Stewarts In America

The Preston and MacDowell union brings the British Isles to America. John Lee was thirteen when he came to America, alone, in 1634. This would make quite a story, when compared to the adventures of Harry and Meghan coming to America. John ends up on a list of notable people and is my kin if Captain Isaac Hull is one of my great grandfathers. He married Anne McCurdy. This is why they call America ‘The Land of Opportunity’. I awoke considering writing another letter to Ed Ray and his Hysterical Historians to make sure they have the history of Elizabeth MacDowell – set outside their Wall of Higher Learning!

John

https://www.geni.com/people/John-Lee-of-Farmington/6000000001473324935

“Mr. John Lee was sent by his father from Colchester, England, to America, among some of the first settlers, and his father told him he designed to come with his family afterward. However, he never came, and John never heard, (’tis said,) much about him.


This John was under age. He lived at Hartford, and when they began to settle Farmington he came here with the Rest, and was one of the eighty-four Proprietors to whom the large Tract of Land called Farmington was granted, as may be seen in the Records of the town, where, in the several Division Lots were layd out to him – John Lee.”

A descendant of Stephen HART is
Diana Spencer, the Princess of Wales.
Here is the way:
1.Stephen Hart 1602/3-1682/3
2.Mary Hart abt 1630-1710 +John Lee 1620-1690
3.Tabitha Lee 1677-1750 +Preserved Strong 1679/80-1765
4.Elizabeth Strong 1704-1792 +Joseph Strong Jr 1701-1773
5.Benajah Strong 1740-1809 +Lucy Bishop 1747-1783
6.Joseph Strong 1770-1812 +Rebecca Young 1779-1862
8.Ellen Wood 1831-1877 +Frank Work 1819-1911
9.Frances Ellen Work 1857-1947 +James Boothby Burke-Roche 1851-1920
10.Edmund Maurice Burke-Roche 1885-1955 +Ruth Sylvia Gill 1980-
11.Frances Ruth Burke-Roche 1936- +Edward John Spencer 1924-
12.Diana Spencer HRH The Princess of Wales 1961- + Charles HRH
The Prince of Wales 1948-
Source:Gen History of Deacon
Stephen Hart and his descendants – Andrews and a book by
Gary Boyd Roberts, through Nancy Bainter
on the net bainter@esdsdf.dnet.ge.com
ANNE LORD She married JOHN MCCURDY.
Children of ANNE LORD and JOHN MCCURDY are:
i. LYNDE6 MCCURDY, m. (1) URSULA GRISWOLD; b. 13 Apr 1754; m. (2) LYDIA LOCKWOOD.
ii. ELIZABETH MCCURDY, m. ALEXANDER STEWART.
iii. ANNA/NANCY MCCURDY, m. NATHAN STRONG.
iv. SARAH/SALLY MCCURDY, m. HENRY CHANNING.
v. JEANNETTE MCCURDY, m. ELISHA HART.
vi. JOHN MCCURDY.

The Rose Preston-Stewart Line | Rosamond Press

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Margaret Stewart of Methven MP

Gender:Female
Birth:circa 1547
Methven, Perthshire, Scotland (United Kingdom)
Death:January 01, 1627 (74-83)
Kilmarnock, Ayr, Scotland
Immediate Family:Daughter of Henry Stewart, 1st Lord of Methven and Janet Stewart
Wife of Andrew Stewart, Master of Ochiltree and Uchtred MacDowall of Garthland
Mother of Andrew Stewart, 1st Baron Castle StuartJosias StewartWilliam StewartAnna StewartJames John Stewart and 8 others
Sister of Dorothea Stewart of AvondaleHenry Stewart and Joan Campbell (Stewart)
Half sister of John StewartJohn Gordon, 11th Earl of SutherlandJanet Gordon-SutherlandBeatrice Gordon-SutherlandWilliam Gordon-Sutherland and 4 others 

HENRY, LORD METHVEN

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Stewart,_1st_Lord_Methven

Henry Stewart, 1st Lord Methven (c. 1495 – 1552) was Master of the Scottish Artillery and last husband of Margaret Tudor, eldest daughter of Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York.

Ancient lineage

He was a son of Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord Avondale and his wife Margaret Kennedy. His brother was Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord Ochiltree. Henry was a fifth-generation male-line descendant of Murdoch Stewart, 2nd Duke of Albany through his son Walter. He was thus a fourth cousin, twice removed of James IV of Scotland, first husband of Margaret Tudor.

Marriage to the Queen mother

Henry and Margaret Tudor were married on 3 March 1528. Margaret had divorced her second husband Archibald Douglas, 6th Earl of Angus. She was already mother to James V of Scotland and Margaret Douglas from her previous marriages. This third marriage would produce another daughter, Dorothea Stewart, who died young. Reaction to the marriage was swift: Margaret and Henry were besieged at Stirling Castle by Lord Erskine, with the support of James V and her former husband, the Earl of Angus. Henry was imprisoned. However, after James V joined his mother at Stirling, Henry was created Lord Methven. Margaret made Methven captain of her castle of Newark in Ettrick. In 1539, Henry and Margaret let their coalfield at Skeoch to John Craigyngelt. As rent he would supply 100 loads to Margaret’s lodging at Stirling Castle.

Second marriage

Henry was discovered to have been keeping a mistress in one of Margaret’s castles. Margaret Tudor wished to divorce him but James V was reluctant to allow it. After she died in 1541, Methven was able to marry his mistress, Janet Stewart, daughter of John Stewart, 2nd Earl of Atholl and Lady Janet Campbell. Her maternal grandparents were Archibald Campbell, 2nd Earl of Argyll and Elizabeth Stewart. Elizabeth was a daughter of John Stewart, 1st Earl of Lennox and Margaret Montgomerie. Margaret was a daughter of Alexander Montgomerie, 1st Lord Montgomerie and Margaret Boyd.

The MacDowell-Stewart Knox-Witherspoon Line

Posted on July 6, 2015 by Royal Rosamond Press

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john-kno

Everything has changed and is now making sense. Above is a photograph of Dorothea Witherspoon and myself taken in 1971. We have just flown from Columbia South Carolina to Los Angeles. I wanted Dottie to meet my mother. We talked about getting married. I had just met about twenty members of the Witherspoon family, down South, a place I swore I would never go. However, Meher Baba’s first home in America is in South Carolina, and I wanted to see where the Avatar walked the earth. I praise the vote in this state to remove the Confederate flag. For years I have called for this, followed by “Repent!”

As it turns out Dottie and I are kin to the Stewarts and thus the Windsors. When Christine Rosamond Benton married Garth Benton, and begat Drew Benton, we became kin to the MacDowell family. Uchtred MacDowall of Garthland married Margaret Stewart, Lady Ochiltree.

When we pulled up to the entrance of Baba’s home in Myrtle Beach, Kitty Davy came out to greet us. She asked Dottie’s name first, and beamed brightly as she said;

“You are related the Signer Witherspoon, and John Knox!”

These men are the Scot-Irish who helped form and promote the Calvinist Presbyterian Church in England and America. The Knox, MacDowell, and Rosamond family took part in the Battle of Boyne. Their New Religion was declared a heresy. These men helped found our Democracy. This is the most religious Family Tree in the history of the United States. The Witherspoons fought under Francis Marion ‘The Swamp Fox’ as did Samuel Rosamond. Both families named their children after Francis Marion.

Dottie became a Christian and lived on the Lighthouse Ranch. I continued my secret work that was introduced by Baba when he spoke out against the use of LSD. After I saved Rena Easton, I gave her lessons about Baba on our mountain. My spiritual work with women, has been arduous. That is Kitty with her master in Venice, and, she and another woman are carrying Baba, which denotes they are The Pillars of his work. No doubt Dottie was seen as the next generation of teachers.

John Knox Witherspoon (February 15, 1723 – November 15, 1794) was a signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Jersey. As president of the College of New Jersey (1768-94; now Princeton University), he trained many leaders of the early nation and was the only active clergyman and the only college president to sign the Declaration.

Jessie and John Fremont appear to have named their son, Frank Preston Fremont after Francis “Frank” Preston Blair whose daughter, Elizabeth Blair, was very close to Mary Todd. Elizabeth married a cousin of General Lee. The Todd family were prominent in Kentucky where the Preston family reigned. Mary Todd was a Scarlet. Mary and Sarah McDowell, the mother of Jessie Benton, have grandfathers named Samuel McDowell. Whether they are related, needs to investigated, because Jessie and Mary are mirror images of each other, and were Flowers of the South. How they came to wed two abolitionist candidates for the Republican Party – connected to the Blair family – needs to scrutinized.

Elizabeth Lee (Blair) (1818 – 1906) – Genealogy (geni.com)

The American House of Stewart

Posted on August 15, 2011 by Royal Rosamond Press

On Sunday the fourteenth of August, I discovered that the Preston family married into the House of Stewart, and thus my family are kin to this royal family that includes Princess Diana and her two sons, William and Harry Windsor. Now I know why the Queen stayed at Blair House, and why John Breckenridge fled to England after he lost the Civil War – that the House of Stewart may have backed! This is huge!

She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.1,2 From 1692, her married name became Preston.2 From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston
Jane Preston+2 b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
Mary Preston2 b. 1696, d. 1749
Colonel John Preston+2 b. 1699, d. 1747

Jon Presco

Copyright 2011

http://thepeerage.com/p15313.htm

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/christine-rosamond-benton/

http://www.mckinneyandstewart.com/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I0183&tree=McKinneyandStewart

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Stewart

Sir William Stewart, 1st Bt.1
M, #24William Stewart, 1st Earl of Blessington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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William Stewart, 1st Earl of Blessington (7 April 1709 – 14 August 1769)[1] was an Anglo-Irish peer and member of the House of Lords, styled The Honourable until 1728 and known as William Stewart, 3rd Viscount Mountjoy from 1728 to 1745.
Sir William Stewart was born on 7 April 1709, the son of William Stewart, 2nd Viscount Mountjoy (1675-1727) and Anne Boyle. He married Eleanor Fitzgerald, daughter of Robert Fitzgerald on 10 January 1733. They had two children, William Stewart and Lionel Robert, both of whom died before their father.
He succeeded his father as Viscount Mountjoy on 10 January 1727. He was Grand Master of the Freemasons (in Ireland) between 1738 and 1740. He was created Earl of Blessington on 7 December 1745, his mother having been sister and sole heiress of Charles, 2nd and last Viscount Blesington. He was made Governor of County Tyrone and in 1748, was sworn of the Privy Council of Ireland.
On his death in London on 14 August 1769 he was buried at Silchester in Hampshire. His peerages became extinct, but his baronetcy was inherited by a distant cousin, Sir Annesley Stewart
 

The House of Stewart (also known as the House of Stuart) is a European royal house. Founded by Robert II of Scotland, the Stewarts first became monarchs of the Kingdom of Scotland during the late 14th century, and subsequently held the position of the Kings of Great Britain and Ireland. Their direct ancestors (from Brittany) had held the title High Steward of Scotland since the 12th century, after arriving by way of Norman England. The dynasty inherited further territory by the 17th century which covered the entire British Isles, including the Kingdom of England and Kingdom of Ireland, also upholding a claim to the Kingdom of France.
In total, nine Stewart monarchs ruled just Scotland from 1371 until 1603. After this there was a Union of the Crowns under James VI & I who had become the senior genealogical claimant to all of the holdings of the extinct House of Tudor. Thus there were six Stuart monarchs who ruled both England and Scotland as well as Ireland (although the Stuart era was interrupted by an interregnum lasting from 1649–1660, as a result of the English Civil War). Additionally at the foundation of the Kingdom of Great Britain after the Acts of Union, which politically united England and Scotland, the first monarch was Anne of Great Britain. After her death, all the holdings passed to the House of Hanover, under the terms of the Act of Settlement 1701.
4

Last Edited=19 Jan 2009
     His will was probated in 1647.2
     Sir William Stewart, 1st Bt. was Captain of the company of 100 Scottish soldiers in June 1608 in Ireland.2 He was invested as a Knight in 1613.2 He was created 1st Baronet Stewart, of Ramalton, co. Donegal [Ireland] in 1623.1
Children of Sir William Stewart, 1st Bt.
Anne Stewart+1
Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt.+2 d. 3 Sep 1650

Mary Stewart1
F, #27914, b. circa 1677, d. 4 October 1765
Hon. Mary Stewart|b. c 1677\nd. 4 Oct 1765|p2792.htm#i27914|William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy||p2792.htm#i27913|Hon. Mary Coote||p25242.htm#i252415|Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt.|d. 3 Sep 1650|p33068.htm#i330678|Catherine Newcomen|d. 8 Dec 1714|p15262.htm#i152616|Richard Coote, 1st Lord Coote, Baron of Coloony|b. 1620\nd. 10 Jul 1683|p12954.htm#i129532|Mary St. George|d. 5 Nov 1701|p12954.htm#i129533|

Last Edited=19 Jan 2009
     Hon. Mary Stewart was born circa 1677.2 She married, firstly, Phineas Preston in 1692 at Mountjoy, Ireland.2,1 She married, secondly, Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard, son of Arthur Forbes, 2nd Earl of Granard and Mary Rawdon, in 1709.1 She died on 4 October 1765.1 She was also reported to have died on 4 October 1758.2
     She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.1,2 From 1692, her married name became Preston.2 From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston
Jane Preston+2 b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
Mary Preston2 b. 1696, d. 1749
Colonel John Preston+2 b. 1699, d. 1747
Nathaniel Preston2 b. c 1700
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard
Lady Mary Forbes1 d. 27 Nov 1797
Lt.-Gen. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard+1 b. 15 Mar 1710, d. 16 Oct 1769

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Sir William Stewart
Abt 1582 – 1646

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Birth 
Abt 1582 
Wigtownshire, Scotland   [1] 
Gender 
Male 
Education 
1613 
Knighted   [2] 
_FA2 
2 May 1623 
Erected a Baronet of Ireland   [2] 
Died 
1646 
Ireland  
Will 
28 Jul 1647 
Will proven  
Notes 
THE STEWARTS IN IRELAND

“Amongst the many branches of the Stewart family that have been transplanted out of Scotland, there have been few that have attained to the degree of wealth and influence which this line of Ulster Stewarts reached in the 17th and 18th centuries. The principal seat was formerly at Newtown-Stewart, County Tyrone, which takes its name from Sir William Stewart, 1st Baronet, who was its founder, and the ruins of the castle of his descendants, the Lords Mountjoy, in the Elizabethan style though not dating back earlier than the middle of the 17th century, are still a picturesque feature of this beautifully situated little Ulster town.

Sir William first went to Ireland, as Captain Stewart, in the year 1608, as evidenced by the following entry in the register of the Privy Council of Scotland:

Edinburgh,
June 21, 1608.

Letter from the Council to the Governor of Knockfergus: Having ressavit directioun from our most sacred Soveraigne, the Mngis Majestie, to send over tua hundreth men of warr for assisting and furthering his Majisteis service “in that Kingdome . . . we have accordingly sent thame unto you under the charge of thir two gentilmen, Capitane Patrik Craufurde and Capitane Williame Stewart”.

