The Fair Rosamond Women

Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor is related to Rosamond Clifford via Lewis de Clifford. Several Pre-Raphaelite Artists did paintings of Fair Rosamond Clifford. Liz was a Muse to Andy Warhol. Her uncle was an art agent to her kin, Augustus John, who is related to Ian Fleming, as is my late sister, the artist, Rosamond.

John Presco

Some years before he became king, Henry was a friend of his distant cousin Ralph de Toney V. It was likely through Ralph that he was introduced to Ralph’s first cousin the enchanting and lovely damsel, Fair Rosamond de Clifford, daughter of Walter and Margaret (de Toney) Clifford. Henry II, Ralph, and Rosamond were all descendants of Godehildis de Toney d’Evreux. They were also descended from Simon de Montford l’Amaury (thought by some to have been the grandson of Robert the Pious, King of France). It was Rosamond who became the love of Henry’s life. He placed her in a beautiful castle at Woodstock, which is about 9 miles NW of the city of Oxford. (Woodstock is where Blenheim Palace was later built, the birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill). Unfortunately, this historic love affair ended in 1176 when Rosamond fell ill and died with a lung ailment at the age of 36 years. It seems that Henry was well taken with the Toney women. One of his other mistresses was one Ida de Toney. Gertrude de Toney was sometimes confused with this Ida because she was on occasion known as Ida herself. Gertrude’s daughter-in-law was Ida de Chaumont who was married to her son Roger de Toney the younger, her husband being Roger de Toney II. Some writers have been tempted to assert that Gertrude was one of Henry II’s mistresses. This, however, is unlikely because Gertrude was 16 or 17 years older than Henry, and a woman of that age would not have appealed to Henry’s taste. He preferred the younger damsels. It was probably a misinterpretation of the following text that led to the notion that Gertrude had an amorous connection with Henry II: The Victoria History of the County of Oxford p. 137 (Garsington Manor)

Elizabeth Taylor

Birth

27 Feb 1932

Hampstead, London Borough of Camden, Greater London, England

Death

23 Mar 2011 (aged 79)

Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA

Burial

Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale)

Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA

Plot

Great Mausoleum, inside main entrance, next to Last Supper window display entrance.

Memorial ID

67312270 · View Source

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/08/18/rosamond-and-the-crusaders/

Rosamond Press

When I read the following this morning, the book, and movie ‘Gone With The Wind’ came to mind.

“The couple had nine children; eight girls and but one son — Martin — who served with Lucas County boys in Company C of the 13th Iowa Infantry and died in service in 1862. When James Roseman died in 1887, there was nobody by the name of Roseman left in the county.”

Thanks to my kin, Charles M. Wright, I was able to find the Western branch of the Rosemond-Rosemond-Rosemond family that descends from James Roseman, Phillip Rosemond, and Moses Morton Rosemond. Add to this branch my grandfather Frank W. Rosamond, and his four daughters, June, Bertha, Rosemary, and Lillian, and the Western Rosamond family, is complete.

I have chosen Mary Morton Rosemond t ground all the Rosy families, because she is a trained Librarian and State Archivist. If she were alive…

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More Rejected History I Saved

Joaquin Miller and his brother were born in Coburg. These are newspapermen and Bohemians. No LSD or religious conflict here. Stop catering to Doomsday Judgers who put that Liar and Racist in office! Trump declared the Press the enemy, and not one Christian leader objects.

Note the play with “The Queen of Bohemia”.

John

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/09/02/the-columbia-street-grail/

Joaquin and Leonie

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Joaquin Miller had a poets colony in the Oakland. Japanese Poets came to live here. One of them was  Yonejiro Noguchi. I just discovered a movie was made about the mother of Yone’s son, who was the famous sculptor, Isamu Noguchi, who had a famous half-sister, Ailes Gilmore. She was a dancer for Martha Graham. Leonie grew up in the Village of New York, and lived in a Tent City in Pasadena California.

My kindred had a twenty-six acre fruit orchard below Miller’s property. Joaquin carried my father on his lap when he took the trolley with my grandmother. Victor Presco gave birth to the world famous artist ‘Rosamond’ and her brother. I am a Art Historian, Poet, Writer, and Reporter for my newspaper Royal Rosamond Press.

Here are two creative branches stemming from ‘The Hights’  where western artists and writers established a Bohemian Mecca. Miller was the first editor for The Eugene City Democratic Register , Eugene Oregon’s first newspaper. Joaquin attended Columbia College in Eugene. Here are the roots of the Beat and Hippie, scene, the Great California Dream, that a Japanese woman producer tried to capture, while we in the West turn our backs, we even forgetting to recall John Steinbeck – for the sake of our young! Our traditions are honored, elsewhere.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonie_(film)

When we were children we would call Juanita Miller on the phone and pretend we were older so we could have The White Witch give us advice on our love life, that we invented. Joaquin Miller’s daughter titled herself the ‘White Witch’ and had involved her groom in a pagan ritual when they got married. She pretended she was dead, and, he brought her back to life. Sounds like Sleeping Beauty.

I found photos of Juanita dancing. Isadora Duncan grew up in Oakland. Above is two photos of my Grandmother, Melba Broderick, with her friend, Violet, on Miller’s property. I now believe they were disciples of the White Witch, and may have danced through the forest with her.  Joaquin carried my infant father on the Fruit Vale trolley.  My kin owned a orchard just below the Hights, the theme park Joaquin and his daughter built. There is a monument to my kindred, John Fremont, that looks like a rook. Here poets and artists met, and lived. Artists Embassy International met here, as well as in Alameda at 532 Haight Avenue in a beautiful Victorian.

Juanita corresponded with the artist, Frederick Church, whose work resembles Christine Rosamond, and, Fanny Corey, who encouraged Royal Rosamond to write. We are looking  at the foundation of the Bohemian-Hippie scene in the San Francisco Bay Area that is tied to the Pre-Raphaelites. Did Church consider himself a Pre-Raphaelite, and was hoping the Millers would give him a introduction to the Rossettis?

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/05/29/juanita-miller-the-white-witch-2/

yone14 yone18

The movie ‘Leonie’ would have been a masterpiece if it had included the history of ‘The Hights’.  Here was the first East meets West.  In 1904 Miller wrote a prophetic poem about Japan. There needs to be a monument to the blending of our culture, that began with the love affair a Japanese poet had with his editor. The image of swarming bees taking off from ships to attack Pearl Harbor, was first seen in the third eye of a Oakland poet.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/2010/11/05/films/portrait-of-the-artists-mother-as-a-young-woman/#.VznyiJErI2w

His cherry-blossoms drop like blood;
His bees begin to storm and sting;
His seas flash lightning, and a flood
Of crimson stains their wide, white ring;
His battle-ships belch hell, and all
Nippon is but one Spartan wall!
Aye, he, the boy of yesterday,
Now holds the bearded Russ at bay;
While, blossom’d steeps above, the clouds
Wait idly, still, as waiting shrouds.

But oh, beware his scorn of death,
His love of Emperor, of isles
That boast a thousand bastioned miles
Above the clouds where never breath
Of frost or foe has ventured yet,
Or foot of foreign man has set!

Here are photographs of the celebration Miller’s daughter, Juanita, conducted at the Hights. I believe these people took part in the play she scripted, where present are members of the artistic Rossetti family who founded the Pre-Raphaelite art movement. That is the artist Xavier Martinez and his wife with two fiddle players on Joaquin’s front porch. Why is this history being ignored?  Yone and the other Japanese poets made bar-b-que for the Ramblen Bohemian Boys and their Village Tent Woman. There’s nothing new under the sun.

