The Hidden Master

I am the Great Man and Hidden Master.

John ‘The Nazarite Judge’

Roses of Blue River Library

Posted on September 17, 2020 by Royal Rosamond Press

Over The Hill And Back

Last night, Don Kahle, who writes for the Register Guard, told me the Free Library was lost in the fire. I swear I smelled burning books. Gone are the smell of roses, gone with a wind that blew a fire through Blue River. What does blood smell like? What is in a name? A child pricks her finger on all that remain, thorns amongst the ashes, and so little human DNA that God sprinkled, there.

“Where art thou?” Was God first recorded question.

Here we are, Lord, in Finn Rock that should have been renamed Rosborough. Here we are amongst the pines and the cedar, the salmon and the trout that run in waters as blue as can be. My grandfather, Royal Rosamond, the son of William Rosamond, and Idia Rose talked about opening a fishing resort on his property in Arkansas. His friend, Otto Rayburn, asked Royal if he knows any poet in the West that would be interested in contribution to his Arcadian Anthology. I will be send the University of Arkansas much history about Rosboro and Blue River.

There is the College of the Ozarks where my kin, Thomas Hart Benton has some of his work. His grandfather was the Senator of the same name who was a good friend of John Astor and family, and was the Proprietor of the Oregon Territory. He son-in-law, John Fremont, blazed the Oregon Trail so many Ulster-Scot could migrate here, and fight off the British. Liz Taylor is my kin, and her uncle used to fish with Eisenhower. I tried to get the City of Eugene and the University of Oregon to preserve Ken Kesey’s cottage in Fairmont where he might have nurtured a idea for his other great novel. ‘Some Times A Great Notion’.

“A private party intends to remove three Doug firs, each at least a hundred feet tall, from in front of the Francis O’Brien Memorial Library,” the group said in a statement. “This removal not only will unnecessarily kill three old-growth trees, but will be dangerous to the surrounding structures. The Blue River Water District board is concerned that falling the trees will ruin the integrity of the water pipes that provides drinking water to the town.”

Dianne Dundon was born in Finn Rock, she the third generation. She and her four children worked everywhere you could along the McKenzie. She never mention the logging mill, Rosboro, that is the biggest employee in Springfield, that some call Springtucky. And now I discover Arkyville?

http://mckenzieriverreflectionsnewspaper.com/News/mayberry-without-barney-andy

In doing research for this post I discovered another work by my grandfather, Royal  Rosamond. Over The Hill And Back sounds like a story of J.R. Tolkien.  I just founded a facebook group:

The Roses of Blue River Library

https://www.facebook.com/groups/359497455425768/

I found another Rose Family that is associated with Rosboro a.ka. Arkyville Members of the Rosamond lived and died in Arkansas. They descend from Patriot Captain Samuel Rosamond, who fought alongside The Swamp Fox.

Thomas Whitaker Rosborough came to Springfield Oregon with his lumber outfit that might have included his black loggers whom he may have adored, because, he refused to get rid of them when he moved Rosboro about Arkansas. I will be contacting Eric Richardson about this possibility.

https://anthonybentongude.com/

My Rosamond ancestors were real Rednecks, the Real McCoys. There is a lot a talk about Cultural Warfare in America. You got a lot of fake cowboys and armed men who say they are rednecks. In rebuilding The Free Blue River Library, we got to get down to hard tacks – and the truth – so we can build a True Story of America and The West.

Here is wild man Yates who murdered my great grandfather, Nonimund Rosamond who was the sheriff of a small town in Arkansas.  There is a rose branch on his tombstone. Yates was bushwhacked by a branch of the Rosamond family. He and his niece are buried on a hill in unmarked graves in Arkansas. I see the end of my life-movie over ‘The Wolf’s bones. I look over the hill, and here they come….The Billy Boys! And they are playing their fifes and beating on their drums. Then come the bagpipes.

I thought about taking the bus up to Blue River and gifting Royal’s books to the Free Library. The University of Arkansas wants them to go with the Rayburn Collection. I had no contact with any family, back when, I was so utterly betrayed. But in the last two weeks I have been in contact with Michael Dundon and Shannon Rosamond. We have gathered our history. We have gathered our Roses.

Just now Michael Dundon told me Ray Frye worked for Rosboro, and Dianne Frye-Dundon grew up in Rosboro Camp. Vicki Presco married James Dundon, and they moved to Blue River where they built a geodesic dome on John Allensworth’s property, the owner of the Log Cabin Inn. I lived with the Dundon children, Jeremy, Jamie, Jennifer, and Lew, who are kin to several members of the Frye family.

Two days ago Shannon told me about a motto she found on a Rosamond cote of arms in Europe.

“I won’t let them win!”

We had a great laugh, and I said;

“Sounds like Scarlett in Rosemary’s favorite movie!”

John Presco

https://www.ozarksalive.com/vance-randolphs-photos/

OTTO ERNEST RAYBURN

Otto Ernest Rayburn moved to the Ozarks in 1917. He lived in Missouri and Arkansas, where he was a teacher, newspaper publisher, bookseller, and promoter of tourism. Toward the end of his life he organized his enormous hoard of information about the Ozarks into the collection now in the University Libraries. He died in 1960.


THE COLLECTION

The Otto Ernest Rayburn Collection was acquired from Mr. Rayburn, a collector, educator, publisher, and bookseller then residing in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, in part purchased by an agreement dated September 8, 1952 and by additional deposits in 1959 and 1960.

The collection included an extensive library of books and other print material pertaining to the Ozark Mountains Region, which has been cataloged and shelved in the Libraries’ main and Arkansas collections. The remaining portion, divided into 13 series, comprises a voluminous collection of research files entitled the Ozark Folk Encyclopedia, bibliographies of Rayburn’s writings and other writing about the Ozarks, several typescript volumes written or compiled by Rayburn, correspondence, scrapbooks, pictures, and other material.

The Rayburn Collection, organized in 13 series, consists of correspondence, writings compiled or written by or about Otto Ernest Rayburn, research files, scrapbooks, and pictures. The bulk of the collection is the Ozark Folk Encyclopedia, 229 folders containing Rayburn’s working files of clippings, notes, letters, pictures, etc., arranged in alphabetical order.

Some material was compiled by Rayburn into book form: Bibliographies of his works and of other writing on the Ozarks; Enchanted Ozarks, in 3 volumes, “anecdotes of men and women who have helped enrich the lore of the region;” Ozark Panorama, in 3 volumes, “folkways and customs, actual events, and traditional folklore;” Ozark Folks and Folklore; Survey of Ozark Superstitions, in 2 volumes; Ozark Sketchbook; a compilation of his verse; Book reviews and comments on his works Forty Years in the Ozarks and Ozark Country; Way Back Yonder, copies of a published newspaper column by Rayburn.

There are 4 scrapbooks and a series of pictures, mostly photographs. Processed by Special Collections. Special Collections Division, University of Arkansas Libraries, Fayetteville, Arkansas.

“I walked on, for I had yet a long way to go before nightfall. Now it
was but a mite after mid-day. After leaving the train at Winona, I
could have perhaps caught a ride to Eminence had I stayed with the
wagon road instead of footing it up the spur-track leading northward
to cross Jack’s Fork at the Hodge place where I left to journey up
Possum Trot toward Little Wonder Schoolhouse and Tucked Away Church
House, above which in the ride to the north, I lived – the place
where I was born and which I called home, where my parents had
settled in their youth and planned some day to die.”

HILLBILLY (Hillbillies)

The origin of this American nickname for mountain folk in the Ozarks and in Appalachia comes from Ulster. Ulster-Scottish (The often incorrectly labeled “Scots-Irish”) settlers in the hill-country of Appalachia brought their traditional music with them to the new world, and many of their songs and ballads dealt with William, Prince of Orange, who defeated the Catholic King James II of the Stuart family at the Battle of the Boyne, Ireland in 1690. William of Orange The signing of the National Covenant, Greyfriar’s Kirkyard, 1638 Supporters of King William were known as “Orangemen” and “Billy Boys” and their North American counterparts were soon referred to as “hillbillies”. It is interesting to note that a traditional song of the Glasgow Rangers football club today begins with the line, “Hurrah! Hurrah! We are the Billy Boys!” and shares its tune with the famous American Civil War song, “Marching Through Georgia”. Stories abound of American National Guard units from Southern states being met upon disembarking in Britain during the First and Second World Wars with the tune, much to their displeasure! One of these stories comes from Colonel Ward Schrantz, a noted historian, Carthage Missouri native, and veteran of the Mexican Border Campaign, as well as the First and Second World Wars, documented a story where the US Army’s 30th Division, made up of National Guard units from Georgia, North and South Carolina and Tennessee arrived in the United Kingdom…”a waiting British band broke into welcoming American music, and the soldiery, even the 118th Field Artillery and the 105 Medical Battalion from Georgia, broke into laughter.

Rosamond Cemetery
Newton County, Arkansas

Birth: Jul 1885(MO)
Death: 9 Jun 1960

Son of NN and Rosa (Bennett) Rosamond
Married to Delia, Maiden Name Unknown
Children:
Elered (Name unclear on census),Willie F, Maggie M, Charles N

Note: This is a remarkable stone. It appears that the flat part with writing was ground flat. The area above the writing was chipped out. The writing is very fancy cursive.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/359497455425768

https://kval.com/news/local/francis-obrien-library-patrons-in-blue-river-work-to-save-old-growth-trees

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Mauldin,_Arkansas

Arewine Yates Standridge was in Prison at Jackson County, Arkansas, for shoting through a door killing N.N. Rosamondand Martha T. Rosamond Overturf, wifeof F. M. Overturf, on January 1, 1908, in Newton County, Arkansas.


Yates was shot and killed from ambush by George Ellis. Yates and his niece Ada Johnson were returning to Vian, Oklahoma from a shopping trip to Sallisaw. This was shortly after noon on August 8, 1940. (A news paper clipping says that Yates was killed outright while his cousin, Mrs Ada Johnson, 29, who was with him died enroute to a Ft. Smith Hospital.) Yates is buried at Hartman, Arkansas in the same cemetery as his mother. Yates Standridge and Mrs. Ada Johnson the woman who was killed with him are buried in a cemetery on a hill in Hartman, Arkansas, in the corner of the junction of two roads. There are no markers. The spot was verified by the town marshall when Yates lived there, Lee Morrow, who had helped to dig these two graves as well as the grave of Yates’ mother Jane (Yates) Taylor Cavin Standridge).

FINN ROCK: “I always wondered why they called it a camp,” Billie Rose recalls. “Our folks lived there for almost 20 years. I guess ‘camp’ sort of gave the impression we were transients but we weren’t.”
Billie, her sister Nancy and brother Joe, were part of a gathering of old friends last Saturday who grew up in a community that many of today’s McKenzie Valley residents might never know existed. Their home, the Finn Rock Camp has long roots, stretching back to 1890, when Thomas “Whit” Whitaker Rosborough built a sawmill in Rosboro, Arkansas. After his honeymoon itinerary swung though the Pacific Northwest, Whit had a longing to return. He did that in 1939 when he moved to Springfield, Oregon, and built what a newspaper of that time called the region’s “most modern timber manufacturing plant.” Timber for the mill came from lands he’d purchased up the McKenzie Valley.

