Culture War In The Fourth Turning

Steve Bannon was also called “evil”  by Ted Lieu. Bannon hates everything Jesus stood for. He recooked a Secular Apocalypse that is turning the world upside down – as called for. World leaders are alarmed – and should be. Revelations is a real book in the New Testament.

Above is the cave Keith Purvis took me to with his kin and our mutual friends. It is located a hundred feet from the rock I fell on a year later. When I was authoring my theological novel ‘Where Art Thou?” I found myself sitting in front of this cave beholding ‘The Tree of Life’ in the back of this abyss, surrounded by a hundred galaxies. I had pondered God’s first question to the man and woman he created, and believed I had come upon the answer as to why Adam and Eve became invisible. THY LIED! They tried to hide the truth, and God is THE TRUTH. They were made in the Imaged of The Truth.

Steve Bannon is the Master Liar, who recognized another good liar when he saw him. This is when he moved in and took over Trump’s campaign. I showed you how Mark, Vicki, and Stacey employed lies so they could own what was not left to them in Christine’s Will. They brought chaos and destruction to this important Literary and Artistic Legacy, believing, when the dust settled they would be sitting on a Rosy Throne.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2017

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cave_of_the_Apocalypse

http://www.msnbc.com/the-last-word/watch/rep-ted-lieu-explains-why-he-called-trump-an-evil-man-907955779543

Steve Bannon Believes The Apocalypse Is Coming And War Is Inevitable

Trump’s top adviser thinks we’re in “the great Fourth Turning in American history.”

WASHINGTON ― In 2009, the historian David Kaiser, then a professor at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, got a call from a guy named Steve Bannon.

Bannon wanted to interview Kaiser for a documentary he was making based on the work of the generational theorists William Strauss and Neil Howe. Kaiser, an expert on Strauss and Howe, didn’t know Bannon from Adam, but he agreed to participate. He went to the Washington headquarters of the conservative activist group Citizens United, where Bannon was then based, for a chat.

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is attacking conservative lawmakers after the failure of the Republican bill to replace Obamacare.

On Twitter Sunday, Trump says: “Democrats are smiling in D.C. that the Freedom Caucus, with the help of Club For Growth and Heritage, have saved Planned Parenthood & Ocare!”

President Trump told Americans Saturday morning to watch “Justice Jeanine” on Fox News. Jeanine Pirro started her show with a segment calling for House Speaker Paul Ryan to “step down.”

Trump publicly expressed confidence in Ryan after the White House-backed Obamacare replacement bill had to be pulled as there weren’t enough votes. However, there have been reports that President Trump and his allies are upset about Ryan’s performance as speaker.

Trump directed people through a tweet to watch Pirro, a former county court judge and district attorney. Her “opening statement” was, “Paul Ryan needs to step down as speaker of the house. The reason? He failed to deliver the votes on his healthcare bill.”

She said that “Americans elected the one man they believed could do it,” and that Speaker Ryan came in with his “swagger and experience” and sold Trump a “bill of goods which ends up a complete and total failure.”

“I want to be clear this is not on President Trump,” Pirro added.

Written in 1997, the book’s full title says it all: The Fourth Turning: An American Prophecy-What the Cycles of History Tell Us About America’s Next Rendezvous with Destiny. In light of Steve Bannon’s “obsession” with the thesis, we recently re-read the book.

Howe and Strauss observe that American history shows a new era, or “turning” about every 20 years. In simplest terms, the “First Turning” is an upbeat era of strengthening institutions. The “Second Turning” is an awakening, a passionate era of spiritual upheaval, when the old order comes under attack. The “Third Turning” is an unraveling — a time when individualism is strengthened and institutions are weakened. The “Fourth Turning” is a crisis, a decisive era of secular upheaval — the old order is toppled and a new one put in its place.

As America’s most recent “Third Turning” began in the mid-1980s, it was due to expire in the first decade of the 21st century. If we accept Howe and Strauss’ thesis, America has already entered its next “Fourth Turning”. The consequences are immense. We quote as follows:

“History is seasonal, and winter is coming. Like nature’s winter, the saecular winter can come early or late. A Fourth Turning can be long and difficult, brief but severe, or (perhaps) mild. But, like winter, it cannot be averted. It must come in its turn. . .

