in-law is German Khan, a billionaire who filed a libel suit in October against Fusion GPS, the investigation firm behind a partly unsubstantiated intelligence dossier that alleged Donald Trump’s campaign colluded with the Russians.

Van der Zwaan married Eva Khan, an art critic and debutante, last year in a lavish wedding at the Luton Hoo estate in the English countryside, where “Four Weddings and a Funeral” and “Vanity Fair” were filmed, according to the BigBagBlog.

According to the charging documents, Alex van der Zwaan was questioned in November and claimed that his last communication with gates was an “innocuous” text message in mid-August 2016. He also said his last communication with someone described only as Person A was in 2014 and that he did not know why a 2016 email exchange with Person A was not turned over to Mueller, the document alleges.

But, according to the prosecutors, van der Zwaan spoke with both Gates and Person A in September 2016 regarding the Tymoshenko report, surreptitiously recorded the calls and deleted the email in question.

The charge against van der Zwaan was announced just days after Mueller indicted 13 Russian nationals accused of interfering in the 2016 presidential election. Trump attorney Ty Cobb declined to comment saying the case, like the Manafort and Gates indictments, is not related in any way to the White House.

Congress has demonstrated its inability to solve the key unanswered questions of the Trump dossier — who paid for it and what were its sources? The dossier was compiled by ex-British spy Christopher Steele of Orbis Business Intelligence of London and was commissioned by Fusion GPS, a Washington, D.C.-based opposition research firm headed by former journalist Glen Simpson.

The artist has depicted his own dreams. One of the paintings, entitled Grossbayer, depicts the a struggle between two worlds: one big and merciful and the other small and malicious… – Sobesednik. Nikolai Fokht.

In 1995 at the «Golden Paintbrush» competition, held in the Central House of Artists, Alexander was awarded a prize for the triptych Flowers, dedicated to the Great Patriotic War.

The following year his hyper realistic floral works were displayed in the Department of the Corps Diplomatique at the request of the ambassador of Ecuador Juan Salazara Sancisi. The exhibition was dedicated to the 124th anniversary of the Battle of Pichins.

http://artodyssey1.blogspot.com/2010/11/igor-egorov.html

But now we know at least part of the answer about the funding:

The Washington Post reports, citing credible sources, that the infamous Trump dossier was funded by the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee (DNC). CNN responded to being scooped by declaring that this is “old news” — that CNN had already reported that the dossier had been funded by “Democrat sources.”

A New York Times reporter complained she had dropped the story after being “lied to” by persons involved in the dossier’s funding. CNN reacted with outrage when President Trump’s tweet suggested a conspiracy between the Russians and the Democrats.

This is a huge story. The dossier was not funded by some rogue Democrat donor but by the Clinton campaign and the DNC itself. So far, neither the Clinton campaign nor the DNC have denied the accuracy of the story.

Among Fusion GPS’s clients were Russian entities that hired it to do opposition research to discredit the Magnitsky sanctions passed by Congress in 2012. Steele and Simpson shopped the dossier to various news outlets before BuzzFeed eventually published it.

Alex van der Zwaan is accused of making false or misleading statements regarding email communications with Richard Gates.

  • His former employer, the renowned law firm Skadden, Arps, says they are cooperating with authorities.
  • Van der Zwaan is married to the daughter of German Khan, a Russian oligarch who is suing research firm Fusion GPS over a dossier alleging salacious and unverified ties between President Donald Trump and Russia.

 

Three Russian investors are suing private investigation firm Fusion GPS and its founder Glenn Simpson for libel over the handling of an intelligence dossier containing salacious allegations against President Donald Trump.

Mikhail Fridman, Petr Aven and German Khan filed suit Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Washington, claiming that their reputations were unfairly tattered by the so-called dossier — a largely unsubstantiated document that has taken on a larger-than-life role in several investigations into alleged collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

“Even though the Dossier contained unverified allegations, Defendants recklessly placed it beyond their control and allowed it to fall into the hands of media devoted to breaking news on the hottest subject of the day: the Trump candidacy,” the suit alleges.

The plaintiffs are among the backers of Alfa Bank, a financial institution that the dossier accuses of involvement in Russian efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

In May, the same three Russian oligarchs filed a separate libel suit in a New York state court against BuzzFeed over its publication of the dossier.

Oil painting: Eva Khan about art-universities in London

The eldest daughter of the eleventh Russian forbes Herman Khan, co-owner of LetterOne. Debutante of the first Ball "Tutler". At school I composed songs for a rock band, I dreamed of being a "free artist and musician away from money and civilization." As a result, he studies in the Courtauld Institute of Art. Moving to study in London, the twenty-two-year-old Eva is especially grateful for her acquaintance with the successful lawyer Alex van der Zwaan (he is thirty-three) - the wedding took place in June

THE ELDEST DAUGHTER OF THE ELEVENTH RUSSIAN FORBES HERMAN KHAN, CO-OWNER OF LETTERONE. DEBUTANTE OF THE FIRST BALL “TUTLER”. AT SCHOOL I COMPOSED SONGS FOR A ROCK BAND, I DREAMED OF BEING A “FREE ARTIST AND MUSICIAN AWAY FROM MONEY AND CIVILIZATION.” AS A RESULT, HE STUDIES IN THE COURTAULD INSTITUTE OF ART. MOVING TO STUDY IN LONDON, THE TWENTY-TWO-YEAR-OLD EVA IS ESPECIALLY GRATEFUL FOR HER ACQUAINTANCE WITH THE SUCCESSFUL LAWYER ALEX VAN DER ZWAAN (HE IS THIRTY-THREE) – THE WEDDING TOOK PLACE IN JUNE

Life in art is about me. I’m twenty-two, I do art, as long as I can remember. In Moscow, I went to art school at the Anglo-American school on Beregovoe, took painting lessons from Alexander Egorov (his canvases are in the Russian Museum and the collection of the Valaam Monastery). When it was time to enter the university, I already exhibited at the online auction Oily Oil, about my work wrote the magazine AD. My mother and I stopped at three British art schools: Central Saint Martins, Goldsmiths, University of London and Kingston University.

I dreamed, of course, of St. Martins. They often come here to study simply because they are fashionable and popular. In Moscow, this is such a secular trend. We have a lot of agencies that convince: “You only need to go there, this is the best university”. Many of those who are bewitched by these mantras are quickly disappointed. Students have to pay a lot of money for what is in fact not the best. Of course, someone is sent there by parents, someone wins grants. But some are in London for five jobs – both a secretary and a model business – just to pay for their studies.