Many of the men who brought the wood out of the woods followed Whit from back East. Nancy said their Dad made the move on his own at first and later arranged for his family to move out on a train.
Doyle Hawks said his father had been hired to build the houses at the camp. When his family rolled into town on a Greyhound bus, Whit’s chauffeur was their to pick them up in a black limousine. He and Whit’s housemaid had also made the move, living in Oregon until he died.
David Quillin’s Dad heard the call from Texas, leaving behind a job as a welder in a shipyard. His family, he said, “sold what they had, loaded up an old black Packard and the clothes on their backs.”
The reminiscing was part of a story gathering process in anticipation of this year’s McKenzie Memories event sponsored by the McKenzie Watershed Council. Scheduled for April 1st in Eugene, the program will include a “Fireside talk” with people recalling what it was like growing up in the Finn Rock Camp, as well as a session with local author Barry Lopez.
This year’s McKenzie Memories will be held at Venue 252 (the old Eugene Planing Mill), 252 Lawrence Street in Eugene, beginning at 7 p.m. Tickets for $15 will go on sale on March 1st. For more information, call 541-345-2799 or contact brandi@mckenzieriver.org.

Top Photo Courtesy Curtis Irish. Back in the 1950’s, the Finn Rock Camp was a thriving community with 27 homes for employees of the Rosboro Lumber Company.

Second image: Lamar White, Nancy Rose, Joe Rose, Billie Rose, Doyle Hawks, and  Dave Quillin in front of the last structure standing, the old camp’s pumphouse.

McKenzie River Reflections

BORN OF TWO ROSES

A half hour ago I talked to Deborah Cryder at the Forestvale Cemetary. She is going to send me information on Ida Rose who died when she was 28 years of age of dropsy. Twenty days later, Ida’s daughter, Dollie Rosamond, dies. She is less then one year old. Royal Rosamond lost his mother and baby sister in one fail swoop. He must have been traumatized. Then, his father gets remarried to a Mildred, who may not have wanted Frank around, and he is “bound” out to his uncle, James Taylor, who married Ida’s sister, Laura Rosamond. Frank will call William Scott Spaulding his father. Did William adopt Frank? If so, when? I believe there is a typo, in regards to the Reese name. John Wesley Rose buried here. Is this where Frank got his middle name? This would make three generations of the Rose Family buried in Montana.

Edward Haney Rose is the grandfather of Ida Rose, and father of John Wesley Rose.

To be born by a mother born Rosemary Rosamond, who named me John, not knowing her great grandfather was named John Rose, is a genealogical wonder. I will be recording my findings with the Rose Family Association.

http://www.rosefamilyassociation.com/html/Rose-Family-DNA-Project.html

https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/edward-haney-rose_131956025

https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/j-wesley-rose_131953322

Deborah went out to where Ida and Dollie are buried side by side. She drove a stick in the ground, and took a picture that she is going to send me. I thanked her profusely, for I saw roses take bloom, and thorns.

The struggle I have had in finding these Rose Names, and gathering them in our Family Vase, is epic, and poetic. To reunite these roses, is a wonder and delight. There was laughter between Deborah and I. This caretaker is happy when people care. All our time, is enchanted.

Jon Presco

https://arkansasgravestones.org/cemetery.php?cemID=7560

This ancient Scottish surname is locational in origin, from the place called “Roxburgh” near Kelso in what is now the “Borders” county of Scotland, formerly Roxburghshire.

In the late summer of 1939, Benton took his son Thomas Piacenza (T. P.) to Arkansas for two short vacations. The pair spent time floating and fishing the White and Buffalo rivers. Benton also sketched and painted the scenery there, resulting in the lithograph Down The River, which featured his son. Another product of these trips was a painting and lithograph of a White River scene, Shallow Creek.

Benton returned in the spring of 1940 with a group of his advanced students from KCAI. They spent about ten days sketching and painting in Newton County, near Jasper. The following year, Benton returned with yet another group of students.

It was about this time that Benton became acquainted with various Arkansas artists and writers. He met poet John Gould Fletcher, who introduced Benton to the artist Adrian Brewer in 1938. Benton knew artists Louis and Elsie Freund and was a periodic visitor at their home in Eureka Springs (Carroll County). He also knew Ozark writer Vance Randolph and illustrated some of his work.

It’s high noon….I said after my Old Man Nap failed to take me into the future, because, the future has arrived at the New Gateway to the McKenzie! I found another Rose. Billy Ruth Rose is The History Keeper, a true Oregonian Hobbit. She might be my kin!

Two days ago my niece, Shannon Rosamond, sent a message of concern. She had hear about the fires in Oregon on NPR radio. She offered me a safe haven in Arizona where she lives close to Christine’s other daughter, Drew Benton.

Dianne-Frye Dundon is third generation Finn Rock. The Fryes are one of the oldest families on the McKenzie River. She married Michael Dundon, the brother of Jim Dundon who married my younger sister, Vicki Presco, who I saw running around topless on John Allensworth’s land. John owned the Log Cabin Inn. Jim built a geodesic home on John’s property. His brother built a cabin next to the dome. Three years later, Michael is a father of four working in the woods as a tree-topper. He later became a foreman for a famous logging outfit. This is ‘Sometimes A Great Notion’.

Michael was a cook at the Inn and the Cougar Room. Both these places burned down years ago. Dianne bartended at the Inn and all her children worked at other restaurants and stores.  Dianne got my newfound sixteen year old mother, a job teaching at McKenzie High School. Jennifer Dundon had just moved out of the cabin you see above, and it was for rent for $500 a month. I sent these photos and offer to Heather, but she had moved. There was no forwarding address – until three days ago! I am in theory, moving all my Rose Family – to Finn Rock – for the rebuilding time started at Noon today! Come back for a visit, for this post….will grow. You can’t keep the dream of a good man down. The ghost of Harold Carlson woke me this morning.

“Time to go to work!”

I have more kin than I know of up the McKenzie in Blue River thanks to my little sister, Victoria Mary Presco marrying James Dundon. They found this little town and built a geodesic dome on John’s property. John owned the Log Cabin Inn until he suffered a heart attack. He wasn’t around when it burned down in 2008. The Duke of Windsor came here to fish, and stayed at the Inn, along with Clark Gable. I better add, they stayed at different times. Folks can talk, make stuff up, if you’re not careful.

Yep! I lived the life my grandpappy dreamed of living after he left it for awhile. Royal Rosamond owned forty acres in Arkansas where he talked with his friend Otto Rayburn about making a resort for poets who like to fish. I got the letter to prove it. Rayburn is the acme me of Ozark Historians.

I don’t talk to any of my River Kin, because they DeFolked me. Its what folks do up river, sometimes. I was ‘The Odd One’ not from around here. I came on a train in 1987 to get sober at Serenity Lane. I stayed in a trailer on Michael and Diane”s property.

Greg and I started studying in his little movie video shop. Blue River People would pull up in those great long squarish cars they don’t make anymore, rent a movie, and lay gravel as they headed home to feed the boredom of their brood. In those days, real loggers thought this was fake plastic stuff. They preferred to watch a kerosene lamp till their kids dosed off. Being authentic, being the Real McCoy, was the local ambition.

When I came to visit, the Dundon’s were on pins and needles. They had waited for days to ask me a question.

“Have you seen the movie ‘My Dinner With Andre’?”

“Yes I have!” I beamed, happy to hear my kin got them some culture.

“What did you think of it?”

“It made my top ten favorite movies of all time!”

The Dundon clan broke out in uproarious laughter.

“I knew it! Told you so!”

Michael had found the VCR lying along Highway 126. He took it home. Put it in the VCR, and after thirty minutes, took it out of the VCR, got in his car, and returned it where he found it. He pulled over and tossed it out the window. We didn’t know about my authentic roots. Those were the salad days. Our Blue River Diner Conversations will be the new catechism.  Come time to celebrate John’s birthday, plastic images of the Dundons will be put out on your lawn – with glowing white sheep!

One day, while I was walking to Greg’s from the Blue River Free Library, I was struck on the head. Some describe it as being dived upon by an eagle. I asked myself this question – out of the blue:

“If John was the greatest prophet born of woman, where is his prophecy so we can read it, compare it, and see it is true – for our own damn self?

PRINGFIELD — Rosboro’s board of directors is considering putting the Springfield-based lumber company up for sale.

The privately held company’s shareholders are widely dispersed geographically and a sale could make sense, the company said.

“What was once an organization owned by just a few of the original leaders of the company today has 60 owner-families throughout the country,” Rosboro Chief Executive Officer Scott Nelson said in a statement Wednesday.

Given that dispersed ownership, the company’s strong financial position and a robust market for mergers and acquisitions, Rosboro’s board has determined it would be “prudent to undertake a review of strategic alternatives to maximize shareholder value,” Nelson said. Those alternatives include potentially selling the company, he said. The company doesn’t publicly disclose its financial figures.

Rosboro said said it is one of the largest employers in Lane County, although the company does not list how many people work for it.

Springfield city spokesman Niel Laudati said that while he has no precise employment figures for Rosboro, the company’s economic presence in the city is significant. The company’s headquarters and Springfield mill are on Main Street. The company also has six other wood products plants, all in Oregon.

“Rosboro is an important part of Springfield and employs many in our community,” Laudati said in an email. “We plan to offer any support we can as they move forward.”

Company leadership is only weighing the possibility of selling, and no deal is in place, according to Nelson’s statement. The company does not plan to disclose any additional information about alternatives until a decision is made, he said.

Rosboro has retained the multinational banking firm Goldman Sachs as a financial adviser and Stoel Rives as attorney for the exploratory process, according to the statement. Portland-based Stoel Rives has law offices around the country.

A spokesman for Rosboro did not immediately return a phone message Wednesday afternoon. Joon Cho, a banker with Goldman Sachs in San Francisco who was listed as a contact in a Rosboro news release about Rosboro’s decision, declined to comment.

Rosboro says it is the largest producer of glued laminated timber, or glulam, in North America. Composed of boards that have been glued together, glulam beams are typically used in large retail stores, bridges and other big structures.

The company says its timberland — about 100,000 acres in Western Oregon — constitutes one of the largest privately owned networks of tree farms in the Pacific Northwest.

Thomas “Whit” Whitaker Rosborough, who had been a lumberman in Arkansas, moved to Springfield in 1939, and the first board came out of his new sawmill in 1940. He retired five years later and left ownership of the company to a group of key employees.

Follow Dylan on Twitter @DylanJDarling . Email dylan.darling@registerguard.com .