Hands across the water. The hearts of poets, flew like doves. Pacific means “peace”. Love conquers all. Water was diverted to flow over oriental rock falls, past the paper and screen huts where even Chinese and Japanese artists, were inspired. Meditation had come to dwell in California. An anglo woman carries in her womb, the infants of Japanese men, to born a new genius, a Western Kabuki Muse, coy fish swimming in foreign waters. Traces of an ancient Emperor and a Wild Man that looks like Gandalf.

I had a vision for a Peace Center in the Sawtelle that was recently named ‘Japan Town’.

https://rosamondpress.com/2016/02/09/the-bohemian-rose-peace-center-2/

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/12/09/sawtelle/

https://rosamondpress.com/2016/02/09/the-roaring-tigers-of-art-and-literature-2/

 

Jon Presco

yone6 yone7

dye334 dye335

 

Léonie Gilmour (June 17, 1873 – December 31, 1933) was an American educator, editor, and journalist. She was the lover and editor of the writer Yone Noguchi and the mother of sculptor Isamu Noguchi and dancer Ailes Gilmour. She is the subject of the feature film Leonie (2010) and the book Leonie Gilmour: When East Weds West (2013).

Miller attended Columbia College in in Eugene City from 1857 to 1858. He taught school, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1861. From 1861 to 1862 Miller rode pony express from Walla Walla to Idaho mines but he soon returned to Eugene City to become a newspaper editor. In his newspaper, The Eugene City Democratic Register, he pleaded for an end to the Civil War, adopting the Quaker creed of his father.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xavier_Mart%C3%ADnez

https://rosamondpress.com/2014/06/08/master-millers-artist-and-poet-colony/

Even today, you’d have to go far to run into a radical individual like Leonie Gilmour. But in America in 1901, to meet a young woman like her must have been on par with witnessing a comet.

Raised in New York by a single mother, Gilmour studied at Bryn Mawr, a liberal-arts college in Pennsylvania, and Paris’ Sorbonne university on a scholarship. She then got a job as an editor for Japanese poet Yonejiro Noguchi; things took a short-lived turn for the amorous, and she bore a son, Isamu Noguchi — who became one of the most influential and important Japanese artists of the 20th century.

https://www.geni.com/people/Ailes-Gilmour/6000000018657311737

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ailes_Gilmour

Ailes grew up in a Japanese style house that Leonie had constructed in Chigasaki, a seaside town near Yokohama. Ailes had close Japanese childhood friends, spoke Japanese as well as English, and identified with Japan before she returned to the USA in 1920, at age 8. When Ailes and her mother returned to America, they lived first in San Francisco and then moved to New York City.

During the Depression Era, dancers like Ailes and artists like Isamu struggled to find work. In 1932, when Radio City Music Hall opened, Ailes performed at the debut with Graham’s company. Their work, Choric Patterns, lasted on stage for just one week. Ailes ruefully observed to Marion Horosko that Radio City Music Hall could succeed only when it became a movie theater with Rockettes.

Noguchi was the first Japanese author to publish English-language novels and books of poetry. Born near Nagoya, Japan, in 1875, he studied at Keio University in Tokyo and gained a passion for English literature. At 18 he came to the United States, where he worked at a newspaper run by Japanese exiles.

Miller attended Columbia College in in Eugene City from 1857 to 1858. He taught school, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1861. From 1861 to 1862 Miller rode pony express from Walla Walla to Idaho mines but he soon returned to Eugene City to become a newspaper editor. In his newspaper, The Eugene City Democratic Register, he pleaded for an end to the Civil War, adopting the Quaker creed of his father.

In 1894, Noguchi visited Miller and was so mesmerized by the aging poet that he stayed with him for four years, working for his room and board. He absorbed Miller’s philosophy of life and met his literary friends.

With Miller, Noguchi said, he found his true vocation as a poet, and he considered Miller’s Oakland Hills estate to be an ideal place to write his poems.

When “Homeless Snail” was republished in 1920, Noguchi wrote a new introduction.

“Since I left California in 1900 for New York and London I have seen many other cities more big and more prosperous, but my mind always returned to Miller Heights (Hights) where my poetry first began to grow amid the roses and carnations which Miller and I watered tenderly. … He was my first friend in American life. … He looked on me as his American son.”

His love life was complicated. He had several relationships simultaneously with white American women. His son, Isamu, whose mother was Leonie Gilmore, became a famous American sculptor.

In 1904, Noguchi went back to Japan and taught English at his alma mater. He continued to write and travel the world. By 1930, his works had fallen into critical disfavor. He died of stomach cancer in 1947.

“Then he had the Japanese and Chinese artists living there. They built their beautiful little Japanese paper houses up through the woods. What beautiful country! It looks like a mess now, but it was beautiful then — a natural and wild landscape — and the Japanese had carefully created a meandering little stream, Japanese style, beautifully arranged with gardens and little rockeries near the poet’s. You know their expertness in creating beauty. They’d made this beautiful place where they had their barbecues. At that time the poet’s barbecues were always run by his Japanese friends. We’d have raw fish and soy sauce — really delicious. Then, always the particular barbecue for which the poet was famous — he had beautifully peeled willow switches on which were arranged rounds of onions and meat — which you held over the fire until cooked to your taste.

Then we’d go up to a little art colony scattered throughout the woods in their beautiful paper houses. These houses were well made, beautifully constructed, but all the doors and windows except the frames were made of paper. We’d go in, take our shoes off and sit down and we’d watch the artists work, or they’d display work to show us. Some were Chinese, most of them were Japanese.

In 1848 William Makepeace Thackeray used the word bohemianism in his novel Vanity Fair. In 1862, the Westminster Review described a Bohemian as “simply an artist or littérateur who, consciously or unconsciously, secedes from conventionality in life and in art”. During the 1860s the term was associated in particular with the pre-Raphaelite movement, the group of artists and aesthetes of which Dante Gabriel Rossetti was the most prominent:[2]

As the 1860s progressed, Rossetti would become the grand prince of bohemianism as his deviations from normal standards became more audacious. And as he became this epitome of the unconventional, his egocentric demands necessarily required his close friends to remodel their own lives around him. His bohemianism was like a web in which others became trapped – none more so than William and Jane Morris.[3]

Although Gilmour harbored literary aspirations, her achievements as a writer were limited. Much of her literary energy was channeled into her editorial projects, particularly those of her partner, Yone Noguchi. It has been speculated that she may have co-authored or authored some works attributed to him, such as The American Diary of a Japanese Girl, and there is little doubt that much of Noguchi’s best writing was accomplished with her editorial assistance.

As an author in her own right, Gilmour’s most successful pieces were short autobiographical essays for newspapers and magazines chronicling unfortunate events with a wry ironic humor, In a picaresque, matter-of-fact style, Gilmour described the unusual situations in which she found herself as a result of her unconventional attitudes and lifestyle. Gilmour’s “Founding a Tent-Home in California,” for example, shows turn-of-the-century Los Angeles from the perspective of a hapless, idealistic new arrival.[21] “Dorobo, or the Japanese Burglar” portrays the experience of being burglarized with a humorous perspective.[22]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A9onie_Gilmour

Léonie Gilmour (June 17, 1873 – December 31, 1933) was an American educator, editor, and journalist. She was the lover and editor of the writer Yone Noguchi and the mother of sculptor Isamu Noguchi and dancer Ailes Gilmour. She is the subject of the feature film Leonie (2010) and the book Leonie Gilmour: When East Weds West (2013).