To enroll in an English university, you need to complete a preparatory course called foundation. I was taken to St. Martins with my hands and feet. The fact is that the exam on the International Baccalaureate (IB) program, which is necessary for admission to a European or American university, is usually taken at the end of school, in the summer. And I passed it while studying, and passed it well. So I entered the foundation, and then spent two weeks with a clear conscience in the “Tutler” and two months at Sotheby’s. In August, my studies began.

St. Martins is a huge building of the former factory in the central London district of Kings Cross. Previously, nearby the show was part of the London Fashion Week. So before the university there were installations all the time, side-by-side parties were going on. On the way to the lecture, you could meet Alex Chang, Lottie Moss or some star blogger. Students, of course, dressed for study as a fashion show. The girls could come in a transparent top without a bra or in a polyethylene skirt, the boys in the form of a ninja or Goshi Rubchinsky’s outfit. Dyed your hair pink. Central Saint Martins has to experiment: in Moscow you live with your parents and live, nothing hovers you, but suddenly you start listening to post-punk, wearing Supreme sneakers and Thrasher shirts. Though my appearance did not affect my appearance. I went to lectures in work clothes: jeans, shoes, shirt. And I would never dye my hair, because I like my color. And I do not like herdness. “Now everyone should wear piercings and stop shaving underarms” – it’s not for me.

Central Saint Martins
CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS

St. Martins stands on the canal, on the beach sit students: eating, chatting. They communicate with groups: Japanese, Chinese, Koreans, Americans, Russians. I then just came to London, it was very difficult for me to find friends, I missed Moscow. And the company at me has developed unusual by local measures: we all were of different nationalities, from different countries, different ages. One guy was over thirty, and he just decided to get another education, an English girl then went to Oxford to study literature, another was from Brazil.

The preparatory course here is extremely versatile, you can choose from everything from shoe design to industrial design and even sculpture. I chose theater and jewelry design, as well as fine art (painting). Three times a week we came to a lecture in a large audience, where the professors told us what interested them at the moment. For example, today he is interested in Freud’s psychoanalysis – and he shows us the works of the Chapman brothers or Sarah Lucas with phallic symbols. So the teachers tried to explain to us that the development of art was not a linear process, they wanted to destroy the stereotypical thinking laid down in the school “first there was Egypt, then Rome, then Byzantium, then the Middle Ages, then the Renaissance.” A conscious lack of system in the British university is absolutely normal phenomenon – as well as self-education. Nobody gives you knowledge on the spoon. You must go to the library yourself, find the material yourself and make a brief extract. Teachers see a couple of hours a week.

On topics that were devoted to classes, we had to submit work every week. Each week, their views are arranged, plus for the year we made three more large projects. The most large-scale – graduation: in the review on its results, I showed four works. They did not like the teachers and students, because they were too traditional, and in St. Martins, everyone is pretty radical. For example, a girl starts on a monthly basis, she sits on the canvas and brings this picture to view – the professors from such a fluttered soul. Immediately remembered Joseph Beuys, who painted with his own blood, the performances of Marina Abramovich, Yoko Ono – here they pray. And I did not experiment. Canvas, oil or pastel – which radical would like this?

Still, when choosing a painting, I thought that we would draw from nature, learn to convey shades, paint portraits and so on. But everything turned out differently. By the way, the content of the forthcoming course can not be known in advance. None of the five best British art schools (Central Saint Martins, Wimbledon College of Arts, Camberwell College of Arts, Chelsea College of Arts and London College of Communication) have any description of programs at all. Details – as in advertising new coworking for Moscow hipsters: “Come, we have such wonderful workshops, excellent cafeterias, bohemian spaces, so that you can sit in their pink skirt-tutu.” In general, Saint Martins did not live up to my expectations. Perhaps, as far as fashion is concerned, they give a good education here, but in the field of contemporary art and painting,

City & amp; Guilds of London Art School
CITY & GUILDS OF LONDON ART SCHOOL

On the first course in the end, I entered City & Guilds of London Art School. This is a chamber classical school of arts in the form in which they existed in the times of Malevich and Chagall. Such a commune of artists: twenty students, teachers – themselves practicing painters and sculptors. It’s difficult to get here, the school is completely closed. Learn about her on the recommendations, I’m still in school from a friend: she wanted to go to the City and Gildes, despite the fashion at St. Martins.

This university is located in a private house in a residential area of ​​London on the south side of the Thames. There is a stained glass workshop, workshops for carving in stone and wood – that is, purely applied specialties (in English arts & crafts). The faculty of painting, of course, is also there, but echoes of conditional carvings on marble are audible there too.

In St. Martins, in order to make a weekly job, some students spent a thousand pounds, and some – not a penny. In City and Gildes, Karl Marx bequeathed everything: to each according to his needs. At our disposal were materials, canvases, workshops. Classes were also a model of Soviet system. For starters, we were taught how to stretch canvas, saw out boards, primed flax. The first project was a painting written from nature. For the second, you had to select a painting in the National Gallery and make a carbon copy. I stopped at the “Baptism of Christ” by Piero della Francesca in 1445. A copy of me, unlike some of my fellow students even for St. Martins, was given quite easily – thanks to the Moscow art school, where they taught to write on canvas with their hands, and not by what they are sitting in St. Martins.

Eva Khan's work "Variations on the theme of Piero della Francesca's painting" The Baptism of Christ ", 2015
EVA KHAN’S WORK “VARIATIONS ON THE THEME OF PIERO DELLA FRANCESCA’S PAINTING” THE BAPTISM OF CHRIST “, 2015

Then we needed to make a picture-interpretation on the basis of a carbon copy. In general, any – even a black box. The main thing is to “read the narrative”. This work has become one of my best (for me, for sure). I laid the golden section of Leonardo da Vinci so that the diagonals passed through all the saints on the canvas, and then left only these diagonals. The only character I prescribed was the Holy Ghost, the dove. But I also outlined it only as a silhouette and also diagonals, and diagonals in 3D.

In City & Guilds, I did not make friends with anyone in particular, because I already started selling Kolya Kosheleva’s works (a graduate of Stroganovka and the New York Academy of Arts was a sign of secular Moscow at last year’s exhibition in the Triumph Gallery .). I constantly flew to Art Basel, to Hong Kong, further everywhere. I took all the university work at home. She said that everything was distracting me in the studio, and I drew something at home in a hurry. Now I look back and understand: I, perhaps, would graduate from this university if I could overcome my ambition. “I’m flying to Art Basel, and here you are drawing sketches” – now I’m sorry that I thought so. My only friend in the City and Gildes was a classmate Oliver Epp – he has a very good career: he is sold in Moscow at an auction of modern contemporary art Sample.