Rosboro (Pike County)

Rosboro is an unincorporated community located in the northeastern corner of Pike County. It is five miles west of Amity (Clark County) and six miles east of Glenwood (Pike County). During its heyday, Rosboro was a major operational center for the Caddo River Lumber Company in the Ouachita Mountains, placed in an area that was a vast virgin forest of short-leaf pine trees.

Thomas Whitaker “Whit” Rosborough, a sawmill owner who lived near Kansas City, Missouri, became interested in this Arkansas forest and decided to move there, bringing some of his employees with him. After arriving and investigating the area, he decided that an area near Amity would be an ideal place to build his sawmill. However, the local citizens did not approve of the venture because Rosborough had African-American employees, so he found another place just five miles west of Amity. He named the new town Rosboro, a shortened version of his surname. The Caddo River Lumber Company’s mill was built around 1907. People began moving in, and soon the population was between 400 and 500. Rosboro became a thriving, well-populated sawmill town with several stores, more than 100 “shotgun” houses for families, a hotel for single employees, a kiln, a commissary, and a company–owned meat market. Everyone had electricity generated by a turbine, plus running water from a water tower.

The town was segregated, having separate living areas for the black and white residents. Both groups had their own churches and schools. In the white people’s area was a theater, while the black neighborhood had an entertainment venue called the “Barrell House.”

The Missouri Pacific Railroad had one passenger train that ran daily, plus a freight train. A depot was built across the street from the company office. A train carried logs thirty or forty miles away, and there were camps along the way for the employees. This log train ran through Self Creek settlement near Daisy (Pike County).

In 1915, one of the sawmills burned. Three years later, the company established another town, Mauldin (Montgomery County). Heavy timber production began there in 1922. Logs were shipped via railroad to Rosboro for processing. Since Rosboro was the main operation, it outlasted Mauldin and another mill at Graysonia (Clark County) by almost a decade. In 1939, the company closed another Rosboro mill, and Rosborough made plans to move his operations to Springfield, Oregon. Nearly all of his employees, both black and white, decided to move with him. Other employees moved out of Rosboro to find other jobs, which effectively ended the town. The Ozan Lumber Mill, smaller than Rosborough’s, shut down in 1956. The population of the area declined, and the school consolidated with Glenwood in 1956.

Amity and Glenwood schools consolidated in 1995. The new high school was built at Rosboro, which is between the two towns, just east of the old town of Rosboro. The school is called Centerpoint High School.

There is little left of Rosboro in the twenty-first century. The stores are all gone, save for an empty store across the highway from the high school. Part of an old store stands just west of the high school, along with the old water tower. Local residents not employed by the school commute to other nearby communities such as Amity, Glenwood, Hot Springs (Garland County), and Arkadelphia (Clark County).

For additional information:
Early History of Pike County, Arkansas: The First Hundred Years. Murfreesboro, AR: Pike County Archives and History Society, 1989.

Smith, Kenneth L. SawmillThe Story of Cutting the Last Great Virgin Forest East of the Rockies. Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1986.

Doris Russell Foshee
Murfreesboro, Arkansas

BLUE RIVER, Ore. — Blue River residents and Francis O’Brien Memorial Library staff and patrons came together Wednesday morning in an attempt to save three trees in front of the library in Blue River.

The issue hinges on whether the trees are located on library property – or the library’s neighbor’s property.

“A private party intends to remove three Doug firs, each at least a hundred feet tall, from in front of the Francis O’Brien Memorial Library,” the group said in a statement. “This removal not only will unnecessarily kill three old-growth trees, but will be dangerous to the surrounding structures. The Blue River Water District board is concerned that falling the trees will ruin the integrity of the water pipes that provides drinking water to the town.”

https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m18!1m12!1m3!1d840.8568173230752!2d-122.33820151788531!3d44.153636881579445!2m3!1f0!2f0!3f0!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x54c0a351996a2b0d:0x54c46dbac97c5fa8!2sBlue%20River%20Library!5e1!3m2!1sen!2sus!4v1573681028674!5m2!1sen!2sus

“A private party intends to remove three Doug firs, each at least a hundred feet tall, from in front of the Francis O’Brien Memorial Library,” the group said in a statement. “This removal not only will unnecessarily kill three old-growth trees, but will be dangerous to the surrounding structures. The Blue River Water District board is concerned that falling the trees will ruin the integrity of the water pipes that provides drinking water to the town.”

They say felling these trees is “potentially detrimental to the town’s water system,” and that it would “hinder access to the library, and unless the trees are fell perfectly, it will damage the surrounding structures, including the library itself and family homes.”

Library supporters and Blue River residents, many in their 80s and 90s, planned to form a human chain around the trees, “if that’s what is needed,” the group said.

Property owner says trees are his

The owner of the property next to the library, Ralph Kennedy, says the trees are located on his property – and his to remove.

“The library built that building on the alley,” Kennedy said. “If anyone has any trouble with any alley, it’s the fact they built that on there.”

{p}The owner of the property next to the library, Ralph Kennedy, says the trees are located on his property – and his to remove. “The library built that building on the alley,” Kennedy said. “If anyone has any trouble with any alley, it’s the fact they built that on there.”{/p}

Kennedy said the trees block morning sunlight – and one of them is diseased and a danger to the public.

The loggers Kennedy had arranged to have cut down the trees left the scene as community members gathered to protest.

Kennedy said he still intends to remove the trees – but would not say when

Library board hopes something can be worked out

Priscilla Oxley, president for library board, said she doesn’t think any local loggers will agree to cut down the trees.

“I don’t think they’ll come back again,” she said. “If they should, our group would be back – and probably still more people.”

{p}Priscilla Oxley, president for library board, said she doesn’t think any local loggers will agree to cut down the trees. “I don’t think they’ll come back again,” she said. “If they should, our group would be back – and probably still more people.” (SBG){/p}

Oxley said she understands Kennedy and his wife’s predicament.

“Our neighbor, when she bought her land, I guess was never told this area was used as a public road for probably the last 75 years as people came to get books,” she said. “I rather feel for them. They are in a difficult situation. I would love to see them sell us that back half of their property.”

{p}Priscilla Oxley, president of the library board, said she understands Ralph Kennedy and his wife’s predicament. “Our neighbor, when she bought her land, I guess was never told this area was used as a public road for probably the last 75 years as people came to get books,” she said. “I rather feel for them. They are in a difficult situation. I would love to see them sell us that back half of their property.” (SBG){/p}

Al Artero, superintendent of the Blue River Water District, said he found out about the plan to cut the trees Tuesday.

“We have a very aging water system, it came in in the early 70s. The shockwave of these trees coming down, in my personal opinion, could cause great risk to our aging water system,” he said. “I would like some clarification on property lines – who owns what lands, where the right of ways are, and just make sure the interest of the public is maintained.”

{p}Al Artero, superintendent of the Blue River Water District, said he found out about the plan to cut the trees Tuesday. “We have a very aging water system, it came in in the early 70s. The shockwave of these trees coming down, in my personal opinion, could cause great risk to our aging water system,” he said. “I would like some clarification on property lines – who owns what lands, where the right of ways are, and just make sure the interest of the public is maintained.” (SBG){/p}

Sean Davis, a community organizer in the area, said the problem stems from uncertainty over property lines.

“Everybody has a map, and they are making the lines mean different things,” he said.

“I know that Mr. Kennedy believes those are his trees,” Davis said.

So does the library.

“The library has been taking care of that property for 20, 30 years now,” he said.

{p}Sean Davis, a community organizer in the area, said the problem stems from uncertainty over property lines. “Everybody has a map, and they are making the lines mean different things,” he said. “I know that Mr. Kennedy believes those are his trees,” Davis said. So does the library. “The library has been taking care of that property for 20, 30 years now,” he said. (SBG){/p}

Jim Baker, one of the residents who came out to support the library, called the situation a misunderstanding.

“You can hire a logger to come in and cut down trees for firewood, you don’t need a permit. You’re going to sell the logs, you need a permit. That still doesn’t give you permission to cut down the neighbor’s trees, or the public’s trees,” he said.

Baker planned to stay and stand between loggers and the trees as long as necessary.

“I’m 90 years old,” he said. “I got a lot of time to be here.”

{p}Jim Baker, one of the residents who came out to support the library, called the situation a misunderstanding. “You can hire a logger to come in and cut down trees for firewood, you don’t need a permit. You’re going to sell the logs, you need a permit. That still doesn’t give you permission to cut down the neighbor’s trees, or the public’s trees,” he said. Baker planned to stay and stand between loggers and the trees as long as necessary. “I’m 90 years old,” he said. “I got a lot of time to be here.” (SBG){/p}

History

William W. Mauldin, known as Billy Mauldin, was born in Greer County, Texas, and in 1906 had homesteaded 160 acres (0.65 km2) where Mauldin would later be located. Billy Mauldin worked in cooperation with Thomas Whitaker “Whit” Rosborough, who had formed the Caddo River Timber Company in 1906, when he started the town of Rosboro, in Pike County. The town of Mauldin first began heavy production of timber in 1922. It was, like Graysonia, Arkansas, a “company-owned town”, but did have a post officeschoolchurch, and a large number of shotgun houses, along with business offices. The Caddo River Lumber Company built a railroad line from Womble (now Norman, Arkansas) to Mauldin, through the Gaston Settlement. The pine timber was shipped via train to mills in Glenwood and Rosboro, the latter of which was Rosborough’s main mill.

For a time the town thrived. But the company, functioning on a “cut and move” theory, packed up and disassembled the entire town almost overnight, in 1933, having cut all the virgin timber in the immediate area. The town had two 1-acre (4,000 m2ponds used to float logs. The ponds still exist today, located just outside Mount Ida on Arkansas Highway 270. Nothing remains today short of a few concrete blocks where the mill once stood, and the two ponds. Both ponds were turned into a fish hatchery in 1940. There is a vacant field to the side of the ponds where the town once stood. All the larger buildings were torn down, while the smaller ones were moved to a new site near Forester, in Scott County.

The Caddo River Lumber Company later sold the majority of the land they owned there to the US Forest Service. In 1939 Thomas Rosborough moved his entire operation to the northwest, settling in Springfield, Oregon, and taking with him large numbers of loyal employees. Today his company, called “Rosboro”, is one of the only fully integrated timber operators in the United States. It is also one of the largest private timberland holders of the Pacific Northwest.