“In the following year Captain Stewart was strongly recommended by the King to the Lord Deputy of Ireland for special favour in the distribution of lands, at the Plantation of Ulster. A despatch to the Lord Deputy, in State Papers, Irish Series, bearing date 19th June 1609, conveys the message that His Majesty desires ” extraordinary respect to be shown to him (Captain Stewart) when the distribution shall come It so that . . . he may therein be regarded before another”.

Captain Stewart’s name was, accordingly, included in the list of ” Servitors ” (i.e., persons in the Government service) recommended for grants of land at the Plantation, and on 30th November 1610, he was vested by Letters Patent with a it proportion” of 1,000 acres along the western shore of the upper part of Lough Swilly, Co. Donegal. This property was erected into the Manor of Stewart’s Fort, and on it Captain Stewart constructed a fortified dwelling known by the name of Fort-Stewart,” which became the residence of his youngest son, Thomas Stewart, and the latter’s descendants till about the year 1780, when Sir Annesley Stewart, 6th Baronet, who had become head of the family in 1769, acquired a more commodious and modern type of residence, known as Brookehill, within a mile or two of the old fortified house. He changed the name of “Brookehill” to ” Fort-Stewart,” and this house remains the residence of his successor in the fourth generation, Sir H. J. U. Stewart, present and Ilth Baronet.

Captain Nicholas Pynnar’s Survey 1618 of the Land Grants in the year 1608 in the Barony of Raphoe list William Stewart, brother of Lord Garlies, as receiving 1,500 acres in the Precint of Boilage and Banagh. County Donegal on the Net, list William Stewart, Esq. as receiving a land grant in the year 1608 in the Barony of Boylagh, County Donegal. (I am unable to explain the descrepancy in dates, locations and acreage. (Note to File – JPRhein)

A further letter from the King recommending Captain Stewart to the special attention of the Lord Deputy is in State Papers, Irish Series, under date of 26th January 1612-13, and this led to his being granted an additional proportion of 1500 acres in the Barony of Strabane, Co. Tyrone, which had been surrendered by the original grantee. He subsequently acquired, either by grant or purchase, further lands of large extent in the counties of Tyrone and Donegal. To his lands in the Barony of Strabane, Co. Tyrone, he gave the name of Newtown-Stewart estate; those in the Barony of Clogher in the same county, became the Mount-Stewart estate; and those in the Barony of Kilmacrenan, Co. Donegal, were designated the Ramelton, Fanad, and Fort-Stewart estates. On the Mount-Stewart property he built the great castle of Aughentaine, which was destroyed during the disturbances which broke out in 1641. Mount-Stewart was officially renamed Fivemiletown about the beginning of the 19th century, and it figures under the latter name on present day maps. The ruins of Aughentaine Castle are shown a short distance to the north.

Captain Stewart was knighted at Royston in 1613, and was created a Baronet of Ireland in 1623. He played a large part in civil and military affairs in Ireland till his death late in 1646, and was a member of the Privy Council and a General in the army. He was succeeded as 2nd Baronet by his eldest son, Sir Alexander Stewart. The latter, besides being a military commander of considerable repute, wa’s a zealous Covenanter, and is described in Patrick Adair’s True Narrative of the Presbyterian Church in Ireland, 1623-1670, as ” a gentleman of great integrity and fervent in propagating the gospel interest in the districts around Derry.” Sir Alexander is chiefly known to history for having conducted the First Siege of Derry in the year 1649, when the city was held for the English Parliament by Sir Charles Coote.” (Source – The Stewarts, Volume VI, The Stewarts In Ireland, Walter A. Stewart, London, S.W. 3, September 1, 1933)

The Right Honorable Sir William Stewart, 1st Baronet of Newtownstewart, County Tyrone, and Ramelton, County Donegal, went over to Ireland in 1608 as Captain commanding a company of Scottish troops sent to serve in that country. ( See Register of the Privy Council of Scotland, June 21, 1608) He is stated by Douglas of Glenbervied in his “Historical and Genealogical Tree of Royal Family of Scotland and name of Stewart”, 1750 to have been a son of Archibald Stewart, 3rd laird of Fintalloch, who died around 1506 (On review this date may have been incorrectly copied by J.P. Rhein or it is incorrect. This will have to be checked further.) and whose family descended from Sir William Stewart, 2nd of Garlies (see Galloway Earl). (Source – Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage)

Sir William Stewart was in great favor with King James VI, who in 1610 granted him 1,000 acres in the barony of Kilmacrean in County Donegal, Ireland, for the plantation of escheated lands in Ulster. William was a member of the privy council of King James VI and of King Charles I. He was a very prominent man in northern Ireland. He led the Ulster forces during the Irish rebellion of 1641 and decisively defeated Sir Phelim O’Neill on June 16, 1642. Sir William resided at Aughentean and Newtown-Stewart, County Tyrone. Among his many possessions was a demesne of 300 acres in County Donegal, upon which he built in 1618 a four story castle, called Ramelton, and a town consisting of 45 houses. (Source – Stewart Clan Magazine, Volume XI-XV, 1933-1938, page 141)

Sir William Stewart in 1613 bought 1,500 acres granted in 1610 to James Haig, gentleman, in the precinct of Strabane, County Tyrone. (Source – Stewart Clan Magazine, Volume XI-XV, 1933-1938, page 118)

“William Stewart, 1st Baronet Ramelton, started out as Captain William Stewart of Whithorn. He was granted lands under the Plantation scheme as a Servitor rather than an Undertaker, in reward for his military service in Ireland under King James I of England. He was granted ‘Gortavagie’ by James and also he received ‘Ramelton’ which had originally been granted to Sir Richard Hansard. Shortly thereafter he also took over the lands in County Tyrone of James Haig, which eventually became known as Newtownstewart, and later still land in Clogher Barony; also in County Tyrone, which he renamed Mount Stewart and which is now known as Fivemiletown. He married Frances Newcomen, and was knighted in 1623. He was made a Baronet of Ramelton in 1623 and died in 1646” (Source – Mary Stewart Kyritsis)

“Sir William Stewart emigrated to Ireland during the planation of Ulster, in the time of King James VI of Scotland who inherited the English throne as James I of England. Sir William married Frances Newcomer, daughter of Sir Robert Newcomer of Mosstown, County Longford. He sat in the Irish parliament for County Donegal in 1613-1615, and was created a baronet on May 2, 1623. He served with distinction against the Irish rebels in 1641 and 1642. He had at least two sons.” (Source – Letter from Mary Hazeltine Cole)

“James I (of England) (1566-1625), king of England (1603-1625) and, as James VI, king of Scotland (1567-1625). Born in Edinburgh Castle, Scotland, James was the only son of Mary, Queen of Scots. When Mary was forced to abdicate in 1567, he was proclaimed king of Scotland. He assumed actual rule in 1581. Scotland was at that time divided by conflict between the Protestants and the Roman Catholics. James tried unsuccessfully to advance the cause of religious peace in Europe, but he repressed both Catholics and Protestants at various times. In 1586 James formed an alliance with his cousin, Queen Elizabeth I of England. He replaced the feudal power of the nobility with a strong central government, and maintaining the divine right of kings, he enforced the superiority of the state over the church. In 1603 James succeeded Queen Elizabeth as James I, the first Stuart king of England. His belief in divine right led to prolonged conflict with Parliament. James authorized a new translation of the Bible, generally called the King James Version. James I was succeeded to the throne by his son, Charles I.” (Source – The Encarta 99 Desk Encyclopedia Copyright 1998 Microsoft Corporation)

“After the first shock of the rebellion and the initial frantic defence measures, the Protestants began to hit back. For example, volunteers from the Laggan district, County Donegal, near Londonderry, launched a counter-attack in early summer 1642, organized by two brothers and professional soldiers, Sir William and Sir Robert Stewart. The Laggin men swiftly recaptured Strabane; relieved Lemavady, destroyed rebel bands in the Magilligan Peninsula, swept through Roe Valley and at the Gelvin Burn near Dungiven finally, relieving Colerain .” (Source – Ulster’s Defence Tradition by Robert K. Campbell)

“The plantation of Ulster was fully planned by the English and Scottish Privy Councils in 1610. Land was assigned to British undertakers during April and May. Undertakers had to be in residence by September 1610, and to have fulfilled their conditions of settlement by Easter 1613. The enterprise attracted those pressed hard by the cost of living, in Scotland as well as England.” (Source – Modern Ireland 1600-1972 by R. F. Foster)

“In 1600, Ulster was synonymous with wildness and untamed Gaelicism: separate by nature and geography, least inhabited, least developed economically, least urbanized. Less than two percent of the population of Ireland was of Scots or English descent; but by the early 1700s the proportion had soared to 27 percent.” (Source – Modern Ireland 1600-1972 by R. F.Foster)

See Links Section on this site for “An Historical Account of the Plantation in Ulster at the Commencement of the Seventeeth Century 1608 -1620”, by the Reverend George Hill. There is a specific reference to Sir William Stewart on pages 322,323,522,533,544 and 545. (Note to File -JP Rhein)

“The following excerpts are taken from The Adair Manuscript section: In May 1642, about 10,000 troops from the Scottish army were sent to Ireland by the Parliament of England. The Irish were rebelling and reportedly encouraged by “the Popish clergy and the Bishop of Raphoe”. The King committed the managing of the war to the Parliament of England. The Presbyterian ministers were attempting to administer the “solemn League and Covenant to the army,” but the Mayor of Derry sent a Captain Hepburn to the ministers to invite them to a conference in his chambers. “There he showed them a letter from the Parliament of England, recommending to them the taking of the covenant when it should come to the Scotch army and withal, a proclamation by those who then ruled in Dublin, prohibiting the taking of it and declared his great straits what to choose.” It appears that no decision was made and the ministers left him’ They soon “received another discouraging letter from Sir Robert Stewart, sent by Major Galbraith. It appears that the Presbyterian ministers continued to preach and administer the covenant to the people, which included many soldiers in the army. Mr. Phillips about Ballycastle (near Newtownlimabady), set himself against it, and did endeavor to dissuade the garrison thereabout from it. And Sir Robert Stewart, with Mr. Humphrey Galbraith, was using the same endeavours about Derry, having heard that the ministers were coming there. Afterwards the ministers went towards Enniskillen ‘without sight of the enemy. For the Irish, who were protected, hearing the covenant was coming that way, fled, because they heard that the covenant was to extirpate all Papists, and was against protecting them.”

They next went to Ramelton, where they received the rest of Sir William Stewart’s regiment, and many of Colonel Mervyn’s, contrary to his threatenings. also, one of those who opposed the covenant at Raphoe entered into it with apparent ingenuousness. From this place they returned to Derry, where Sir Robert Stewart, Colonel Mervyn and Major James Galbraith came now to hear the ministers preach and explain the covenant. A document dated on 14 December 1642, in the records of Fermanagh, Ireland: ‘The last true Intelligence from Ireland; Being a true Relation of the great Victory lately obtained against the Rebels by Sir William Stewart, Colonel Sanderson, Colonel Mervyn, and Sergeant Major Galbraith against the great O’Neales and MacGwires Forces, wherein they slew great numbers of the Rebels, took 900 cows, 500 sheep, and 300 horses from the Rebels in the County of Fermanagh. Sir William Stewart understanding that a party of Oneales in the Kirrilrs Woodes, sent out Captain Balfoure, a deserving soldier, with a hundred men, who skirmished with them, killing fifty rebels, and lost but four of his own men, and took away four hundred cows from the Rebels. Some four days after Sir William Stewart desired Lieutenant Colonel Sanderson, Lieutenant Colonel Audley Mervin, and Sergeant-Major James Galbraith to march from Newtowne to relieve Ageer and Aghatyan, with five hundred foot and a hundred horse.” (Source – The Redtower, Clan Galbraith Association International, Volume XX, No. 3, March 1999)

A copy of “The Stewarts” by Walter A. Stewart, 10 Durham Place, Chelsea, London, September 1, 1933, is filed in the research files of J. P. Rhein, Volume 4, Packet D. This is a 49 page detailed document dealing with these Stewarts in Ireland. It also contains several dissenting views as true line of descent of these Stewarts. (Note to file JP Rhein)

“GEORGE CRAWFURD (or Crawford), a Scottish historian with a bent for genealogy, whose works were published at Edinburgh in 1710 and around then, gave his opinion of the origin of the Mountjoy Stewarts in Ireland, several generations after those Stewarts were settled there. Apparently he got his information from conversations with fourth or fifth cousins of the Mountjoy branch-not from signed documents nor, of course, contemporary witnesses. Crawford named Archibald Stewart of Fintalloch, in Kirkcudbrightshire, but did niot trace his ancestry, because the descendants with whom he talked did not know it themselves. They dimly knew that they were cadets of the Stewarts of Garlies, because the earls of Galloway, who presented the eldest branch of that strain, were their super chiefs.

In the reigns of William & Mary and Queen Anne, when Crawford worked, the fame of the Lords Mountjoy, grandson and great-grandson of the first Sir William Stewart, was widespread. Anybody who could claim relationship to them was proud to do so. The Stewarts of Fintalloch whom Crawford talked with included particularly William Stewart of Culgruff, probably in Kirkcudbrightshire, secretary to the dukes of Queensberry, for it was he who first rook an interest in the Fintalloch ancestry and hired a genealogist, Rev. Andrew Symson, to look it up. This Willam Stewart of Culgruff was the eldest son of Archibald Stewart of Culgruff, second son of John Stewart of Shambellie, in Dumfriesshire. John was a son of John Stewart of Allans, son of John and Bessie (Newell) Stewart of Auchinleck. John was a younger son of Archibald Stewart, jr. of Fintalloch, second son of Archibald and Elizabeth (Kennedy) Stewart of Fintalloch. Archibald and Elizabeth’s elder son was William, called Black William: he inherited the lease of Fintalloch, married Janet Gordon but left no issue, and died July 24, 1595, at the court of Queen Elizabeth. His brother Archibald succeeded to Fintalloch: he married a daughter of McLellan of Bombie and had these children, as listed by Crawford – Richard, who succeeded to Fintalloch ; John of “Allans”, James, “ancestor of Archibald Stewart, the great Whig with the whiskers who lives in the Cowgate (Edinburgh)”; Robert, “ancestor of the Lords Mountjoy in Ireland”; and Archibald “of Heisilside. Crawford overlooked a son William and supposed that Robert, whose name, was quite as distinguished as William’s in the early settlement of Ulster, was the great-grandfather of the Lord Mountjoy of his (Crawford’s) time. He took a stab at it, and came as close as anybody could who depended on what he had heard.” (Source – Stewart Clan Magazine, Tome H, Volume 37, Number 6, December 1959)

THE PLANATION AND SETTLEMENT OF IRELAND

The following excerpts were taken from Irish and Scotch-Irish Ancestral Research Volume 1, Repositories and Records, by Margaret Dickson Falley, B.S., published by Genealogical Publishing Col, Inc. 1981.