The Noguchi Museum, chartered as The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, was designed and created by the Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi. Opening on a limited basis to the public in 1985 the purpose of the museum and foundation was and remains to preserve and display Noguchi’s sculpturesarchitectural models,stage designsdrawings, and furniture designs. The two-story, 24,000 square feet (2,200 m2) museum and adjacent sculpture garden, located in Long Island City section of Queens, one block from the Socrates Sculpture Park, underwent major renovations in 2004 allowing the museum to stay open year round.[1]

Isamu Noguchi (野口 勇 Noguchi Isamu?, November 17, 1904 – December 30, 1988) was an American artist andlandscape architect whose artistic career spanned six decades, from the 1920s onward.[1] Known for his sculpture and public works, Noguchi also designed stage sets for various Martha Graham productions, and several mass-produced lamps and furniture pieces, some of which are still manufactured and sold.

In 1947, Noguchi began a collaboration with the Herman Miller company, when he joined with George NelsonPaul László and Charles Eames to produce a catalog containing what is often considered to be the most influential body of modern furniture ever produced, including the iconic Noguchi table which remains in production today.[2] His work lives on around the world and at the Noguchi Museum in New York City.

Leonie (Japaneseレオニー HepburnReonī?) is a 2010 Japanese film directed by Hisako Matsui and starring Emily Mortimer and Shido Nakamura. The film is based on the life of Léonie Gilmour, the American lover and editorial assistant of Japanese writer Yone Noguchi and mother of sculptor Isamu Noguchi and dancer Ailes Gilmour.

Production started in April 2009 and the film was released in Japan on November 20, 2010. An extensively reedited version of the film began a limited theatrical run in the United States on March 22, 2013 and was released on DVD on May 14, 2013.

The film opens on a beach. A window overlooks the beach. In a dark room, Isamu Noguchi, grown old, is chipping away at a large stone with a hammer and chisel. “Mother, I want you to tell the story.” The film periodically returns to this scene of Isamu at work.

Bryn Mawr 1892. After a class in which she argues with a professor about the importance of artist Artemisia Gentileschi, Leonie (Emily Mortimer) befriends Catherine Burnell (Christina Hendricks). Later, they meet Umeko Tsuda (Mieko Harada), a graduate student. In Tsuda’s room, Leonie gazes at a print of Hokusai’s The Great Wave off Kanagawa.

The story now alternates between Pasadena 1904—where Leonie, living in a primitive tent with her mother Albiana (Mary Kay Place), bears a child temporarily named “Yo,”—and New York, where Leonie met Japanese poet Yone Noguchi (Shido Nakamura). She and Yone succumb to passion while collaborating on his anonymous novel, The American Diary of a Japanese Girl, published by Frederick A. Stokes (David Jensen). They quarrel when Yone returns unannounced from London with an apparently drunk Charles Warren Stoddard (Patrick Weathers). The Russo-Japanese War begins and Yone, declaring he will return to Japan, greets Leonie’s announcement of pregnancy with angry disbelief. Leonie tells her sad story to the now unhappily married Catherine, who reminds her of her advice not to be boring. In California, Leonie fends off a racist attack against her son and decides, against Albiana’s advice, to accept Yone’s invitation to come to Japan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonie_(film)

Léonie Gilmour was born in New York City on June 17, 1873, and grew up in the East Village, Manhattan.[1] At the time of her birth, her father, Andrew Gilmour, a clerk, and mother, Albiana Gilmour (née Smith, daughter of one of the co-founders of the Brooklyn Times-Union),[2] were living “in one room in a rear house”[3] in St. Bridget’s Place, the alley behind St. Brigid’s Church on the east side of Tompkins Square Park.

http://www.botchanmedia.com/YN/LG/interview101211.htm

When we were children we would call Juanita Miller on the phone and pretend we were older so we could have The White Witch give us advice on our love life, that we invented. Joaquin Miller’s daughter titled herself the ‘White Witch’ and had involved her groom in a pagan ritual when they got married. She pretended she was dead, and, he brought her back to life. Sounds like Sleeping Beauty.

Several days ago I found photos of Juanita dancing. Isadora Duncan grew up in Oakland. Above is two photos of my Grandmother, Melba Broderick, with her friend, Violet, on Miller’s property. I now believe they were disciples of the White Witch, and may have danced through the forest with her.  Joaquin carried my infant father on the Fruit Vale trolley.  My kin owned a orchard just below the Hights, the theme park Joaquin and his daughter built. There is a monument to my kindred, John Fremont, that looks like a rook. Here poets and artists met, and lived. Artists Embassy International met here, as well as in Alameda at 532 Haight Avenue in a beautiful Victorian.

Above is a letter to Juanita from the artist, Frederick Church, whose work resembles Christine Rosamond, and, Fanny Corey, who encouraged Royal Rosamond to write. We are looking  at the foundation of the Bohemian-Hippie scene in the San Francisco Bay Area that is tied to the Pre-Raphaelites. Did Church consider himself a Pre-Raphaelite, and was hoping the Millers would give him a introduction to the Rossettis?

 

Joaquin Miller

The Little Brown Man (ca. 1904)

Where now the brownie fisher-lad?
His hundred thousand fishing-boats
Rock idly in the reedy moats;
His baby wife no more is glad.
But yesterday, with all Nippon,
Beneath his pink-white cherry-trees,
In chorus with his brown, sweet bees,
He careless sang, and sang right on.
Take care! for he has ceased to sing;
His startled bees have taken wing!

His cherry-blossoms drop like blood;
His bees begin to storm and sting;
His seas flash lightning, and a flood
Of crimson stains their wide, white ring;
His battle-ships belch hell, and all
Nippon is but one Spartan wall!
Aye, he, the boy of yesterday,
Now holds the bearded Russ at bay;
While, blossom’d steeps above, the clouds
Wait idly, still, as waiting shrouds.

But oh, beware his scorn of death,
His love of Emperor, of isles
That boast a thousand bastioned miles
Above the clouds where never breath
Of frost or foe has ventured yet,
Or foot of foreign man has set!
Beware his scorn of food (his fare
Is scarcely more than sweet sea-air);
Beware his cunning, sprite-like skill—
But most beware his dauntless will.

Goliath, David, once again,
The giant and the shepherd youth—
The tallest, smallest of all men,
The trained in tongue, the trained in truth.
Beware this boy, this new mad man!
That erst mad man of Macedon,
Who drank and died at Babylon;
That shepherd lad; the Corsican—
They sat the thrones of earth! Beware
This new mad man whose drink is air!

His bees are not more slow to strife,
But, stirred, they court a common death!
He knows the decencies of life—
Of all men underneath the sun
He is the one clean man, the one
Who never knew a drunken breath!
Beware this sober, wee brown man,
Who yesterday stood but a span
Beneath his blossomed cherry-trees,
Soft singing with his brother bees!

The brownie’s sword is as a snake,
A sudden, sinuous copperhead:
It makes no flourish, no mistake;
It darts but once—the man is dead!
’Tis short and black; ’tis never seen
Save when, close forth, it leaps its sheath
And, snake-like, darts up from beneath.
But oh, its double edge is keen!
It strikes but once, then on, right on:
The sword is gone—the Russ is gone!—From the Century.

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The Nazarites War With Rome Over Temple

I am a Nazarite. Here is my church. I am considering founding Virtual Zimbabwe. Marilyn Reed and I have ended our feud, and love one another again.

I discovered there are two William Wilsons buried in St. Georges a father and son. One died in Windsor Castle. I have an amazing genealogy with much history. Stop attacking me and getting in my way!