The surname Roxburgh, which has been spelled in the same way for five or six centuries, is the stillliving root from which come similar names or variants beginning in Ros-, Ross- and Rose-. Examples of
the variants are Rossburgh, -borough, -brugh and -brough. Among those beginning in Ros- we find the
same endings and also the ending -boro, while for those beginning in Rose- there are also the endings –
braugh and -burrough and possibly -burrow. Some of the variants are confined to the United States,
where the tendency to phonetic spelling is especially noticeable.
Five or six centuries ago, before the name had become Roxburgh, it was Rokesburg or Rokesburgh as
we will show below. Still earlier there had been a Celtic predecessor which is mentioned in the ancient
Welsh Book of Taliessin, a collection of poetry written mainly in the sixth century.
It is hard, at first, to understand why the early Welsh bard Taliessin would have had occasion to refer to
the south of Scotland. In the early fifth century, however, what are now England and the Scottish
lowlands were still inhabited mainly by the Welsh or Cymric peoples. When the protection of the
Roman armies was withdrawn from Britain for the last time about the year 400 the invaders from across
the North Sea and from Scotland began almost immediately to drive the Welsh toward the far southwest
of the island. For two centuries the Welsh fought a delaying action Under the leadership of the
celebrated Arthur who was either a king or a chieftain, and of his successors, before they were at last
confined to what are now Wales and Cornwall.
It is from the period of this ancient struggle that the earliest known predecessor of the names Rokesburg
and Roxburgh can be traced. The Welsh form of the name, as it appears in the Book of Taliessin, is Caer
Rywc, meaning fort of Rywc or Rywg. The next form was the Anglo-Saxon Rauics Burh and the next
appears to have been Roca or Rawics burg, the word burg at that period meaning a fortified settlement.
The name Caer Rywc in Taliessin (“between Caer Ryan and Caer Rywc”, in the tenth poem, Daronwy,
as given in W. F. Skene, cited below) referred not to Roxburgh Castle, however, but to a fort located
near the River Nith, a stream that flows south-east from central Ayrshire into Solway Firth. From the
fort’s location it is thought that it was used for defense against the Picts, and in imagination one may ask
the natural but unanswerable question, was it ever visited by King Arthur himself? Today the name Caer
Rywc survives locally in the name Crawic Water, a nearby tributary of the Nith that enters it from the
north a little above Sanquhar,
Rawic’s name was not confined, however, to an obscure fort in the hills. According to Sir Herbert E.
Maxwell, in his Scottish Land Names, p.142 “this Rawic seems to have left his name attached to a better
known place; Roxburgh, spelt of old Rokesburh is Rawic’s Burgh”.. The Welsh passage in the Book of
Taliessin., mentioned earlier, is found in W. F. Skene’s The Four Ancient Books of Wales volume 1, p.
270, line 50, and in volume II, page 148, next to last line.
The name Rokesburg appears in a deed or charter granted about the year 1120 by David, Earl of
Lothian and Cumbria. It is worth recalling that David was the fourth son of Malcolm III of Scotland.
Malcolm to whose name the appellation Canmore (i.e. “big head”) is usually applied, had overcome
Macbetfi in 1054 with the aid of MacDuff, regaining the throne of Duncan his father whom Macbeth
had murdered. Malcolm (whose wife, Margaret later became a Saint) died in 1093 and was succeeded in
turn by his three older sons before David came to the throne in 1124. During David’s constructive reign
of 30 years Rokesburg, located at a strategic point on the River Tweed, suddenly became noteworthy as
the site of a royal castle that was protected by unusually strong fortifications. The charter granted by
David, already referred to, gave lands and buildings for the perpetual support of a monastery at Selkirk
Abbey. Some of the property given for the Abbey is described in the charter as “in burgo de
Roxburgh as a Place and Family Name – Prof. D.C. MacGregor Page 2 of 12
file:///C:/Users/Owner/Documents/Research/History/Scottish%20History/Roxburgh/Roxbu… 3/10/2013
Rokesburge. This charter or deed, which contains perhaps the first mention of Rokesburg in a reliable
document, is reproduced in Appendix I.
Many of David’s later official acts were completed at Rokesburg, the place having become one of the
four royal burghs from which the perambulating government of those days was from time to time
administered. Rokesburg is for this reason mentioned at least fifty-one times in the documents in Sir
Archibald Lawrie’s collection of Early Scottish Charters prior to A.D. 1153.
The spelling of the name varies considerably, however, the first syllable appearing in three other ways as
in Rochesburg, Rogesburg and Roxburg. In addition there are four main spellings of burg, not counting
the required Latin ending in e following the preposition in. The full range of twelve spellings of the
whole word will be found in Appendix II. It is clear from this that differences and errors in spelling the
name are not confined to modern times.
In the middle of the 1100’s Rogesburg appears also as a family name, an Adam de Rogesburg being one
of the witnesses to a charter granted by King David about the year 1150. The document is reproduced in
Appendix III. A further charter, also from Lawrie’s collection (No. 213) and issued in November 1150,
refers in the body of the document to Adam de Rochesburh capellanus regis (chaplain to the king). The
two documents, which almost certainly refer to the same person, despite the different spelling, appear to
be the earliest documentary evidence of the name as applied to a family, and from the time and
circumstances it probably applied to a single family connection.
Later in the same century, between 1163 and 1185, Walter de Rokeburg appears as witness of several
charters issued by the bishop of St. Andrew’s. In the same period, Hugh de Rokesburc, who was chosen
as bishop of Glasgow after being King William the Lion’s chief minister, Chancellor of Scotland,
received a royal grant of land in the abbacy of Munros. This is recorded in the Registrum de
Aberbrothoc. He died in 1199 before his consecration as bishop, and was buried at Jedburgh, not far
from Roxburgh.
A Rokeburgh is on record in 1269, and in 1291 William de Roxburgh was an official (the ‘cellarer’ or
keeper of stores) of Newbattle Abbey, a little south of Dalkieth and within ten miles of Edinburgh. The
cellars of this Abbey survive as foundations of the country seat, Newbattle, of the Marquis of Lothian. A
little south of the Scottish border, in Northumberland, a William de Rokesburgh is mentioned in the Pipe
Rolls of Edward I in 1293-94.
Another, John de Rokesburg, served in 1295 as lawyer or procurator for the monks of Kelso, only a mile
from Rokesburg Castle. In 1332 William de Rokesburg was the head of a hospital in Berwick, about 20
miles downstream from Rokesburg, and a John Rokesburgh appears as defendant in a legal dispute in
1358.
No occurrences of the name in the 1400’s are mentioned in George F. Black’s Surnames of Scotland
(New York Public Library, 1946) from which some of the above details are drawn. The absence of the
name may reflect the misfortunes of the period. From 1346 to 1460 Roxburgh Castle was in Englishhands and on its recovery, following the siege of 1460, the great structure was demolished and the town,
already much damaged no doubt by repeated warfare, declined. Another event that almost certainly
contributed to the absence of the name after 1360 was the Black Death or bubonic plague which reached
Scotland from England and Europe in 1350 and recurred twice in the 1360’s. The plague, which carried
off about half the population of Europ

Joaquin Miller Went To Columbia College

Posted on February 28, 2020 by Royal Rosamond Press

Joaquin Miller’s proposal to Pre-Raphaelite Muse Emma Brown – is huge! That he attended one of the first colleges in the West – is huge! I was going to tell you why, but, I am saving it for my lawsuit against Oregon State. This is what I want. I am made a professor for life with tenure. A model of Miller’s cabin is built for me out in the agriculture fields where I will hold classes on Tolkien, Miller, London, and Fleming.

I am going to ask Phil Knight to revive Columbia College and make it a Mecca for Bohemian, Alternative, Learning – with Hippie Museum!

John Presco

https://www.friendlyareaneighbors.org/blog/columbia-college

Laneland

Posted on February 12, 2019by Royal Rosamond Press

One of the first colleges in Oregon was burned down – twice! Arson is suspected. I believe a man loyal to the cause of Joseph Lane is the culprit. Could it have been my hero, Joaquin Miller, who graduated from Columbia with about twenty others. There was a schism. John Dicky was an abolitionist preacher who co-founded Columbia. Was Miller, like Paul, blinded by the light, he seeing the error of his way, and turning his life around? Did Harry Lane see the error of his grandfather’s way, and make a precise plan to not be like him?

In the De-naming game I find myself in the thick of, I decided to go all the, by De-naming the United States of America – because We the People – have never been united. End the hypocrisy – now! How about ‘Laneland’? Two generations of the Lane family dwelt in Jamestown that was an experimental city. This might be America’s first Hippie Town…..Bohemianville if you will!

Two days ago I watched Ken Burn’s ‘Vietnam’. It was painful from the start. Being a Anti-War Demonstrator, I grieved at the loss of time and my youth – all our youths! I thought I would die without seeing a anti-war monument. Then I saw the painting of the new building around the old dealership of Joe Romania who donated much of the land that Lane College is built on. I will be going before Mayor of Eugene, suggesting a statue of Harry Lane be put here, because he was against America entering World War 1.

We hippies invented Political Correctness. We honored Native Americans and begged for Non-Violence. We need a museum to record and preserve this important history. Do no let Ed Ray have the last word. I want to interview him. Did he go to Vietnam, or did he get a college deferment? Many Vets who were gungho about killing gooks, turned their life around. The motto of Lane College is…….

Transforming Lives Through Learning

Consider Harry Potter and Harry Lane. Demand more magic in your lives! Screw that ugly wall that is a continuance of Benton’s Manifest Destiny. Our President is unteachable!

Note the wall around Jamestown, and the hundred foot Warrior Chief on the other side. Here is proof the grand experiment went wrong at the beginning. I will be sending a script to the History Channel about my theory why Europeans had to kill all the Native Americans. Apparently they carried a giant gene after mating with the Nephilim, and, every now and then a Squaw gave birth to a giant. Say goodbye to that Shame Game!

John Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

Colonel Joseph Lane (son of Thomas Lane and Elizabeth Jones) was born 1675 in Jamestown, James City, VA, USA, and died 1758 in Edgecombe,NC, USA.He married Julian Alderson on 1685 (sic) in Surry, VA, USA. Col. Joseph Lane is my 7th great-grandfather, and my GEDMATCH is #A319313 and my DNA matches his son, Edward Lane. He married Julian Jarrell.

In a Land Deed signed by his son Joseph LANE Sr, it states that: “Deed from Joseph Lane and Julian his wife of Isle of Wight County, Sept. 4, 1710, to Thomas Lane, of Surrey County 200 acres given me by my father (Thomas Lane, patent 1682) in his last will and testament (father Thomas Lane, patent 1682). Signed, Joseph Lane (Ielian) Julian Lane

“Sealed in red wax. Wit: Thomas Hart, Mary Hart, Thomas Lane Jr. The witnesses Thomas and Mary Hart were the son in-law and daughter of Richard & Eliz. Washington- his will Nov. 9, 1724, Surrey Co.” (Ref. Surrey County Deed Book 5, page 37) This can be found on Microfilm at the Family History Center called” General History of the LANES of NC and GA.”

There is some refrences that state Thomas LANE SR. was the son of John LANE who married the daughter of Robert BIRD, John had sons Robert, Thomas and John, however more research needs to be done.