“On the whole, the Plantation and Settlement of Ireland carried out the principal object of the Crown and the English Government (including that of the Commonwealth) over a period of one hundred and fifty years, to eventually subjugate Ireland by confiscation, and plant the realm with new land-lords, loyal to the State, who would supply revenue to the Government, maintain English law administered by representatives from England, and furnish protection by locally supported military forces. Thus the forfeitures of individual estates by “enemies of the State” are a part of the series of Plantation and Settlement records which set forth the changes in ownership and tenure of Irish lands.

The Presbyterians in Ireland were largely Ulster Scots. During two and a half centuries after the first plantation of Scottish Presbyterian colonies in Ulster, ca. 1606, they maintained a close connection with their homeland, while they remained a race apart from their Irish and English neighbors. They were hated by the Roman Catholics of Ulster, whose land they had usurped. They were despised by the English, whose Government and Established Church inflicted persecution upon them due to religious non-conformity.

The Ulster Scots kept their racial strain pure in matters of intermarriage. They sent their sons to Scotland to be educated for the ministry, etc. Many of them married there before they returned to Ulster. Thus they remained under the influence of Scottish religion, philosophy, and family ties to their early and some later generations.

While the Presbyterians who settled in Ulster were almost solidly Scottish, there were many English Puritans of Calvinistic doctrine who settled in Dublin and the South of Ireland. The English type of Presbyterianism lacked the more severe theology and discipline of the Scottish Church. Their congreations in Leinster and Munster were the outgrowth of the English Puritans and Independents of the Commonwealth period, left there without organization after the Restoration. These two sects united in 1696 and developed the Southern Association of the Presbyterian Church. This became the Presbytery of Munster and a part of the General Synod.

Historians of Church and local off airs, and the genealogists, have preserved a wealth of published and manuscript records regarding Presbyterian families and individuals.

A few points which may puzzle genealogists will be clarified by a brief review of the history of the Presbyterians and their problems, due to the laws of the realm regarding dissenters from the Established Church of Ireland. This will show that less than half of the Presbyterian families were permanently settled in Ireland before 1650. The Penal Laws and other Acts of Parliament, depriving Presbyterians of religious and civil liberty, were during some periods more rigorously imposed in Scotland than in Ireland, thus resulting in a large emigration to Ulster. At other times the Ulster Presbyterians were more severely penalized, causing several ministers and many Church members to return to Scotland. At all times until well into the eighteenth century, the religious laws and practices resulted in the entries of many records of baptism, marriage and burial, in the Parish Registers of the Established Church.

The first wave of Presbyterian settlers come to Ulster as leasers of the numerous Scottish proprietors who were granted estates by James I, 1605-1625. By patent of 16 April 1605, the northeast quarter of County Down was granted to Hugh Montgomery and the northwest quarter was granted to James Hamilton. This represented two-thirds of the estates forfeited by Con O’Neill, who later was forced to sell his remaining lands to the benefit of Hamilton and Montgomery. The southern part of County Down remained in Roman Catholic hands. The new proprietors were required by the Crown to live on their estates, build houses, churches, and bring English or Scottish settlers as tenants, able to bear arms for the King, build houses and develop their land. Hamilton and Montgomery brought emigrants from the Scottish counties of Ayre, Renfrew, Wigtown, Dumfries and Kirkcudbright. They began coming in May 1606. By 1610, Montgomery could muster 1,000 men for the King and in 1614, the two proprietors mustered 2,000 men, representing about 10,000 Scots settled in County Down.

Sir Arthur Chicester received a large portion in the southern part of County Antrim. In 1603, he was granted the “Castle of Belfast” and surrounding property. He soon afterward acquired land along Carrickfergus Bay and to the north almost as far as Lough Larne. He at first settled an English colony around Belfast, but before long the Scottish settlers predominated throughout the lower half of County Antrim. The upper half had been in the hands of the Macdonnell clan since about 1580. Soon after 1607, the area was granted to Randall Macdonnell who, in 1620, became the Earl of Antrim.

Scottish tenants also spread through his estates, being required to bear arms for the King and develop the land. The flight of the Ulster Earls of Tyrone and Tyrcommel with their Chiefs who were confederates, on 14 September 1607, gave James I the opportunity to confiscate their lands for past and present treason. The six counties of Armagh, Cavan, Donegal, Fermanagh, Londonderry, and Tyrone, were escheated to the Crown. This great confiscation, of some 3,800,000 acres, lead to the carefully planned “Plantation of Ulster” between 1608 and 1620. Of this land, about 1,500,000 acres were only partly fertile and largely bog, forest, and mountain country. This was restored to the Irish Roman Catholic natives. Extensive grants were reserved for the bishops and their incumbents of the Established Church. Trinity College, Dublin, and other Royal Schools received about 20,000 acres. Land was also set aside for the corporate towns, forts, etc. The remaining half million acres of the most fertile land was reserved for colonization by English and Scottish settlers.

King James at first chose fifty-nine Scotsmen of high social standing and influence and nearly as many Englishmen, together with fifty-six military officers or “servitors” and eight-six natives, as undertakers who were to receive estates of 2,000 acres of less, in all counties but Londonderry which was reserved for the Corporation of the City of London. Eventually, by 1630, some undertakers acquired as much as 3,000 acres, and estates in County Londonderry came into private hands.

Through the influence of John Knox, the foundations of the Presbyterian Church were laid in Scotland and the first General Assembly was called in 1560. James VI of Scotland who succeeded to the English throne as James I, in 1603, was determined to strengthen the Established Church in Scotland. Melville, the leading Presbyterian of the time, was imprisoned in the Tower of London, and the General Assembly was forbidden to function. Presbyterian ministers and their adherents alike were severely persecuted by the bishops, to bring them under Church control.

At the same time, King James was anxious for a large settlement of English and Scots in Ireland. The latter came to Ulster for new land but also for religious liberty, attracted by the tolerant attitude maintained there by the bishops. The new Confession of Faith, sanctioned by Parliament for the Plantation Settlements, reconciled the differences between Anglicans and Presbyterians. It was Calvinistic in doctrine and allowed Presbyterian ministers to serve as clergy in the parish churches according to their own practices and beliefs. This encouraged the Scottish ministers to follow their countrymen to Ulster.

The easy cooperation of the bishops in Ulster changed after 1625, and the ministers preached under increasing restrictions. This came about through the influence of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, over Charles I. They were determined to tighten the control of the Established Church and this was reflected in Ireland.

To make matters worse, Wentworth (Earl of Strafford) was appointed to the Irish Vice-royalty and arrived in Dublin in 1633. He and his government began a reign of terror for Roman Catholics and Presbyterians alike. He followed Laud’s policy to the letter. The earlier “Articles of Religion” were set aside and the ministers were required to adopt a Confession of Faith embodying the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England. He further ordered the Act of Uniformity to be enforced against the ministers. This declared that every clergyman or minister celebrating any religious service other than that of the Established Church, every layman assisting at such a service and every person who opposed the liturgy of the Church, was liable on the third offense to confiscation of goods and imprisonment for life.

John M’Clelland, of Newtownards, was deposed but continued to preach, and was therefore excommunicated.

In 1636, Robert Blair, Robert Hamilton, John M’Clelland and John Livingstone organized a group of 140 Scottish settlers to emigrate to New England. They set sail in September, 1636, and when half way across, were driven back by storms. The ministers, to escape arrest, fled to Scotland, accompanied by many of their adherents. At this time Scotland had become a safe refuge.

The crowning blow to Ulster came in 1639 when the “Black Oath” was imposed. The clergy were required to read it from their pulpits and the people were forced to swear on their knees, if over age sixteen, to obey the King’s commands and to abjure and renounce the Covenant. The clergy were ordered to report on every Presbyterian in each parish. Some conformed. Landed proprietors such as the Hamiltons and the Montgomerys betrayed their faith and joined the persecutors. Great numbers, who could re-establish themselves in Scotland, returned there. As many as 500 at a time returned to Scotland for the Communion season.

This persecution and departure of many Scots from Ulster saved hundreds of lives during the Rebellion which broke out in 1641. The Roman Catholics, determined to exterminate the English, also hated the Presbyterians for settling on their forfeited land. They tortured and murdered thousands and drove others out of their homes to die of privation. Reprisals by the settlers, and a Scottish army sent to Ulster, were equally devastating.

Following the Rebellion, after 1652, the Presbyterians came from Scotland to Ulster in great numbers, owing to the unsettled conditions while Cromwell was attacking the Scottish Royalists. Some, who had fled Ulster during the early years of the Rebellion, returned after Scottish forces made their safety more assured. When peace was established, Cromwell at first held the Presbyterians suspect for having supported the Royalist cause. After a little time they were allowed to flourish and many of their ministers were permitted to preach under ecclesiastical control of the new State Church. By 1658, there were eighty congregations and seventy Presbyterian ministers organized into five Presbyteries and a General Synod.

The Presbyterians who were in Ulster in 1659, if settled in one of the counties of Antrim, Armagh, Donegal, Down, Fermanagh, Londonderry or Monaghan, are listed in A Census of Ireland, circa 1659, edited by Seamus Pender, Dublin, 1939. Records for the counties of Cavan and Tyrone are omitted, due to the fact that the original documents were not preserved.

Following the restoration of Charles II, in 1660, he who had pledged his loyalty to the Presbyterian Church when Scotland crowned him king, soon after his father’s execution in 1649, now betrayed his word. He and his Parliament returned the Established Church to power. Its lands and churches, taken by the Commonwealth Government, were restored to the extent they were owned in 1641, and the bishops with their clergy regained their positions.”
Person ID 
I0183 
McKinney and Stewart of Clarion County, Pennsylvania
Last Modified 
20 May 2010 

Father 
Archibald Stewart of Barclyee, Wigtownshire,   b. Abt 1550 
Family ID 
F0126 
Group Sheet

Family 
Frances Newcomen 
Married 
Abt 1610  [1] 
Children 
 
1. Catherine Stewart
>
2. Sir Alexander Stewart,   b. Abt 1616,   d. 3 Sep 1650, Killed at the battle of Dunbar, fighting on the royalist side against Cromwell.
 
3. John Stewart,   b. Abt 1618,   d. Oct 1649, Put to death after trying to escape from the defenders of Londonderry, Ireland
 
4. Robert Stewart,   b. Abt 1622
 
5. William Stewart,   b. Abt 1626
>
6. Thomas Stewart,   b. Abt 1630, Fort Stewart, County Donegal, Ireland

Family ID 
F0125 
Group Sheet

Photos

County Donegal, Ireland
This is the Stewart Grotto behind the Killydonnell Friary. The Friary was founded in 1471 by the O’Donnells for the Franciscan Friars on the site of an older church erected by the O’Tonners. The bilding and lands were granted at the Planation, in 1603, to Captain Basil Brooke.

County Donegal,Ireland
Ramelton

County Donegal, Ireland
Lough Swilly behind the third old house at Ramelton.

County Donegal, Ireland
The bridge at Ramelton.

See Stewart Caveat for rendering of the bridge around 1609 to 1622.

County Tyrone, Ireland
Castle at Newtown-Stewart

Aughentaine Castle, in Aghintain Townland, was built in 1618 by Sir William Stewart. In 1622 it is was described as a large Castle of Lyme & Stone, strong & defencible…about it is a Bawne of lyme & stone, 211foot long, 112 foot broad & 10 foot high, with Flanckers”. Only fragments of this 17th century fortified house remain. It was destroyed in 1641 and never rebuilt. The west wall stands to full height and there are some fireplaces at the higher levels. The building was three storeys high plus attic. The main block is aligned E-W and is about 17m by 10m externally.

A wing about 6m square projects from the middle of the north wall. In the angle between this wing and the W portion of the main building there is a fine Scottish-type corbel, with 12 courses of corbels. This carries the remains of a circular stairwell which rises from first floor level.

County Tyrone, Ireland
Castle at Newtown-Stewart

On the Mount-Stewart property Sir William Stewart built the great castle of Aughentaine, which was destroyed during the disturbances which broke out in 1641.

County Tyrone, Ireland
Castle at Newtown-Stewart

On the Mount-Stewart property Sir William Stewart built the great castle of Aughentaine, which was destroyed during the disturbances which broke out in 1641.

County Donegal, Ireland
In 1611 Sir William Stewart built Fort Stewart as a defence along the shores of Lough Swilly. When another planter Sir Richard Hansard moved to Lifford, Stewart acquired Hansard’s Ramelton estates.

In 1623 he was made a baronet and granted the castle of Ramelton, becoming the biggest landowner in the town. He also gained valuable fishing rights on Lough Swilly.

Donegal had become a county in 1585, and Sir William Stewart was one of the county’s three members of parliament during the period 1613-15 and again in 1634. He is also credited with building part of Letterkenny town, and with the formation of the “Lagganeers” or Laggan army: this force were victorious at the battle of Glenmaquin, defeating Sir Phelim O?Neill in 1641. The Stewarts of Ramelton are buried in their family vault at Killydonnell Franciscan Friary, between Letterkenny and Ramelton.

Documents

County Donegal, Ireland
Land Ownership in 1618

Histories

The Plantation of Ulster.
In a figurative sense the term “Plantation” is applied to the establishment of new colonies of English, Welsh and Scots in Ireland, chiefly carried out by Elizabeth and James I. The preliminary ground work was, however, laid by Henry VIII, and the first steps were taken during the reigns of Edward VI and Mary.

