Ursule ‘She-Bear’ de Bar Rougemont

<img src=https://rosamondpress.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/ferrette23232.png&#8221; alt=”” width=”545″ height=”600″ class=”aligncenter size-full wp-image-12514″ />

Ursule de Ferrette de Sundgau married Hughes de Hohenzollern. Ursule is the sister of Jeanne de Rougemont de Ferrette who married Albert von Habsburg. From this couple most of the Habsburgs descend. This branch is spliced into the Ursule Hohenzollern branch, begetting most of the royalty of Europe via the de Bar family. There is a modern myth that says members of the de Bar family were Grand Masters of the Priory de Sion, that with the help of the Knights Templar, guard a Grail Bloodline. If true, this Holy Bloodline could not help but be swallowed in the blood that flow from these two sisters who may descend from “The People of the Bear”.

The name Ursule means “she-bear”. From this she-bear Georg Friedrich Hohenzollern ‘Prince of Prussia and Orange’ is born, as was Kaiser Wilhelm a grandson of Queen Victoria. Georg is close kindred of William and Harry Windsor.

Ursule’s son, “Hugo VII was a scion of the comital house of Montfort at Bregenz, head of an old and influential Swabian family of nobles, holding numerous high administrative posts. By his mother Countess Ursula of Ferrette (Pfirt), he was related with the Austrian House of Habsburg.
Hugo wrote songs and Minnebrief rhymes, as well as political and didactic speeches. About 1402 he had a first manuscript of his works drawn up. Approximately 40 of his texts are preserved in an elaborate 1414 codex. Though still standing in the shadow of his famous contemporary Oswald von Wolkenstein, he is today considered one of the last importatnt representatives of the German Minnesang.”

It is this bloodline I beheld when I died. It takes us to the Bradenberg Gate where my Stuttmeister kin lived. I was born to raise it from the ashes of tryanny and dispair. These ‘People of the Bear’ are kin to John Fremont whose Bear Flag flew over California after he took it from the Habsburgs.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2012

Wilhelm II or William II (German: Friedrich Wilhelm Viktor Albert; English: Frederick William Victor Albert) (27 January 1859 – 4 June 1941) was the last German Emperor (Kaiser) and King of Prussia, ruling the German Empire and the Kingdom of Prussia from 15 June 1888 to 9 November 1918. He was a grandson of the British Queen Victoria and related to many monarchs and princes of Europe. Crowned in 1888, he dismissed the Chancellor, Otto von Bismarck, in 1890 and launched Germany on a bellicose “New Course” in foreign affairs that culminated in his support for Austria-Hungary in the crisis of July 1914 that led to World War I.

Georg Friedrich, Prince of PrussiaFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search Georg Friedrich
Prince of Prussia

Head of the House of Hohenzollern
Period 26 September 1994 – present
Predecessor Prince Louis Ferdinand (I)
Heir Presumptive Prince Christian-Sigismund

Spouse Princess Sophie of Isenburg
Father Prince Louis Ferdinand (II)
Mother Countess Donata of Castell-Rüdenhausen
Born (1976-06-10) 10 June 1976 (age 36)
Bremen, Germany

Prussian Royal Family

HI&RH The Prince
HI&RH The Princess
HRH Princess Cornelie-Cecile

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HRH Princess Marie Cécile

HRH Prince Christian-Sigismund
HRH Princess Christian-Sigismund
HRH Prince Christian Ludwig
HRH Princess Irina Maria
Extended family[show]
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HRH Princess Christa

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HRH The Princess of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg

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HRH Prince Frederick Nicholas
HRH Prince Andrew
HRH Princess Victoria Marina Cecile
HRH Prince Rupert Alexander Frederick
HRH The Duchess of Ciudad Rodrigo

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HRH Princess Marie Louise
HRH Prince Adalbert

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HRH Princess Donata
HRH Prince Wilhelm-Karl
HRH Prince Oskar
HRH Princess Oskar

HRH Prince OskarHRH Princess WilhelmineHRH Prince Albert
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HRH Prince Franz Wilhelm

HI&RH Prince George Michael
v ·t ·e ·

Georg Friedrich Ferdinand, Prince of Prussia, (legal name: Georg Friedrich Ferdinand Prinz von Preußen)[a] (born 10 June 1976) is the current head of the House of Hohenzollern, the former ruling dynasty of the German Empire and of the Kingdom of Prussia. He is the great-great-grandson and historic heir of William II, the last German Emperor and King of Prussia, who was deposed and, initially, went into exile upon Germany’s defeat in World War I in 1918.