Joaquin Miller And Emma Brown

Posted on September 4, 2019by Royal Rosamond Press

I learned yesterday that Joaquin Miller proposed to Pre-Raphaelite Muse, Emma Hill, who became the wife of Ford Maddox Brown. Joaquin spent some time in Maddox’s famous home at 37 Fitzroy Street that is regrettably owned by Scientology. Some of the greatest artists, poets, and writers of Britain met here, especially the Pre-Raphaelites, of which I declared I was one in 1969. I shared these artists with my late sister, the world famous artist known as ‘Rosamond’ who took up art in 1972. I have posthumously titled Christine a Pre-Raphaelite Artist. One of the artists that spent time at William Morris whom had a great influence on J.L. Tolkien. The painting Brown rendered are moviesque. I will try to get the director of my movie ‘Hromund’ to use the work of the Pre-Raphaelites.

Joaquin Miller was friends with William Michael Rossetti, and his brother, Gabriele. William married Lucy Maddox Brown. If Joaquin had married Emma, then he would be kin to the most literary and creative people in the West. For years I have been trying to get City Manager, Neil Laudati, interested in making Springfield Oregon, the Home of the Pre-Raphaelites, because the Miller family lived down the road apiece, and were Oregon Pioneers. My family knows nothing about this history. Since Christine’s death, Drew Benton, Shannon Rosamond, and Shamus Dundon have not written and published ONE WORD about the Artists and Writers in their family, yet, they claim so much! This is an astounding Creative Legacy that will be recognized by Great Britain, once they are made aware of it.

I modeled Royal Rosamond Press after The Germ. I elevated the famous commercial success of Drew and Shannon’s mother, and I have never been thanked. Christine said she owed her success to me, her teacher. The proof of this is evident.

Yoni Noguchi was at the Fitzroy House and lived with Miller in the Oakland Hills. My family knew Miller who may have modeled his Bohemian enclave after the Pre-Raphaelites and the creative souls who knew the Brown family. Yoni appears to have been a Japanese Spy sent by the Emperor to learn Western Culture through poetry. This is so Tolkienish! Here is the Japanese Bilbo who travels to a strange land and bonds with Gandalf. Joaquin write about their small statue. More of his “brown” people came to the Hights.

So soon after I gave my family a flash of bright light, there are dark problems about why I was not told Vicki died ten days ago. It has been suggested I was both the mother and father to my parents, and my siblings. I have been avoiding the possibility I am……..The Family Giver…………and I have been severely ripped off? Or is it a case of the naughty stupid children hiding everything from their brilliant parent who may be their superior, and a genius. No one but me took the time to learn anything about art, and, literature!

Joaquin Miller was the editor of Eugene’s first newspaper – before there was a Springfield. His brother George married a Cogswell who are the founders of the Eugene Register Guard. There’s newspaper men surrounding the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and Sisterhood. George could have been the brother-in-law of  Emma Hill.

Joaquin put the make on English Women dressed as a cowboy, or, Californian Hippie. He came to conquer – with poetry! I would like to employ Miller’s poetry in my book and movie the same way Tolkien did with the poetry of William Morris. Joaquin did his best to wed English Literature to the Wild West. Joaquin’s influence on the culture of Japan needs a collegiate study. The Invasion of Pearl Harbor may have contained Miller’s poetry.

“The Californians like to laze about all day reading poetry to one another, and painting pretty picture. Then, when the mood strikes them, they roll over on one another and fornicate like beasts. Our Imperial Marines will make quick work of them. Bonsai!”

The Beauty that Joaquin really wanted to roll over one, was Mathilde Blind. But, he met his Waterloo! Alas I think I have found the Teutonic Woman that broke Miller’s heart. Did he propose to Emma after Blind body-slammed his cowboy ass in the Bohemian Cage of Pathos, Life, and Death? Our Orgonian was out of his league. There is no Pathos, here, here! Lucy Maddox Brown did a portrait of Blind.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucy_Madox_Brown

With the passing of my sister my thoughts went to the loneliness of Rena Victoria Easton, my Waterloo. It is this connectivity that motivates and moves these Bohemians across a flowery dance floor seeking first the attention of their Sisters and Brothers. Here are the original Hobbits and Hippies, the timeless root of the New Cooperation.

The other day, when my beloved sister came to me while I took my old man nap, she thanked me! From heaven she could behold the Big Picture now that her artistic siblings allowed her to be a part of. She was – wowed! She could not believe her good fortune, and the great choice she made, to be born from the same Rosy womb!

Are those California poppies? Did Joaquin bring a pot of them, over there, on a ship?

John Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

Copyright 2019

Mathilde Blind (born Mathilda Cohen, 21 March 1841 in Mannheim, Germany, died 26 November 1896 in London),[1] was a German-born English poet, fiction writer, biographer, essayist and literary critic. In the early 1870s she emerged as a pioneering female aesthete in a mostly male community of artists and writers, and by the late 1880s she had become a prominent voice and leader among New Woman writers, including Vernon Lee (Violet Paget), Amy LevyMona CairdOlive SchreinerRosamund Marriott Watson, and Katharine Tynan. Her work was praised by Algernon Charles SwinburneWilliam Michael RossettiAmy LevyEdith NesbitArthur Symons and Arnold Bennett. Her widely discussed poem The Ascent of Man represents a distinctly feminist response to the Darwinian theory of evolution.[2]

https://www.lronhubbard.org/landmark-sites/fitzroy.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathilde_Blind

Rosamond Marriet Watson is sometimes placed in the milieu of Thomas Hardy, and again with fin-de-siecle poetry (Oscar Wilde for example). There’s a magnificent website dedicated to her

Mother of the unfortunate, mystic form,
Who calm, immutable, like oldest fate,
Sittest, where through the sombre swinging gate
Moans immemorial life’s encircling storm.
My heart, sore stricken by grief’s leaden arm,
Lags like a weary pilgrim knocking late,
And sigheth–toward thee staggering with its weight–
Behold Love conquered by thy son, the worm!

He stung him mid the roses’ purple bloom,
The Rose of roses, yea, a thing so sweet,
Haply to stay blind Change’s flying feet,
And stir with pity the unpitying tomb.
Here, take him, cold, cold, heavy and void of breath!
Nor me refuse, O Mother almighty, death.

https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Mathilde_Blind

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joaquin_Miller

Emma Madox Brown

https://www.geni.com/people/Yone-Noguchi/6000000018657315549

Born in London, he was a son of immigrant Italian scholar Gabriele Rossetti and his wife Frances Rossetti née Polidori, and the brother of Maria Francesca RossettiDante Gabriel Rossetti and Christina Georgina Rossetti.

He was one of the seven founder members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848, and became the movement’s unofficial organizer and bibliographer. He edited the Brotherhood’s literary magazine The Germ which published four issues in 1850 and wrote the poetry reviews for it.

It was William Michael Rossetti who recorded the aims of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood at their founding meeting in September 1848:

  1. To have genuine ideas to express;
  2. To study Nature attentively, so as to know how to express them;
  3. To sympathize with what is direct and serious and heartfelt in previous art, to the exclusion of what is conventional and self-parading and learned by rote;
  4. And most indispensable of all, to produce thoroughly good pictures and statues.[1]

Although Rossetti worked full-time as a civil servant, he maintained a prolific output of criticism and biography across a range of interests from Algernon Swinburne to James McNeill Whistler. He edited the diaries of his maternal uncle John William Polidori (author of The Vampyre and physician to Lord Byron), a comprehensive biography of D. G. Rossetti, and edited the collected works of D. G. Rossetti and Christina Rossetti.

Rossetti edited the first British edition of the poetry of Walt Whitman, which was published in 1868; however, this edition was bowdlerized.[2] Anne Gilchrist, who became one of the first to write about Whitman, first read his poetry from Rossetti’s edition, and Rossetti helped initiate their correspondence.[3]

In 1874 he married Lucy Madox Brown, daughter of the painter Ford Madox Brown. They honeymooned in France and Italy. Their first child, Olivia Frances Madox, was born in September 1875, and her birth was celebrated in an ode of Swinburne’s. A son, Gabriel Arthur, was born in February 1877, followed by another daughter, Helen Maria, in November 1879, and twins, Mary Elizabeth and Michael Ford, in April 1881. Their son Michael died in infancy. Rossetti and his wife did not have the children baptized, nor were they raised in a Christian household. The children were schooled at home by their mother and governesses. In 1897, Olivia married an Italian anarchist refugee, Antonio Agresti. They later moved to Italy, where Olivia became a translator and writer. After she was widowed in 1926, she became an associate of Ezra Pound, and the two corresponded frequently.

Ford was born in Wimbledon in London,[2], to Catherine Madox Brown and Francis Hueffer, the eldest of three; his brother was Oliver Madox Hueffer. Ford’s father, who became music critic for The Times, was German and his mother English. His paternal grandfather Johann Hermann Hüffer was first to publish Westphalian poet and author Annette von Droste-Hülshoff. He was named after his maternal grandfather, the Pre-Raphaelite painter Ford Madox Brown, whose biography he would eventually write.

https://www.lronhubbard.org/landmark-sites/fitzroy.html

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebritynews/6677898/How-English-Heritage-snubbed-the-Scientologist-founder-L-Ron-Hubbard.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Madox_Brown

Melba Charlotte Broderick

Posted on August 31, 2011by Royal Rosamond Press

Above is a photo of my father’s mother, Melba, and her childhood friend, Violet (Vie), near Joaquin Miller’s house. I heard they were into Isadora Duncan. Did they meet Miller and his daughter at this age?Joaquin Miller lived in the Oakland Hills above the Stuttmeister farm and orchard located in the city of Fruitvale that would later be incorporated into the city of Oakland. Miller was titled the `Poet of
the Sierras’. His farm was called `The Heights’ and was a Mecca for California artists and poets. This eccentric Bohemian was friends of William Broderick and would accompany Melba Charlotte Broderick, the mother of Victor Presco, to San Francisco where Melba met her husband, Hugo Presco, a professional gambler in the Barbary Coast.

Miller carried the infant father of Rosamond on these adventures that proved too much for Melba who divorced Hugo when Victor, Melba’s only child, was three years of age. Joaquin Miller was invited to England by the Pre-Raphaelite poet and artist, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and had dinner at his house with most of the Brotherhood present. The four Presco children would converse with Miller’s daughter on the phone, she calling herself `The White Witch’..

The boy in the two photos is Melba’s brother, Frederick Broderick, with his cow, Daisy. This had to be taken on the farm in Fruit Vale.

Jon Presco

Copyright
2011

http://www.poetryatlas.com/poetry/poem/2357/the-plains-of-arizona.html

Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce (June 24, 1842[2] – circa 1914[3]) was an American short story writer, journalist, poet, and Civil War veteran.

