Sir Ian Easton

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Here is the resting place of Rena Easton’s husband who was given a poet’s burial.

Jon

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=46208927

Birth:

1917

Death:

Jun. 14, 1989


Admiral, K.C.B., D.S.C. Former Head of the British Defence Staff. He was Commandant of the Royal College of Defence Studies in 1976, a UK senior serving military officer between 1972 and 2001. For the 2nd Louis Vuitton Cup, which was held in Fremantle, Australia in 1987, he paid an entry fee deposit of $16.000 for Royal Thames Yacht Club’s White Crusader I and White Crusader II, representing United Kingdom.
Burial:
All Saints Churchyard
Freshwater
Isle of Wight Unitary Authority
Isle of Wight, England

The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly the Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath)[1] is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725.[2] The name derives from the elaborate medieval ceremony for creating a knight, which involved bathing (as a symbol of purification) as one of its elements. The knights so created were known as “Knights of the Bath”.[3] George I “erected the Knights of the Bath into a regular Military Order”.[4] He did not (as is commonly believed) revive the Order of the Bath,[5] since it had never previously existed as an Order, in the sense of a body of knights who were governed by a set of statutes and whose numbers were replenished when vacancies occurred.[6][7]

The Order consists of the Sovereign (currently Queen Elizabeth II), the Great Master (currently The Prince of Wales),[8] and three Classes of members:[9]

  • Knight Grand Cross (GCB) or Dame Grand Cross (GCB)
  • Knight Commander (KCB) or Dame Commander (DCB)
  • Companion (CB)

Members belong to either the Civil or the Military Division.[10] Prior to 1815, the order had only a single class, Knight Companion (KB), which no longer exists.[11] Recipients of the Order are now usually senior military officers or senior civil servants.[12][13] Commonwealth citizens not subjects of the Queen and foreigners may be made Honorary Members.[14]

The Order of the Bath is the fourth-most senior of the British Orders of Chivalry, after The Most Noble Order of the Garter, The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle

The church is medieval.[1][2] is one of the oldest churches on the Isle of Wight, and was listed in the Domesday survey of 1086.[3][4][5] Mark Whatson is the pastor of All Saints, which is an Anglican church[6] in the Anglican Diocese of Portsmouth. A primary school associated with the church is nearby.[7]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distinguished_Service_Cross_(United_Kingdom)

Memorials[edit]

There is a marble memorial commemorating Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson in All Saints Church. His wife Emily Tennyson, Baroness Tennyson, son Hallam Tennyson, 2nd Baron Tennyson and other family members are buried in the church cemetery. The church is also the site of a memorial to Tennyson’s son, Lionel Tennyson, who died of malaria in 1886. Inside the Church there are memorial plaques to members of the Crozier Family who resided nearby. Lady Mary Martin is also remembered on a plague her maiden name being Crozier. Admirial Crozier is buried near to Lord Tennyson in a large Table Tomb. The wynch Gate was built compete with roof in memory of The Crozier Family.

All Saints’ Church, Freshwater is a parish church in the Church of England located in Freshwater, Isle of Wight

Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, FRS (6 August 1809 – 6 October 1892) was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria‘s reign and remains one of the most popular British poets.[2]

Tennyson excelled at penning short lyrics, such as “Break, Break, Break“, “The Charge of the Light Brigade“, “Tears, Idle Tears” and “Crossing the Bar“. Much of his verse was based on classical mythological themes, such as Ulysses, although In Memoriam A.H.H. was written to commemorate his friend Arthur Hallam, a fellow poet and student at Trinity College, Cambridge, after he died of a stroke aged just 22.[3] Tennyson also wrote some notable blank verse including Idylls of the King, “Ulysses“, and “Tithonus“. During his career, Tennyson attempted drama, but his plays enjoyed little success. A number of phrases from Tennyson’s work have become commonplaces of the English language, including “Nature, red in tooth and claw” (In Memoriam A.H.H.), “‘Tis better to have loved and lost / Than never to have loved at all”, “Theirs not to reason why, / Theirs but to do and die”, “My strength is as the strength of ten, / Because my heart is pure”, “To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield”, “Knowledge comes, but Wisdom lingers”, and “The old order changeth, yielding place to new”. He is the ninth most frequently quoted writer in The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations.[4]

Lord Tennyson.