(Ursule von Pfirt)
(Ursula de Sundgau)
Ursule de HOHENZOLLERN

Hugues de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern, comte de Hohenberg à Rottenburg †1354 (Parents : Rodolphe I, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg †1336 

The Sicambrians, ancestors of the Franks, were known as the “people of the Bear” for their worship of the bear-goddess Arduina. The word “Arcadia” comes from Arkas, patron god of that area of Greece, the son of the nymph Callisto, sister of the huntress Artemis. Callisto’s constellation is also known to many as Ursa Major, the Great Bear. The name “Arthur” comes from the Celtic arth, related to “Ursus” — namely, “bear.” In legend, the Merovingians were said to be descended from the Trojans, and Homer reports that Troy was founded by a colony of Arcadians. The “Prieure documents” claim that the Arcadians were descended from Benjamites driven out of Palestine by their fellow Israelites for idolatry. “Arcadia” was also known as the source of the River Alphaeus, the “underground stream” which figures so prominently in Coleridge’s poetry and in esoteric literature. The Merovingians were “sacred kings” who reigned but did not rule, leaving the secular governing function to chancellors known as the Mayors of the Palace. It was one of these Mayors, Pepin the Fat, who founded the dynasty that came to supplant them — the Carolingians.

Many websites claim the Merovingian bloodline a.k.a. the Rose Line, is infested with Vampires and Satanic Dragon folks who love to mess with world famous artists, bid them to render secret symbols and messages. Many authors claim this artisitic Rose Line has been busy influencing world events, but, they all fail to give a valid example of these covert opperations. The only example I find worthy is John and Jessie Fremont’s war against the Hapsburg Emperor of Mexico, and Napoleon the third. Below are declassified CIA documents that reveal the secret war the Jessie Scouts fought against Napoleon’s invasion forces in Mexico. Napoleon has been linked with the Rose Line, thus the Arcadian Bear. Consider Fremont’s Bear Flag Revolt that delcared California (a goddess) a Republic, a sovereign state that Fremont had no intention of joining to the United States. Would Fremont be King of California, and Jessie, the Queen -or Empress?
“The result is an Independent California belonging to niether The US or Mexico. The original design is updated as OTL, but instead the words California Republic are replaced with República de California. A second star is added, representing the nations two ideals. Freedom and Sovereignty. A border is also added.”
Little is revealed about Fremont’s French ancestry. I see Fromond or Fromont. What does the red star represent? Is it a Star of David? The addition of a second bloody star, and the French words, suggest a link has been made with French sovereigns. Consider Jessie Benton’s close ties to the Beauharnais family who are of Merovingian descent. I suspect this family gave Jessie secret information about Napoleon’s plans to sieze California and Oregon, then plant his Arcadian Bear flag in American soil.
A movie has just come cout about Abe Lincoln the Vampire Slayer. It is said that John Fremont forced Lincoln’s hand, he freeing the slaves of Missouri lest they be used by the Confederacy that was in league with much European Royalty to overthrow the entire United States of America.
Jon Presco
Copyright 2012
It is very likely that the Jessie Scouts assisted in the delivery of funds from Sheridan’s headquarters to Juarez in what Sheridan described as a “covert program” of supporting the Mexican liberals against Maxmilian’s army. What is known is that large amounts of weapons were transferred from captured Confederate depots, as Sheridan said, “30,000 stand of muskets from the Baton Rouge Arsenal alone,” to Juarez’ army as they began to win victories. The magnitude of this “covert” operation was enormous and Grant made arrangements for General Schofield to take a leave of absence to command all of the liberal forces in their war against the French and their allies.