Bierce’s book The Devil’s Dictionary was named as one of “The 100 Greatest Masterpieces of American Literature” by the American Revolution Bicentennial Administration.[4] His story “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” has been described as “one of the most famous and frequently anthologized stories in American literature”;[5] and his book Tales of Soldiers and Civilians (also published as In the Midst of Life) was named by the Grolier Club as one of the 100 most influential American books printed before 1900.[6]

A prolific and versatile writer, Bierce was regarded as one of the most influential journalists in the United States,[7][8] and as a pioneering writer of realist fiction.[9] For his horror writing, Michael Dirda ranked him alongside Edgar Allan Poe and H. P. Lovecraft.[10] His war stories influenced Stephen CraneErnest Hemingway, and others,[11] and he was considered an influential and feared literary critic.[12] In recent decades Bierce has gained wider respect as a fabulist and for his poetry.[13][14]

In December 1913, Bierce traveled to Chihuahua, Mexico, to gain first-hand experience of the Mexican Revolution.[15] He disappeared, and was rumored to be traveling with rebel troops. He was never seen again.

Brown, Ford Madox; Cordelia’s Portion; The Fitzwilliam Museum; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/cordelias-portion-4910

King Ren?’s Honeymoon 1864 Ford Madox Brown 1821-1893 Purchased 1917 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N03229

   

Rosamund Ball, known as Rose, was born in London[1] on 6 October 1860, the fifth child of Benjamin Williams Ball, an accountant and amateur poet, and Sylvia (Good) Ball.[2] Her older brother Wilfrid Ball became a painter of landscapes and marine subjects who helped introduce her to London’s literary circles, including John Lane, the influential publisher of The Yellow Book.[2]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosamund_Marriott_Watson

Gandalf and the Pre-Raphaelites

Posted on November 5, 2018by Royal Rosamond Press

Joaquin Miller had dinner with the Pre-Raphaelites and was my grandmother’s friend. This history is being compiled for the grant I am applying for. The history of the Pre-Raphaelites has not been discarded. I will prepare a home in Springfield.

Above is a photograph of my ancestors taken in the Oakland Hills no far from where Miller lived in his Bohemian enclave called ‘The Hights”. These are Turners and Forty-eighters who helped found the Abolitionist Republican Party and elected our Kin, John Fremont, to be the first Presidential candidate. I am going to send this photo to the Smithsonian. There is a rifle and a black wreath hanging in the tree. The wreath may have something to do with the Odd Fellows who allowed Ken Kesey’s mural to be rendered on their wall.

“As a token of her confidence, she told him he need no longer call
her, “Auntie.” The previous year, Bilbo had suggested that Frodo no
longer address him as, “Uncle,” if he wished. Plain, “Bilbo,” would
do. Frodo still called Bilbo, “Uncle,” now and then; it had become
too ingrained a habit. But, following suit, Rosamunda suggested Frodo
might call her, “Rosa,” or, “Rosamunda.” Frodo forgot, and called
her, “Auntie,” many times, but, within the space of an afternoon
tea, “Rosa,” she became.”

Rosamunda Bolger (née Took) was the mother of Fredegar “Fatty” Bolger
and Estella Brandybuck. She was married to Odovacar Bolger and was
known as Rosamunda Took prior to the marriage. They lived in
Budgeford in Bridgefields in the Eastfarthing of the Shire. Rosamunda
and Odovacar both attended the Bilbo’s Farewell Party in 3001 along
with their children.

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Christine Rosamond Benton and I were drawn into Tolkien’s Trilogy. The artist known as ‘Rosamond’ could not put these books down, nor could I. This caused our mutual friend, Keith Purvis, a British subject, to comment;

“She doesn’t know these books are real.”

We three were original hippies who took the Lord of the Rings to heart as we modified the modern world, made it over more to our liking, we oblivious to what normal folk were about. This is exactly what William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelite Brother and Sisterhood did. They – returned!

I discovered the Pre-Raphaelites in 1969 and let my hair grow long for the first time. I gave up drugs in 1967 and was looking for a spiritual format. I came under the spell of the Rossetti family who were friendly with Joaquin Miller. We Presco children knew Miller’s daughter as ‘The White Witch’ and we would call her for advice. Miller’s home ‘The Abbye’ was above our home in the Oakland Hills. Our kindred were friends of Miller, who was also a friend of Swineburn, who wrote ‘The Queen-Mother and Rosamund’ and ‘Rosamund Queen of Lombards. Tolkien was inspired by the Lombards.

Filed away in Rosamond’s probate is my plea to the executor to allow me to be my sister’s historian. I mention Miller and Rossetti. I saw myself in the role of Michael Rossetti who had his own publishing company. He published Miller and other famous poets. When I was twelve, my mother read evidence I might become a famous poet.

All my imput has been ruthlessly ignored, because petty un-creative minds have forced our families creative legacy down the tiny holes of their hidden agendas, into the mouths of worms and parasites, because these ignorant people sensed I and the real Art World, did not let them in the door – would never admit them into our circle, our ring of genius!

Jon Presco

http://www.ochcom.org/miller/

Copyright 2011

Glenwood and George Miller

Posted on February 4, 2019by Royal Rosamond Press

I propose a newspaper museum for the New Glenwood, and the naming of the George Miller Highway from Florence to Winnemucca. I would like to see Glenwood renamed Fairmont, after the city that was swallowed by Eugene.

Elizabeth Maude “Lischen” or “Lizzie” Cogswell married George Miller. Lizzie was the foremost literary woman in Oregon. On Feb. 6, 1897, Idaho Cogswell, married Feb. 6, 1897, Ira L. Campbell, who was editor, publisher and co-owner (with his brother John) of the Daily Eugene Guard newspaper. The Campbell Center is named after Ira.

The Wedding of John Cogswell to Mary Frances Gay, was the first recorded in Lane County where I registered my newspaper, Royal Rosamond Press. Idaho Campbell was a charter member of the Fortnightly Club that raised funds for the first Eugene Library. Joaquin Miller was the editor of Eugene’s first newspaper the Democratic Register, and the Eugene City Review.

George Melvin Miller was a frequent visitor to ‘The Hights’ his brothers visionary utopia where gathered famous artists and writers in the hills above my great grandfather’s farm. The Miller brothers promoted Arts and Literature, as well as Civic Celebrations. Joaquin’s contact with the Pre-Raphaelites in England, lent credence to the notion that George and Joaquin were Oregon’s Cultural Shamans. Joaquin took part in the City Beautiful movement. George platted the city of Florence and Fairmont that was located next to Franklin Street. George was the promoter of a highway from Crescent City to Winnamucca, that was going to be a National Highway to New York. With new highways, I am promoting the Florence to Winnamucca route that traverses the Fremont Highway, named after the ‘Pathfinder’ who explored and mapped the Oregon Territory.

John Presco

Oregon Route 31 is a state highway in the U.S. state of Oregon that runs between the Central Oregon cities of La Pine and Lakeview. OR 31 traverses most of the Fremont Highway No. 19 of the Oregon state highway system,[2] named after John C. Frémont. The entire length of OR 31 is part of the Outback Scenic Byway, though the byway extends further south beyond the end of OR 31, to the California border.

“TO THE ROSSETTIS”

Posted on April 3, 2014by Royal Rosamond Press

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Yesterday I received in the mail a book I ordered on E-Bay. I quickly scanned it to see if their were any illustrations or photographs. Then, I found it, what amounts to my personal Holy Grail. Joaquin Miller dedicated his book of poems ‘Songs of The Sun-Land’ to the Rossetti family that includes Gariel, Michael, and, Christine. Gabriel was a artist and poet, Michael, a publisher, and Christine, a poet.

“TO THE ROSSETTIS”

There is controversy over this dedication. Michael is against it. He is critical of Miller’s poems that takes the reader to the Holy Land. Joaquin is describing a personal relationship with the Savior that reminds me of how Bohemians and Hippies would view Jesus, he a Nature Boy of sorts.

Gabriel, who had Joaquin over to his house for dinner, where he met several members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood seems to address his brother’s objections in a letter, and gives a tentative go ahead. He talks about Miller sending him a photograph of himself and bids him to say a word or two at the bottom of it, that does not exist. This photo may be the famous one taken by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, who is better known as Lewis Carrol the author of ‘Alice in Wonderland’. If Joaquin had glued this portrait to a piece of paper, then we might have seen it on the dedication page.

What is going on here is extremely profound. Miller has exported his vision and lifestyle to the England, where he wrote Song of the Sierras, and now he is importing to America a cultural brand that contains Grail and Arthurian subject matter that was at the epicenter of the work of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.

The Rossettis may not have been too happy with Miller attaching himself to their star because the British are very protective of their culture. I wish I could say the same thing about the University of Oregon that is about to tear down homes that were once in the city limits of Fairmount, the city founded by Joaquin’s brother, George Miller.

The homes the Miller brothers lived in are registered and protected as Monuments. There is a Joaquin Miller State Park near Florence that was founded by George who also promoted the Winnemucca to the Sea Highway. There needs to be a Monument for George. I suggest the homes on Columbia Terrace be spared, and this city block declared a National Monument. I have suggested these homes be used to house homeless Vets going to college, but now I see a Free College on this site due to the student loan crisis.

This college will teach alternatives to prospective students of the UofO, such as having parents of students purchase a home in Eugene. In many cases a mortgage is cheaper than rent. Teaching your children how to get a job rather then attend college, will produce more home ownership that the UofO who promises jobs – that don’t exist!

The Miller Brothers were born on a farm near Coburg. They went into the world and achieved much. They are a cultural icon too Oregon and California. On page ten of the prelude, we read;

“By unnamed rivers of the Oregon north’
That roll dark-heaved into turbulent hills,
I have made my home….The Wild heart thrills
With memories fierce, and world storms forth.”

I once read that many college students didn’t know there was a Oregon, and if they did, they didn’t know where it is. The Rossettis more than likely read these words. Did they go to a globe to see where Joaquin and George live?
How many students at the UofO know who the Miller brothers were, and the Brotherhood.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2014

Joaquin and Leonie

Posted on May 16, 2016by Royal Rosamond Press

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Yone-Noguchi-courtesy-Oakland-History-Room

Joaquin Miller had a poets colony in the Oakland. Japanese Poets came to live here. One of them was  Yonejiro Noguchi. I just discovered a movie was made about the mother of Yone’s son, who was the famous sculptor, Isamu Noguchi, who had a famous half-sister, Ailes Gilmore. She was a dancer for Martha Graham. Leonie grew up in the Village of New York, and lived in a Tent City in Pasadena California.

My kindred had a twenty-six acre fruit orchard below Miller’s property. Joaquin carried my father on his lap when he took the trolley with my grandmother. Victor Presco gave birth to the world famous artist ‘Rosamond’ and her brother. I am a Art Historian, Poet, Writer, and Reporter for my newspaper Royal Rosamond Press.