John Presco

https://rosamondpress.com/2012/02/16/gods-nazarites-are-reborn/

An important chapter in Elisabeth’s life began in 1988, when she and her husband acquired Forrester Estate in Zimbabwe. In addition to managing the business, they built new dams for 28 million cubic meters of water, and an irrigation system to go with it. On their African farm, the couple also expanded medical care and provided education for the local inhabitants. In the 1990s, the Pezolds established a polytechnic college, with all the equipment generously provided by the Federal Republic of Germany. Because of political developments in Zimbabwe, however, the college was never opened – as part of the country’s so called land reform, the state took over the location and the school was demolished.

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/08/19/my-kin-preached-in-this-cathedral/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windsor_Castle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prebendary

Review of Black Panther

You don’t have to invite me to a costume ho-down – but once! When I saw black folks dressed in African regalia on the news, I had to get me some. All I had was a pillowcase to my safari sleep-set. I draped it over my shoulder, and…….Wah-Lah Wakanda!

“Wakanda, here I come! Just me, and my regal self.”

Zulu Nazarite Prophets

gainer3

When John Gainer came on stage at the Hult Center, I had no idea he was going to sing a Zulu song. Marilyn did not tell me much about the show she was co-producing. She wanted to surprise me. I was surprised!

In 1988 I declared myself a Nazarite, and baptized myself in the McKenzie River. I went to town and got on the internet at the Eugene Public Library. I was looking for other Nazarites. I found them in South Africa. I wrote them.

A year earlier, after reading all of Luke for the first time, I asked Jesus to come into my life and help me with the darkness of Family Incest. He appeared, and said this;

“I and my Father in Heaven are already working on this matter. Be not afraid. Spiritual Courage will be met with Spiritual Courage.”

Rejected by the local church, I found an infinity for John the Baptist who I was named after.  Two hours ago I googled John and Incest. I don’t know why I never did this. I was shocked to see it is a topic being discussed – openly!

After coming into the light, I found my childhood sweetheart again. She invited me to hear the choir she sang in. Inspirational Gospel Sounds of Eugene, is open to everyone. You can be an atheist and sing songs about God. They have always been my Zulu Nazarite Church in America.

Molested children are too young to form a religious opinion. Often, they become super loyal to their abusers. The Truth – does set them free!

At Kenny Reed’s Jazz and Poetry readings, I read my poem ‘Wake Up Ye Africans’ and did a version of the dance you see performed by the men in white.

Play top two videos at same time.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2016

http://origins-of-christianity.blogspot.com/2016/01/incest-as-hellenistic-marker.html

https://rosamondpress.com/2012/02/16/gods-nazarites-are-reborn/

 

Rosamond Press

I just learned Christopher Tolkien resigned from his father Estate Trust, in disgust. This has left the Tolkien Cosmology open to crass commercialism. Because I declared myself a Nazarite after the long-haired Nazarene Artists of Germany who influenced the Pre-Raphaelite Artists of England, of whom William Morris was a member, and because Morris was a major influence on Tolkien………I hereby TRANSFER that influence……..over to Royal Rosamond Press, and The New Nazarites.

For the reason I made the first legal argument in regards to the Pre-Raphaelites and the Holy Grail, and, my Rose Line, these lawsuits in regards to the Priory de Sion, are part of a Creative Cosmology that has been established in our Superior Courts. Biblical and Secular Laws have merged with several important legends, the Oera Linda Books being one of them, along with the Legends of the Lombards and the people of Iceland.

I will make a…

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Elisabeth von Pezold, née Princess of Schwarzenberg-Frauenberg

Here is my kin.

John

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/czechrepublic/8684376/Czech-foreign-minister-and-sister-in-feud-over-family-castles-and-palaces.html

Elisabeth von Pezold wants the return of property expropriated by the Czechoslovak state in 1947.

However, her adopted brother, Karel Schwarzenberg, the Czech Republic’s foreign minister, apparently does not.

The homes include the Cesky Krumlov castle, a jewel in the crown of Czech tourism which towers over an ancient town in southern Bohemia.

But Mrs von Pezold claims that her brother, one of the republic’s most popular politicians, has blocked her case.

She argues that the Prince of Schwarzenberg, to use his formal title, has failed to fulfil the wishes of their father, whose will asked that his successor should fight to get the property back.

Law360, New York (February 11, 2016, 6:59 PM EST) — A Swiss-German family whose farms and forest holdings were seized by Zimbabweans during the government’s “land reform” of the 2000s is owed at least $130 million and perhaps more than $310 million by the country’s government, according to a decision from the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes made public this week.

In a ruling marked by sweeping assessments of history, politics, power and what could have been for the struggling African country, an ICSID panel said the government of Robert Mugabe bears responsibility…

https://gw.geneanet.org/efrogier?lang=en&n=von+schwarzenberg&oc=0&p=elisabeth+regina+gabriela

Elisabeth von Pezold, née Princess of Schwarzenberg-Frauenberg

Princess Elisabeth of Schwarzenberg was born on 1 October 1947 in Vienna as the only daughter of Prince Heinrich Schwarzenberg, Duke of Krumlov, and his wife Eleonore Schwarzenberg, Countess of Stolberg-Stolberg. Because of his exemplary anti-Fascist and pro-Czechoslovak stance during the war he was imprisoned by the Gestapo i.a. in KZ Buchenwald and became a forced labourer until the end of the war. Since 1945 her father was groundlessly barred from returning to Czechoslovakia, and so Elisabeth grew up with her parents in Gusterheim near Pöls in Styria, where she attended the local elementary school. Later, she moved with her parents to the Schwarzenberg Palais in Vienna so that she could attend the Sacre Coeur Catholic Grammar School

In Vienna, Elisabeth lived not only with her parents, but also with her aunt, Princess Eleonore Schwarzenberg and her uncle, Prince Joseph Schwarzenberg, the last head of the family.

After 1945, Elisabeth’s father managed to win the restitution of the property of Prince Adolph Schwarzenberg in Germany and Austria confiscated by the Gestapo in 1940. He then managed this property for his cousin and adoptive father as its general trustee. For his part, Heinrich owned Gusterheim Castle, which he had inherited from his father Felix in 1946. Adolph died in 1950, making Heinrich his universal heir. With much effort, he managed to rebuild the family’s Vienna palais, which had been partially destroyed by wartime bombing, while his wife devoted herself to looking after the expansive park.

Elisabeth’s father Heinrich died in 1965, the same year she successfully completed grammar school and began studying art history and archeology at the university in Freiburg im Breisgau, where her father had applied for her to stay at the Catholic hall of residence. Elisabeth later continued her studies in Bonn and in Munich.

On 31 May 1970, Elisabeth married Rüdiger von Pezold in Gusterheim. The couple then moved to Munich, where he worked as an attorney. In 1971 their daughter Anna was born, followed over the next twelve years by one more daughter, Juliane, and five sons – Heinrich, Georg Philipp, Felix, Johann, and Adam.

Following the completion of renovations at Gusterheim Castle, the family moved in, devoting itself to managing the agricultural and forestry holding inherited from Elisabeth’s father. The Pezolds restructured their farm and forestry activities with an emphasis on natural forestry and a reduction in the number of ungulate game. Over the years, Elisabeth reforested 500 hectares of primarily high-mountain land in order to protect the landscape from avalanches. Here she invested some four million Euros, also to clean up streams and rivers. Elisabeth von Pezold also established fish ladders and restored dried-up stream beds so that they could be suitable for fish again.

The 1980s were marked by the battle against emissions from two state-owned industrial companies that threatened local forests and human health. After many years of court hearings and official negotiations, Elisabeth and her husband and neighbours succeeded in effecting the closure of the nearby ÖDK Zeltweg thermal power station and the establishment of a new cellulose factory in Pöls reflecting technical and safety standards.