Compared with the students of St. Martins, the students of City and Gilds are more bohemian. Everyone reads Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Camus. They are friends only among themselves. If someone has a crisis, everyone suffers. Especially if someone does not get a grant.

At an interview at the Institute of Courto I was asked to describe one picture of my choice. I described, I was accepted.

I left City and Gildes after finishing the school year. Just then I realized that I did not want to be an artist – much more I was interested in the art market, the history of art. Six months I worked at Sotheby’s, but at the end of the summer I decided to continue my studies. In England, the UCAS system operates, with which all applicants apply to universities – you can do this literally a week before the start of the school year. If there are still places, you are assigned an interview. August 15, I applied to the Courtauld Institute of Art, and on August 20 I had an interview. I was asked to describe one job of my choice. I chose, of course, the same “Baptism of Christ” by Piero della Francesca. Described, came out – in fifteen minutes I got a call and said: “You are accepted.”

Courtauld Institute of Art
COURTAULD INSTITUTE OF ART

The Courto Institute is the best university I have ever studied. They do not teach painting at all, there is no applied skill in the program either. In the first year we read the chronological history of the arts. Plus we had to choose two modules. I chose “Rubens’ Art” and “Renaissance Art in English Collections” – in this module we were told only about those works that are stored in London’s museums and palaces. That is, students are purposefully taught so that it is easier for them to find themselves in the professional world. Now I can go to any London museum, go to any work and tell why it hangs right here, how she got here, who was a patron and who is the customer. At the Courtauld Institute, I was given a curatorial knowledge base.

The module in the second year was called Frameworks for Interpretation. We studied different approaches to the study of art, looked at it through the prism of feminism, the magnifying glass of Marxism and the sight of the theory of power.

Earlier in the Institute of Courto took only graduates of schools like Eton, Wellington, Harrow. Now the most ordinary people study here. This is almost the main difference from St. Martins, where there were a lot of guys from noble families, and from City and Gilds: almost all of them went to grants there. In Courto, there are, of course, people with shaved temples (we are still in the homeland of punk), but on the strength of five people. Boys dress very quietly – polo shirt, beige chinos trousers. The girls are also ordinary, although a couple of my classmates were lucky and they looked like Bella Hadid.

Russian in my course is not at all. Even Russian speakers do not exist – neither from Kazakhstan, nor from Ukraine, no one. Of family souls – only a Serbian girl, but she was born in London. The fact is that it is very difficult to get to the Courtauld Institute. If you have bad English, you can not study here: you will have to write insanely and read even more. In St. Martins, almost do not need to read, just look at the pictures in Dazed & Confused. Therefore, there are so many people who speak English with a dictionary.

 

If van der Zwaan pleads guilty, he will be the fourth person to cut a deal with Mueller. The others are:

  • Mike Flynn: Trump’s short-tenured national security advisor pleaded guilty in December to a charge of making false statements to the FBI about his communications with Russia after the election but before the inauguration — allegedly made at the urging of Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner and Flynn’s former deputy, K.T. McFarland.
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The Nashi Motive

 

 

 

Since Friday there has been a fierce debate about the Indictments – which do not include MOTIVE. I have established motive. Here is the cherry on the cake. Putin founded the Nashi movement because the birthrate had fallen drastically. The Nashi were secular in the beginning. Open sex camps sprang up everywhere. As they became religious, they needed a Satan boogy-man. Obama was it. Then Hillary and her Lesbian Brigade. I suspect the ninety at the Cyber farm, are Nashi.

This is a real Crusade, folks, launched against the Democratic Party. Putin wants one party, under God, who hates Gays, and wants them exterminated. Pence is willing. This is what Hitler did. He went after the mentally ill in folks homes. Once family members agreed to off them, he had them. This is the purpose of Trump’s Wall. Americans agree to damn Mexicans to hell, and Gays are next.

“Lock her up!”

I am watching a show on Warren Jeff who raped children, as did Koresh. When they got caught, they brought the world to an end.

This video shows mass weddings with promise to have three children. Cult followers need a pay-off…..over and over, again! Something bad has to happed to Gays – again! The Nashis will be manning their computers come election time – again! Trump is doing nothing because he knows the outcome. He is a Traitor to the United States. He has a million crazy evangelical followers – armed to the teeth! The school shooter wore a red Trump cap, and spent much time on the internet. Young teenagers, unsure of their sexuality, are vulnerable.

Trump is a Rape Artist. Has he been to Nashi camps? Did he bed beauty contestants who had? Melania knows her Superman is in the other room slamming women up against the wall. This is Sex Abuse on a massive scale. What if there is a photo of Trump with a Russian Twink? Has Mueller seen it? All the Nashi are Aryan types, descendants from Vikings and Danes. White folks like to give signs of comradeship, just like the make-believe folks do in the movie Black Panther. They, cross their chest!

Weinstein is a bi-sexual rape artist. It’s about having power over others. If I am correct, and the proof becomes public truths, then the Republicans party, and the Evangelical cult, cease to exist. These are dangerous times.

Jon Presco

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashi_(youth_movement)

https://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/celebrity/david-parfitt-accuses-harvey-weinstein-of-assaulting-him-on-‘my-week-with-marilyn’/ar-BBJlMXE?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp

SAN FRANCISCO — One hour after news broke about the school shooting in Florida last week, Twitter accounts suspected of having links to Russia released hundreds of posts taking up the gun control debate.

The accounts addressed the news with the speed of a cable news network. Some adopted the hashtag #guncontrolnow. Others used #gunreformnow and #Parklandshooting. Earlier on Wednesday, before the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., many of those accounts had been focused on the investigation by the special counsel Robert S. Mueller III into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/after-florida-school-shooting-russian-‘bot’-army-pounced/ar-BBJlGVk?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp

Oddly, the Orthodox-evangelical alliance marks one of the few bright spots in an otherwise strained relationship between the United States and Russia. As one American banker in Moscow with close ties to Hilarion Alfeyev told me, “It is surely one of the most positive things taking place right now regarding US-Russian relations.”

We want to promote the idea of the unity between the West and Russia on the basis of common Christian roots,” Sevastianov told Inside the Vatican magazine in 2009. “We believe in this alliance among traditional Christian countries…and we believe that, with a united voice, we can be a strong force against the radical secular world which has become dominant in our societies.”