Here are two creative branches stemming from ‘The Hights’  where western artists and writers established a Bohemian Mecca. Miller was the first editor for The Eugene City Democratic Register , Eugene Oregon’s first newspaper. Joaquin attended Columbia College in Eugene. Here are the roots of the Beat and Hippie, scene, the Great California Dream, that a Japanese woman producer tried to capture, while we in the West turn our backs, we even forgetting to recall John Steinbeck – for the sake of our young! Our traditions are honored, elsewhere.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonie_(film)

When we were children we would call Juanita Miller on the phone and pretend we were older so we could have The White Witch give us advice on our love life, that we invented. Joaquin Miller’s daughter titled herself the ‘White Witch’ and had involved her groom in a pagan ritual when they got married. She pretended she was dead, and, he brought her back to life. Sounds like Sleeping Beauty.

I found photos of Juanita dancing. Isadora Duncan grew up in Oakland. Above is two photos of my Grandmother, Melba Broderick, with her friend, Violet, on Miller’s property. I now believe they were disciples of the White Witch, and may have danced through the forest with her.  Joaquin carried my infant father on the Fruit Vale trolley.  My kin owned a orchard just below the Hights, the theme park Joaquin and his daughter built. There is a monument to my kindred, John Fremont, that looks like a rook. Here poets and artists met, and lived. Artists Embassy International met here, as well as in Alameda at 532 Haight Avenue in a beautiful Victorian.

Juanita corresponded with the artist, Frederick Church, whose work resembles Christine Rosamond, and, Fanny Corey, who encouraged Royal Rosamond to write. We are looking  at the foundation of the Bohemian-Hippie scene in the San Francisco Bay Area that is tied to the Pre-Raphaelites. Did Church consider himself a Pre-Raphaelite, and was hoping the Millers would give him a introduction to the Rossettis?

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The movie ‘Leonie’ would have been a masterpiece if it had included the history of ‘The Hights’.  Here was the first East meets West.  In 1904 Miller wrote a prophetic poem about Japan. There needs to be a monument to the blending of our culture, that began with the love affair a Japanese poet had with his editor. The image of swarming bees taking off from ships to attack Pearl Harbor, was first seen in the third eye of a Oakland poet.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/2010/11/05/films/portrait-of-the-artists-mother-as-a-young-woman/#.VznyiJErI2w

His cherry-blossoms drop like blood;
His bees begin to storm and sting;
His seas flash lightning, and a flood
Of crimson stains their wide, white ring;
His battle-ships belch hell, and all
Nippon is but one Spartan wall!
Aye, he, the boy of yesterday,
Now holds the bearded Russ at bay;
While, blossom’d steeps above, the clouds
Wait idly, still, as waiting shrouds.

But oh, beware his scorn of death,
His love of Emperor, of isles
That boast a thousand bastioned miles
Above the clouds where never breath
Of frost or foe has ventured yet,
Or foot of foreign man has set!

Here are photographs of the celebration Miller’s daughter, Juanita, conducted at the Hights. I believe these people took part in the play she scripted, where present are members of the artistic Rossetti family who founded the Pre-Raphaelite art movement. That is the artist Xavier Martinez and his wife with two fiddle players on Joaquin’s front porch. Why is this history being ignored?  Yone and the other Japanese poets made bar-b-que for the Ramblen Bohemian Boys and their Village Tent Woman. There’s nothing new under the sun.

Hands across the water. The hearts of poets, flew like doves. Pacific means “peace”. Love conquers all. Water was diverted to flow over oriental rock falls, past the paper and screen huts where even Chinese and Japanese artists, were inspired. Meditation had come to dwell in California. An anglo woman carries in her womb, the infants of Japanese men, to born a new genius, a Western Kabuki Muse, coy fish swimming in foreign waters. Traces of an ancient Emperor and a Wild Man that looks like Gandalf.

I had a vision for a Peace Center in the Sawtelle that was recently named ‘Japan Town’.

Jon Presco

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Léonie Gilmour (June 17, 1873 – December 31, 1933) was an American educator, editor, and journalist. She was the lover and editor of the writer Yone Noguchi and the mother of sculptor Isamu Noguchi and dancer Ailes Gilmour. She is the subject of the feature film Leonie (2010) and the book Leonie Gilmour: When East Weds West (2013).

Miller attended Columbia College in in Eugene City from 1857 to 1858. He taught school, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1861. From 1861 to 1862 Miller rode pony express from Walla Walla to Idaho mines but he soon returned to Eugene City to become a newspaper editor. In his newspaper, The Eugene City Democratic Register, he pleaded for an end to the Civil War, adopting the Quaker creed of his father.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xavier_Mart%C3%ADnez

Even today, you’d have to go far to run into a radical individual like Leonie Gilmour. But in America in 1901, to meet a young woman like her must have been on par with witnessing a comet.

Raised in New York by a single mother, Gilmour studied at Bryn Mawr, a liberal-arts college in Pennsylvania, and Paris’ Sorbonne university on a scholarship. She then got a job as an editor for Japanese poet Yonejiro Noguchi; things took a short-lived turn for the amorous, and she bore a son, Isamu Noguchi — who became one of the most influential and important Japanese artists of the 20th century.

https://www.geni.com/people/Ailes-Gilmour/6000000018657311737

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ailes_Gilmour

Ailes grew up in a Japanese style house that Leonie had constructed in Chigasaki, a seaside town near Yokohama. Ailes had close Japanese childhood friends, spoke Japanese as well as English, and identified with Japan before she returned to the USA in 1920, at age 8. When Ailes and her mother returned to America, they lived first in San Francisco and then moved to New York City.

During the Depression Era, dancers like Ailes and artists like Isamu struggled to find work. In 1932, when Radio City Music Hall opened, Ailes performed at the debut with Graham’s company. Their work, Choric Patterns, lasted on stage for just one week. Ailes ruefully observed to Marion Horosko that Radio City Music Hall could succeed only when it became a movie theater with Rockettes.

Noguchi was the first Japanese author to publish English-language novels and books of poetry. Born near Nagoya, Japan, in 1875, he studied at Keio University in Tokyo and gained a passion for English literature. At 18 he came to the United States, where he worked at a newspaper run by Japanese exiles.

Miller attended Columbia College in in Eugene City from 1857 to 1858. He taught school, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1861. From 1861 to 1862 Miller rode pony express from Walla Walla to Idaho mines but he soon returned to Eugene City to become a newspaper editor. In his newspaper, The Eugene City Democratic Register, he pleaded for an end to the Civil War, adopting the Quaker creed of his father.

In 1894, Noguchi visited Miller and was so mesmerized by the aging poet that he stayed with him for four years, working for his room and board. He absorbed Miller’s philosophy of life and met his literary friends.

With Miller, Noguchi said, he found his true vocation as a poet, and he considered Miller’s Oakland Hills estate to be an ideal place to write his poems.

When “Homeless Snail” was republished in 1920, Noguchi wrote a new introduction.

“Since I left California in 1900 for New York and London I have seen many other cities more big and more prosperous, but my mind always returned to Miller Heights (Hights) where my poetry first began to grow amid the roses and carnations which Miller and I watered tenderly. … He was my first friend in American life. … He looked on me as his American son.”

His love life was complicated. He had several relationships simultaneously with white American women. His son, Isamu, whose mother was Leonie Gilmore, became a famous American sculptor.

In 1904, Noguchi went back to Japan and taught English at his alma mater. He continued to write and travel the world. By 1930, his works had fallen into critical disfavor. He died of stomach cancer in 1947.

“Then he had the Japanese and Chinese artists living there. They built their beautiful little Japanese paper houses up through the woods. What beautiful country! It looks like a mess now, but it was beautiful then — a natural and wild landscape — and the Japanese had carefully created a meandering little stream, Japanese style, beautifully arranged with gardens and little rockeries near the poet’s. You know their expertness in creating beauty. They’d made this beautiful place where they had their barbecues. At that time the poet’s barbecues were always run by his Japanese friends. We’d have raw fish and soy sauce — really delicious. Then, always the particular barbecue for which the poet was famous — he had beautifully peeled willow switches on which were arranged rounds of onions and meat — which you held over the fire until cooked to your taste.

Then we’d go up to a little art colony scattered throughout the woods in their beautiful paper houses. These houses were well made, beautifully constructed, but all the doors and windows except the frames were made of paper. We’d go in, take our shoes off and sit down and we’d watch the artists work, or they’d display work to show us. Some were Chinese, most of them were Japanese.

In 1848 William Makepeace Thackeray used the word bohemianism in his novel Vanity Fair. In 1862, the Westminster Review described a Bohemian as “simply an artist or littérateur who, consciously or unconsciously, secedes from conventionality in life and in art”. During the 1860s the term was associated in particular with the pre-Raphaelite movement, the group of artists and aesthetes of which Dante Gabriel Rossetti was the most prominent:[2]

As the 1860s progressed, Rossetti would become the grand prince of bohemianism as his deviations from normal standards became more audacious. And as he became this epitome of the unconventional, his egocentric demands necessarily required his close friends to remodel their own lives around him. His bohemianism was like a web in which others became trapped – none more so than William and Jane Morris.[3]

Although Gilmour harbored literary aspirations, her achievements as a writer were limited. Much of her literary energy was channeled into her editorial projects, particularly those of her partner, Yone Noguchi. It has been speculated that she may have co-authored or authored some works attributed to him, such as The American Diary of a Japanese Girl, and there is little doubt that much of Noguchi’s best writing was accomplished with her editorial assistance.

As an author in her own right, Gilmour’s most successful pieces were short autobiographical essays for newspapers and magazines chronicling unfortunate events with a wry ironic humor, In a picaresque, matter-of-fact style, Gilmour described the unusual situations in which she found herself as a result of her unconventional attitudes and lifestyle. Gilmour’s “Founding a Tent-Home in California,” for example, shows turn-of-the-century Los Angeles from the perspective of a hapless, idealistic new arrival.[21] “Dorobo, or the Japanese Burglar” portrays the experience of being burglarized with a humorous perspective.[22]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A9onie_Gilmour

Léonie Gilmour (June 17, 1873 – December 31, 1933) was an American educator, editor, and journalist. She was the lover and editor of the writer Yone Noguchi and the mother of sculptor Isamu Noguchi and dancer Ailes Gilmour. She is the subject of the feature film Leonie (2010) and the book Leonie Gilmour: When East Weds West (2013).

The Noguchi Museum, chartered as The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, was designed and created by the Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi. Opening on a limited basis to the public in 1985 the purpose of the museum and foundation was and remains to preserve and display Noguchi’s sculpturesarchitectural models,stage designsdrawings, and furniture designs. The two-story, 24,000 square feet (2,200 m2) museum and adjacent sculpture garden, located in Long Island City section of Queens, one block from the Socrates Sculpture Park, underwent major renovations in 2004 allowing the museum to stay open year round.[1]

Isamu Noguchi (野口 勇 Noguchi Isamu?, November 17, 1904 – December 30, 1988) was an American artist andlandscape architect whose artistic career spanned six decades, from the 1920s onward.[1] Known for his sculpture and public works, Noguchi also designed stage sets for various Martha Graham productions, and several mass-produced lamps and furniture pieces, some of which are still manufactured and sold.