Sources 
1. [S02864] The Stewart Society, 17 Dublin Street, Edinburgh.
2. [S02856] The Irish Times, Saturday, November 10, 1940

Mary Stewart1
F, #27914, b. circa 1677, d. 4 October 1765
Hon. Mary Stewart|b. c 1677\nd. 4 Oct 1765|p2792.htm#i27914|William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy||p2792.htm#i27913|Hon. Mary Coote||p25242.htm#i252415|Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt.|d. 3 Sep 1650|p33068.htm#i330678|Catherine Newcomen|d. 8 Dec 1714|p15262.htm#i152616|Richard Coote, 1st Lord Coote, Baron of Coloony|b. 1620\nd. 10 Jul 1683|p12954.htm#i129532|Mary St. George|d. 5 Nov 1701|p12954.htm#i129533|

Last Edited=19 Jan 2009
     Hon. Mary Stewart was born circa 1677.2 She married, firstly, Phineas Preston in 1692 at Mountjoy, Ireland.2,1 She married, secondly, Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard, son of Arthur Forbes, 2nd Earl of Granard and Mary Rawdon, in 1709.1 She died on 4 October 1765.1 She was also reported to have died on 4 October 1758.2
     She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.1,2 From 1692, her married name became Preston.2 From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston
Jane Preston+2 b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
Mary Preston2 b. 1696, d. 1749
Colonel John Preston+2 b. 1699, d. 1747
Nathaniel Preston2 b. c 1700
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard
Lady Mary Forbes1 d. 27 Nov 1797
Lt.-Gen. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard+1 b. 15 Mar 1710, d. 16 Oct 1769

William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy1
M, #27913
William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy||p2792.htm#i27913|Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt.|d. 3 Sep 1650|p33068.htm#i330678|Catherine Newcomen|d. 8 Dec 1714|p15262.htm#i152616|Sir William Stewart, 1st Bt.||p25.htm#i244||||Sir Robert Newcomen, 4th Bt.|d. 12 Aug 1677|p15262.htm#i152617|Anne Boleyn||p15262.htm#i152618|

Last Edited=19 Jan 2009
     William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy married Hon. Mary Coote, daughter of Richard Coote, 1st Lord Coote, Baron of Coloony and Mary St. George.1
     He was the son of Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt. and Catherine Newcomen.2 He succeeded to the title of 3rd Baronet Stewart, of Ramalton, co. Donegal [I., 1623] on 3 September 1650.1 He was created 1st Viscount Mountjoy, of co. Tyrone [Ireland] on 19 March 1682/83.3 He was created 1st Baron Stewart of Ramalton, co. Donegal [Ireland] on 19 March 1682/83.3
Children of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy
William Stewart, 2nd Viscount Mountjoy+4 d. 10 Jan 1727/28
Hon. Alexander Stewart+5
Children of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote
Hon. Catherine Stewart+
Hon. Mary Stewart+6 b. c 1677, d. 4 Oct 1765
Citations
1. [S37] Charles Mosley, editor, Burke’s Peerage, Baronetage & Knightage, 107th edition, 3 volumes (Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books) Ltd, 2003), volume 1, page 893. Hereinafter cited as Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition.
2. [S6] G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume IX, page 349. Hereinafter cited as The Complete Peerage.
3. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 350.
4. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume IX, page 351.
5. [S6] Cokayne, and others, The Complete Peerage, volume II, page 192.
6. [S37] Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 107th edition, volume 2, page 1628.
Hon. Mary Stewart1
F, #27914, b. circa 1677, d. 4 October 1765
Hon. Mary Stewart|b. c 1677\nd. 4 Oct 1765|p2792.htm#i27914|William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy||p2792.htm#i27913|Hon. Mary Coote||p25242.htm#i252415|Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt.|d. 3 Sep 1650|p33068.htm#i330678|Catherine Newcomen|d. 8 Dec 1714|p15262.htm#i152616|Richard Coote, 1st Lord Coote, Baron of Coloony|b. 1620\nd. 10 Jul 1683|p12954.htm#i129532|Mary St. George|d. 5 Nov 1701|p12954.htm#i129533|

Last Edited=19 Jan 2009
     Hon. Mary Stewart was born circa 1677.2 She married, firstly, Phineas Preston in 1692 at Mountjoy, Ireland.2,1 She married, secondly, Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard, son of Arthur Forbes, 2nd Earl of Granard and Mary Rawdon, in 1709.1 She died on 4 October 1765.1 She was also reported to have died on 4 October 1758.2
     She was the daughter of William Stewart, 1st Viscount Mountjoy and Hon. Mary Coote.1,2 From 1692, her married name became Preston.2 From 1709, her married name became Forbes. As a result of her marriage, Hon. Mary Stewart was styled as Countess of Granard on 24 August 1734.
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Phineas Preston
Jane Preston+2 b. c 1690, d. a 12 Nov 1746
Mary Preston2 b. 1696, d. 1749
Colonel John Preston+2 b. 1699, d. 1747
Nathaniel Preston2 b. c 1700
Children of Hon. Mary Stewart and Vice-Admiral George Forbes, 3rd Earl of Granard
Lady Mary Forbes1 d. 27 Nov 1797
Lt.-Gen. George Forbes, 4th Earl of Granard+1 b. 15 Mar 1710, d. 16 Oct 1769

Sir William Stewart, 1st Bt.1
M, #244

Last Edited=19 Jan 2009
     His will was probated in 1647.2
     Sir William Stewart, 1st Bt. was Captain of the company of 100 Scottish soldiers in June 1608 in Ireland.2 He was invested as a Knight in 1613.2 He was created 1st Baronet Stewart, of Ramalton, co. Donegal [Ireland] in 1623.1
Children of Sir William Stewart, 1st Bt.
Anne Stewart+1
Sir Alexander Stewart, 2nd Bt.+2 d. 3 Sep 1650

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Drew Benton Is Kin To The Napoleons

Rosamond Press

Last week I came upon a youtube video of a man visiting the grave of Catherine Charlotte Bonaparte Benton. I believe this was her son, Prince Frederick Joseph Benton the great great grandson of King Joseph Napoleon Bonaparte. Last night I looked at his genealogy and found his relation to Senator Thomas Hart Benton, and Drew Benton. whose grandfather was Carl Janke, the owner of Belmont Soda Works, and owner of a German Theme Park that predates Disneyland. I am in touch with the Belmont Historical Society and am giving them astonishing proof they will own amazing history that will put them on the map, and make them a premiere historic city, that was co-founded by Count Cipriani. I see a new theme park in their future. When my sister, Christine Rosamond Presco, married the muralist, Garth Benton, a artistic dynasty was born. This creative couple did not know we…

View original post 6,042 more words

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McDowell and Dew

Maybe one day my daughter, Heather Hanson, will realize Family Trees – ARE HUGE – and no power on earth can replace these trees. Heather is the cousin of Drew Benton, whose ancestor is Captain John McDowell.

John

https://macdougall.org/macdowalls-of-galloway/

McDowell or MacDowell is a Scottish surname, derived from the Gaelic Mac Dubhghaill, meaning “son of Dubhghall” (i.e. of the same origin as McDougall).

MCDOUGALL

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_MacDowall

Dubhghall mac Ruaidhrí (died 1268) was a leading figure in the thirteenth-century Kingdom of the Isles.[note 1] He was a son of Ruaidhrí mac Raghnaill, and thus a member of Clann Ruaidhrí.

Dubhghall was active in Ireland, and is recorded to have conducted military operations against the English in Connacht. In 1259, the year after his victory over the English Sheriff of Connacht, Dubhghall’s daughter was married to Aodh na nGall Ó Conchobhair, son of the reigning King of Connacht. This woman’s tocher consisted of a host of gallowglass warriors commanded by Dubhghall’s brother, Ailéan. This record appears to be the earliest notice of such soldiers in surviving sources. The epithet borne by Dubhghall’s son-in-law—na nGall—can be taken to mean “of the Hebrideans”, and appears to refer to the Hebridean military support that contributed to his success against the English.

Dubhghall mac Ruaidhrí – Wikipedia

Ember Rosamond Dew | Rosamond Press

Elizabeth Preston McDowell (1794–1854) • FamilySearch

Capt. John McDowell among area’s first settlers (newsleader.com)

Ephraim McDowell, his sons, John and James, his son-in-law James Greenlee, the accompanying families of those men, and at least one indentured servant had sailed from Ulster in the north of Ireland on the ship “George and Ann.” The voyage across the Atlantic to Philadelphia was an unusually long one, 118 days.

The family did not linger too long in Pennsylvania. Lured by inexpensive land on the Virginia frontier, son James McDowell, soon came to Augusta County and established a farm near Woods Gap (now Jarman’s Gap). Perhaps it was Ephraim’s son James or the McDowell’s kinsman John Lewis that recommended that the entire family migrate south into the Valley of Virginia.

So by September 1737 the family was camped out along Linville Creek in what is now Rockingham County. Their plan was to acquire land in the Beverley tract around what eventually became Staunton. Soon a chance encounter would change the course of their lives. A man named Benjamin Borden entered their camp and asked to spend the night. He was the beneficiary of a 100,000-acre land grant in what is now southern Augusta County and northern Rockbridge, but he needed help surveying his holdings. John McDowell, who was a surveyor, struck a bargain with Borden whereby McDowell would survey the tract in exchange for 1,000 acres of land.

Elizabeth Lee (Blair) (1818 – 1906) – Genealogy (geni.com)

CHAPTER 57

The Tracy Family History
our famous cousins

Jessie Fremont

“I am like a deep ship, I drive best under a strong wind.”




This is the family tree of Jessie Benton Fremont; these are the six generations of Jessie Benton Fremont

Michael Woods, Sr., of Blair Park married Lady Mary Campbell of Argyle, from the mighty Campbell clan. They had a daughter…

Magdalene Woods, the great beauty (sister to my 6th  great grandmother Martha Woods) whose second marriage to Benjamin Borden, Jr., would make her one of the wealthiest women in America. They had a son…

James McDowell, Sr., who married Elizabeth Cloyd. They had a son…

Capt. James McDowell, Jr., who married Sarah Preston. They had a daughter…

Elizabeth (You will note that the name Elizabeth carries down through the generations.) McDowell, a “lovely” Southern Belle, who married US Senator Thomas Hart Benton. They had a daughter…

Jessie Hart Benton, a Southern Belle, who married Gen. John Charles Fremont, “the Pathfinder.”

My mother’s definition of a Southern Belle

Young, vivacious, charming, with many suitors. The most popular girl at a ball. From an upper-class family. Note: A “great beauty” is one class above a “Southern Belle.”

Text Box:
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    Our cousin, Jessie Benton Fremont, was even more than a Southern Belle. She came from a long line of aristocrats with all the cultural traits that comes with that title. From her mother’s side she learned elegance, sophistication. She was idealistic, with great passion and energy. Above all, she was… ambitious.
    Her mother was spoiled rotten. Elizabeth McDowell was well bred, delicate with gentile manners. She summered at the White Sulphur Springs Resort and wintered in Richmond. Her relations were the governors, senators, and congressmen. As late as the 1880s the family still counted two senators and six congressmen. These were the uncles, cousins, and brothers. That does not include their other nobles.
    She traveled in a custom London-built coach with an interior of scarlet leather, accompanied by a footmen and maid. When traveling by coach in Virginia she could stop almost anywhere and visit relatives at their “great estates.” Trailing behind the carriage would be a mule drawn wagon loaded with baggage.
    “Staunton was also a great thoroughfare for travelers going to and returning from the Virginia springs. During the “spring season,” the town was alive with stagecoaches, besides the private carriages in which many wealthy people traveled. Some of the latter and all of the former were drawn by four horses, and occasionally there was a quite a display of “liveried servants.” (The movies never show these magnificent carriages always being trailed behind with an old mule drawn baggage wagon. I never saw this scene in “Gone With the Wind.”)
    This was her world. They were our people, also… a long time ago.
    Elizabeth and her husband hated slavery. When Elizabeth’s father died she freed the 40 family slaves. This hatred of slavery would carry through the family.
    The romance between Elizabeth McDowell and Thomas Hart Benton is a classic study in opposites attracting. Benton was a frontier brawler, burly, pugnacious and boisterous. In their earlier days, he and his brother, Jesse (for whom Jessie was named) got into a brawl with Andrew Jackson and his friends. Everyone emerged alive after Jesse put a bullet into Jackson’s shoulder. Although the fight took place in a bar room, it was in an elegant hotel. One of the bullets went through the wall and into a room with a mother and her baby. It is not recorded how close the bullet came to the baby. However, no mother likes a bullet fired in anger entering her baby’s room.
    Benton pursed the Southern Belle for many years. She finally agreed to marry him when she was at the advanced age of 27. He was older. She agreed to the marriage only after he had attained an acceptable social position and was elected US Senator from Missouri.
    Elizabeth did not like the idea of giving up five generations of Virginia aristocracy to live on the wild Missouri frontier. She soon learned to love her adopted country. Such was the wealth that Elizabeth brought to the marriage that the family lived between St. Louis, Virginia, and Washington D.C. They would travel with all the servants money could provide. This shows the immense wealth that flowed from Magdelene.
    It was into this family, on their plantation in Lexington, Virginia, that Jessie Benton was born in 1824. This was in the middle of our Woods-Wallace country. Jessie grew up among the powerful in Washington D.C. When her father visited with President Jackson at the White House, Jessie would sit by the president’s side. The president would run his hand through her curly hair.
    Andrew and Thomas were now good friends and allies in politics. They laughed about the feud they had so many years before. It is said that no one could become a friend of Andrew Jackson unless they first had a fight with him.
    To show you how history interconnects, this was the same Andy Jackson, who as a teenager helped to nurse the wounded after the Battle of Waxhaws. This was the battle where Jessie’s kin, Capt. Adam Wallace, was “hacked to pieces.”
    Her mother developed poor health. This propelled Jessie, at a very young age, into the social whirl of Washington D.C. Not only did she attend parties but she also acted as the social hostess for the events given for her Senator father.
    Highly educated, she spoke both French and Spanish fluently. Her features at the age of 15:  Her figure was slender. She had an oval face even described as being classic, dark eyes, knockout red hair. She was a classic Southern Belle.
    It was at this tender age, for Jessie now an experienced young woman, that she gave a party to which was invited John C. Fremont. He was 11 years older, handsome, and well known for completing several western expeditions. They fell in love at first sight.
    The parents were not pleased with the romance. Fremont had no money or social position, and he was of illegitimate birth. Jessie, as you will see, had a mind of her own. Her actions were considered unacceptable for a young lady of her social standing. Southern girls were expected to know their place and stay in that place. At the age of 17, they eloped and had a secret marriage.
    The secret marriage was all anyone talked about in Washington. Her father was furious when he found out about it. Jessie, with great dramatics, left her father’s house on the arm of her new husband.
    Cousin Jessie was an ambitious young woman, now married to an ambitious young man, and she had an ambitious father. She had everything going for her: beauty, intelligence, experience, and all of the right social and political connections. They were now the most sought after couple in Washington for parties, balls, social and political gatherings. They were a “handsome pair.”
    In the frontier days it seems that all parents objected to their daughter’s choice of husbands, and all the daughters eloped. Then the parents would forgive and forget.

Rosamond Clifford Dew

Posted on October 31, 2019 by Royal Rosamond Press

What are the odd that I would find the name Rosamond in the genealogy of Robert Dew who is the father of my unborn granddaughter that I wanted to be named after My mother, Rosemary Rosamond, and aunt, Lillian Rosamond. This is pure prophecy! What more could a father-writer ask for! I m positive the Dews did not know they were kin to royalty.

John Presco

Copyright 2019

Dew-Hatfield Benham-O’Sullivan Tree
Public Member Tree
5 attached records, 5 sources  
Rosamond Clifford Tomkyns Dew
Birth:  dd mm 1887 – city, London, England
Death:  date – Shropshire, EnglandF:Tomkyns DewM:Ada Isab

Tomkyns Dew

M, #648334Last Edited=14 Oct 2018     Tomkyns Dew is the son of Tomkyns Dew and Anne Styleman. He married Margaret Beatrice Napleton, daughter of Reverend Timothy Napleton and Decima Green.

Children of Tomkyns Dew and Margaret Beatrice Napleton

Child of Tomkyns Dew

https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/pubmembertrees/?name=Tomkyns_Dew

https://genealogy.links.org/links-cgi/readged?/home/ben/camilla-genealogy/current+!0:131451+2-2-0-1-0

http://www.thepeerage.com/p64834.htm#i648334

The Glory That Was Garthland

Posted on June 6, 2013 by Royal Rosamond Press

garthland3
garthland4
garthland44
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garthland666

Jessie and John Fremont appear to have named their son, Frank Preston Fremont after Francis “Frank” Preston Blair whose daughter, Elizabeth Blair, was very close to Mary Todd. Elizabeth married a cousin of General Lee. The Todd family were prominent in Kentucky where the Preston family reigned. Mary Todd was a Scarlet. Mary and Sarah McDowell, the mother of Jessie Benton, have grandfathers named Samuel McDowell. Whether they are related, needs to investigated, because Jessie and Mary are mirror images of each other, and were Flowers of the South. How they came to wed two abolitionist candidates for the Republican Party – connected to the Blair family – needs to scrutinized, because the Fremonts had a falling out with the Blair family that led to their ruin.

