Joseph Teixeira de Mattos

There is evidence that Samuel Josefa de Mattos, died in 2012. I hereby absolve him of his promise made to me because I know this is important.

The de Mattos family were artists, theologians, and tutors. Teixeira de Mattos imparted knowledge to Vincent van Gough. They were cultured and intelligent people who took part in the rise of Gentiles from the dark ages.

Jon Presco

https://harsinai-md.org/

http://www.vangoghroute.com/the-netherlands/amsterdam/

https://www.codart.nl/guide/exhibitions/van-amsterdam-naar-parijs-hoogtepunten-uit-de-collectie-teixeira-de-mattos/

https://internationalart-gallery.blogspot.com/2013/06/joseph-teixeira-de-mattos.html

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For me, the values of Judaism … the concept of tzedakah, the concept of lashon hara, the concept of repairing the world and of social justice serve me not only in my personal life and in my synagogue life, but also in building a community as a CEO in a major health-care association.

For the past many months, the country has been consumed by the Affordable Care Act. As president of HFAM, what do you think of Obamacare?

The Affordable Care Act  has tre-mendous potential for the better integration, education and focus of health care in the United States. The question mark is going to be what it does to … marketplace value relative to the cost of health care. I’m optimistic that with the better integration of health care, and with the better focus on outcome, that over time having more people getting care earlier will ultimately lead not only to better outcomes, but also to lower costs.

http://jewishtimes.com/10197/a-passion-for-caring/news/

Joseph Teixeira de Mattos (1892–1971), was a Dutch watercolor painter and pastellist who made drawings wherever he went. A large collection of his drawings is in the Teylers Museum.

Biography[edit]

Teixeira was born in Amsterdam, where he became a member of Arti et Amicitiae in 1934 and began drawing animals at Artis.[1][2] In 1931 he moved to Paris, and for the war years he moved to Pornic in Brittany, where he remained until he died.[1] The Teylers museum had an exhibition of his work in 2004.[3]

Early career[edit]

Joseph Teixeira de Mattos shared his name with his uncle, who was a sculptor. He was the elder of the two sons of Jacob Teixeira de Mattos and Abigael Lopes Cardozo. Joseph showed promise as an artist while still at school. When he was only 13, he enrolled for a year-long class designed for children to train them to become art teachers. Graduation from an esteemed course did not, however, bring Joseph success as an artist, and he had to abandon the teaching career to pursue a career as an artist. During this problematic phase in his career, he was received financial support from Joseph Mendes da Costa and Samuel Jessurun de Mesquita.[4]

Teixeira de Mattos began working independently from 1916. His earliest works were mostly self-portraits made in and around Amsterdam. His family members became recurrent characters in his works. He also made several chalk drawings of the Waag on the Nieuwmarkt. Teixeira de Mattos first exhibited in 1917 at the Galerie Walrecht.[4]

Motif[edit]

Teixeira de Mattos frequently drew animals. Crocodile were particularly common in his works. He was known to very diligent and obsessed with technical mastery of drawing material

Vincent arrived in Amsterdam in May 1877, intending to prepare for theology studies at the university.

He had several contacts in the city: his uncle Johannes Paulus Stricker was a minister there, his uncle Cor van Gogh dealt in books and art, and his uncle Jan van Gogh was the director of the city’s naval dockyard. Jan van Gogh had set up a study bedroom for Vincent, and Vincent spent his days amid the inspiring liveliness of the dockyard.

His schedule consisted of Greek and Latin lessons with the classicist Maurits Benjamin Mendes da Costa, geometry and algebra lessons with a Mr Texeira de Mattos, and plenty of self-study. Vincent worked from early morning until late at night, but he found his studies difficult. Although he was making progress, he did not feel as if he was mastering the material. On Sundays he often attended multiple church services and also taught Sunday school.

Although his attention was necessarily focused on his studies, he visited museums such as the Trippenhuis and Museum van der Hoop whenever he could, and he enjoyed walking in the city, whose beauty he admired. He often managed to capture its atmosphere in letters by comparing it to various paintings. In the end, Vincent failed to successfully complete his studies and left Amsterdam in summer 1878 for his parents’ house in Etten. There, he began contemplating his future plans.

Vincent was to visit Amsterdam twice more in his life. In 1881, he went to the capital to see his cousin Kee Vos, with whom he had fallen powerfully in love; his feelings would remain painfully unrequited. In 1885, he returned to the city for the last time to visit the newly opened Rijksmuseum with his friend Anton Kerssemakers.

s.[4]

Joseph Teixeira de Mattos

Joseph Teixeira de Mattos

Birthdate: (46)
Birthplace: Amsterdam, Government of Amsterdam, North Holland, The Netherlands
Death: March 30, 1858 (46)
Amsterdam, Government of Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands
Immediate Family: Son of Benjamin Teixeira de Mattos and Ester Mendes da Costa
Husband of Hana Rachel de la Mar and Hanna Teixeira de Mattos
Father of Esther Teixeira de Mattos; Benjamin Teixeira de Mattos; Isaac Teixeira de Mattos; Judith Teixeira de Mattos; Sara Teixeira de Mattos and 1 other; and Joseph Henri Teixeira de Mattos « less
Brother of Sara Teixeira de Mattos and Dr Isaac Teixeira de Mattos
Managed by: Bart van der Meijden
Last Updated:

References[edit]

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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