In 1947, Noguchi began a collaboration with the Herman Miller company, when he joined with George NelsonPaul László and Charles Eames to produce a catalog containing what is often considered to be the most influential body of modern furniture ever produced, including the iconic Noguchi table which remains in production today.[2] His work lives on around the world and at the Noguchi Museum in New York City.

Leonie (Japanese: レオニー HepburnReonī?) is a 2010 Japanese film directed by Hisako Matsui and starring Emily Mortimer and Shido Nakamura. The film is based on the life of Léonie Gilmour, the American lover and editorial assistant of Japanese writer Yone Noguchi and mother of sculptor Isamu Noguchi and dancer Ailes Gilmour.

Production started in April 2009 and the film was released in Japan on November 20, 2010. An extensively reedited version of the film began a limited theatrical run in the United States on March 22, 2013 and was released on DVD on May 14, 2013.

The film opens on a beach. A window overlooks the beach. In a dark room, Isamu Noguchi, grown old, is chipping away at a large stone with a hammer and chisel. “Mother, I want you to tell the story.” The film periodically returns to this scene of Isamu at work.

Bryn Mawr 1892. After a class in which she argues with a professor about the importance of artist Artemisia Gentileschi, Leonie (Emily Mortimer) befriends Catherine Burnell (Christina Hendricks). Later, they meet Umeko Tsuda (Mieko Harada), a graduate student. In Tsuda’s room, Leonie gazes at a print of Hokusai’s The Great Wave off Kanagawa.

The story now alternates between Pasadena 1904—where Leonie, living in a primitive tent with her mother Albiana (Mary Kay Place), bears a child temporarily named “Yo,”—and New York, where Leonie met Japanese poet Yone Noguchi (Shido Nakamura). She and Yone succumb to passion while collaborating on his anonymous novel, The American Diary of a Japanese Girl, published by Frederick A. Stokes (David Jensen). They quarrel when Yone returns unannounced from London with an apparently drunk Charles Warren Stoddard (Patrick Weathers). The Russo-Japanese War begins and Yone, declaring he will return to Japan, greets Leonie’s announcement of pregnancy with angry disbelief. Leonie tells her sad story to the now unhappily married Catherine, who reminds her of her advice not to be boring. In California, Leonie fends off a racist attack against her son and decides, against Albiana’s advice, to accept Yone’s invitation to come to Japan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonie_(film)

Léonie Gilmour was born in New York City on June 17, 1873, and grew up in the East Village, Manhattan.[1] At the time of her birth, her father, Andrew Gilmour, a clerk, and mother, Albiana Gilmour (née Smith, daughter of one of the co-founders of the Brooklyn Times-Union),[2] were living “in one room in a rear house”[3] in St. Bridget’s Place, the alley behind St. Brigid’s Church on the east side of Tompkins Square Park.

http://www.botchanmedia.com/YN/LG/interview101211.htm

When we were children we would call Juanita Miller on the phone and pretend we were older so we could have The White Witch give us advice on our love life, that we invented. Joaquin Miller’s daughter titled herself the ‘White Witch’ and had involved her groom in a pagan ritual when they got married. She pretended she was dead, and, he brought her back to life. Sounds like Sleeping Beauty.

Several days ago I found photos of Juanita dancing. Isadora Duncan grew up in Oakland. Above is two photos of my Grandmother, Melba Broderick, with her friend, Violet, on Miller’s property. I now believe they were disciples of the White Witch, and may have danced through the forest with her.  Joaquin carried my infant father on the Fruit Vale trolley.  My kin owned a orchard just below the Hights, the theme park Joaquin and his daughter built. There is a monument to my kindred, John Fremont, that looks like a rook. Here poets and artists met, and lived. Artists Embassy International met here, as well as in Alameda at 532 Haight Avenue in a beautiful Victorian.

Above is a letter to Juanita from the artist, Frederick Church, whose work resembles Christine Rosamond, and, Fanny Corey, who encouraged Royal Rosamond to write. We are looking  at the foundation of the Bohemian-Hippie scene in the San Francisco Bay Area that is tied to the Pre-Raphaelites. Did Church consider himself a Pre-Raphaelite, and was hoping the Millers would give him a introduction to the Rossettis?

Joaquin Miller

The Little Brown Man (ca. 1904)

Where now the brownie fisher-lad?
His hundred thousand fishing-boats
Rock idly in the reedy moats;
His baby wife no more is glad.
But yesterday, with all Nippon,
Beneath his pink-white cherry-trees,
In chorus with his brown, sweet bees,
He careless sang, and sang right on.
Take care! for he has ceased to sing;
His startled bees have taken wing!

His cherry-blossoms drop like blood;
His bees begin to storm and sting;
His seas flash lightning, and a flood
Of crimson stains their wide, white ring;
His battle-ships belch hell, and all
Nippon is but one Spartan wall!
Aye, he, the boy of yesterday,
Now holds the bearded Russ at bay;
While, blossom’d steeps above, the clouds
Wait idly, still, as waiting shrouds.

But oh, beware his scorn of death,
His love of Emperor, of isles
That boast a thousand bastioned miles
Above the clouds where never breath
Of frost or foe has ventured yet,
Or foot of foreign man has set!
Beware his scorn of food (his fare
Is scarcely more than sweet sea-air);
Beware his cunning, sprite-like skill—
But most beware his dauntless will.

Goliath, David, once again,
The giant and the shepherd youth—
The tallest, smallest of all men,
The trained in tongue, the trained in truth.
Beware this boy, this new mad man!
That erst mad man of Macedon,
Who drank and died at Babylon;
That shepherd lad; the Corsican—
They sat the thrones of earth! Beware
This new mad man whose drink is air!

His bees are not more slow to strife,
But, stirred, they court a common death!
He knows the decencies of life—
Of all men underneath the sun
He is the one clean man, the one
Who never knew a drunken breath!
Beware this sober, wee brown man,
Who yesterday stood but a span
Beneath his blossomed cherry-trees,
Soft singing with his brother bees!

The brownie’s sword is as a snake,
A sudden, sinuous copperhead:
It makes no flourish, no mistake;
It darts but once—the man is dead!
’Tis short and black; ’tis never seen
Save when, close forth, it leaps its sheath
And, snake-like, darts up from beneath.
But oh, its double edge is keen!
It strikes but once, then on, right on:
The sword is gone—the Russ is gone!—From the Century.

The Enmeshed Rosamond and Rossetti Family

Posted on November 8, 2011by Royal Rosamond Press

After dying and beholding untold beauty in heaven, I sought a way to heal my family. This was going to be near impossible because we are an enmeshed family due to the extreme abuse, and the relationship between the abusers and the abused that demands extreme loyalty – even after death. I am reluctant to give the antidote to the poison apple that Christine Rosamond, partake, for her other family, those parasite are in waiting – for their fair share!

“Many of us come from enmeshed families in which the boundaries are skewed and all members are a part of the pie, so to speak, as opposed to individual slices within the pie. Members of these families look to one another for insight regarding who they are becoming, as opposed to looking within.”

“Enmeshed families are characterized by an extreme sense of closeness, so much so that almost any expression of independence or separateness is seen as disloyalty to the family. This kind of false loyalty is a very high value in an Enmeshed family.”

The uncreative members of my family have been agitated by the parasites who know they are in the shadow of the gifted ones, and are needing to feel equal – somehow – thus they convinced my family, the more outside parasites – the rosier!

That Christine came to honor her father and older brother, over me, is as tragic a tale one can find. To find it in the art world – is maddening – destructive beyond belief! What happened?

The answer is simple. From an early age I began to look inward to find my identity, while my parents tried to manipulate and control thier mate, and then their children. Mark Presco’s hateful manifestos are all about the outisders who let him down, and thus tainted his perfect image he wangted to own of himself as the White Super Misogynist Man who needs NO ONE, but a hundred million inferior scum-bags after his little pile of money. Mark Presco has turned women and people of color into his disloyal children! Mark is a god. He was named after Marcus Arealius, the Roman Emperor – who declared they were gods!

Mark, and his ilk, want allot of bang for their buck. This is why they want Jesus on their side, because he utterly ignored money in his lifetime. Today, Jesus is extremely interested in the Stock Market and Herman Cain’s devine ambition that allows Republicans to overlook the idea that he grabbed a womans’ head and pulled it down to his crotch. The Ne Roman Republican Party have Jesus atop a tall building Gothum with his good bud, Howard Roarke, Ann Rand’s invention.

“Look at all those socialist parasites down there, how they clammer over one another so as to get a piece of our tax pie! Come Jesus, let’s smoke a bowlful, get instrospective, and design another high tower, another monument to the Selfish Giant Indvidual!”

Christine Rosamond did not have time to develope an artistic identity, complete her journey within to find herself, develope a healing bond with her Muse. When one of her first paintings was bought by Priscilla Presley at a show in Westwood, Ira Cohen took note. I assume he got to look at the list of sales. What he knew, was it was a matter of who you know. He understood Christine had gotten her foot in the door, and very famous folks would be viewing her work, including Elvis. They would talk about Christine’s painting, ask where they could get one of works of art. If Coehn could get Rosamond signed to a contract, then, the Already Famous would come to him, beat a path to his gallery on Lacienaga.
A year later, my dear sister is asking me to help her find a artisitc idienty – within! Sadly I tell her;

“I can’t give you that!”

Christine turned to her enmeshed idenity within our extremely dysfunctional family for her identity. Rather then seek psychiratritc help for their mental illness, Vic and Rosemary worked out on their children almost every day of our their lives. This is why Julie Lynch invited a fake ninety nine year old crone school teacher to come get Christine and take her home to ‘The Caretaker’ who ended up with the Rosamond Gallery, the Rosamond Publishing company, the Rosamond Movie, the Rosamond T.V. Series – and my dream! The Rossetti family were poets, artists, and publishers.

Joaquin Miller went to Europe and had dinner with Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelites. In his novel ‘The Distruction of Gotham’ he is in New York following an old crone and yojng girl who has turned to prostitution to survive in the big city. Miller carried my ingant father on his lap when he wnet with Melba on the trolly to the Ferry. In ‘The Distruction of Gotham’ Miller has his Roxanne walk from Liberty Street, where William Stuttmeister lived, to Fight Avenue.

Miller was one of the founders of Bohemian Grove where the elite go to camp, live in a tent, then go to the Russian river to swim. I and my Muse, would swim in the same waters. When David beheld Bathsheba, he had to have her, and the world would never be the same.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2011

Shamus called and said my sister is dead. Why didn’t you tell me? I suspect Cean put you in touch with Mark. I have copied all our messages. https://rosamondpress.com/2019/09/03/hearing-my-sister-vicki-2/

I was just going to plan a road trip to tell you in person , I was planning on leaving in the morning with my loyal companion. Then I looked didn’t my phone the first time really in a few days , I saw you message and the first time today is when I saw Shamus’s text.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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