The church’s close ties with American evangelicals reflect a shift in policy. For much of the post-Soviet period, the Russian Orthodox Church held evangelical denominations at arm’s length, fearing that they would compete for influence within Russia. But as the church has consolidated its power, it has come to view the evangelical community as a partner. “The ROC realizes that the evangelical denominations are not their opponents but rather their allies in the relations between the church and the secular population,” says Olga Kazmina, a professor of ethnology at Moscow State University.

It’s a re-envisioned paradigm,” says Father Leonid Kishkovsky, head of the Orthodox Church in America’s Department of External Affairs. In many ways, it makes sense, he adds: both religious groups share an ideological commitment and have grown disillusioned with the way mainline churches have dealt with issues like gay marriage and abortion. “But what I’m quite nervous about is the ideological core which actually motivates both sides,” Kishkovsky says. “Where is the motivating force? Is it in faith? Or is it in political ideology?

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Is Our President Gay Curious?

Pence has connections to Scott Lively, and, is extremely anti-Gay! These Bashers are very organized all over the world. It is coming back to me that in the battles I had on facebook, they would bring in a religious expert when I was besting them. I believe The Troll Factory is full of Russian Christians on a anti-gay crusade. These Trolls have taken over our Democracy. Putin could have introduced Donald to a very seductive gay man, a real flatterer. When did Pence, Sessions, and Lively, approach Citizen Trump? They knew of his desire to built Trump hotels in Russia. Did they have a video? Does Scott Lively know Roy Moore?

What we got here is a religious cult that is under scrutiny by the FBI and Mueller. Consider Jim Jones, David Koresh, and Patty Hurst. These CRIMINAL CULTS do not go down easy. They never believe they did anything wrong. The did it FOR OUR OWN GOOD, and are on a mission from God.

Take a good look at Pence and Sessions. They are the last of The Red-Hot Heterosexual Lovers who took over the United States of America – with Putin’s help!

Jon Presco

http://www.weeklystandard.com/the-bi-curious-case-of-donald-j.-trump-and-wikileaking-bill-kristol/article/2004076

http://thehill.com/homenews/administration/355594-trump-joked-that-pence-wants-to-hang-all-gay-people-report

You see?” Trump reportedly said to Pence. “You’ve wasted all this time and energy on it, and it’s not going to end abortion anyway.”

And when the meeting began to focus on gay rights, Trump reportedly pointed to Pence, joking, “Don’t ask that guy — he wants to hang them all!”

One Trump campaign staffer also told The New Yorker that Trump used to ask people leaving meetings with Pence, “Did Mike make you pray?”

http://fortune.com/2018/02/18/a-russian-troll-in-his-own-words/

This rising Russian social conservative movement frequently invokes the argument that pro-gay and women’s rights groups are puppets of the West, which is seeking to undermine Russian autonomy and interfere in the country’s internal affairs. At an annual meeting of journalists and academics presided over by Vladimir Putin in Valdai in September, the Russian president said that European countries had strayed from their roots by legalizing gay marriage. He urged Russians to embrace the conservative values of the Orthodox Church and other traditional religions and issued a warning to those who might want to challenge those values. “Russia’s sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity are unconditional—these are red lines no one is allowed to cross,” he declared.

We want to promote the idea of the unity between the West and Russia on the basis of common Christian roots,” Sevastianov told Inside the Vatican magazine in 2009. “We believe in this alliance among traditional Christian countries…and we believe that, with a united voice, we can be a strong force against the radical secular world which has become dominant in our societies.”

The church’s close ties with American evangelicals reflect a shift in policy. For much of the post-Soviet period, the Russian Orthodox Church held evangelical denominations at arm’s length, fearing that they would compete for influence within Russia. But as the church has consolidated its power, it has come to view the evangelical community as a partner. “The ROC realizes that the evangelical denominations are not their opponents but rather their allies in the relations between the church and the secular population,” says Olga Kazmina, a professor of ethnology at Moscow State University.

It’s a re-envisioned paradigm,” says Father Leonid Kishkovsky, head of the Orthodox Church in America’s Department of External Affairs. In many ways, it makes sense, he adds: both religious groups share an ideological commitment and have grown disillusioned with the way mainline churches have dealt with issues like gay marriage and abortion. “But what I’m quite nervous about is the ideological core which actually motivates both sides,” Kishkovsky says. “Where is the motivating force? Is it in faith? Or is it in political ideology?”

On Friday, a new indictment by special counsel Robert Mueller provided a comprehensive overview of a picture that had been emerging for months. Russia’s Internet Research Agency, with backing from the Kremlin, ran huge “troll factories” where commenters using fake identities manipulated Americans’ online political debates.

New insight into the details of that operation came Saturday, when the Washington Post published an interview with a man who says he worked at one of those ‘factories.’

The Post’s informant, Marat Mindiyarov, is not one of the 13 mostly high-level operatives named in the latest Mueller indictment. Instead, he was one of the rank-and-file workers who advanced Kremlin talking points in online discussions, working from a facility in the St. Petersburg area. He says he worked primarily in a department aimed at manipulating Russian citizens, for instance by leaving comments downplaying the impact of international sanctions on the Russian economy.

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Trump Will Not Betray the Anti-Gay Cause

Trump has no values. He had no reason to be President. Jeff Sessions and Steve Bannon gave him two reasons. Putin offered Donald big money deals.

Jon

This past June, the Russian Parliament passed an anti-gay law that came as a surprise to much of the rest of the world. The statute, an amendment to the country’s Code of Administrative Offenses, bans “propaganda” regarding “nontraditional sexual relations among minors.” (In earlier versions of the bill, it was simply referred to as “homosexual propaganda.”) The bill’s language is so vague that it could include just about any kind of gay rights advocacy, from newspaper editorials and advertisements to public information campaigns and demonstrations. Among the penalties: fines of up to 5,000 rubles for an individual and 1 million rubles for a media organization or other legal entity. (A few days later, a bill banning the adoption of Russian children by same-sex couples in countries that recognize gay marriage was also passed.) In November, the editor of a newspaper in the far eastern city of Khabarovsk was charged under the new law after quoting an LGBT activist saying, “My entire existence is credible proof of the normality of homosexuality.”

Though it sparked worldwide condemnation at a moment when Russia is poised to host the Sochi Olympics, the bill in effect codified existing social policy. Several regions, including St. Petersburg and Novosibirsk, had already passed similar laws; gay rights demonstrations have been routinely banned; and LGBT activists have lived for years in a climate of fear, enduring beatings, arrests and harassment.