I suspect Mary Todd saw the Fremonts as usurpers, and when Jessie made her anti-Slavery views public record, the Southern Bells who are close kin, turned their back on her. Did they do the same to Mary Todd? I suspect not because Abe was for a slow ending of slavery and the deportation of blacks to their own country he would help found. Lincoln was into nation building for blacks. Were all those Kentucky Colonels behind Lincoln’s secret plan, thanks to Mary’s kindred?

When Fremont emancipated the slaves of Missouri I am sure the Preston family went ballistic and came to Mary Todd for solace. The idea these Belles would be surrounded by freed blacks, must have been revolting. Surely they talked amongst themselves. Surely Abe overheard their conversations, and shuttered. Jessie and her husband were drummed out of the South – and the North. Their power in the West was stripped from them. But Lincoln;s hand was forced. The Radical Republicans, and the foreign Forty-Eighters, could muster votes.

My kindred erected a monument to James McDowell whose family fled Ireland to America. The McDowell family are of the Clan McDougal. They appear to be Peckerwoods, redheads, Irish-Scotts. The captain of the ship they were on tried to starve the McDowells to death in order to get their money. Like the Rosamond family, the McDowells fought at the battle of Boyne. They backed William of Orange.

I think I will wear the McDowell Clan Tartan at the coming Scottish games. I am a tireless supporter of the Fremonts and their lost history.

Above are the ruins of Garthland, ancestral home of the McDowells. There is a O’Hara clan that mentions Scarlet O’Hara in the fiction ‘Gone With The Wind’. Jessie and her mother were the real Scarlet. Was Garth Benton named after Garthland. I will try to get a fund going to save Garthland.

Above is a portrait of Elizabeth Graham of Airth, Wife of William MacDowall of Castle Semple and Garthland by William Mosman.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

http://leomcdowell.tripod.com/id27.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Macdowall

This Monument
is erected to their grandparents, James and Sarah McDowell, by the surviving children of Susan P. Taylor, Elizabeth Benton, and James McDowell, in the year 1855.

http://home.comcast.net/~davidmartin/ppl/a/b/abc80ae0c8a698883d5.html

Ephriam McDowell was descended from Somerled (or Somervil), Lord of the Isles, then from his son Dougall who founded the Clan of Dougall or MacDougal, one of the eldest of the fifty-two Highland Clans proper. In the coat of arms of the McDougals or McDowells ins quartered the lymphiad or ancient four-eared galley found in the armorial bearings of the clans of the western part of Scotland.

Ephriam’s family fled from Scotland to Ireland and settled near Londonberry. Ephriam was born in 1672 in Londonberry County. He was only sixteen years of age when on December 9, 1688, McDonell of Antrim approached the walls of Londonberry. Ephriam went to the defense of the heroic town and assisted in closing the gates against the intruders. He also fought against the forces of James II at Boyne River.

http://home.comcast.net/~davidmartin/ppl/a/b/abc80ae0c8a698883d5.html

http://www.irishgathering.ie/clan_info.asp?clanID=562

Ephraim’s father (Abraham McDowal [1648]) left Scotland with his father, Joseph “the Calvinist” and with his family during the period of the English Civil Wars (abt. 1650). The name Mc Dowell is a modification of the Gaelic: Mac Dhu ghall, or MacDougal, meaning son or descendant of the dark stranger or Dane. The name was given over ten centuries ago to Norse settlers in Galloway, Scotland and the descendants of a son of Prince Fergus and Princess Elizabeth de Galloway, daughter of King Henry I of England.

Ephraim McDowell was one of the apprentice boys who shut the gates to Londonderry at the siege of Londonderry at the age of 16, and later fought at the Battle of Boyne River, in 1690. His brother, John, supposedly died during the Siege, but may have been confused with brother Charles, of which little is known, other than the fact that the three brothers were present at the Siege of Londonderry in 1689

http://www.lochwinnoch.info/history/local-tales/the-glory-that-was-garthland

Sadly the historic house is now but a shell of its former self. Today it lies derelict, abandoned and boarded-up in woodlands now overgrown and neglected. Yet still the old mansion clings tenaciously to its proud history. Even in the midst of its devastation it is not difficult to imagine Garthland in all its architectural and horticultural glory.

Known originally as Garpel House then Barr House before becoming Garthland House, the regal residence was acquired by the Macdowall family who came initially from Garthland in Wigtownshire and were descended from the Lords of Galloway. During the mid-1930s, Henry Macdowall sold it to the Mill Hill Foreign Missionary Society that was founded. Garthland House was renamed St Jospeh’s College by the Society and, during its heyday, around 30 young men were students there.

Elizabeth Graham of Airth, Wife of William MacDowall of Castle Semple and Garthland
by William Mosman

Elizabeth Lee (Blair) (1818 – 1906) – Genealogy (geni.com)

Elizabeth Lee (Blair)
Birthdate:June 30, 1818
Birthplace:Lexington, Franklin, Kentucky
Death:September 13, 1906 (88)
Silver Spring, MD, United States 
Place of Burial:Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Arlington County, Virginia, USA
Immediate Family:Daughter of Francis Preston Blair and Elizabeth Violet Howard Blair
Wife of Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee
Mother of Sen. Francis Preston Blair Lee, Sr.
Sister of Montgomery Blair, U.S. Postmaster GeneralJuliet BlairJames Blair and Sen. Maj. Gen. Francis Preston Blair, (D-MO)
Managed by:Tina Marie Brown
Last Updated:August 7, 2020

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Historical records matching Elizabeth Lee

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Elizabeth Lee (born Blair) in WikiTree

Elizabeth Lee in Biographical Summaries of Notable People

Elizabeth Lee in The Daily Morning Journal and Courier – Sep 19 …

Elizabeth Lee in The Fargo Forum and Daily Republican – Sep 27 1906

Elizabeth Lee in The Independent – Sep 20 1906

Elizabeth Lee in The Springfield Herald – Sep 28 1906

Elizabeth Lee in Rocky Ford Enterprise – Sep 21 1906

Elizabeth Lee in Camden Democrat – Sep 15 1906

Elizabeth Blair Lee in Famous People Throughout History

Elizabeth Lee in The Boston Herald – Sep 15 1906

Elizabeth Lee in The Boston Transcript – Sep 15 1906

Eliza Mrs Lee in FamilySearch Family Treeview all

Immediate Family

About Elizabeth Lee

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Blair_Lee

Elizabeth Blair Lee (born June 20, 1818, Kentucky; died September 13, 1906) was an American woman who lived through the American Civil War, and wrote hundreds of letters describing the events of the times to her husband, Samuel Philips Lee.

Biography

She was born in Kentucky to Francis Preston Blair and Eliza Violet Gist Blair. She was the sister of Montgomery Blair, Jessup Blair, and Francis Preston Blair, Jr. When the family moved to “Blair House” across the street from the White House, the President, Vice-President and Cabinet members were frequent guests. Elizabeth’s best friend was President Jackson’s young niece who was serving as First Lady for her uncle, whose wife had died. Elizabeth lived in the White House one winter because of her health problems from dampness at Blair House.

According to one version of the story, Elizabeth was present with her father when they chanced upon the silver-flecked spring which would inspire the name of the family’s summer home in what would eventually become Silver Spring, Maryland. The spring site is memorialized at Silver Spring’s Acorn Park though the water source was disrupted in the 1950’s.

She married Rear Adm. Samuel Phillips Lee, a US Navy commander in the Union Army during the Civil War. Her letters to her husband, who was away for long periods as commander of the USS Philadelphia, describe wartime life in her homes of Washington, D.C. and Silver Spring, Maryland, during the war. Elizabeth was the mother of Blair Lee, a US senator from Maryland.

Held DAR membership # 171

“Descendant of Gen Nathaniel Gist, of Maryland.”

Info added per DARs “Lineage Book of the Charter Members” by Mary S Lockwood and published 1895 stating:

“Nathaniel Gist was a colonel and brigdier of the Virginia Line.”

“Also descendant of Ann, mother of Archibald Cary, of Virginia, who was a member of the Committee of Correspondence in Virginia and of the Convention of 1776”

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Is Bobby Dew – Blood Royal?

Rosamond Clifford Dew
Posted on October 31, 2019 by Royal Rosamond Press

What are the odd that I would find the name Rosamond in the genealogy of Robert Dew who is the father of my unborn granddaughter that I wanted to be named after My mother, Rosemary Rosamond, and aunt, Lillian Rosamond. This is pure prophecy! What more could a father-writer ask for! I m positive the Dews did not know they were kin to royalty.

John Presco

Copyright 2019

Dew-Hatfield Benham-O’Sullivan Tree
Public Member Tree
5 attached records, 5 sources

Rosamond Clifford Tomkyns Dew
Birth: dd mm 1887 – city, London, England
Death: date – Shropshire, England

F: Tomkyns Dew
M: Ada Isab
Tomkyns Dew
M, #648334
Last Edited=14 Oct 2018
Tomkyns Dew is the son of Tomkyns Dew and Anne Styleman. He married Margaret Beatrice Napleton, daughter of Reverend Timothy Napleton and Decima Green.
Children of Tomkyns Dew and Margaret Beatrice Napleton
Major Frederick Napleton Dew+
Elizabeth Sophia Dew+
Child of Tomkyns Dew
Lucy Beatrice Dew+1 b. 1829, d. 1907
https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/pubmembertrees/?name=Tomkyns_Dew

https://genealogy.links.org/links-cgi/readged?/home/ben/camilla-genealogy/current+!0:131451+2-2-0-1-0

https://gw.geneanet.org/frebault?lang=en&n=dew&oc=0&p=tomkyns

http://www.thepeerage.com/p64834.htm#i648334

Rosamond Press

I woke up from my old man’s nap and looked at declaring ny unborn granddaughter to be of Royal Blood. I was prepared to bring forth John Wilson, to do battle with the Witches of San Rafael and Salem. I had left a message on Bobby Dew’s FB telling him his child was going to be my grandchild. I ask…….”Are you qualified?” There is a very good chance Bobby is related to the Plantagenets. We are kin to the Cliffords. I found a Rosamond Clifford Tomkyn that led me to the most Royal Family of Britain. When I went do Sonoma for my second visit I brought a genealogical book. My big fight with Heather Hanson, was that she was – choosing men beneath her! This is a dream come true. Our War of the Roses……..is over! Peace!

The name Dew come from Eu……….d’Ue.

John Presco

Copyright 2019

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/02/13/dna-links/

Four…

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The Irish Rose of Windlesore

A Rose Amongst The Woodwose

by

John Presco

Copyright 2021

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

CHAPTER TWO

The Irish Rose of Windlesore

 And the king of Connaught shall accept hostages from all whom the lord king of England has committed to him, and he shall himself give hostages at the will of the king.

Not but an hour had passed, and John Wilson is picking out his kinfolk in the crowd. They are all represented in the New World, the children of the founders of New Windsor, that was called ‘Windlesore’. Owning a love for words, John saw this name….ROSEWINDLE! His father and grandfather, both named William, talked endlessly about the treaty King Henry the Second made with the High King of Ireland, Hostages were exchanged. Henry could not keep his eyes off her the princess named Rose, and he rode to his camp at Woodstock. Ruaidhrí Ó Conchobhair had tried to hide his sixteen-year-old daughter as King Henry strolled amongst his children choosing this one, then that one. Henry spotted her right away. There was a glow about her even though she moved like the moon around the earth doing her best to not be seen. She fought back her tears as King Ruasidhri chose one of Henry’s daughters, for this was getting very serious. This is why the King of England chose Rose, last. He signaled to his men to hasten the retreat. Everyone could hear the crying of the Rose Princess, who would be captured in a clever labyrinth made for the Irish Hostages at Windlesore, lest the High King change his mind, and come for his daughter.

William Wilson the first, was granted a cote of arms after coming into a large inheritance from his father, Sir Thomas Wilson, who was a close councilor to Queen Elizabeth. Legend had it that the Protestant Queen made Thomas her Master Spy because he knew many languages. Elizabeth was determined to destroy the Habsburg Emperor who had found NEVER-ENDING TREASURE in the New World and had built a monolithic structure from where his Papal Knights would set out to overcome the world. Elizabeth wanted her own capitol, and thus she bid Thomas to see if he could intercept, or capture a Spanish ship laden with gold. Thomas allowed himself to be captured, and tortured. He was chained to an ore on a Spanish Gallion. The captain overheard Thomas giving lessons in English Rhetoric in perfect Spanish, and made Wilson his confidant. They became fast friends. When Sir Francis Drake captured the ship, he was hearing a wealth of un-ending information that led to the capture of two gold laden vessels heading to Spain from the New World.

Appearing before the Queen, Thomas was bid to elevate his kinfolk, and marry as many allies as possible. The Webb family is kin to the Wilson family in many ways – as well as the Shakespear family. It is alleged Thomas began the play ‘The Merry Wives of Windsor’ that his son William inherited. Then it was passed on the Willaim Shakespeare for finishing touches. John was told as a teenager the character in this play, are his close relatives who have to remain anonymous until it is safe to reveal them. It is alleged they all shared a NEVER-ENDING TREASURE and thus these words are written on the copperplate of John’s father in Saint Georges Cathedral. What was written on his great-grandfather’s plate, was lost, for no sooner was it laid with a great stone set, a gang of robbers broke into the cathedral, removed the Wilson Stone, and did extensive digging.

As John Wilson shook the hand of Alexander Webb, he beheld the gling in his eye, that asked;

“Did Thomas found a lost colony in New England, or, did he go to California with Drake?”

———————————–

The key to all these mysteries, and lost treasures, is identifying the character Falstaff. After World War One there was an Anti-German Crusade in America that eradicated most of the German worlds from the play that Shakespeare, loathed. Is it possible he did not write the Merry Wives of Windsor? While researching the history of Windsor I discovered another ROSE LINE amongst the Royals of Ireland, from where my Rosamond ancestors, hail. I made this discovery this morning on 12-30-21. For over twenty-five years I have been searching for the reason why Joan Clifford was called Rosamond. I have wondered why the Clifford family have not really – owned her. The English have a long history of making – everything their own – especially if they have failed to overcome peoples and their history. Queen Elizabeth was a master at this as she was The Leader of the Protestant Heresy in the Isles.

I am going to try to sell ‘A Rose Amongst The Woodwose’ as a series. There is too much here for one movie. Perhaps a Trilogy? I will contact Barbara Broccoli. I would like to SERALIZE my story in my newspaper-blog Royal Rosamond Press, because there is a Never-ending Treasure of Information.

John Presco

President Royal Rosamond Press.