The next Fourth Turning is due to begin shortly after the new millennium, midway through the Oh-Oh decade. Around the year 2005, a sudden spark will catalyze a Crisis mood. Remnants of the old social order will disintegrate. Political and economic trust will implode. Real hardship will beset the land, with severe distress that could involve questions of class, race, nation, and empire. . .The very survival of the nation will feel at stake. Sometime before the year 2025, America will pass through a great gate in history, commensurate with the American Revolution, Civil War, and twin emergencies of the Great Depression and World War II.

The risk of catastrophe will be very high. The nation could erupt into insurrection or civil violence, crack up geographically, or succumb to authoritarian rule. If there is a war, it is likely to be one of maximum risk and effort — in other words, a total war. Every Fourth Turning has registered an upward ratchet in the technology of destruction, and in mankind’s willingness to use it.”

Howe and Strauss caution that Americans can be expected to encounter personal and public choices that are equal to the harshest ever faced by prior generations. “And it will require us to admit that our faith in linear progress has often amounted to a Faustian bargain with our children. Faust always ups the ante, and every bet is double or nothing. Through much of the Third Turning, we have managed to postpone the reckoning. But history warns that we can’t defer it beyond the next bend in time.”

With Republicans about to gut the Affordable Care Act — also known as Obamacare — an atheist has come forward to explain that it was Christian Evangelical attacks of health care for all that drove him from the church seven years ago.

Writing on Facebook, Bruce Horst explained that he knows how important adequate healthcare is because of his own health issues.

“As an overweight man with a family history of heart disease, I was uninsurable,” Horst wrote. “It wasn’t that I couldn’t afford heath insurance, there were no health insurance companies which would sell me health insurance at any price. I know this because I tried for many years to buy health insurance.”

Horst noted that, despite the fact that he made a good living while being self-employed, he was well aware that one trip to the hospital or a severe illness could wipe out every penny his family had.

With that in mind, Horst said he was horrified when his fellow Christians came out so strongly against President Obama’s signature achievement that would help the poor and children receive healthcare so many other American’s enjoyed.

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“In 2010 I had been a Conservative Evangelical Christian for all of my adult life. I began to realize that others around me despised the thought of allowing people like me the benefit of affordable health insurance. For some reason, all of the Christians that I knew thought that offering health insurance to people like me would put them at some kind of a disadvantage that they were not willing to accept. Frankly, they had been lied to so they believed those ‘others’ were going to get healthcare and make their own healthcare inadequate,” Horst wrote.

“As a Christian, I believed that I would be judged on the Final Judgment Day on how I took care of the ‘least of these’ as described in the Bible book of Matthew, chapter 25,” He continued. “I came to the sober realization that Christians around me had no such convictions. If they didn’t believe Jesus’ words as recorded in the Bible, why should I? Then one day I discovered I could no longer believe any of it.”

According to Horst, he now has come to believe that some of his former Christian friends are, “not followers of Jesus. Not the Jesus that the Bible speaks of, anyway.”

“I understand that Congress is about to take away the healthcare coverage of about 18 million of my fellow Americans. And they are doing this at the insistence of Conservative Evangelical Christians,” Horst wrote. “I have friends who are alive today because of Obamacare. Probably all of us do. To me, this proves my Christian friends are not pro-life, but instead they’ve been told they are as a matter of manipulation, probably to keep them putting money in the offering plate, or voting for the proper candidate. One thing is clear to me, they are not really pro-life.

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“I would have to believe that the Jesus of the Bible would say to them, ‘depart from me, I never knew you.’ Just like He did in Matthew 25,” he concludes.

The entire Facebook post can be read here.

This article was originally published in “What I Learned This Week” on February 23, 2017. To subscribe to our weekly newsletter, visit 13D.com or find us on Twitter @WhatILearnedTW.

Steve Bannon Believes The Apocalypse Is Coming And War Is Inevitable

Trump’s top adviser thinks we’re in “the great Fourth Turning in American history.”