The anti-gay measure is the product of a growing conservative movement in Russia spearheaded by the Orthodox Church and sympathetic lawmakers. Its goals are not only to criminalize homosexuality, but to limit access to abortion and reproductive healthcare and to aggressively promote the “traditional family” through state subsidies and other benefits. In 2011, the parliament passed a law restricting abortion access that pro-choice activists regard as the first volley in an effort to ban the procedure altogether. Clinics were required to list the potential negative side effects of an abortion—like the warning on a pack of cigarettes—in any advertisements. More recently, a bill was passed prohibiting doctors’ offices or health clinics from advertising that they perform abortions at all. Yelena Mizulina, head of the Duma’s Committee on Family, Women and Children’s Affairs, which has formulated much of the new legislation, has said her primary task in the upcoming session will be to further restrict access to abortion and limit the availability of emergency contraception. Meanwhile, numerous think tanks, advocacy groups and charitable organizations with close ties to the Kremlin have taken up the cause.

This rising Russian social conservative movement frequently invokes the argument that pro-gay and women’s rights groups are puppets of the West, which is seeking to undermine Russian autonomy and interfere in the country’s internal affairs. At an annual meeting of journalists and academics presided over by Vladimir Putin in Valdai in September, the Russian president said that European countries had strayed from their roots by legalizing gay marriage. He urged Russians to embrace the conservative values of the Orthodox Church and other traditional religions and issued a warning to those who might want to challenge those values. “Russia’s sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity are unconditional—these are red lines no one is allowed to cross,” he declared.

Several LGBT rights groups have been targeted under another new law, which requires any nongovernmental organization that receives funding from other countries for political activities to register as a “foreign agent.” Failure to do so can lead to investigations, legal action or crippling fines. The implication is that these groups are not only agents of the West but also out of touch with everyday Russians.

The irony is that it is the new conservative vanguard—anti-gay, anti-abortion and pro–“traditional family”—that has most successfully cultivated the West’s financial and institutional support. Scott Lively, an extreme anti-gay campaigner, all but took credit for the new law, calling it “one of the proudest achievements of my career,” while Brian Brown, president of the National Organization for Marriage, visited Moscow with much fanfare just before the new law was passed. But the language of Russia’s anti-gay and anti-abortion movement seems to borrow most heavily from mainstream evangelicals and conservative politicians in the United States and Europe. Referring to the anti-abortion bill passed in 2011, Lyubov Erofeeva, executive director of the Russian Association for Population and Development, a women’s advocacy group, said: “It was 100 percent clear that everything was copied from the experience of American fundamentalists and conservative circles of several European countries where abortion is forbidden or restricted severely.”

The church’s close ties with American evangelicals reflect a shift in policy. For much of the post-Soviet period, the Russian Orthodox Church held evangelical denominations at arm’s length, fearing that they would compete for influence within Russia. But as the church has consolidated its power, it has come to view the evangelical community as a partner. “The ROC realizes that the evangelical denominations are not their opponents but rather their allies in the relations between the church and the secular population,” says Olga Kazmina, a professor of ethnology at Moscow State University.

“It’s a re-envisioned paradigm,” says Father Leonid Kishkovsky, head of the Orthodox Church in America’s Department of External Affairs. In many ways, it makes sense, he adds: both religious groups share an ideological commitment and have grown disillusioned with the way mainline churches have dealt with issues like gay marriage and abortion. “But what I’m quite nervous about is the ideological core which actually motivates both sides,” Kishkovsky says. “Where is the motivating force? Is it in faith? Or is it in political ideology?”

The Russian Orthodox Church’s chief emissary to the US evangelical community is Hilarion Alfeyev, a high-ranking bishop and chairman of the powerful Department of External Church Relations (the position previously held by Patriarch Kirill). In February 2011, the 47-year-old Alfeyev traveled to Washington, where he met with prominent evangelical and “pro-family” leaders; and then to Dallas, where he addressed thousands of members of the Highland Park Presbyterian Church and emphasized the importance of “creat[ing] new alliances,” especially around issues of marriage, abortion and the family. Alfeyev also visited the Dallas Theological Seminary and had an hour-long meeting with George W. Bush.

The trip to Dallas grew out of an increasingly close friendship between church leaders and a small circle of American and European Christian businessmen in Moscow. Alfeyev’s visit was organized by Jerry Fullinwider, an oil executive and elder of the Highland Park church who, until recently, had business interests in Russia. Fullinwider, a member of the Koch brothers’ circle of major donors—those who have given more than $1 million to Koch-related causes—met Alfeyev through his friend Bob Foresman, head of Barclay’s Capital in Russia. This select group of businessmen has unusual access to Alfeyev. In an interview for this article, Fullinwider described having dinner at Alfeyev’s private residence on a recent trip to Moscow. “He’s a real busy guy,” says Fullinwider. “He’s very, very hard to get in touch with unless you have a special number and you know the main guy who handles him, who’s a good friend of mine.”

Alfeyev’s first trip to the United States paved the way for others, and in October 2012 he delivered a lecture at Villanova University, where he received an honorary degree and paid a visit to the Milwaukee-based Lynde and Harry Bradley Foundation. One of the largest donor organizations of its kind in the United States, the Bradley Foundation, with more than $600 million in assets, is known for its contributions to US conservative groups like the Heritage Foundation and the Heartland Institute. But its charity isn’t limited to home: over the last four years, the foundation has given $750,000 to the St. Gregory the Theologian Charity Foundation in Moscow, a new educational and cultural initiative founded in 2009 by Alfeyev, Russian billionaire and pharmaceutical magnate Vadim Yakunin, and Leonid Sevastianov, a 35-year-old international business consultant and head of Stratinvest.ru, a consulting and public relations firm. In 2009, through Alfeyev’s charity, the Bradley Foundation donated $150,000 to support the “Day of the Family,” a recently created Russian holiday honoring faith and fidelity. The annual event has been championed by Svetlana Medvedeva, wife of Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev, a staunch anti-abortion advocate.

“We want to promote the idea of the unity between the West and Russia on the basis of common Christian roots,” Sevastianov told Inside the Vatican magazine in 2009. “We believe in this alliance among traditional Christian countries…and we believe that, with a united voice, we can be a strong force against the radical secular world which has become dominant in our societies.”