From 1975 to 1995, Rüdiger von Pezold was chairman and director general of the ducal foundations in Coburg. Besides the management of the ample forests his main task was to look after the foundation’s collection of furniture, art, and coins, as well as the renovation of the castle and family mausoleum in Coburg and Castle Greinburg in Upper Austria with the aim of opening them to the public. In these efforts, Elisabeth’s extensive knowledge of art was of great help, as she put to use both her knowledge of art as well as her experiences from renovating her patronage church of St. James in Frauenburg, Styria, which she led personally.

In 1979, Elisabeth provided her house in Unzmarkt to the disposition of Professor Franz Schwarzenberg-Orlik and his wife Amelie when they came to Austria from the United States after his retirement. Later Elisabeth was adopted by Amelie Schwarzenberg-Orlik.

An important chapter in Elisabeth’s life began in 1988, when she and her husband acquired Forrester Estate in Zimbabwe. In addition to managing the business, they built new dams for 28 million cubic meters of water, and an irrigation system to go with it. On their African farm, the couple also expanded medical care and provided education for the local inhabitants. In the 1990s, the Pezolds established a polytechnic college, with all the equipment generously provided by the Federal Republic of Germany. Because of political developments in Zimbabwe, however, the college was never opened – as part of the country’s so called land reform, the state took over the location and the school was demolished.

In 1998, the couple handed over the management of their African holdings to their 27-year-old son Heinrich, in order to transfer responsibility for managing their expansive agricultural and forestry holdings. As a result, the couple gained more time for the exceptionally complex and time-demanding work associated with the unexpected duty to push for the restitution of Adolph Schwarzenberg’s property confiscated in Czechoslovakia. After her adoptive brother Karel Schwarzenberg had failed to comply with his promise to meet his obligations contained in the will of her father regarding the restitution of this property, Elisabeth has become the only person engaged in the restitution process. The restitution concerns her grandfather Adolph Schwarzenberg’s property confiscated by the Gestapo in 1940 and since 1945 held by the Czechoslovak, and later the Czech state, in violation of the law and the constitution. In order to properly devote herself to the issue, Elisabeth acquired Czech citizenship and moved to Prague in 1993.

In December 1994, Elisabeth’s mother passed away in Gusterheim, surrounded by family. With Amelie Schwarzenberg, however, the Pezolds’ children continue to have a loving and loved Czech grandmother.

In 2003, Elisabeth acquired a house in Prague’s Smichov district, which she renovated with the help of her son Georg Philipp. Since then, she has lived there with her husband. Currently, her son Adam is living with his parents in Prague and working there for a company which refurbishes historic listed houses.

Following years of court hearings, in 2007 the High Court in Vienna ruled that Karel Schwarzenberg forfeited his inheritance from Heinrich Schwarzenberg in favour of Heinrich’s daughter Elisabeth if he failed culpably to fulfil the duty assigned to him by the will of his adoptive father Heinrich Schwarzenberg to actively work towards the return of the confiscated Czech property of Adolph Schwarzenberg. The Austrian High Court’s ruling returned the case to the court of first instance for, among other things, clarification of this issue.

In 2009, Elisabeth von Pezold was able to celebrate another legal victory when the Czech Constitutional Court warranted that the family’s tomb in Domanin near Trebon and other property that had not been confiscated had to be returned.

Elisabeth is the proud grandmother of eight grandchildren, who visit her in Prague and whom she visits at their homes in Zimbabwe, England, and Austria.

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Kim Hafner

I made the mistake of telling the Hafner family about Garth Benton. I upstaged the Hafners. I had to be brought low. They brought out their BIG GUN, their family appendage, Jesus Christ. I could not compare to their Personal Family Savior. When they read that I was not a Christian, but, somehow, a prophet, they began working hard to get me in the Johnson Unit, and in a strait jacket.

Sue Hafner is a Super Christian, and as ordinary and clean as a bar of Dove soap. Very few can compare themselves to her. If you try, she will bring Jesus out of the hall closet and denigrate you, talk ill of you behind your back, cut you down to size. Kim is good at this, too. Busted! I told Kim I am a Nazarite. I was raised Catholic. My kin founded Briar Cliff College. They don’t believe in the Rapture, a recent invention.

https://rosamondpress.com/2012/02/16/gods-nazarites-are-reborn/

It all started when I told Kim I was going to paint out of the words of Job in the Kesey mural, and paint a hit of LSD instead. She could hardly contain her glee, that alas the Hafners got proof I am a low-life insane degenerate, scumbag, and, am no way their equal.

Such is life in Springfield Oregon.

John

https://rosamondpress.com/2012/02/16/gods-nazarites-are-reborn/

 

Garth Benton Went To Reseda High

The Hypnotic Eye (1960)
Directed by George Blair
Shown: Lobby card

Yesterday, Sue Hafner, returned my call. I had just discovered that Garth Benton (Paul Garfield Benton) went to Reseda High School, and graduated in 1959. Two months ago I was at Sue and Jack’s home looking at family photos, and the 1958 yearbook, because Sue had graduated in 1958 from Reseda High. I was going to help her with a story about her grandfather, Maynard, a renowned pole vaulter. Jack Webb was at his wedding.

As it turns out, the actress, Merry Anders, played police woman, Dorothy Miller, in the series Dragnet, and, co-starred in the movie with Garth Benton, who played Buddy ‘Raiders From Beneath The Sea. Merry starred in ‘The Hypnotic Eye’ and ‘The Beauty and the Beast’. This makes Garth the most famous graduate of Reseda High.

http://www.reseda-regents.com/S59-Grad-Pics-1.asp

The Franciscan Family of Mary Magdalene Rosamond

Briar_Cliff_University_dedication,_1930ttt

order4

orderst

Wieneke445

My grandmother’s cousin was the founder of Briarcliff College and Mother Superior of the Order of Saint Francis that was forced to leave Germany. My friend, Joy, showed me family photographs of her grandfathers with the Black Robes. John Grass and Gall, were chiefs of the Hunkpapa Sioux, who are standing in the way of the Keystone Pipeline owned by a Canadian company, and thus, they are not “people too”  like Hobby Lobby. The Ghost Dance incorporated the Franciscan religion. Mary Magdalene’s was part Native American.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standing_Rock_Indian_Reservation

On September 26-27, 1877 Chief Sinte Gleska (Spotted Tail), leader of the Sicangu Lakota and Chief Red Cloud, leader of the Ogalala, met with President Rutherford B. Hayes and formally requested that the Black Robes come to their lands to educate their people. Sinte Gleska told the President, “I would like to say something about a teacher. My children, all of them, would like to learn how to talk English. They would like to learn how to read and write. We have teachers there, but all they teach us is to talk Sioux, and to write Sioux, and that is not necessary. I would like to get Catholic priests. Those who wear black dresses. These men will teach us how to read and write English.”

The Franciscans are still amongst the Sioux, and I believe they are protected by the agreements made with President Hayes. I need an attorney to help me bring a lawsuit against the Trumpite Ideologues, and TransCanada for violation of my family religions that came together by the Providence of God. The Wieneke and Rosamond immigrant family make a case, that no religious sect, or order, should be oppressed, or banned, for only God-Allah knows what is in store, when alas…..His will, be done!

Jon Presco

“The History of Mount St. Francis The Sisters of St. Francis of the
Holy Family were founded in Herford, Germany in 1864. Forced to
emigrate by the Kulturkampf, the small community arrived in Iowa
City on Sept. 8, 1875. Here they established the first orphanage
under Catholic auspices in the state of Iowa. In 1878, Bishop
Hennessy invited them to move to Dubuque to establish a diocesan
orphanage. Today, 125 years later, Mount St. Francis Center in
Dubuque is the home for approximately 375 sisters. It is also home
for those who are retired and those who need full-time nursing care.
It houses the central administrative offices of the congregation as
well as the novitiate community, where young women live and study as
they prepare to become members.”

