Wilson of Windsor

Wilson and Webb

Posted on March 5, 2019 by Royal Rosamond Press

My kindred, William Wilson, and his brother-in-law, Erasmus Webb may have known William Shakespeare – intimately! Anne (Webb) Wilson lived at Windsor Castle. Her brother, Erasmus, was the Archdeacon of Buckingham Palace. Are we looking at the authors of Shakespeare’s plays? Why has this family lineage been buried, and all but forgotten? These are extremely educated men, whose wives would be at court. They would know all the intrigues, and, hear confessions. They would know the merry wives of Windsor. People would bring them all the gossip that is the bane of the church, aimed at bringing other down as they vie for royal favors.

This bloodline flows from Bohemia and has seeded several major religions. This is the ‘Hidden Seed’. The Webb family came to America. In the chart below we see that Sir Alexander Webb married Mary Wilson, the daughter of Thomas Wilson MP, the grandfather (or Great Uncle?) of Reverend John Wilson of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, that the Webb family played a large role in. Shakespeare’s line, died out, and thus, this is his American Seed.

Statesman, Thomas Wilson MP, was a stellar scholar and author who could have prepared the way for the writing of Shakespeare. Why not put Alexander Webb is the race? Surely the Webb-Wilson family saw themselves as the family-power behind the Church and Throne, and in need of new forum.

“Wilson belongs to the second rank of Elizabethan statesmen. An able linguist, he had numerous acquaintances among Spanish and Flemish officials in the Netherlands, and, in a wider context, his range of friends included Leicester, Burghley, Hatton, Davison, Sir Francis Knollys, Paulet, Walsingham, William of Orange, Jewel, Parker, Parkhurst, Gresham, Ludovico Guiccardini and Arias Montano.”

http://webb.skinnerwebb.com/gpage1.html

https://www.geni.com/people/Thomas-Wilson-MP/6000000010886211061?through=6000000006520219276

John Presco

Copyright 2019

Chancellor of St. Paul’s 1596-1615, died 15 May 1615, and was buried in St. George’s Chapel near his father (there was a monumental inscription (now lost) to his father, W

“The career of William Wilson, D.D., appointed Canon of St. George’s, Windsor 10 Dec. 1584, is related in S.L. Ollard, Fasti Wyndesorienses: The Deans and Canons of Windsor (Historical Monographs Relating to St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, 8), 76. He was born 1545, attended Merton College, oxford (Fellow 1565, B.A. 1564, M.A. 1570, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607), rector of Islip, do. Oxford, 1578, Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Prebendary of Rochester [Kent] 1591, 1614, Rector of Cliffe [near Rochester], Chancellor of St. Paul’s 1596-1615, died 15 May 1615, and was buried in St. George’s Chapel near his father (there was a monumental inscription (now lost) to his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, co. Lincoln., gentleman, who died at Windsor Castle 27 Aug. 1587]). The sketch of Edmund Wilson, M.D. (1583-1616) is given in the same source. The endorsement – ‘Wylson, a prebendary of Wynsor’ – identifies the writer of this letter as Rev. William Wilson, the father of Rev. John Wilson. Mather states that Rev. William Wilson was ‘a prebend of . . . Windsor,’ and William’s brass in St. George’s, Windsor, also calls him ‘Prebendarie of this Church.’ The contact between William Wilson and the Earl of Huntingdon may indicate that they shared similar Puritan (or Proto-Puritan) religious views, although in this instance they were discussing the distinctly un-Puritan matter of a chantry. The marriage of John Wilson, a great-nephew of the Archbishop of Canterbury, into the family of one of Huntingdon’s gentlemen, is not terribly unusual. Wilson’s father has been called ‘a man of deep erudition, a scholar and a courtier . . . we must suppose him to have been a persona grata in the eyes of Queen Elizabeth.’ “

Reverend William Wilson, D.D. (1542 – 1615) – Genealogy (geni.com)

New Windsor developed as a royal borough in the shadow of the castle. It received its first charter in 1277 and returned Members intermittently from 1302 and regularly from 1447.1 A new charter issued in August 1603, on the ‘humble petition and request’ of Charles Howard, 1st earl of Nottingham, entrusted its government to some 30 brothers of the guildhall, ‘of the better and more approved inhabitants’, of whom 13 were to be styled ‘benchers’ and to include the ten aldermen from among whom the mayor was to be chosen.2 Both Nottingham and George Villiers, 1st duke of Buckingham, successive constables of the castle, served as high stewards of the borough, and could expect the nomination to one seat, but on the whole Windsor stood by its resolution of 1572 that the other should go to a townsman, often its under-steward or recorder.3 The indentures were exchanged between the sheriff of Berkshire and the mayor, bailiffs and burgesses. There is no evidence that the borough paid wages to its Members.

New Windsor | History of Parliament Online

Main Article

New Windsor developed as a royal borough in the shadow of the castle. It received its first charter in 1277 and returned Members intermittently from 1302 and regularly from 1447.1 A new charter issued in August 1603, on the ‘humble petition and request’ of Charles Howard, 1st earl of Nottingham, entrusted its government to some 30 brothers of the guildhall, ‘of the better and more approved inhabitants’, of whom 13 were to be styled ‘benchers’ and to include the ten aldermen from among whom the mayor was to be chosen.2 Both Nottingham and George Villiers, 1st duke of Buckingham, successive constables of the castle, served as high stewards of the borough, and could expect the nomination to one seat, but on the whole Windsor stood by its resolution of 1572 that the other should go to a townsman, often its under-steward or recorder.3 The indentures were exchanged between the sheriff of Berkshire and the mayor, bailiffs and burgesses. There is no evidence that the borough paid wages to its Members.