* * *

The push to deepen ties with American evangelicals, to present a united front, coincides with the church’s broadening influence within Russia. In State Department cables published by WikiLeaks in 2010, then–US Ambassador to Russia John Beyrle described a meeting with Alfeyev in which the bishop admitted that the Russian Orthodox Church “has been extending its reach further into heretofore secular areas of society” like education. “Calling the ROC ‘a significant actor’ in the life of the country,” Beyrle wrote, “Hilarion said that Patriarch Kirill is ‘not only symbolic,’ but can also influence major currents in Russia, including its political development.”

In his remarks at Villanova in 2012, Alfeyev emphasized the importance of bringing together the symbolic and political power of the church. “It is essential,” he said, “to protect and support a cultural tradition which is favorable to the family,” and to take “an active part in the creation of legislation that favors the family and its natural foundation.”

Clearly, the church’s efforts are beginning to pay off within the country, while Russia has also emerged as a leader in the international “pro-family” movement.

In 2011, the World Congress of Families held its first Demographic Summit in Moscow. Established in 1997 by Dr. Allan Carlson, the WCF is an interfaith, international movement whose mission is to “restore the natural family as the fundamental social unit.” Back in 1995, Carlson was invited to speak at Moscow State University by two professors of sociology who admired his book Family Questions: Reflections on the American Social Crisis. According to Jennifer Butler in Born Again: The Christian Right Globalized, “The professors and Carlson, joined by a lay leader in the Russian Orthodox Church, came to the conclusion that what they needed was to bring together scholars and leaders from ‘newly free Europe and Russia’ to meet with leaders from the West.” The first global conference was held in Prague in 1997 and drew more than 700 participants.

The 2011 summit was attended by leading US evangelicals like Janice Shaw Crouse of Concerned Women for America and Larry Jacobs of the WCF. The meeting’s Russian attendees included not only church heavyweights but Natalia Yakunina, chair of the Sanctity of Motherhood Program and wife of Vladimir Yakunin, the head of the state-run Russian Railways and a member of Putin’s inner circle. In promotional material, the WCF claims that the 2011 summit “helped pass the first Russian laws restricting abortion in modern history.” The WCF held a follow-up Demographic Summit in Ulyanovsk in 2012.

* * *

The organizer of the events and the WCF’s representative in Russia is Alexey Komov, a 41-year-old doctoral candidate in the social sciences at Moscow State University. Komov, who studied in the United States and the United Kingdom, is part of a new generation of young anti-choice activists in Russia who are drawing on tactics that have come to define the battle over reproductive rights in the United States: they have adopted the phrase “pro-life” to describe themselves, regularly picket health clinics that perform abortions, and have launched national campaigns that stigmatize the procedure, often using graphic and misleading language and images. In recent years, anti-choice groups in Russia have developed hundreds of websites and attracted funding from several foundations supported by leading political and cultural figures. “They are growing like mushrooms,” says Lyubov Erofeeva. “They are attracting young people with little knowledge, with little life experience.”

Komov has established his own group, FamilyPolicy.ru, whose mission is to create a network of “grassroots pro-family activists” in Russia to influence legislation, policy-makers and the media. A rising star in Russia’s conservative movement, Komov began working with the Orthodox Church’s Department of External Relations under Alfeyev in January 2012. According to a WCF newsletter, “His responsibilities include Church relations with institutions in foreign countries,” from political parties and think tanks to foundations and NGOs. In December 2012, with support from the Duma’s Committee on Family, Women and Children and the Orthodox Church, Komov announced the creation of the National Parents Association. Janice Shaw Crouse attended the organizing conference in Nizhny Novgorod and hailed the NPA’s effort to “strengthen the two-parent, mom-and-dad family.” Komov will serve as the group’s CEO.

The anti-choice lobby in Russia has been winning slow but steady change in the laws governing access to abortion. In the early 1990s, there was strong federal support for family planning services in Russia, and hundreds of clinics providing free reproductive healthcare were established. Though the coverage was uneven, the effort represented an important push to integrate women’s reproductive needs into the larger healthcare system. A public information campaign was launched, according to Erofeeva, who is also an ob-gyn. Postgraduate programs for gynecologists covering new methods of contraception—especially the pill, which had not been available during the Soviet period—were introduced. Abortions, which had become a default form of contraception during Soviet times, when methods of preventing pregnancy were limited, declined by almost 30 percent. “That was the flourishing of family-planning ideas,” Erofeeva says. But funding dried up after the collapse of the ruble in 1998 and the financial crisis that followed. The federal program was eliminated. According to a 2007 USAID report, “The future of family planning provision became unclear as regions were left to determine if and how to finance family planning at the regional and municipal levels.” At its peak in 1998, there were more than 400 well-financed family-planning centers throughout Russia, according to Erofeeva; in 2012, there were only twenty-one.

In the next decade, little attention was paid to family planning. Instead, the Ministry of Health shifted its emphasis to incentivizing birth. By the time the Duma began drafting a new law in 2010 overhauling the country’s healthcare system, reproductive rights and women’s health were no longer a top priority. In early 2010, Yelena Mizulina, the chair of the Duma’s Committee on Family, Women and Children, established an interdepartmental working group to draft anti-choice legislation. The group was made up of nineteen people, seven of them representatives of the Orthodox Church, including Dmitry Pershin, head of the church’s youth council, and Maxim Obukhov, founder and chair of the church’s anti-abortion medical center, Zhizn (Life). (Pershin has been one of the most vocal advocates of the ban on gay “propaganda.”)

Erofeeva, who was invited by chance to observe one of the group’s early meetings, says she was horrified to discover that the committee did not include a single medical doctor: “They worked for nine or ten months and prepared the new law, which of course was not called the ‘anti-abortion law’—it was called ‘In the interests of the unborn child.’… So they were playing this card that in Russia there are so many abortions and the birthrate is very low and we’re killing our unborn babies.”

Rather than risk a protracted battle over the controversial law, Mizulina took parts of the legislation drafted by the working group and inserted them into the health reform bill signed by Medvedev in November 2011. The law limits abortions to the first trimester (with the exceptions of rape and risk to the life of the mother) and institutes a mandatory waiting period of two to seven days. Similar laws restricting abortion access have been passed throughout Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Even if the health law fell far short of what the church hoped to achieve—that is, ending federal support of all abortion services, requiring that women receive the approval of their spouses before having an abortion, and requiring prescriptions for the morning-after pill—it marked a decisive shift in Russia’s evolving battle over reproductive rights. Just after the bill was introduced in the Duma, Patriarch Kirill met with Tatyana Golikova, head of the Ministry of Health, and signed an agreement of cooperation on future initiatives that included combating abortion and promoting motherhood and the traditional family. “This is not just joint projects,” Golikova said, “but also the solution to the problems at the legislative level.”