In 1825, in the village of Fenagh in county Leitrim in Ireland, a gang of Catholic youths attacked the Rosamond home. The Rosamonds were staunch Protestants. James, aged 20 (born 1805) and his brother Edward, aged 15, attempted to protect their mother. A shot was fired by Edward and a youth was dead. The boys fled to Canada. James went to Merrickville where he worked for James Merrick as a weaver. Edward, still fearing arrest, worked his way eventually to Memphis, Tennessee.

From 1871 to 1876, the Prussian state parliament and the federal legislature (Reichstag), both with liberal majorities, enacted 22 laws in the context of the Kulturkampf. They were mainly directed against clerics: bishops, priests and religious orders (anti-clerical) and enforced the supremacy of the state over the church.[62][63] While several laws were specific to the Catholic Church (Jesuits, congregations etc.) the general laws affected both Catholic and Protestant churches. In an attempt to overcome increasing resistance by the Catholic Church and its defiance of the laws, new regulations increasingly went beyond state matters referring to purely internal affairs of the church. Even many liberals saw them as encroachment on civil liberties, compromising their own credo.[64]

Here is a video that contains a photo of Mother Mary Dominica Wieneke, Major Superior of the Sisters of Saint Francis of Dubuque. Her cousin, Mary Magdalene Wieneke-Rosamond, was my grandmother, the mother of Rosemary Rosamond.

Above is an amazing photo of the groundbreaking ceremony for Briar Cliff College that is located on the Missouri River overlooking the states of South Dakota and Nebraska. I might do a painting of this scene because more than likely there are more than twenty of my kindred in it. My grandmother Mary is above in white.

Look at those beautiful children who want their shot at life even though they know they are crippled. They are filled with hope. How can anyone who claims they are a Christian, talk about taking away hope from any child who suffers?

Jon Presco

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My Kin Preached In This Chappel

Our kin is buried here along with these royals. Ben Toney, Karl Schwarzenberg, and John Presco, are related to William Wilson. I come from Holy Stock and have to hide my light under a bushel because people become jealous of me. They sense there is something noble about me. But, being poor, they wonder why I live next to them. There must be something wrong with me. I must be insane – to have it all work for them.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex got married here.

John Presco

William Wilson DD (1545 – 15 May 1615) was a Canon of Windsor from 1584 to 1615[1] and Chancellor of St Paul’s Cathedral from 1596 to 1615.

https://www.geni.com/people/Rev-Dr-William-Wilson/6000000000484569073

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_Paul%27s_Cathedral

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St_George%27s_Chapel,_Windsor_Castle

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/70589734/william-wilson

Henry VIII (d. 1547)

Jane Seymour, third wife of Henry VIII (d. 1537)

Charles I (d.1649)

Infant child of Queen Anne(d.1696)


Royal Vault:

Princess Amelia, daughter of George III (d.1810)

Princess Augusta, Duchess of Brunswick, sister of George III (d.1813)

Stillborn son of Princess Charlotte(d. 1817)

Princess Charlotte (daughter of George IV) (d.1817)

Queen Charlotte, wife of George III (d.1818)

Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria (d.1820)

King George III (d.1820)

Prince Alfred, son of George III (d.1782, placed in vault 1820)

Prince Octavius, son of George III (d.1783, placed in vault 1820)

Princess Elizabeth, daughter of William IV (d.1821)

Prince Frederick, Duke of York (d.1827)

King George IV (d.1830)

Still-born daughter of Prince Ernest Augustus, son of George III (d.1818)

King William IV (d.1837)

Princess Sophia, daughter of George III (d.1840)

Queen Adelaide, wife of William IV (d.1849)

Prince Frederick of Schleswig-Holstein, son of Princess Christian (d.1876)

King George V of Hanover (d.1878)

Victoria von Pawel Rammingen, daughter of Princess Frederica of Hanover (d.1881)

Princess Mary Adelaide, Duchess of Teck, mother of Queen Mary (d.1897)

Prince Francis, Duke of Teck, father of Queen Mary (d.1900)

Princess Frederika of Hanover (d.1926)

Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, grandfather of Queen Mary (d.1850, placed in vault 1930)

Princess Augusta, Duchess of Cambridge, grandmother of Queen Mary (d.1889, placed in vault 1930)


North Quire Aisle:

King Edward IV (d. 1483)

Queen Elizabeth Woodville (d. 1492)

Princess Louise, Duchess of Saxe-Weimar, niece of Queen Adelaide (d.1832)


King George VI Memorial Chapel:

King George VI (d.1952, buried in chapel 1969)

Queen Elizabeth (d.2002)

Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon (d.2002) (ashes)


South Quire Aisle:

King Henry VI (d.1471)

King Edward VII (d.1910)

Queen Alexandra (d.1925)


The Gloucester Vault:

Prince William, Duke of Gloucester (d.1805)

Princess Maria, Duchess of Gloucester (d.1807)

Prince William, Duke of Gloucester (d.1834)

Princess Sophia of Gloucester (d.1844)

Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester (d.1857)


North Nave Aisle:

King George V (d.1936, placed there 1939)

Queen Mary (d.1953)

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My Kindred Preached God’s Words In Old Saint Paul’s

Karl, Ben, and I have this common relative in our family tree, William Wilson. I was destined for the church. I founded a church. I am the prophet of my church.

William Wilson DD (1545 – 15 May 1615) was a Canon of Windsor from 1584 to 1615[1] and Chancellor of St Paul’s Cathedral from 1596 to 1615.

I tried to save KORE. I am being ridiculed. They hope I die – soon – before people get fired!

John Presco

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_St_Paul%27s_Cathedral

https://www.geni.com/people/Rev-Dr-William-Wilson/6000000000484569073

Reverend William Wilson, D.D. MP

Gender: Male
Birth: 1542
Wellsbourne, Lincolnshire, England
Death: May 15, 1615 (73)
Windsor, Berkshire, England
Place of Burial: Windsor,Berkshire,England
Immediate Family: Son of William Wilson, of Wellborn and Isabell Helen Wilson
Husband of Ann Wilson and Isabel Alice Wilson
Father of Robert Wilson; Reverend Thomas Wilson; Maria Sheaffe; NN Wilson; Isabel Gibbs and 6 others; Elizabeth Wilson; Edmund Wilson; Rev. John Wilson; Rev. Thomas Wilson; Margaret Rawson and William Wilson « less
Brother of Alexander Wilson; Mary Wilson and Hamon Wilson
Added by: Richard Robertson on April 25, 2007
Managed by: Jose Vicente Alberdi and 37 others
Curated by: Margaret (C)

About

• Rev. William WILSON

• Birth: ABT 1542

• Death: 15 MAY 1615

• Burial: St. George’s Chapel, Windsor, Berkshire, England

He was also said to have been born 1545.

He was also said to have married Isabel Woodhall about 1575.

“Arms of ‘Wil’m Wilsonn, of Welborne, per Norroy flower, 1586.’

Per pale argent and azure three lions’ gambs barways, erased and counterchanged.

Crest: – A lion’s head erased argent guttee de sand.

Harleian Coll., No. 1550, Fol. 192, British Museum; Richard Mundy’s copy of the Visitations of LIncolnshire, 1564 adn 1592.”

“The Wilson arms (Harleian Manuscript 1507):

A confirmacon of ye Armes & guifte of ye Crest of Wm Wilson of Welborne in ye County of Lincolne son of William Wilson of ye Town of Perith [i.e. Penrith] in ye County of Cumber And to allhis issue & offspring for ever under ye hand & seale of Wm Flower alias Clarenc. king of Armes Dated ye 24 of March 1586 ye 19th of Queen Elizabeth.