In 1604 Nottingham may have exercised his interest in favour of Samuel Backhouse, a London merchant’s son who had settled in Berkshire and served as sheriff in 1600. The other Member, Thomas Durdent, was the under-steward. Durdent died in 1607, and was replaced shortly before the fourth session by one of Nottingham’s nephews, Sir Francis Howard, a young man of 24 but already an experienced naval officer. By the time of the next election, in 1614, he was at sea, while Backhouse transferred to Aylesbury, leaving his former seat to a more distinguished Berkshire gentleman, Sir Richard Lovelace, who had just replaced Nottingham as high steward.4 The junior place went to the new under-steward, Thomas Woodward, whose father had been clerk of the works at the castle and a Member for the borough in 1586. Lovelace took a county seat in the third Jacobean Parliament, making room at Windsor for another of Nottingham’s nephews, (Sir) Charles Howard, who held several of ‘the offices of Windsor’, at the castle and in the forest. Woodward gave way to Sir Robert Bennett, nephew of a former dean of Windsor and later clerk of the works at the castle. Bennett fell ‘very desperately ill’ during the Parliament, which may explain his failure to sit in 1624. The senior Member then, Edmund Sawyer, was an auditor in the Exchequer whose circuit included Berkshire and who had recently purchased a manor some six miles from Windsor. Woodward regained the junior seat, but died after Parliament was prorogued for the summer. At the ensuing by-election he was replaced by the keeper of Windsor Little Park, Sir William Hewett, who wanted a seat because his conduct as receiver-general for purveyance compositions was under investigation by the Commons. However, the House did not meet again before the death of James I.

When a fresh Parliament was summoned in 1625, Hewett was re-elected, together with the by now recovered Bennett. This was despite a letter of 8 Apr. 1625 from the new high steward, Buckingham, craving Windsor’s

favour in a request which I trust you will not think unreasonable, which is that on my recommendations you will elect Sir William Russell the treasurer of His Majesty’s Navy for one of the burgesses to serve in this approaching Parliament for your town. His known worth and merits speak so well for him that I shall not need to tell you what I believe of him, and being born not far from you, I doubt not you will easily grow confident that he will be very tender of the trust you shall repose in him for the good of your town.5

Russell, however, whose father had lived some five miles away and who had himself inherited property in Old Windsor, was chosen in 1626, together with the under-steward, Humphrey Newbery, who was to prove an active Member. Early in the following year Newbery and the mayor were summoned before the Privy Council to account for their arrest of a castle servant. The mayor was immediately discharged, but Newbery, held ‘more to be blamed’ and accused of ‘divers other misdemeanours’, was obliged to keep himself ready for further attendance until April 1628.6 He was accordingly unavailable for election to the third Caroline Parliament. Russell, having resigned his treasurership of the Navy, was replaced in the senior seat by the Buckingham client and clerk of the Privy Council (Sir) William Beecher, for whom the duke had failed to find a seat at Dover; he was the only complete outsider to sit for Windsor in the period. The junior seat went to Thomas Hewett, eldest son of Sir William, who had just completed his education. Neither Beecher nor Hewett is known to have taken notice of the complaint made in Parliament against Richard Montagu, who was said to have kicked out ‘the bonfires in Windsor Castle’ after the king yielded to the Petition of Right.7

Posted on February 13, 2019by Royal Rosamond Press

Sir Lewis Clifford, Kt. is William Thomas Rosamond’s 13th great uncle’s great grandfather.

William Thomas Rosamond

Samuel Rosamond
his father

show 16 relatives 

Benjamin Rosamond
his father

James Rosamond
his father

Sarah Wilson Rosamond
his mother

Thomas Wilson
her father

Jane Lee
his mother

Sir Thomas Lee, 1st Baronet
her father

Elizabeth Ingoldsby
his mother

Mary Bennett
her mother

Sir Thomas Bennet, Lord Mayor of London
her father

Ann Bennet
his mother

Ann Molyns
her mother

Sir Alexander Culpeper, Kt.
her father

Sir John Culpepper, Kt., of Bayhall, Hardreshull & Bedgebury
his father

Margaret Culpeper
his sister

Alexander De Clifford, Esq
her husband

Lewis Clifford
his father

William de Clifford
his father

Sir Lewis Clifford, Kt.
his father

Ann Molyns (Culpeper) (c.1483 – 1591) – Genealogy (geni.com)

Alexander Culpeper, Kt. (c.1460 – 1541) – Genealogy (geni.com)

I Am Kin To Shakespeare

Posted on March 5, 2019 by Royal Rosamond Press

It is amazing the struggle I have had to do our Family Tree from members of my famiy, especially my daughter and her family, who all but detsroyed me when they offered my grandson to Bill Cornwell and his right-wing Tea Party father. https://rosamondpress.com/2018/07/16/robert-wilson-maried-jane-lee/

Rosamond Press

William Shakespeare’s grandmother, is my great, great, great grandmother, Abigail Shakespeare (Webb)

I implore the children of Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor to take the Rosamond Family DNA test. It was through this test I found Abigail. The Webb family went on crusade and is why they have a cross on their crest. I believe my grandfather picked up this relationship via genetic memory. So did I. I tried to read William’s complete set when I was eleven. Is there a Seer gene? Consider all the actors around Liz Taylor.

John Presco

Copyright 2018

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Shakespeare

William Shakespeare(bapt.26 April 1564 – 23 April 1616)[a]was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s greatest dramatist.[2][3][4]He is often called England’s national poetand the “Bard of Avon”.[5][b]His extant works, including collaborations

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About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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