New legislation will be high on the agenda at the WCF’s 2014 congress in Moscow in September. The event, titled “Every Child a Gift: Large Families—the Future of Humanity,” will include a special parliamentary forum organized by Mizulina, who is known as “the Inquisitor” and drafted both the anti-abortion and anti-gay bills. “Pro-family” MPs from Europe and around the world are expected to attend.

The Moscow summit will be held at the Congress Hall of the Kremlin and the Cathedral of Christ the Savior, where the punk band Pussy Riot staged its mock prayer denouncing Vladimir Putin in February 2012. Putin, whose close ties to the church hierarchy are well-known, said shortly after he was re-elected that conflict over “cultural identity, spiritual and moral values, and moral codes” will come to define Russia’s relations with other countries.

Oddly, the Orthodox-evangelical alliance marks one of the few bright spots in an otherwise strained relationship between the United States and Russia. As one American banker in Moscow with close ties to Hilarion Alfeyev told me, “It is surely one of the most positive things taking place right now regarding US-Russian relations.”

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Trump is a Fake Christian Plant

Trump didn’t have a platform and did not want to be President. Sessions and the Christian World Crusaders were looking for a…………….Messiah!

Jon

How anti-gay Christians evangelize hate abroad

How anti-gay Christians evangelize hate abroad
“The vitriol that has fueled U.S. culture wars for so long is now being exported, and some of our most ardent culture warriors are finding a far more receptive audience abroad,” writes Kapya Kaoma. (Daniel Zender / For The Times)

If you live in the United States, it’s easy to be lulled into thinking that the battle for broader civil rights for gay people is nearly over. The last few years have brought important victories in courts, legislatures and at the ballot box, and momentum is firmly on the side of increased equality.

That’s not true, however, in other parts of the world. The vitriol that has fueled U.S. culture wars for so long is now being exported, and some of our most ardent culture warriors are finding a far more receptive audience abroad.

In nations such as Uganda, Russia, Nigeria and Belize, an insidious homophobia engineered in America is taking root. I have seen this hate being spread with my own eyes.

In March 2009, while in Kampala, Uganda, researching reports of U.S. right-wing evangelical involvement in attacks on LGBTQ equality and reproductive justice, I was invited to a three-day conference on homosexuality hosted by the Family Life Network, which is based in New York. The keynote speaker was Scott Lively from Springfield, Mass., who introduced himself as a leading expert on the “international homosexual agenda.” I filmed Lively over the course of two days as he instructed religious and political leaders about how gays were coming to Uganda from the West to “recruit children into homosexuality.”

Some of his assertions would have been laughable had he not been so deadly serious. He claimed that a gay clique that included Adolf Hitler was behind the Holocaust, and he insinuated that gay people fueled the Rwandan genocide.

In the United States, Lively is widely dismissed as an anti-gay firebrand and Holocaust revisionist. But in Uganda, he was presented — and accepted — as a leading international authority. The public persecution of LGBTQ people escalated after Lively’s conference, with one local newspaper publishing the pictures and addresses of activists under the headline, “Hang Them.”

Lively was also invited to private briefings with political and religious leaders, and to address the Ugandan parliament during his 2009 visit. The next month, Ugandan lawmaker David Bahati unveiled his Anti-Homosexuality Bill, which in its original form called for the death penalty as punishment for a new crime of “aggravated homosexuality.”

In recent years, millions of dollars have been funneled from anti-LGBTQ evangelical conservatives to Uganda, funding local pastors and training them to adopt and mirror the culture-war language of the U.S. Christian right. Bahati and a notorious anti-gay pastor, Martin Ssempa, were personally mentored by U.S. conservatives. And powerful Christian right organizations such as the Family Research Council lobbied Congress to change a resolution denouncing the Uganda legislation.

Other prominent right-wing evangelicals have also made Uganda appearances, including California’s Rick Warren and Lou Engle, who founded TheCall ministry. They met with politicians, hosted rallies and public meetings, and used their influence and credibility to contribute to a culture war in Uganda much more intense and explosive than anything seen in the United States; Lively himself described the work as a “nuclear bomb” in Uganda. These conservative evangelicals later distanced themselves from the law, saying they didn’t think homosexuality should be criminalized, but it was too late.

In December, the Ugandan parliament finally passed the Anti-Homosexuality Bill, and last month President Yoweri Museveni signed it into law. The death penalty provision was removed, but the law includes life sentences for homosexual “repeat offenders” and criminalizes advocacy on behalf of LGBTQ Ugandans.

Uganda has deservedly received widespread attention, but it’s not the only country with a culture war that carries the fingerprints of U.S. campaigners. Nigeria has passed a bill almost identical to Uganda’s, and Cameroon and Zambia are enthusiastically imprisoning LGBTQ people.

And let’s not forget Russia. In 2007, Lively traveled throughout Russia to, as he put it, bring a warning about the “homosexual political movement.” He urged Russians, among other things, “to criminalize the public advocacy of homosexuality.” Last year, President Vladimir Putin signed a bill into law that criminalizes distribution of “gay propaganda” to minors, including any material that “equates the social value of traditional and nontraditional sexual relations.”

Later this year, the World Congress of Families — an Illinois-based conservative umbrella organization — will convene in Russia. As the group’s leader, Larry Jenkins, put it: “We’re convinced that Russia does and should play a very significant role in defense of the family and moral values worldwide. Russia has become a leader of promoting these values in the international arena.”

U.S. culture warriors have strategically focused on countries already suspicious of America, often ones with authoritarian leaders eager to turn public attention away from issues of corruption or economic inequality.

By recasting LGBTQ people in their countries as creations of the West, these leaders both feed on and fuel existing prejudices. Strongly worded statements from President Obama, Secretary of State John F. Kerry and U.N. General Secretary Ban Ki-moon merely reinforce the argument that the West is imposing an international “gay agenda” on unwilling nations. The irony, of course, is that these “anti-Western” policies were created and marketed by Americans.

The people of Uganda, Nigeria, Russia and elsewhere are leading their own struggles for human rights. Their fight is difficult enough without campaigns of vilification designed by a handful of Americans who distort the meaning of the Gospels to justify the criminalization of innocents.

Lively is facing a civil lawsuit in a Massachusetts court brought by the African group Sexual Minorities Uganda, which has accused him of violating international law by inciting persecution of Ugandan gays. Although Lively has denied the lawsuit’s allegations, it is one of the few cases that attempts to hold Americans accountable for inciting persecution overseas.

