Sleeping Beauty Rosamond

The work of Disney Artist, Eyvind Earle, hung in the Rosamond Gallery in Carmel. Eyvind illustrated ‘Sleeping Beauty’. Instead of this being the major theme in continuing the artistic legacy of Rosamond, everything became about Vicki Presco, and what she did not get. She got the Rosamond partnership prints from Christine’s house – the very day she drowned! Her and Shamus Dundon –  stuffed Grandma’s American Rambler with them! The Grimm Brothers named Sleeping Beauty ROSAMUND-ROSAMUND.

http://www.waltdisney.org/exhibitions/awaking-beauty-art-eyvind-earle

‘Sleeping Beauty’ is, depending on which version of the story you read, called Sleeping Beauty, Talia, Little Briar Rose, Rosamond, or Aurora. This is because, like many other classic fairy tales, the tale of Sleeping Beauty exists in numerous versions, each of which is subtly – or, in some cases, quite strikingly – different from the others.

In the Italian version published in the Pentamerone, an Italian collection of fairy tales published in 1634, the heroine is named Talia. Charles Perrault, in his version published later in the century, calls her the Sleeping Beauty. The Brothers Grimm call her Dornröschen or ‘Little Briar Rose’, which is sometimes adapted as ‘Rosamond’. In the Disney film, the adult heroine is named Aurora. For the purposes of clarity here, we’re going to call her ‘Sleeping Beauty’ or ‘the princess’.

A Summary and Analysis of the Sleeping Beauty Fairy Tale – Interesting Literature

Grimm Brothers’ version[edit]

Sleeping Beauty and the palace dwellers under a century-long sleep enchantment (The Sleeping Beauty by Sir Edward Burne-Jones).

The Brothers Grimm included a variant of Sleeping Beauty, Little Briar Rose, in their collection (1812).[13] Their version ends when the prince arrives to wake Sleeping Beauty (named Rosamund) and does not include the part two as found in Basile’s and Perrault’s versions.[14] The brothers considered rejecting the story on the grounds that it was derived from Perrault’s version, but the presence of the Brynhild tale convinced them to include it as an authentically German tale. Their decision was notable because in none of the Teutonic myths, meaning the Poetic and Prose Eddas or Volsunga Saga, are their sleepers awakened with a kiss, a fact Jacob Grimm would have known since he wrote an encyclopedic volume on German mythology. His version is the only known German variant of the tale, and Perrault’s influence is almost certain.[15] In the original Brothers Grimm’s version, the fairies are instead wise women.[16]

Christine Rosamond – Wikipedia

Sleeping Beauty – Wikipedia

Rosamond Press

Tonight, is Halloween. Grimm named the Sleeping Beauty Princess ‘Rosamond’. What are the odds that I find a women named ‘Rosamond Clifford Dew’ after Fair Rosamond?

I have been attacked by real witches for five years – and longer! The curse has been lifted. A Royal Child, a ‘Rose of the World’ will be born. I am the Wizened Grandfather who saw into the future!

Here is my Rose Line to Rosamond Clifford:

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/07/14/jimmy-dale-rosamond-clifford/

Here is my Rose Line to Bohemian Royalty that are trying to get their castles back. A DNA test inked me this the Schwarzenbergs.

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/06/08/the-wilson-leigh-line-to-bohemia/

Dare I invoke the other name of Linda Comstock, who eagerly awaits the birth of Rosamond Clifford Dew?

Maleficent!

John Presco

Copyright 2019

Many a long year afterwards there came a King’s son into that country, and heard an old man tell how there should be a castle standing behind the…

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About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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