Now 1594 Barneby Wilson of ye prebends of wildsor sonn of ye Aforesd Wm Wilson of Wilborne.

Arms: Per pale argent and azure, three lions gambs erased fessways in pale counterchanged.

Crest: A lion’s head argent guttee de sang.” Photo on file

“William Wilson was Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Prebendary of Rochester, Rector of Cliffe, near Rochester, etc. and for 32 years, Prebendary of St. George’s Chapel at Windsor where he was buried.”

“He was educated at Merton College, Oxford which he left in 1575 on his acceptance of a living from the Earl of Pembroke. . .He became Prebendary of Saint Paul’s and Rochester Cathedrals, and held the rectory of Cliffe, Kent. In 1584 he became a Canon of Windsor in place of Dr. William Wickham.”

“He was a Prebendary of St. Paul’s and Rochester Cahtedral, and also rector of Cliffe, Kent. He was chaplain of Archbishop Grindall of Canterbury, and was made Canon of Windsor in 1584. He married Isabel, daughter of John and Elizabeth Woodhall of Walden, Essex, a niece of Bishop Grindall. He died in 1615, and was buried next his father at Windsor.”

“Rev. William Wilson, D.D., of Merton College, Oxford, was also a prebendary of st. Paul’s and Rochester cathedrals, and held the rectory of cliffe, in the county of Kent. In 1584 he became canon of Windsor in place of dr. Will. Wickham promoted to the see of Lincoln, being about that time chaplain to Edmund (Grindall), Archbishop of Canterbury. He married Isabel Woodhall, daughter of John and Elizabeth Woodhall of Walden in Essex, and niece of Archbishop Grindall. He was buried in St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, near the body of his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in Lincolnshire, Gent.”,

With Isabel he had six sons and six daughters.

He was “Rev. William Wilson, D.D., Canon of Windsor.”

“John Wilkinson, of London, gentleman, 3 May, 1614, . .. I do give and bequeath unto the Right Worshipfull my lving uncle William Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, five pounds and to every one of my loving cosens, his children, twenty shillings apiece.”

“Dame Mary Rowe, widow of Sir Thomas Row, Knight, late citizen and alderman of London . . by her will of 21 March, 1579, proved in the year 1582-3, bequeathed to William Wilsonn, parson of Cliff, als Clyve, in Kent, a ring of gold, or three pounds or three pounds in money, and to his wife a ring of gold or its equivilent in money. Rowe, 1.”

“He made his will on 23 August 1613, then, two years later, apparently sick and expecting to die, he added two codicils and died a few days later on 15 May 1615, aged 73. He was buried in the chael of Saint George by Windsor Casle as was his father. On the north side was a grave stone on which, in brass plates, was the figure of a man and this inscription. It is now gone. The inscription to his memory, now gone, was:” Inscription and will to be entered.

“Rev. William Wilson, in his will proved 27 May, 1615, mentions his godson William Sheafe when twenty-one; and in the codicil he mentions his son-in-law Mr. Dr. Thomas Sheafe.”

“two of New England’s greatest Divines, Hooker and Wilson, the latter of them, says Cotton Mather, ‘having for his mother a niece of Dr. Edmund Grindal;’ and the same veracious chronicler makes honorable mention, in his life of Wilson, of the ‘good kinsman of his, who deserves to live in the same story, as he now lives in the same Heaven, with him, namely, Mr. Edward Rawson, the honored Secretary of the Massachuset Colony.’ ”

“William Wilson was educated at Merton College, Oxford, was prebendary of St. Paul’s and Rochester Cathedral, Rector of Cliffe, Kent, and in 1584 became Canon of Windsor. He and his wife Anne’s wills are printed in Henry F. Waters, Genealogical Gleanings in England (Boston, 1901), 1:54, 55, 1397. Elias Ashmole in History and Antiquities of Berkshire (Reading, 1736) recorded monumental inscriptions to them once located in St. George’s Chapel but now lost. The shielf of arms to him and his wife, however, is still extant. the illustration below is from a rubbing [photo on file] ”

“Rev. William Wilson, D.D., ‘prebend of St. Paul’s, of Richester and of Windsor, and rector of Cliff [-at-Hoo, Kent], with his wife Isabel Woodhall, a niece of Edmunc Grindal, Archbishop of Canterbury. Rev. William Wilson, the father, was in contact with Henry Hastings, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon (the patron of John Mansfield) as shown by a surviving letter from Rev. Wilson to the Earl. As previous writers have been unaware of the Wilson-Huntingdon connection, it may be helpful to print the abstract of this letter.

‘1592/3], Jan. 29. Windsor. – I have made the abstract of the chantries of Windsor Chapel plainer and send than to you. It seems your chantry was appointed by the will of William, Lord Hastings, but was not perfected till after his death, by Dme Katheren, his wife, and his son Edward, Lord Hastings and Hungerford, which was the cause of the error in the abstract exhibited to you on Saturday last. I pray your purpose and our desires may take effect. Mr. Dean and my brethren have sent the late Lord Chancellor’s robe by the bringer hereof, Mr. Wulward, one of our brethren, for your to see. If you like it, please send word what you will give for it. Endorsed: ‘Wylson, a prebendary of Wynsor, J. 29.’ ”

“The career of William Wilson, D.D., appointed Canon of St. George’s, Windsor 10 Dec. 1584, is related in S.L. Ollard, Fasti Wyndesorienses: The Deans and Canons of Windsor (Historical Monographs Relating to St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, 8), 76. He was born 1545, attended Merton College, oxford (Fellow 1565, B.A. 1564, M.A. 1570, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607), rector of Islip, do. Oxford, 1578, Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Prebendary of Rochester [Kent] 1591, 1614, Rector of Cliffe [near Rochester], Chancellor of St. Paul’s 1596-1615, died 15 May 1615, and was buried in St. George’s Chapel near his father (there was a monumental inscription (now lost) to his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, co. Lincoln., gentleman, who died at Windsor Castle 27 Aug. 1587]). The sketch of Edmund Wilson, M.D. (1583-1616) is given in the same source. The endorsement – ‘Wylson, a prebendary of Wynsor’ – identifies the writer of this letter as Rev. William Wilson, the father of Rev. John Wilson. Mather states that Rev. William Wilson was ‘a prebend of . . . Windsor,’ and William’s brass in St. George’s, Windsor, also calls him ‘Prebendarie of this Church.’ The contact between William Wilson and the Earl of Huntingdon may indicate that they shared similar Puritan (or Proto-Puritan) religious views, although in this instance they were discussing the distinctly un-Puritan matter of a chantry. The marriage of John Wilson, a great-nephew of the Archbishop of Canterbury, into the family of one of Huntingdon’s gentlemen, is not terribly unusual. Wilson’s father has been called ‘a man of deep erudition, a scholar and a courtier . . . we must suppose him to have been a persona grata in the eyes of Queen Elizabeth.’ ”

“See J. Garnder Bartlett’s article on Wilson, Register [note 99]. William Wilson, John Mansfield, John Ewry alias Every [Eure] and William Vessey ere defendants in Chancery concerning woods called ‘Byrkell,’ ‘Rigg,’ ‘Bentley Park,’ land in Walington and Bentley, parcel of the manor of Bentley, Yorks., 42 Elizabeth I [PRO E134/42Eliz/East8).”