Lively and other culture warriors rely on their deeds abroad going largely unnoticed back home. When things get hot, as they did during the debate over Uganda’s “kill the gays” bill, they issue statements distancing themselves from the events they have set in motion. But they should be held accountable for the persecution of women and LGBTQ people abroad.

If we fail to do so, we’ll find that Nigeria, Russia and Uganda are just the beginning.

Kapya Kaoma is an Anglican priest and the senior religion and sexuality researcher at Political Research Associates in Boston. He wrote the reports “Colonizing African Values” and “Globalizing the Culture Wars.”

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Putin – The Defender of Family Values

Putin has been playing the Christian-right for years. Has he read my warnings about them on this blog, and saw a opening? Putin has been making laws banning homosexuals, who the evangelicals see as their No.1 Enemy. Sessions is the Anti-Gay Crusader in the U.S. How about Russia?

Bannon says he brought Sessions into the Trump campaign that was running on Anti-Immigration. Did Steve want Jeff as the poster boy of Gay Bashers in order to send a signal to evangelical voters – who went to the poles as never before! This includes Black evangelical who hate LGBT folks – too!

But, what if Sessions approached Trump – directly? And, he was encouraged by Russian evangelicals? This is Trump’s hidden platform, a Gay Bashing Alliance with Russia mixed with Trillion’s of dollars in business deals. Jeff tells Bannon Trump shares his values. This is why he and evangelical leaders overlook Trumps heterosexual sins. Hillary is the leader of the Fag Conspiracy to overthrow THE WEST. Imagine if the movie ‘Black Panther’ was full of Fags and Lesbians – only!

This is a Covert Crusade that has used ISIS. If nothing makes sense in a secular way, look to Christian leaders – in sheep’s clothing. I believe Mueller is going to Indict Jeff very soon. He has chummed the waters of confusion and prepared to drop the answer to the riddle in our laps. Right-wing groups are calling for pardons to stop the truth from arriving.

Jon Presco

Over the weekend, the New York Times reported that Attorney General Jeff Sessions personally intervened to dispatch a federal hate crimes lawyer to prosecute a man in Iowa who has been charged with the murder of a transgender high school student. The newspaper characterized the move by Sessions as an effort to defy his anti-civil rights image.

But, please, don’t be fooled.

Putin noted the role of the Russian Orthodox Church “in matters of education and charity, strengthening the moral foundations of society and the education of the younger generation.”

The president also commended Patriarch Kirill on the holiday, noting his role as the head of the Russian Orthodox Church in the public life of the country. This year’s Easter celebrations did not “bypass” Russian soldiers in Syria. On Easter Eve a festive mass took place in one of the Syrian makeshift temples close to the Russian airbase. This is the first time that a Russian Orthodox Church bell chimed on Syrian soil to celebrate Christ’s resurrection.

From the moment he was confirmed as attorney general of the United States, Sessions has been the driving force behind the Trump administration’s attacks on basic dignity and equality for LGBT people.

Who’s ‘godless’ now? Russia says it’s U.S.
Putin seizes on issue of traditional values

MOSCOW — At the height of the Cold War, it was common for American conservatives to label the officially atheist Soviet Union a “godless nation.”
More than two decades on, history has come full circle, as the Kremlin and its allies in the Russian Orthodox Church hurl the same allegation at the West.
PHOTOS: Top 10 handguns in the U.S.
“Many Euro-Atlantic countries have moved away from their roots, including Christian values,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said in a recent keynote speech. “Policies are being pursued that place on the same level a multi-child family and a same-sex partnership, a faith in God and a belief in Satan. This is the path to degradation.”
In his state of the nation address in mid-December, Mr. Putin also portrayed Russia as a staunch defender of “traditional values” against what he depicted as the morally bankrupt West. Social and religious conservatism, the former KGB officer insisted, is the only way to prevent the world from slipping into “chaotic darkness.”
As part of this defense of “Christian values,” Russia has adopted a law banning “homosexual propaganda” and another that makes it a criminal offense to “insult” the religious sensibilities of believers.

White House chief strategist Steve Bannon helped convince Attorney General Jeff Sessions to endorse Donald Trump in the 2016 election despite Sessions’ worries that the endorsement could be the end of his political career, a new book revealed.

As Joshua Green wrote in “Devil’s Bargain,” Sessions, then a senator from Alabama, was unsure if Trump could secure the Republican nomination, and knew that being the first senator to endorse Trump could further curtail his political future if Trump, the Republican frontrunner at the time, lost.

The day before Sessions endorsed Trump at a Madison, Alabama rally in February 2016, then-Breitbart News chairman Bannon told Sessions that it was “do or die” time and that “this is the moment” to endorse.

“Trump is a great advocate for our ideas,” Sessions told Bannon. “But can he win?”

Conservative advocacy groups have renewed calls for President Donald Trump to pardon those implicated in special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, citing allegations of partisan sabotage.

The push comes as the Mueller inquiry notches important victories. A grand jury in Washington, D.C., issued sweeping indictments against 13 Russian nationals for interference operations on Friday. The Los Angeles Times reported just two days later that former Trump campaign aide Rick Gates has agreed to cooperate with the special counsel.

Tom Fitton, president of Judicial Watch, a government oversight group, said the president should seriously consider clemency for his associates given the alleged anti-Trump bias of Justice Department investigators. Several lawyers who joined Mueller’s team have donated to Democratic candidates, while FBI agents assessing Russian sabotage efforts regularly traded texts attacking Trump’s candidacy.

Also WATCH: White House spox says Trump handles Russia better than Obama

“The whole super structure of the Russia investigation is compromised,” Fitton told Politico. “Those caught up in it deserve some protection. Rather than just let the virus run its course, it’d be appropriate for the president to consider pardons for people who are caught up in the prosecution.”

Frederick Fleitz of the Center for Security Policy and Larry Klayman, a prodigious conservative litigator, expressed similar sentiments.

There is not yet evidence that the alleged bias affected the substance of the investigations.

The comments appeared just one day after the LAT reported that Gates will plead guilty to fraud-related charges in exchange for a reduced sentence. He is expected to cooperate with the special counsel’s case against Paul Manafort, the deposed Trump campaign manager facing 12 criminal charges ranging from money laundering to violations of the Foreign Agents Registration Act.

Unnamed sources close to the process say the deal is somewhat informal — the agreement does not yet exist in writing and Mueller’s team has not been specific as to possible

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