After William Wordsworth’s death in 1850, and Samuel Rogers‘ refusal, Tennyson was appointed to the position of Poet Laureate; Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Leigh Hunt had also been considered.[15] He held the position until his own death in 1892, by far the longest tenure of any laureate before or since. Tennyson fulfilled the requirements of this position by turning out appropriate but often uninspired verse, such as a poem of greeting to Princess Alexandra of Denmark when she arrived in Britain to marry the future King Edward VII. In 1855, Tennyson produced one of his best-known works, “The Charge of the Light Brigade“, a dramatic tribute to the British cavalrymen involved in an ill-advised charge on 25 October 1854, during the Crimean War. Other esteemed works written in the post of Poet Laureate include Ode on the Death of the Duke of Wellington and Ode Sung at the Opening of the International Exhibition.

Come into the Garden, Maud
Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron (1809–92)

COME into the garden, Maud,
  For the black bat, night, has flown,
Come into the garden, Maud,
  I am here at the gate alone;
And the woodbine spices are wafted abroad,         5
  And the musk of the rose is blown.
For a breeze of morning moves,
  And the planet of Love is on high,
Beginning to faint in the light that she loves
  On a bed of daffodil sky,         10
To faint in the light of the sun she loves,
  To faint in his light, and to die.
All night have the roses heard
  The flute, violin, bassoon;
All night has the casement jessamine stirr’d         15
  To the dancers dancing in tune;
Till silence fell with the waking bird,
  And a hush with the setting moon.
I said to the lily, “There is but one
  With whom she has heart to be gay.         20
When will the dancers leave her alone?
  She is weary of dance and play.”
Now half to the setting moon are gone,
  And half to the rising day;
Low on the sand and loud on the stone         25
  The last wheel echoes away.
I said to the rose, “The brief night goes
  In babble and revel and wine.
O young lord-lover, what sighs are those,
  For one that will never be thine?         30
But mine, but mine,” I sware to the rose,
  “For ever and ever, mine.”
And the soul of the rose went into my blood,
  As the music clash’d in the hall:
And long by the garden lake I stood,         35
  For I heard your rivulet fall
From the lake to the meadow and on to the wood,
  Our wood, that is dearer than all;
From the meadow your walks have left so sweet
  That whenever a March-wind sighs         40
He sets the jewel-print of your feet
  In violets blue as your eyes,
To the woody hollows in which we meet
  And the valleys of Paradise.
The slender acacia would not shake         45
  One long milk-bloom on the tree;
The white lake-blossom fell into the lake
  As the pimpernel doz’d on the lea;
But the rose was awake all night for your sake,
  Knowing your promise to me;         50
The lilies and roses were all awake,
  They sigh’d for the dawn and thee.
Queen rose of the rosebud garden of girls,
  Come hither, the dances are done,
In gloss of satin and glimmer of pearls,         55
  Queen lily and rose in one;
Shine out, little head, sunning over with curls,
  To the flowers, and be their sun.
There has fallen a splendid tear
  From the passion-flower at the gate.         60
She is coming, my dove, my dear;
  She is coming, my life, my fate;
The red rose cries, “She is near, she is near;”
  And the white rose weeps, “She is late;”
The larkspur listens, “I hear, I hear;”         65
  And the lily whispers, “I wait.”
She is coming, my own, my sweet;
  Were it ever so airy a tread,
My heart would hear her and beat,
  Were it earth in an earthy bed;         70
My dust would hear her and beat,
  Had I lain for a century dead;
Would start and tremble under her feet,
  And blossom in purple and red.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Sir Ian Easton

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    It is all coming together God’s Liberating Movie starring my Muse, Rena Easton. https://rosamondpress.com/2015/06/19/hail-britania-2/

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