Treaty of Windsor (1386) – Wikipedia

The Treaty of Windsor (1175) was a territorial agreement made during the time of the Norman invasion of Ireland.[1] It was signed in Windsor, Berkshire by King Henry II of England and the High King of IrelandRory O’Connor.

titles were changed and given more English-sounding names, including the royal family’s from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor. Kaiser Wilhelm II (who as Queen Victoria and Prince Albert’s eldest grandson was a member of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha through his mother, and who had been in line of succession to the British throne)[17] countered this by jokingly saying that he wanted to see a command performance of “The Merry Wives of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.


Treaty of Windsor (1175) – Wikipedia

Overall, the agreement left O’Connor with a kingdom consisting of Ireland outside the provincial kingdom of Leinster (as it was then), Dublin and a territory from Waterford Dungarvan, as long as he paid tribute to Henry II, and owed fealty to him. All of Ireland was also subject to the new religious provisions of the papal bull Laudabiliter and the Synod of Cashel (1172).[citation needed]

O’Connor was obliged to pay one treated cow hide for every ten cattle. The other “kings and people” of Ireland were to enjoy their lands and liberties so long as they remained faithful to the kings of England, and were obliged to pay their tribute in hides through O’Connor.[2]

The witnesses were Richard of IlchesterBishop of WinchesterGeoffreyBishop of ElyLaurence O’TooleArchbishop of DublinWilliam, Earl of EssexJusticiar Richard de Luci; Geoffrey de Purtico, Reginald de Courtenea (Courtenay) and three of Henry’s court chaplains.

The Annals of Tigernach recorded that: “Cadla Ua Dubthaig came from England from the Son of the Empress, having with him the peace of Ireland, and the kingship thereof, both Foreigner and Gael, to Ruaidhrí Ó Conchobhair, and to every provincial king his province from the king of Ireland, and their tributes to Ruaidhrí.” The Annals also listed the ongoing violence in Ireland at the time.[3] The text reveals a misunderstanding of the scope of the treaty and the matters agreed by the two kings that soon proved fatal to the peace of Ireland. Henry saw O’Connor as his subordinate within the feudal system, paying him an annual rent on behalf of all his sub-kings; O’Connor saw himself as the restored High King of Ireland, subject only to a very affordable annual tribute to Henry

“This is the agreement which was made at Windsor in the octaves of Michaelmas [October 6] in the year of Our Lord 1175, between Henry, king of England, and Roderic [Rory], king of Connaught, by Catholicus, archbishop of Tuam, Cantordis, abbot of Clonfert, and Master Laurence, chancellor of the king of Connaught, namely: The king of England has granted to Roderic [Rory], his liegeman, king of Connacht, as long as he shall faithfully serve him, that he shall be king under him, ready to his service, as his man. And he shall hold his land as fully and as peacefully as he held it before the lord king entered Ireland, rendering him tribute. And that he shall have all the rest of the land and its inhabitants under him and shall bring them to account [justiciet eos], so that they shall pay their full tribute to the king of England through him, and so that they shall maintain their rights. And those who are now in possession of their lands and rights shall hold them in peace as long as they remain in the fealty of the king of England, and continue to pay him faithfully and fully his tribute and the other rights which they owe to him, by the hand of the king of Connaught, saving in all things the right and honour of the king of England and of Roderic. And if any of them shall be rebels to the king of England and to Roderic and shall refuse to pay the tribute and other rights of the king of England by his hand, and shall withdraw from the fealty of the king of England, he, Roderic, shall judge them and remove them. And if he cannot answer for them by himself, the constable of the king of England in that land [Ireland] shall, when called upon by him, aid him to do what is necessary. And for this agreement the said king of Connaught shall render to the king of England tribute every year, namely, out of every ten animals slaughtered, one hide, acceptable to the merchants both in his land as in the rest; save that he shall not meddle with those lands which the lord king has retained in his lordship and in the lordship of his bat:ons; that is to say, Dublin with all its appurtenances; Meath with all its appurtenances, even as Murchat Ua Mailethlachlin [Murchadh 0′ Melaghlin] held it fully and freely [melius et plenius] or as others held it of him; Wexford with all its appurtenances, that is to say, the whole of Leinster; and Waterford with its whole territory from Waterford to Dungarvan, including Dungarvan with all its appurtenances. And if the Irish who have fled wish to return to the land of the barons of the king of England they may do so in peace, paying the said tribute as others pay it, or doing to the English the services which they were wont to do for their lands, which shall be decided by the judgment and will of their lords. And if any of them are unwilling to return and their lords have called upon the king of Connaught, he shall compel them to return to their land, so that they shall dwell there in peace. And the king of Connaught shall accept hostages from all whom the lord king of England has committed to him, and he shall himself give hostages at the will of the king. The witnesses are Robert, bishop of Winchester; Geoffrey, bishop of Ely; Laurence, archbishop of Dublin; Geoffrey Nicholas and Roger, the king’s chaplains; William, Earl of Essex; Richard de Luci; Geoffrey de Portico, and Reginald de Courteney.”

The treaty broke down very quickly, as O’Connor was unable to prevent Norman knights carving out new territories on a freelance basis, starting with assaults on Munster and Ulaid in 1177. For his part Henry was by now too distant to suppress them and was preoccupied with events in France. In 1177 he replaced William FitzAldelm with his 10-year-old son Prince John and named him as Lord of Ireland.

One of Ruadhrí’s first acts as King was to invade Leinster and expel its king, Dermot Mac Morrough. He then received hostages from all the major lordships and kings of Ireland to show their submission. However, his power base was still in his home Province of Connacht. Dublin was under the rule of Ascaill mac Ragnaill who had submitted to Ruadhrí.[10]

Children and descendants[edit]

The last of Ruaidrí’s descendants to hold the kingship of Connacht, Aedh mac Ruaidri Ua Conchobair, died in 1233. The Annals of Connacht give the following reason for this:Aed mac Ruaidri had been five years King of Connacht, as the poet said: ‘Aed mac Ruaidri of the swift onslaught, five years his rule over the province, till he fell— a loss on every frontier— by the hand of Fedlimid.’ Here ends the rule of the children of Ruaidri O Conchobair, King of Ireland. For the Pope offered him the title to [the kingship of] Ireland for himself and his seed for ever, and likewise six wives, if he would renounce the sin of adultery henceforth; and since he would not accept these terms God took the rule and sovranty from his seed for ever, in punishment for his sin.

[13]

The annals and genealogies list thirteen children fathered by Ruaidrí. There may have been more.

Rose Ní ConchobairPrincess of Connacht and IrelandLady of Meath, fl. 1180.

Rose was one of some thirteen children of King of IrelandRuaidrí Ua Conchobair. About 1180 she married Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath (before 1179 to 1186). De Lacy had five daughters and two sons by his first wife Rose de Monmouth. Rose Ní Conchobair was the mother of two more children, William Gorm de Lacy and Ysota de Lacy.

Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath – Wikipedia

King Henry’s ostensible grant of Meath to Lacy was not accepted by Tighearnán Ó Ruairc, King of Bréifne, who ruled it at that time. Ó Ruairc refused to concede, but parleyed with Lacy on the Hill of Ward, in Meath. After negotiations stalled, a dispute ensued in which an interpreter was killed by a blow aimed at Lacy, who fled; Ó Ruairc was killed by a spear-thrust as he mounted his horse, and he was decapitated. His head was impaled over the gate of Dublin Castle and was later sent to Henry II. The Annals of the Four Masters say that Ó Ruairc was treacherously slain. From the account given by Giraldus Cambrensis, it would appear that there was a plot to destroy Ó Ruairc.[3]

The Monk Gerald of Wales related the following legend of Féchín and Hugh de Lacy:

” Chapter LII (Of the mill which no women enter)

  • “There is a mill at Foure, in Meath, which St. Fechin made most miraculously with his own hands, in the side of a certain rock. No women are allowed to enter either this mill or the church of the saint; and the mill is held in as much reverence by the natives as any of the churches dedicated to the saint. It happened that when Hugh de Lacy was leading his troops through this place, an archer dragged a girl into the mill and there violated her. Sudden punishment overtook him; for being struck with infernal fire in the offending parts, it spread throughout his whole body, and he died the same night”.

In 1186 Hugh de Lacy was killed by Gilla-Gan-Mathiar O’Maidhaigh, while he was supervising the construction of a Motte castle at Durrow at the instigation of An tSionnach and O’Breen.[4] Prince John was promptly sent over to Ireland to take possession of his lands.

Rohese of Monmouth (Rohese de Monemue in Anglo-Norman; born about 1135/1140; died in or near 1180) was the daughter of Baderon fitzWilliam, lord of Monmouth, and of his wife Rohese de Clare. About the year 1155 Rohese married Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath. They had eight children

Rohese de Clare (bef. 1166) was a member of the wealthy and powerful de Clare family and a strong patron of Monmouth Priory.

Rohesia (Clare) de Monmouth (abt.1110-1149) | WikiTree FREE Family Tree

Rohesia (Rohese) “Rose” de Monmouth formerly Clare aka de Clare

Born about 1110 in Clare, Suffolk, England

Gilbert, born before 1066, was the second son and an heir of Richard Fitz Gilbert of Clare and Rohese Giffard.[1] He succeeded to his father’s possessions in England in 1088 when his father retired to a monastery;[2] his brother, Roger Fitz Richard, inherited his father’s lands in Normandy.[3] That same year he, along with his brother Roger, fortified his castle at Tonbridge against the forces of William Rufus. But his castle was stormed, Gilbert was wounded and taken prisoner.[4] However he and his brother were in attendance on king William Rufus at his death in August 1100.[4] He was with Henry I at his Christmas court at Westminster in 1101.[4]

Walter Giffard, Lord of Longueville, Normandy (a.k.a. ‘Giffard of Barbastre’), was a Norman baron, a Tenant-in-chief in England, a Christian knight who fought against the Saracens in Spain during the Reconquista and was one of the 15 or so known companions of William the Conqueror at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

Rose Ní ConchobairPrincess of Connacht and IrelandLady of Meath, fl. 1180.

Rose was one of some thirteen children of King of IrelandRuaidrí Ua Conchobair. About 1180 she married Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath (before 1179 to 1186). De Lacy had five daughters and two sons by his first wife Rose de Monmouth. Rose Ní Conchobair was the mother of two more children, William Gorm de Lacy and Ysota de Lacy.

Rose Ní Conchobair – Wikipedia

The traditional story recounts that King Henry adopted her as his mistress. To conceal his illicit amours from his queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine, he conducted them within the innermost recesses of a complicated maze which he caused to be made in his park at WoodstockOxfordshire. Rumours were heard by Queen Eleanor, and she contrived to penetrate the labyrinth, confronted her rival, and forced her to choose between the dagger and the bowl of poison; Rosamund chose the latter and died.[4][5]

Rosamund Clifford – Wikipedia

Eventually the wives tell their husbands about the series of jokes they have played on Falstaff, and together they devise one last trick which ends up with the Knight being humiliated in front of the whole town. They tell Falstaff to dress as “Herne, the Hunter” and meet them by an old oak tree in Windsor Forest (now part of Windsor Great Park). They then dress several of the local children, including Anne and William Page, as fairies and get them to pinch and burn Falstaff to punish him. Page plots to dress Anne in white and tells Slender to steal her away and marry her during the revels. Mistress Page and Doctor Caius arrange to do the same, but they arrange Anne shall be dressed in green. Anne tells Fenton this, and he and the Host arrange for Anne and Fenton to be married instead.

The title page from a 1565 printing of Giovanni Fiorentino’s 14th century tale, Il Pecorone.

The wives meet Falstaff, and almost immediately the “fairies” attack. Slender, Caius, and Fenton steal away their brides-to-be during the chaos, and the rest of the characters reveal their true identities to Falstaff.

The play’s date of composition is unknown; it was registered for publication in 1602, but was probably several years old by that date. In the Fairy pageant in Act 5 Scene 5 (lines 54–75), Mistress Quickly, as the Queen of the Fairies, gives a long speech giving an elaborate description of the Order of the Garter. The play also alludes to a German duke, who is generally thought to be Frederick I, Duke of Württemberg, who had visited England in 1592 and was elected to the Order of the Garter in 1597 (but was eventually only installed in Stuttgart on 6 November 1603).[3] These facts led commentators starting with Edmond Malone in 1790 to suggest that the play was written and performed for the Order of the Garter festival.[4] William Green suggests that the play was drawn up when George Carey, 2nd Baron Hunsdon, as Lord Chamberlain and patron of Shakespeare’s company, was elected Order of the Garter in April 1597.[5] If this is so, it was probably performed when Elizabeth I attended Garter Feast on 23 April.

Considering the Falstaff of The Merry Wives of Windsor in contrast to the Falstaff portrayed in the two Henry IV plays, Mark Van Doren states: “Only the husk of Falstaff’s voice is here.”[11] Harold Bloom refers to this Falstaff as “a nameless impostor masquerading as the great Sir John Falstaff.”[12] He adds:No longer either witty in himself or the cause of wit in other men, this Falstaff would make me lament a lost glory if I did not know him to be a rank impostor. His fascination, indeed, is that Shakespeare wastes nothing upon him. The Merry Wives of Windsor is Shakespeare’s only play that he himself seems to hold in contempt, even as he indites it.

[13]

That Shakespeare would so stumble with one of his greatest creations is puzzling and a satisfactory reason for this remains to be found. The most obvious explanation is that it was written very quickly. Leslie Hotson wrote that “it is certain that the play bears the earmarks of hasty writing.

During the period of anti-German feelings in England during World War I, many German names and titles were changed and given more English-sounding names, including the royal family’s from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor. Kaiser Wilhelm II (who as Queen Victoria and Prince Albert’s eldest grandson was a member of the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha through his mother, and who had been in line of succession to the British throne)[17] countered this by jokingly saying that he wanted to see a command performance of “The Merry Wives of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.

Francis Drake – Wikipedia

With the success of the Panama isthmus raid, in 1577 Elizabeth I of England sent Drake to start an expedition against the Spanish along the Pacific coast of the Americas. Drake acted on the plan authored by Sir Richard Grenville, who had received royal patent for it in 1574. Just a year later the patent was rescinded after protests from Philip of Spain.

Diego was once again employed under Drake; his fluency in Spanish and English would make him a useful interpreter when Spaniards or Spanish-speaking Portuguese were captured. He was employed as Drake’s servant and was paid wages, just like the rest of the crew.[46] Drake and the fleet set out from Plymouth on 15 November 1577, but bad weather threatened him and his fleet. They were forced to take refuge in Falmouth, Cornwall, from where they returned to Plymouth for repair.[53]

Rathlin Island massacre

Drake was present at the 1575 Rathlin Island massacre in Ireland. Acting on the instructions of Sir Henry Sidney and the Earl of Essex, Sir John Norreys and Drake laid siege to Rathlin Castle. Despite their surrender, Norreys’ troops killed all the 200 defenders and more than 400 civilian men, women and children of Clan MacDonnell.[51] Meanwhile, Drake was given the task of preventing any Gaelic Irish or Scottish reinforcements reaching the island. Therefore, the remaining leader of the Gaelic defence against English power, Sorley Boy MacDonnell, was forced to stay on the mainland. Essex wrote in his letter to Queen Elizabeth’s secretary, that following the attack Sorley Boy “was likely to have run mad for sorrow, tearing and tormenting himself and saying that he there lost all that he ever had.”[52]

Drake’s first raid was late in July 1572. Drake formed an alliance with the Cimarrons. Drake and his men captured the town and its treasure. When his men noticed that Drake was bleeding profusely from a wound, they insisted on withdrawing to save his life and left the treasure. Drake stayed in the area for almost a year, raiding Spanish shipping and attempting to capture a treasure shipment.