“William Wilson, Canon of St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle August, 1613, proved 27 May, 1615. To be buried in the chapel near the plsace where the body of my dear father lies. If I die at Rochester or in the County of Kent, then to be buried in the cathedral church of Rochester, near the bodies of wives Isabel and Anne. To my cousin College prebendary at Rochester. To the Fellows and scholars of Martin College, Oxford. My three sons Edmond, John and Thomas Wilson, daughter Isabel Guibs and daughter Margaret Rawson. My goddaughter Margaret Somers which my son Somers had by my daughter Elizabeth, late wife. To my god-son William Sheafe, at the age of twenty one ye Son Edmund, a fellow of King’s College, Cambridge, eldest son of me, said William. To son John the lease of the Rectory and Parsonage Caxton in the County of Cambridge, which I have taken in his name. Thomas Wilson, my third son. Son Edmond to be executor and Mr Erasmus Webb, my brother-in-law, being one of the Canons of St. George Chapel, and my brother, Mr. Thomas Woodward, being steward of the town of New Windsor, to be overseers.

The witnesses were Thomas Woodwarde, Joh. Woodwarde, Robert Lower & thomas Holl.

In a codicil, dated 9 May, 1615, wherein he is styled William Wilson Doctor of Divinity, he directs his son Edmond to give to his son John forty pounds and to his wife forty marks, he gives to Lincoln College Oxford ten pounds toward a Library, and mentions son-in-law Mr Doctor Sheafe and daughter Gibbes. to this Thomas Sheafe was a witness, among others.

In another codicil, of 12 May, 1615, he says, I have provided for the husband of my daughter Isabel Givves a place in Windsor, in reversion, of some worth. His signature to this codicil was witnessed by David Rawson and William Newman. Rudd, 36.”

“Rev. William Wilson, D.D., of Merton College, Oxford, was also a prebendary of St. Paul’s and Rochester cathedrals, and held the rectory of Cliffe, in the county of Kent. In 1584 he became canon of Windsor in place of Dr. Will. Wickham promoted to the see of Lincoln, being about that time chaplain to Edmund (Grindall). Archbishop of Canterbury. He married Isabel Woodhall, daughter of John and Elizabeth Woodhall of Walden in Essex, and niece of Archbishop Grindall. He was buried in St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, near the body of his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in Lincolnshire, Gent.”

“The following notes, taken from the History and Antiquities of Berkshire, by Elias Ashmole, Esq. (Reading, 1736), give the inscriptions found by that famous antiquary in the Chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, relating to this family.

On the North Side lied a Grave-stone, on which, in Brass Plates, is the Figure of a Man, and this Inscription.

‘To me to live is Christ, and to dye is Gain.

Philip. I.21.

Here underneath lied interr’d the Body of William Wilson, Doctour of Divinitie, and Prebendarie of this Church by the space of 32 yeares. He had Issue by Isabell his Wife six sons and six daughters. He dy’d the 15th of May, in the Year of our Lord 1615, of his Age the 73. beloved of all in his Life much lamented in his Death.

Who thinke of Deathe in Lyfe, can never dye,

But mount through Faith, from Earth to heavenly Pleasure,

Weep then no more, though her his Body lye,

His Doul’s possest of never ending Treasure.’

On another small Brass Plate, on the same Grave-stone, is the following Inscription.

‘Neere unto this Place lyes buried William Willson, the third Son, Who, after a long Trial of grievous Sickness, did comfortably yield up his Spirit in the Yeare of our Lord 1610. of his Age 23.’

On a Brass Plate, on a Grave-Stone Northward of the last, is this Inscripition.

‘William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in the County of Lincolne, Gent. departed this Lyfe, within the castle of Windsor, in the Yeare of our Lord 1587. the 27th Day of August, and lyeth buried in this Place.’ P. 309.

Arms of ‘Will’m Wilsonn, of Welborne, per Norroy flower, 1586.’

‘Per pale argent and azure three lions’ gambs barways, erased and counterchanged.

Crest: – A lion’s head erased argent guttee de sang.

Harleian Coll., No. 1550, Fol. 192, British Museum: Richard Mundy’s copy of the Visitations of Lincolnshire, 1564 and 1592.”

“Rev. William Wilson, D.D., born about 1542, graduated at Merton College, Oxford, B.A. 1564, M.A. 1570, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607; rector of Islip, Oxfordshire, 1578; rector of Cliffe, co. Kent, 1579; rector of Caxton, co. Kent, 1593; prebendary of st. Paul’s London, 1595-1615, and of Rochester Cathedral, 1591-1614. About 1580 he became chaplain to Edmund Grindll, Archbishop of Canterbury, and in 1583 became canon of Windsor, holding his position for thirty-two years, until his death May 15, 1615, aged 73, and was buried in the chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, where a monumental brass to his memory states that he was ‘beloved of all in his Life, and much lamented in his Death.’ (Alumni Oxoniensis, vol. iv, p. 1657; Ashmole’s ‘History and Antiquities of Berkshire,’ p. 305; Register, ante, vol. xxxviii, pp. 306-308, and vol lii, p. 144.) He married first, about 1575, Isabel, daughter of John Woodhall, Esq., of Walden, co Essex, by Elizabeth his wife, sister of Rev. Edmund Grindall, the celebrated Puritan Archbishop of Canterbury, described by Lord Bacon as ‘the gravest and greatest prelate of the land.’ (Register, ante, vol. xxxviii, pp. 301-308.) He married second, Anne, sister of REv. Erasmus Webb, canon of Windsor, who died in 1612, without issue. (Register, ante, vol. lii, pp. 143-4.) ”

“Dr. William Wilson, a prebend of St. Paul’s, of rochester and of Winsor, and rector of Cliffe.”

“John Wilkinson, of London, gentleman, 3 May, 1614, acknowledged 27 May, 1628; acknowledged again 18 June, 1634; . . . I do give and bequeath unto the Right Worshipfull my loving uncle William Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, five pounds,, and to every one of my loving cosens, his children, twenty shillings apiece. . . ”

“Dame Mary Rowe, widw of Sir Thomas Row, Knight, late citizen and alderman of London . . . by her will of 21 March, 1579, proved int he eyar 1582-3, bequeathed to William Wilsonn, parson of Cliff, als Clyve, in Kent, a ring of gold, of three pounds of three pounds in money, and to his wife a ring of gold or its equivilent in money. Rowe, 1.”

Father: William WILSON b: ABT 1515

Mother: ?

Marriage 1 Isabel WOODHALL b: ABT 1550


Rector of Cliffe, Kent

Chaplain to Edmund Grindall, Archbishop of Canterbury

Canon of Windsor


Rev. William Wilson. Born ca 1542 at England.116 William died in May 1615.65 Buried on 15 May 1615 in St George’s Chapel, Windsor.116 Education: Merton College, Oxford, B.A. 1564, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607.116 William was prebendary of St Paul’s and Rochester Cathedral, Rector of Cliffe, Kent, and in 1584 became Canon of Windsor. From Bartlett:116 William was “rector at Islip, Oxfordshire, 1578; rector of Cliffe, co. Kent, 1579; rector of Caxton, co. Kent, 1593, prebendary of St. Paul’s, London, 1595-1615, and of Rochester Cathedral, 1594-1614. About 1580 he became chaplain to Edmund Grindall, Archbishop of Canterbery, and in 1583 became canon of Windsor, holding this position for thirty-two years, until his death May 15, 1615, aged 73, and was buried in the chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, where a monumental brass to his memory states that he was ‘beloved of all in his Life, and much lamented in his Death.'” Ca 1570 William first married Isabel Woodhall (4978) , daughter of John Woodhall Esq (ca 1519-) & Elizabeth Grindall (1341) (ca 1520-bef Apr 1583). Born ca 1546. Isabel died at England bef 1615. Buried in Rochester Cathedral, Kent.65

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