WASHINGTON ― In 2009, the historian David Kaiser, then a professor at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, got a call from a guy named Steve Bannon.

Bannon wanted to interview Kaiser for a documentary he was making based on the work of the generational theorists William Strauss and Neil Howe. Kaiser, an expert on Strauss and Howe, didn’t know Bannon from Adam, but he agreed to participate. He went to the Washington headquarters of the conservative activist group Citizens United, where Bannon was then based, for a chat.

Kaiser was impressed by how much Bannon knew about Strauss and Howe, who argued that American history operates in four-stage cycles that move from major crisis to awakening to major crisis. These crises are called “Fourth Turnings” — and Bannon believed the U.S. had entered one on Sept. 18, 2008, when Hank Paulson and Ben Bernanke went to Capitol Hill to ask for a bailout of the international banking system.

Illustration: Chris McGonigal: Getty

“He knew the theory,” Kaiser said. “He obviously enjoyed interviewing me.”

Bannon pressed Kaiser on one point during the interview. “He was talking about the wars of the Fourth Turnings,” Kaiser recalled. “You have the American Revolution, you have the Civil War, you have World War II; they’re getting bigger and bigger. Clearly, he was anticipating that in this Fourth Turning there would be one at least as big. And he really made an effort, I remember, to get me to say that on the air.”

Kaiser didn’t believe global war was preordained, so he demurred. The line of questioning didn’t make it into the documentary — a polemical piece, released in 2010, called “Generation Zero.”

Bannon, who’s now ensconced in the West Wing as President Donald Trump’s closest adviser, has been portrayed as Trump’s main ideas guy. But in interviews, speeches and writing — and especially in his embrace of Strauss and Howe — he has made clear that he is, first and foremost, an apocalypticist.

In Bannon’s view, we are in the midst of an existential war, and everything is a part of that conflict. Treaties must be torn up, enemies named, culture changed. Global conflagration, should it occur, would only prove the theory correct. For Bannon, the Fourth Turning has arrived. The Grey Champion, a messianic strongman figure, may have already emerged. The apocalypse is now.

“What we are witnessing,” Bannon told The Washington Post last month, “is the birth of a new political order.”

Drew Angerer via Getty Images
President Donald Trump speaks on the phone with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull on Jan. 28, 2017, with national security adviser Mike Flynn, center, and Chief Strategist Steve Bannon, at right.

Strauss died in 2007, and Howe did not respond to requests for comment. But their books speak for themselves. The first, Generations, released in 1991, set forth the idea that history unfolds in repetitive, predictable four-part cycles ― and that the U.S. was, and still is, going through the most recent cycle’s tail end. (In Generations, Strauss and Howe became perhaps the first writers to use the term “millennials” to describe the current cohort of young people.)

Strauss and Howe’s theory is based on a series of generational archetypes — the Artists, the Prophets, the Nomads and the Heroes — that sound like they were pulled from a dystopian young adult fiction series. Each complete four-part cycle, or saeculum, takes about 80 to 100 years, in Strauss and Howe’s reckoning. The Fourth Turning, which the authors published in 1997, focuses on the final, apocalyptic part of the cycle.

Strauss and Howe postulate that during this Fourth Turning crisis, an unexpected leader will emerge from an older generation to lead the nation, and what they call the “Hero” generation (in this case, millennials), to a new order. This person is known as the Grey Champion. An election or another event — perhaps a war — will bring this person to power, and their regime will rule throughout the crisis.

“The winners will now have the power to pursue the more potent, less incrementalist agenda about which they had long dreamed and against which their adversaries had darkly warned,” Strauss and Howe wrote in The Fourth Turning. “This new regime will enthrone itself for the duration of the Crisis. Regardless of its ideology, that new leadership will assert public authority and demand private sacrifice. Where leaders had once been inclined to alleviate societal pressures, they will now aggravate them to command the nation’s attention.”

Cyclical models of history are something academics kick around every now and then, said Sean Wilentz, an American history professor at Princeton University. But the idea has not caught on among historians or political actors.