The most celebrated of Drake’s adventures along the Spanish Main was his capture of the Spanish Silver Train at Nombre de Dios in March 1573. He raided the waters around Darien (in modern Panama) with a crew including many French privateers including Guillaume Le Testu, a French buccaneer, and Maroons, enslaved Africans who had escaped from their Spanish slaveowners. One of these men was Diego, who under Drake became a free man; Diego was also a capable ship builder.[46] Drake tracked the Silver Train to the nearby port of Nombre de Dios. After their attack on the richly laden mule train, Drake and his party found that they had captured around 20 tons of silver and gold. They buried much of the treasure, as it was too much for their party to carry, and made off with a fortune in gold.[47][48] (An account of this may have given rise to subsequent stories of pirates and buried treasure). Wounded, Le Testu was captured and later beheaded. The small band of adventurers dragged as much gold and silver as they could carry back across some 18 miles of jungle-covered mountains to where they had left the raiding boats. When they got to the coast, the boats were gone. Drake and his men, downhearted, exhausted and hungry, had nowhere to go and the Spanish were not far behind.

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Stuttmeisters Expelled From Belmont

Rosamond Press

Odd Fellows Cemetery, San Francisco: Removal

Workers commence removal of ‘Odd Fellows’ remains. Note fence constructed to keep work from easy view. All of the headstones shown here, would have been discarded as no one had claimed them.

Odd Fellows Cemetery, San Francisco: Removal – Odd Fellows Cemetery – Colma

I tried to plant the history of my Stuttmeister relatives in Belmont, next to their kin, the Jankes – the Founders of Belmont – but was met with the most outrageous onslaught of lies and hostility from the Belmont Historical Society, in particular, Cynthia Karpa McCarthy, who said this in response to my shock that she was removing my historic posts, and, limiting them by falsely stating that was a facebook rule I was not obeying. Not once was I greeted with kindness, and thanked for my contributions.

We are related to historic people somewhere.

(2) Belmont Historical Society, Belmont, CA | Facebook

““The…

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Meet Snitty Cynthia Karpa McCarthy

I tried to bring the Woke Movement to Belmont – before I heard of it. One of my first posts suggested Belmont and the Bay Area celebrate the election of Vice President Kamala Harris – whose pole numbers threaten all Democrats. Belmont will be the epicenter for a New Vision For Germans.

John

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woke

Harris, Michelle Obama top 2024 picks if Biden doesn’t run (nypost.com)

Vice President Kamala Harris and former first lady Michelle Obama are the top two picks for the Democratic presidential nomination if President Biden decides not to seek re-election in 2024, according to a survey.

Black American folk singer-songwriter Huddie Ledbetter, a.k.a. Lead Belly, uses the phrase near the end of the recording of his 1938 song “Scottsboro Boys”, which tells the story of nine black teenagers accused of raping two white women, saying: “I advise everybody, be a little careful when they go along through there – best stay woke, keep their eyes open.”[8][9] Aja Romano writes at Vox that this represents “Black Americans’ need to be aware of racially motivated threats and the potential dangers of white America”.[4] J. Saunders Redding recorded a comment from an African American United Mine Workers official in 1940, stating: “Let me tell you buddy. Waking up is a damn sight harder than going to sleep, but we’ll stay woke up longer.”[10]
Belmont Historian Destroys Black History | Rosamond Press

Rosamond Press

The Jealous Historical Society | Rosamond Press

Here she is, the devil who played evil mind games with me – and dead members of my family!. She wrote a book on the City of Belmont – and did not tell me for three days. We were having a squabble over how the facebook for the Belmont Historical Society is set up. My first posts identified me as a close relative of Carl Janke. Did Snitty Miss Cynthia – jump for joy and say;

“Oh by God! I thought you were all dead. I wrote a book on your family. Have you read my book? Do you have more family photos – and history?

One of the first posts I posted was on Cipriani found La California in Italy. did she jump for joy at this news. Did she tell me this was fantastic research. This is a ex-librarian. Don’t they…

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Wolf Stuttmeister Comes To Belmont

My kindred founded a Nation and two colleges. They were religious leaders.

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/03/26/reverand-john-wilson-founder/

Rosamond Press

“Dr. and Mrs. Stuttmeister left Thursday morning for Santa Cruz and Monterey, where they will spend the honeymoon. On their return they will make their home in Belmont.”

When I awoke from my Old Man Nap yesterday, I wept when I saw the words I composed to my friend, Ed Howard, as to why our quest to get funding for the preservation of the History of Black Oakland – was sabotaged – by white citizens of Belmont, who loved my families White History, but hated my White Integrated History, especially my Turnverein Forty-Eighter History. I have been looking at the real possibility Rudolph Stuttmeister was a Berlin Turnverein, and he fled to the New World before the Revolution of 1948? This very wealthy family saw what was coming. Were they conservatives who took the side of the radicals? Germans were killing Germans.

Name:Rudolph Stuttmeister Arrival Date:12 Jul 1843 Age:27 Gender:M…

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Dark Skinned Windsor

Africans were brought by ships to the Caribbean and the Americas. With no sailing ships, the world would have been a better place?

Casey Farrell has come up with loony ideas about John Wilson causing me to end our conversations. We have not collaborated on anything.

John

https://www.biography.com/news/edward-viii-wallis-simpson-nazi-sympathizers-hitler

A new book about the British royals claims that Prince Charles was the one to infamously speculate about the complexion of Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s firstborn son, Archie. 

In March of 2020, The Duke and Duchess of Sussex sat down for a tell-all interview with Oprah Winfrey during which they made shocking allegations about their time in the royal family. One of the most provocative was when Markle revealed a member of the royal family had “concerns” about the color of her child’s skin before he was born. At the time, Harry made sure to note that it was not Queen Elizabeth II nor Prince Philip, leaving the door open to speculation. 

In a new book by author Christopher Andersen, “Brothers And Wives: Inside The Private Lives of William, Kate, Harry and Meghan,” a source close to the royal family claims that Charles wondered aloud about the child’s complexion during a conversation in 2017 that took place shortly after the Duke and Duchess of Sussex got engaged. 

“I wonder what the children will look like?” Charles reportedly told his wife, Camilla (via Page Six). 

Prince Charles was the royal who asked about complexion of Meghan Markle, Prince Harry’s firstborn, book says | Fox News

Wilson Family of Windsor Castle

Posted on November 28, 2019 by Royal Rosamond Press

    Here

Why did the Wilson family come to live and be born in Windsor Castle? Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor, Christine Rosamond Benton, and, John Gregory Presco are keen to know – even from beyond the grave! The Puritan Adventure to America begins here. Resident, Edmund Wilson, donated one thousand pounds to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The American, Meghan Markle, has lived in Windsor Castle.

John Presco

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windsor_Castle

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUDDsZ2I_gk wind

https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/travel-guide/a27197378/prince-harry-meghan-markle-windsor-castle-significance/

This morning, the Duke of Sussex addressed the world’s media from Windsor. A proud papa, he announced the birth of his first child, saying, “I’m very excited to announced that Meghan and myself had a baby boy early this morning, a very healthy boy. Mother and baby are doing incredibly well,” he said.

“It’s been the most amazing experience I could ever have possibly imagined.”

In many ways, Windsor Castle, and the town of Windsor itself have been central to Meghan and Harry’s love story, so it only makes sense that news of their first child’s arrival would be broadcast from the town.

Prince Harry’s fondness for Windsor started long before he met Meghan.

In fact, it’s where the young prince was christened in December of 1884, and there are adorable photos of Harry riding horses on the grounds as a youngster, going to church services at St George’s Chapel with his cousins, and posing for portraits with the rest of the royal family in the drawing room of the historic castle.

Prince Harry riding a pony at Windsor Castle

Prince Harry rides a pony at Windsor Castle in April of 1987. He’s accompanied by a groom.Julian ParkerGetty Images

When he was older, Harry attended Eton College, a boarding school which is located just across the River Thames from Windsor, so it only makes sense that he’d now like to share the town with his growing family.

WILSON FAMILY
June 7, 2016

1.THOMAS WILSON (1470-)
LADY ANNE CUMBERUETH (1470-)

THOMAS WILSON was born about 1470, of Strubby, England, to unknown parents. He married Anne Cumberworth. He was a yeoman (farmer) of Strubby.

Thomas Wilson died unknown date in England.

LADY ANNE CUMBERWORTH was born about 1478 in Cumberworth, Lincolnshire, England, to Roger Cumberueth and unknown mother. Ann married Thomas Wilson.

Ann Cumberworth died about 1570 in Hartford, Chestershire, England, at about age 92.

Children of Thomas Wilson and Anne Cumberworth:

1.William Cumberworth Wilson was born about 1492, of Penrith, Cumbria, England, to Thomas Wilson (1470- ) and Anne Cumberworth (1478-1570.)  He married (1) Sarah Unknown, about 1511; (2)*Helen Isabell Gilmore, about 1545. William Cumberworth Wilson died 27 August 1587, in Lincolnshire, England, age 95.
2.William Wilson, b. 1500, Denton.
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2.WILLIAM CUMBERWORTH WILSON (1492-1587)
HELEN ISABELL GILMORE (1496-1545)

WILLIAM CUMBERWORTH WILSON was born about 1492, of Penrith, Cumbria, England, to Thomas Wilson (1470-1530) and Anne Cumberworth (1478-1570.)  He married (1) Sarah Unknown, about 1511; (2)*Helen Isabell Gilmore.

William Cumberworth Wilson died 27 August 1587, in Lincolnshire, England, age 95.
HELEN ISABELL GILMORE was born about 1496, of Welbourn, Lincolnshire, England, to unknown. She married William Wilson, at Welsbourne, England.

Helen Isabell Gilmore passed away about 1545, of Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead, England, age 49.

Children of William Cumberworth Wilson and Helen Isabell Gilmore:

1.William Wilson was born about 1515 to William Cumberworth Wilson (1492-1587) and Helen Isabell Gilmore (1496-1545.) He married Isabell Helen Collins. William Wilson died at Windsor Castle, Berkshire, England, 27 August 1587, and was buried in the chapel at Windsor, age 72.
2.Mary Wilson, b. 1519; d. 1547.
3.Thomas Wilson, b. 1525; md. (1) Agnes Wynter, (2) Jane; d. 1581.
4.Robert Wilson, b. 1534; d. 1568.
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3.WILLIAM WILSON, GENT. (1515-1587)
ISABELL HELEN COLLINS (1516-1580)

WILLIAM WILSON was born about 1515, of Wellsbourne, Lincolnshire, England, to William Cumberworth Wilson (1492-1587) and Helen Isabell Gilmore (1496-1545.) He married Isabell Helen Collins.

He acquired a considerable estate, and on 24 March 1586, had confirmation of a coat of arms and grant of crest.

He was a Wellsbourne, Lincolnshire, gentleman. He apparently moved from Wellsbourne to Windsor in Berkshire where he held a position of sufficient importance that he was called gentleman and was buried in the Chapel of Saint George by Windsor Castle in 1587, about age 72.

William Wilson died at Windsor Castle, Berkshire, England, 27 August 1587, and was buried in the chapel at Windsor.

ISABELL HELEN COLLINS was born about 1516, of Wellsbourne, Lincolnshire, England, to Edward Collins (1490- ) and Unknown. She married William Wilson.

Isabell Helen Collins died 17 March 1580, in Windsor, Lincolnshire, England, about age 65.

Children of William Wilson and Isabell Helen Collins:

1.Hamon Wilson, b. 1540, Lincolnshire, England.
2.Rev. Dr. William Wilson was born about 1542, in Wellsbourne, Lincolnshire, England, to William Cumberworth Wilson (1515-1587) and Helen Isabell Gilmore (1516-1580.) He married Isabel Woodhall about 1575. He died 15 May 1615, Windsor, age 73.
3.Alexander Wilson, b. 1545, Penrith; md. Catherine Grindall Woodhall; d. Dec 1583, leaving 3 children.
4.Mary Wilson, b. 1550; md. Rev. Guy Briscoe.
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4.REVEREND DR. WILLIAM WILSON (1542-1615)
ISABEL WOODHALL (1545-bef. 1615)

REVEREND DR. WILLIAM WILSON was born about 1542, of Wellsbourne, Lincolnshire, England, to William Wilson (1542-1587) and Isabel Helen Collins (1516-1580.) He married (1) *Isabel Woodhull in 1575, niece of Edmund Grindall, the celebrated Puritan Archbishop of Canterbury. He married (2) Anne, sister of Rev. Erasmus Webb, ccanon of Windsor, who died in 1612, without issue.

He attended Merton College in Oxford, England where he obtained the following degrees: B.A. 1564, M.A. 1570, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607.
Prebendary (an honorary Canon having the title of a prebend, receiving a stipend) of Saint Paul’s and Rochester Cathedrals, and held the rectory at Cliffe, Kent. In 1584, he became a Canon of Windsor in place of Dr. William Wickham who was promoted to Lincoln, he being about that time made chaplain to Edmund Grindall, the Archbishop of Canterbury, who was his wife’s uncle, and in 1583 he became Canon of Windsor, holding this position for 32 years, until his death in 1615.
He was buried in the chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, where a monumental brass to his memory states that he was “beloved of all in his life, and much lamented in his death.”

Will
He made his will on 23 Aug 1613; it was proved on 27 May 1615. It said, “Will of William Wilson, Canon of Saint George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle … to be buried in the chapel near the place where the body of my dear father lies. If I die at Rochester or Cliff, in the county of Kent, then to be buried in cathedral church of Rochester, near the bodies of wives Isabel and Anne. To my cousin Collins, prebendary at Rochester … to the Fellows and Scholars of Martin College, Oxford … my three sons Edmond, John and Thomas Wilson, daughter Isabel Guibs and daughter Margaret Rawson … my goddaughter Margaret Somers which my son Somers had by my daughter Elizabeth, his late wife … to my god-son William Sheafe, at the age of twenty one years … son Edmond, a fellow of King’s College, Cambridge, eldest son of me, the said William … to son *John the lease of the Rectory and Parsonage of Caxton in the county of Cambridge, which I have taken in my name … to Thomas Wilson my third son … son Edmond to be executor and Mr. Erasmus Webb, my brother in law, being one of the Canons of St. George’s Chapel, and my brother, Mr. Thomas Woodward, being steward of the town of New Windsor, to be overseers. Witnesses: Thomas Woodwarde, Joh. Woodwarde, Robert Lowe & Thomas Holl.”
Death and Burial
He died on 15 May 1615 at Windsor, Berkshire, England. He is buried at St. George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle, next to his father.
On the North Side lied a Grave-stone, on which, in Brass Plates, is the Figure of a Man, and this Inscription.
To me to live is Christ, and to dye is Gain.
Philip. I.21.
Here underneath lied interr’d the Body of William Wilson, Doctour of Divinitie, and Prebendarie of this Church by the space of 32 yeares. He had Issue by Isabell his Wife six sons and six daughters. He dy’d the 15th of May, in the Year of our Lord 1615, of his Age the 73. beloved of all in his Life much lamented in his Death.
Who thinke of Deathe in Lyfe, can never dye,
But mount through Faith, from Earth to heavenly Pleasure,
Weep then no more, though here his Body lye,
His Soul’s possest of never ending Treasure.

