“Woman, behold your….?”

Paul does away with Mosaic Law. Does this contradict the teaching of Jesus? Yes. Paul invented Anti-Semitism. This is why he claimed Jesus died for sins. This replaces the teaching of John the Baptist and the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur) Instead of the Sacrificial Goat, you have a Sacrificial Human Being. The Sacrifice of animals at the Jewish Temple – IS NEGATED! If SCOTUS repeals Woe vs. Wade, then I insist they become experts in Temple Laws and Practices, as this is….

GOD’S LEGAL REMEDY

With the pending repeal of Roe vs. Wade, the Supreme Court overrides Paul’s elimination of Mosaic Laws, and reinstates them all. This applies to the laws against homosexuals. This is being done because the majority of the judges – are Christians – who some believe are going to use Roe vs. Wade to make more Pro-Christian rulings. As it is – I declare The Crucifixion….NULL & VOID. You can not have it both ways.

Also, I am convinced the true teaching has been altered. I believe Jesus was married to Mary Magdalene, and Jesus gave her to his brother – not while on the cross – but on the Mount of Olives after reading the Book of Ruth to his Disciples – who had an idea Jesus was going to be arrested for saying he was the Rightful King of Judah via his ancestor, Ruth, whose marriage to Boaz may have instigated the Levirate Marriage – which might have been recently outlawed. I have shown that Jesus was RESTORING other traditions that had become outlawed. The Halizah ritual may have inspired the story of Cinderella. Dispensationalists insist the Jews must build a new temple before the arrival of

THE BRIDE

John Presco

Copyright 2022

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13803600590926369

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levirate_marriage

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yibbum

“Most scholars believe Joseph, Mary’s husband, was already dead by this time. Traditionally, the oldest son in a Jewish family was duty-bound to provide for his mother’s care if she became a widow. By entrusting Mary to John’s care, Jesus was fulfilling His family responsibility as a devoted son.

With the words, “Woman, behold your son,” Jesus invited His mother to look to John, His much-loved disciple and friend, to be her son now. Jesus was departing from her, but John would take the Lord’s place in her life as much as was possible. John was the only apostle brave enough to take a stand with the women who had accompanied Jesus to the cross (Luke 23:49Mark 15:40John 19:25). The rest of Christ’s disciples had scattered, abandoning the Lord in fear (John 16:32).

In the Hebrew Bible, a form of levirate marriage, called yibbum, is mentioned in Deuteronomy 25:5–10, under which the brother of a man who dies without children is permitted and encouraged to marry the widow. Either of the parties may refuse to go through with the marriage, but both must go through a ceremony, known as halizah, involving a symbolic act of renunciation of a yibbum marriage. Sexual relations with one’s brother’s wife are otherwise forbidden by Leviticus 18 and Leviticus 20.[4]

Jewish custom has seen a gradual decline of yibbum in favor of halizah, to the point where in most contemporary Jewish communities, and in Israel by mandate of the Chief Rabbinateyibbum is prohibited.

The Jewish people will construct the third temple, also known as the eschatological Tribulation Temple, on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. This distinctly dispensational statement carries the weight of the accurate, authoritative, inerrant and infallible Scriptures (cf. 2 Tim. 3:162 Pet. 1:20-21).

What did Jesus mean when He said, “Woman, behold your son” on the cross? | GotQuestions.org

Dispensationalism | Theopedia

The Third Temple Period – Dispensational Publishing

Paul Was Against The Law

Posted on September 28, 2018 by Royal Rosamond Press

The Christian-right honor Biblical laws in regards to homosexuals. This goes against the teaching of Paul. There is no Biblical law against abortion.

John

The Apostle Paul, in his Letters, says that believers are saved by the unearned grace of God, not by good works, “lest anyone should boast”, and placed a priority on orthodoxy (right belief) before orthopraxy (right practice). The soteriology of Paul’s statements in this matter has long been a matter of dispute. The ancient gnostics interpreted Paul[citation needed], for example in 2 Peter 3:16, to be referring to the manner in which embarking on a path to enlightenment ultimately leads to enlightenment, which was their idea of what constituted salvation. In what has become the modern Protestant orthodoxy, however, this passage is interpreted as a reference to justification by trusting Christ.

Paul used the term freedom in Christ, for example, Galatians 2:4. Some understood this to mean “lawlessness” (i.e. not obeying Mosaic Law).[citation needed] For example, in Acts 18:12–16, Paul is accused of “persuading .. people to worship God in ways contrary to the law.”

In Acts 21:21 James the Just explained his situation to Paul:

And they are informed of thee, that thou teachest all the Jews which are among the Gentiles to forsake Moses, saying that they ought not to circumcise their children, neither to walk after the customs.

As Jesus hung on the cross, the Bible records that He spoke seven final statements. The third saying, recorded in John 19:26–27, expresses the Lord’s care and concern for His mother: “When Jesus saw his mother there, and the disciple whom he loved standing nearby, he said to her, ‘Woman, here is your son,’ and to the disciple, ‘Here is your mother.’ From that time on, this disciple took her into his home.” The unnamed disciple whom Jesus addressed was the apostle John himself.

Despite His excruciating physical agony, Jesus was concerned about the welfare of His mother and the pain she was experiencing. With His thoughts on Mary’s future security and protection, Jesus entrusted her into the care of John, His beloved disciple.

Most scholars believe Joseph, Mary’s husband, was already dead by this time. Traditionally, the oldest son in a Jewish family was duty-bound to provide for his mother’s care if she became a widow. By entrusting Mary to John’s care, Jesus was fulfilling His family responsibility as a devoted son.

Typically, a dying son would commit his mother into the care of another member of his immediate family. In the case of Jesus, that would have been James, Jude, or another male sibling. But Jesus knew that none of His half-brothers were disciples yet—they had not accepted Christ’s claims or committed to His mission. Thus, Jesus most likely chose John out of profound spiritual concern for His mother. Even in death, Christ was focused on spiritual matters.

With the words, “Woman, behold your son,” Jesus invited His mother to look to John, His much-loved disciple and friend, to be her son now. Jesus was departing from her, but John would take the Lord’s place in her life as much as was possible. John was the only apostle brave enough to take a stand with the women who had accompanied Jesus to the cross (Luke 23:49Mark 15:40John 19:25). The rest of Christ’s disciples had scattered, abandoning the Lord in fear (John 16:32).

There is no disrespect in the Lord’s use of the title woman instead of mother. He had addressed her as “Woman” before (John 2:4). The address may sound disrespectful in English, but not in Greek. Woman was, in fact, “a highly respectful and affectionate mode of address” (Marvin Vincent, Word Studies in the New Testament, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1887, entry for Jn. 2:4). The Amplified Bible translates it as “[Dear] Woman.”

A symbolic meaning can be drawn from Jesus’s words “Woman, behold your son.” Establishing the family of God was at the heart of Christ’s mission and ministry. Through relationship with Jesus Christ, believers become members of a new family (John 1:12). As the Lord completed His earthly ministry, His words to Mary, “Woman, behold your son,” and to John, “Here is your mother,” were profoundly illustrative of God’s new family being born at the foot of the cross.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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