“It’s just a conceit. It’s a fiction, it’s all made up,” Wilentz said about cyclical historical models. “There’s nothing to them. They’re just inventions.”

Michael Lind, a historian and co-founder of the New America Foundation, a liberal think tank, has called Strauss and Howe’s work “pseudoscience” and said their “predictions about the American future turn out to be as vague as those of fortune cookies.”

But Bannon bought it.

“This is the fourth great crisis in American history,” Bannon told an audience at the Liberty Restoration Foundation, a conservative nonprofit, in 2011. “We had the Revolution. We had the Civil War. We had the Great Depression and World War II. This is the great Fourth Turning in American history, and we’re going to be one thing on the other side.”

Major crises “happen in about 80- or 100-year cycles,” Bannon told a conference put on by the Republican women’s group Project GoPink that same year. “And somewhere over the next 10 or 20 years, we’re going to come through this crisis, and we’re either going to be the country that was bequeathed to us or it’s going to be something that’s completely or totally different.”

The “Judeo-Christian West is collapsing,” he went on. “It’s imploding. And it’s imploding on our watch. And the blowback of that is going to be tremendous.”

War is coming, Bannon has warned. In fact, it’s already here.

It’s war. It’s war. Every day, we put up: America’s at war, America’s at war. We’re at war. White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon, 2015

“You have an expansionist Islam and you have an expansionist China,” he said during a 2016 radio appearance. “They are motivated. They’re arrogant. They’re on the march. And they think the Judeo-Christian West is on the retreat.”

“Against radical Islam, we’re in a 100-year war,” he told Political Vindication Radio in 2011.

“We’re going to war in the South China Seas in the next five to 10 years, aren’t we?” Bannon asked during a 2016 interview with Reagan biographer Lee Edwards.

“We are in an outright war against jihadist Islamic fascism,” he said in a speech to a Vatican conference in 2014. “And this war is, I think, metastasizing far quicker than governments can handle it.”

In a 2015 radio appearance, Bannon described how he ran Breitbart, the far-right news site he chaired at the time. “It’s war,” he said. “It’s war. Every day, we put up: America’s at war, America’s at war. We’re at war.”

To confront this threat, Bannon argued, the Judeo-Christian West must fight back, lest it lose as it did when Constantinople fell to the Ottomans in 1453. He called Islam a “religion of submission” in 2016 — a refutation of President George W. Bush’s post-9/11 description of Islam as a religion of peace. In 2007, Bannon wrote a draft movie treatment for a documentary depicting a “fifth column” of Muslim community groups, the media, Jewish organizations and government agencies working to overthrow the government and impose Islamic law.

Carlos Barria / Reuters
Trump signs an executive order he said would impose tighter vetting to prevent foreign terrorists from entering the United States, Jan. 27, 2017.

“There’s clearly a fifth column here in the United States,” Bannon warned in July 2016. “There’s rot at the center of the Judeo-Christian West,” he said in November 2015. “Secularism has sapped the strength of the Judeo-Christian West to defend its ideals,” he argued at the Vatican conference. The “aristocratic Washington class” and the media, he has claimed, are in league with the entire religion of Islam and an expansionist China to undermine Judeo-Christian America.

This sort of existential conflict is central to Strauss and Howe’s predictions. There are four ways a Fourth Turning can end, they argued, and three of them involve some kind of massive collapse. America might “be reborn,” and we’d wait another 80 to 100 years for a new cycle to culminate in a crisis again. The modern world — the era of Western history that Strauss and Howe believe began in the 15th century — might come to an end. We might “spare modernity but mark the end of our nation.” Or we might face “the end of man,” in a global war leading to “omnicidal Armageddon.”

Now, a believer in these vague and unfounded predictions sits in the White House, at the right hand of the president.

“We’re gonna have to have some dark days before we get to the blue sky of morning again in America,” Bannon warned in 2010. “We are going to have to take some massive pain. Anybody who thinks we don’t have to take pain is, I believe, fooling you.”

“This movement,” he said in November, “is in the top of the first inning.”

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About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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