On another small Brass Plate, on the same Grave-stone, is the following Inscription.
Neere unto this Place lyes buried William Willson, the third Son, Who, after a long Trial of grievous Sickness, did comfortably yield up his Spirit in the Yeare of our Lord 1610 of his Age 23.
On a Brass Plate, on a Grave-Stone Northward of the last, is this Inscription.
William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in the County of Lincolne, Gent. departed this Lyfe, within the castle of Windsor, in the Yeare of our Lord 1587, the 27th Day of August, and lyeth buried in this Place.
ISABEL WOODHALL was born about 1546, of Waldon, Devonshire, England, to John Woodhall of Walden (1519-1542) and Elizabeth Grindall (1519-1583.)  She married William Wilson in October 1575, in London, England, age 29. The daughter of John Woodhall, Esq., of Walden, county Essex.

Her uncle was Edmund Grindall, Archbishop of Canterbury. He left in his will dated 8 May 1583: “to my nieces Dorothy, Katherine, Elizabeth and Isabell, the daughters of Elizabeth Woodhall, my sister late deceased, £50 to each.” He also left “to my niece Isabell Wilson, one other bowl, double gilt, without a cover.”

Isabel Woodhall passed away about 1615, age 69, of Rochester, Kent, England

Children of William Wilson and Isabel Woodhall:

1.Marie (Mary) Wilson, b. 1575, Cranbrook, Kent, England; md. Rev. Thomas Sheaffe; d. 26 July 1613…
2.NN Son Wilson, b. 1578, Windsor, Berkshire, England. Child.
3.Isabel Wilson, b. 24 Feb 1580, Windsor, England; md. Thomas Gibbs, 1608.
4.Elizabeth Wilson, b. 1582, Cliffe, Kent, England; md. John Somer, 1601; d. 1606, 3 children.
5.Edmund Wilson, b. 1583, of Windsor, Berkshire, England; d. Sep 1633, unmarried. Gave to the Massachusetts Bay Colony £1000.
6.William Wilson, b. 1586, of Windsor, Berkshire, England.
7.Rev. John Wilson was born December 1588, in Windsor, Berkshire, England, to Rev. William Wilson (1542-1615) and Isabel Woodhall (1545-1615.) He married Elizabeth Mansfield, before 1618, in England. He became a Puritan. [Rev.] John Wilson died testate [made a valid will] at Boston, 7 August 1667, age seventy-eight and a half years.
8.Rev. Thomas Wilson, b. 1591, England.
9.Margaret Wilson, b. 1593, London, England; md. Rawson.

(Source: The Ancestry of Reverend Henry Whitfield (1590-1657) and His Wife Dorothy Sheafe (159?-1669) of Guilford, Connecticut, by John Brooks Threlfall, publ. 1989 in Madison, Wisconsin.)
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5.REVEREND JOHN WILSON SR. (1588-1667)
ELIZABETH MANSFIELD (1596-1658)
REVEREND JOHN WILSON SR. was born in Windsor, England, about 1588, to Rev. William Wilson (1541-1615) and Isabel Woodhall (1545-bef. 1615.) He married Elizabeth Mansfield, before 1618, in England. He became a Puritan.

After four years’ preparation at Eton School, he was admitted to King’s College, Cambridge, in 1602. While at the university he became deeply interested in the theological discussion of the day, and under the influence of Rev. Richard Rogers, of Wethersfield, and of the celebrated Rev. William Ames, D. D., he soon became converted to the principles of the Puritans. His non-conformity resulted in his being obliged to leave the University for a time, and he entered one of the Inns of Court to study for the legal profession, but his disposition for the ministry continuing, by the father’s influence, he was returned to the University, where, at Christ College, he obtained the degree of B. A. in 1606 and M. A. in 1609.

After preaching in several places and being persecuted and frequently suspended for his non-conformity, he encouraged and supported the colonization of the Massachusetts Bay, and joined the first emigration, coming to New England in the spring of 1630, in the Arbella, with Governor Winthrop, leaving his wife and children in England.

Soon after the arrival of the company the First Church of Boston was organized, on July 30, 1630, John Wilson being installed as teacher. After laboring for nearly a year, and filling an important part in establishing the colony on a permanently prosperous basis, he went back to England, in 1631, return to Boston in May 1632, with his wife, son John and daughter Elizabeth. A few months after his return he was installed as Pastor of the church, November 23, 1632, being succeeded as teacher by the celebrated Rev. John Cotton. He continued as Pastor until his death in 1652.

Many contemporary writers and records bear witness to the high esteem and veneration in which Rev. John Wilson was held. While not endowed with as brilliant talents as the Rev. John Cotton, he was, nevertheless, a devout, learned, zealous and able man, and his sympathetic nature, kindness of heart and generosity to the needy, greatly endeared him to his parishioners. Of his character Cotton Mather said: “If the picture of this good and therein great, man were to be exactly given, great zeal with great love would be the two principal strokes, that joined with orthodoxy should make up his portraiture.”

The Rev. John Wilson went as chaplain to the expedition against the Pequot Indians. During his ministry he frequently made visits to the Indian settlements with Rev. John Elliot, the “Apostle” and labored as a missionary to the savages.

Hooker and Wilson created much history. They are “Founders” of Commonwealths. Connecticut and Massachusetts are what these men and their associates proposed and carried out.

Known as “the immigrated.”

Residence: Charlestown, Suffolk, MA U. S. A.
Residence: Boston, Suffolk, MA U. S. A.
[Rev.] John Wilson was born at Windsor, Berkshire, England, about 1588.
[Rev.] John Wilson, son of [Rev.] William Wilson, D.D. and his wife Isabel Woodhall, married, in England about 1617, Elizabeth Mansfield, daughter of John Mansfield, Esq., of London, Henley-Thames, Oxfordshire, and Hutton-on-Derwent, Yorkshire and Elizabeth (unknown) his wife.
“They had two sons, [Dr.] Edmund and [Rev.] John, and two daughters, Elizabeth, (wife of [Rev.] Ezekiel Rogers), and Mary (wife of [Rev.] Samuel Danforth and Joseph Rock)”.
John immigrated to Massachusetts in 1630 and was appointed pastor of the First Church of Boston. [2]Elizabeth’s refusal to leave England was the subject of several letters by Margaret Winthrop. [3] John went back to England, and persuaded Elizabeth to return with him to Boston in 1632. [3] Their son Edmund remained in England, but their son John and daughter Elizabeth went to Boston with them. Their daughter Mary was born at Boston 12 September 1633.
In 1636 controversy broke out in among his congregation regarding the teachings of Anne Hutchinson. In May of 1637, John “volunteered to be the minister of a military unit that went to Connecticut to settle the conflict with the Pequot Indians.” He returned to Boston, and to the controversy with Hutchinson, on August 5th.
In Nov. 1637 she was brought before a civil court for her religious teachings, and in 1638, brought to trial before the church, and excommunicated by Wilson.
John Wilson was one of the ministers who assented to the hanging of Quaker missionaries for their religious beliefs. He participated in the deaths of Marmaduke Stevenson and William Robinson in 1659, and later Mary Dyer in 1660.
Elizabeth, his wife, died at Boston, about 1658.
[Rev.] John Wilson died testate [made a valid will] at Boston, 7 August 1667, age seventy-eight and a half years.
ELIZABETH MANSFIELD was born 3 December 1592, of Windsor, Berkshire England, to John Thomas Mansfield (1553-1601) and Elizabeth Unknown (-1633.) Elizabeth married Rev. John Wilson about 1617. She was a Puritan, joining the Church in Massachusetts, 20 March 1636, a later date.

Elizabeth died in about 1658, age 65, of Boston, Massachusetts. John Wilson and his wife Elizabeth both lie buried in one tomb in King’s Chapel Burial Ground.

Children of John Wilson and Elizabeth Mansfield:

1.Dr. Edmond Wilson, b. 1618, Windsor; md. Unknown about 1645; d. 7 Aug 1657.
2.Rev. John Wilson Jr. was born Sep 1621, London, to Rev. John Wilson Sr. (1588-1667) and Elizabeth Mansfield (1592-1658.)  Rev. Wilson married Sarah Hooker, daughter of Rev. Thomas and Susannah Hooker, about 1648 of Medfield, Norfolk, Massachusetts. He died 23 August 1691, age 70.
3.Elizabeth Wilson, b. 1623, Windsor; md. Rev. Ezekiel Rogers, 1650; she and infant died in childbirth in Feb. 1651.
4.Mary Wilson, b. 12 Sep 1633, Boston; md. (1) Rev. Samuel Danforth, 5 Nov 1651, d. 1674; (2) Joseph Rock; d. 13 Sep 1713.
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6. REVEREND JOHN WILSON JR. (1621-1691)
SARAH HOOKER (1629-1725)
REVEREND JOHN WILSON Jr. was born September 1621, of London, England, to Rev. John Wilson Sr. (1588-1667) and Elizabeth Mansfield (1592-1658.)  Rev. Wilson married Sarah Hooker, daughter of Rev. Thomas and Susannah Hooker, about 1648 of Medfield, Norfolk, Massachusetts.

John Wilson Jr. was brought to New England by his father, John Wilson Sr., on the latter’s second voyage, 1632. He was graduated in the first class at Harvard College, in 1642, was admitted to his father’s church in Boston in 1644, and was freeman in 1647. After preaching several years he became assistant to Rev. Richard Mather, at Dorchester in 1649, and after two years’ service here removed to Medfield, soon after the settlement of that place, and in December, 1651, he was installed as the first minister of the town, where he was ordained Pastor, October 12, 1652, in which service he continued for forty years, until his death, besides performing the duties of physician and school master.

By a contemporary he is referred to as “gracious and godly, a faithful and useful man, well esteemed.”

In his will, made three days before his decease, he mentions his wife Sarah; son John (to whom he bequeathed his share of the Braintree farm); daughter *Sarah, wife of Josiah Torrey, formerly wife of Paul Batt; daughter Susanna, wife of Grindall Rawson; and grandchild Thomas Weld son of his daughter Elizabeth, deceased, formerly wife of Thomas weld. (Suffolk Co. Probate, Vol. 8, fol. 58.)

Reverend John Wilson died 23 August 1691, in Medfield, Massachusetts, age 70, having on the previous Sunday “preached both forenoon and afternoon, fervently and powerfully.”
SARAH HOOKER was christened 21 February 1630, in Chelmsford, England.

Sarah’s parents were Thomas Hooker (1586-1647, immigrant) and Susanna Garbrand (1593-1676.) Thomas Hooker came from Rotterdam in 1633 in the Griffin. He resided in Cambridge and then Hartford in 1636. He was Pastor there. He was a Freeman 14 May 1634. In his will he left “my daughter, Sarah Hooker £100 at marriage or at age twenty-one, the disposal and further education of her and the rest I leave to my wife.” The inventory of his estate was £1136, including £450 in real estate.

Sarah married John Wilson in about 1647, of Medfield, Massachusetts.

Sarah Hooker passed away 20 August 1725, Braintree, Massachusetts, age 95.

Children of Rev. John Wilson and Sarah Hooker:

1.John Wilson, b. 6 July 1649; d. young. Child.
2.Sarah Wilson was born about 1650 of Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, to Rev. John Wilson (1621-1691) and Sarah Hooker (1629-1725.) She married (1) Paul Batt, bef. 1674, of Boston. He died in 1678; (2) *Josiah Torrey, 5 May 1680, in Medfield, Norfolk, Massachusetts. We do not know when or where Sarah Wilson passed away.
3.Thomas Wilson, b. 1652; d. 1652. Child.
4.Elizabeth Wilson, b. 1653 d. 1653. Child
5.Elizabeth Wilson, b. 1656; d. 1687.
6.Dr. John Wilson, b. 1660; d. 1728.
7.Thomas Wilson, b. 1662; d. 1662. Child.
8.Susanna Wilson, b. 1664; d. 1748.
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REVEREND CAPTAIN JOSIAH TORREY (1658-1732)
7. SARAH WILSON (1650- )

REVEREND CAPTAIN JOSIAH TORREY was born 28 January 1658, in Scituate, Plymouth, Massachusetts, to William Torrey and Elizabeth Frye. He married Sarah Wilson, 5 May 1680, in Medfield, Norfolk, Massachusetts.

Residence: Medfield, Norfolk, MA U. S. A.
Residence: Boston, Suffolk, MA U. S. A.
Residence: Mansfield, Tolland, CT U. S. A.
Rev. Josiah Torrey died 30 October 1732, Mansfield, Tolland, Connecticut, age 74.

SARAH WILSON was born about 1650, of Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, to Rev. John Wilson (1621-1691) and Sarah Hooker (1629-1725.) She married (1) Paul Batt, bef. 1674, of Boston. He died in 1678; (2) *Josiah Torrey, 5 May 1680, in Medfield, Norfolk, Massachusetts.

She was a resident of Colonial New England:

Residence: Boston, Suffolk, MA U. S. A.
Residence: Medfield, Norfolk, MA U. S. A.
Residence: Mansfield, Tolland, CT U. S. A.

We do not know when or where Sarah Wilson passed away.

Children of Paul Batt and Sarah Wilson:
1.Paul Batt, Jr.; md. Elizabeth Mighill.
2.Sarah Batt, b. 18 Jan 1674, Boston; md. Micajah Torrey (uncle to Josiah Torrey.)
Children of *Josiah Torrey and *Sarah Wilson:
1.Josiah Torrey, b. 9 Feb 1681; md. Sarah Athearn, 1697; d. 8 Oct 1723.
2.Margaret Torrey, b. 19 Apr 1683; md. James Humphrey, 1690.
3.Elizabeth Torrey, b. 3 May 1685; md. Francis Green, 1702; d. 1724.
4.Mary Torrey was born 17 April 1689 in Mendon, Worcester, Massachusetts, to Josiah Torrey (1658-1732) and Sarah Wilson (1650-1725.) She married Nathaniel Southworth in 1709, Worcester, Massachusetts. Mary Torrey died, January 1768, age 78.
5.John Torrey, b. 6 Apr 1692; md. Zerviah Athearn, 1712; d. 20 Jan 1714.
6.Margaret Torrey, b. 1 Nov 1702; md. Caleb Church, 14 Aug 1735; d. 29 Jan 1792.

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The British Balloon Buddy Is Coming

QAnon take note.

Rosamond Press

Who saw this coming?

Seer John

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-britain-election-johnson/british-pm-johnson-to-trump-keep-out-of-uk-election-idUSKBN1Y30VG

LONDON (Reuters) – Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Friday it would be “best” if U.S. President Donald Trump does not get involved in Britain’s election when he visits London for a NATO summit next week.

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