Fredemund

Frotmund (Frimutel) the GRAIL-KING (FISHER-KING)

10th Grandmaster

Male.
Click here to read about Tim Dowling, a blemish on genealogy.
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Wife/Partner: Hatilde (Princess) of FRANKS
Possible Children: Faramund (of the Grail Myth) ; Mazadan (11th GRAIL-KING)
Alternative Father of Possible Children: Frotmund [alt ped]
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_______ _______ _______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ _____ ____ ____
/ — poss. Joseph ben JACOB + ====> [ 165 ,,qD,&]
| | or: poss. Tiberius Julius Abdes Panthera
| | OR: poss. Elohim, GOD of I. + ====> [ 1]
/ | or: Father in the Holy Trinity
/ — prob. Yeshu (ben PANTERA ?) ha-NOTZRI
| \ | OR: poss. source: Yeishu ben P. + ====> [ 2]
| | | or: poss. Yehuda of GALILEE
/ \ — Mary `Holy Mother’ + ====> [ 162 ,,qd]
/ — Joseph RAMA-THEO
| \ | OR: Alain `li Gros’ the GRAIL-KING + ====> [ 168 ,,qD,&]
| \ — prob. Mary MAGDALENE + ====> [ 153 ,,qdY]
/ | OR: poss. source: Sophia of W. + ====> [ 8]
/ — Josue (Bishop) the GRAIL-KING
/ | or: Alphanye (Josue’s son)
/ — Aminadab the GRAIL-KING
/ — Cathaloys (Catheloys Carcelois) the GRAIL-KING
| \ / — poss. Lleurig MAWR (King) of EWYAS + ====> [ 208 ,,qD,&]
| \ — poss. Eurgen
/ \ — poss. Gladys verch EURGEN of SILU. + ====> [ 209 ,,q,&]
/ — Manael (Manuel Emanuel) the GRAIL-KING
/ — Titurel (Titure) the GRAIL-KING (? – 250+)
/ — Boaz (Anfortas Enfertez)
/
– Frotmund (Frimutel) the GRAIL-KING (FISHER-KING)

Based upon the story of Pharamond, a mythological King of the Franks, circa 420 AD and the early history of France, the opera opens with Gustavo (King of the Cimbrians) and Prince Adolfo lamenting the death of Sveno (Gustavo’s son) and swearing vengeance upon Faramondo (King of the Franks), by whose hands Sveno was slain. Into this tense situation comes the captured Princess Clotilde (sister to Faramondo), whom Adolfo loves – and it’s only by his pleading for her that Clotilde is not slain. Once the two young lovers are left alone, Clotilde extracts a promise from Adolfo to change his allegiance to her brother Faramondo, for love of her. Immediately after, Gustavo’s daughter Rosimonda finds her quarters invaded by Frankish soldiers, including Faramondo. As can only be expected in a Handelian opera, Faramondo is instantly struck with love for his fair captive. Even while she rails at him for killing her brother Sveno in battle, and for making an alliance with the Swabian king (Gernando) who is at enmity with the Cimbrians, Rosimonda too finds her heart captured by her erstwhile enemy, Faramondo.

Rosamond and Female Line begot Franks
The male line from Pharamond to Merovee is traced from
Rosamond/Argotta and her daughters. Rosamond was an heiress, the
daughter of the Frankish King, Genobald. That the heiress, Jeanne de Rougemont, one of four daughters of Ulrich de Rougemont, begot the
Habsburgs, and from Rougemont comes the name Rosamond, is profound,
as Jesus’ mother has been titled the ‘Rose of the World’. Some
authors claim the Habsburgs descend from Jesus’s brother,
James/Jacob the Nazarite, who I claim were a ‘race of prophets’.
This puts the name Rosamond at the apex of the Grail liniage.

Gauthier de Costes de la Calprenede is said to have written the first
historic romance novel when 1668 he compiled the history of the
Merovingian Frankish Kings in his monumental work ‘Pharamond’. Within
we have an account of Pharamond’s love for Rosemonde, the Cambrian
princess whose tribe, the Cimri, are mentioned in the Bible, they
associated with the Royal Scythians and the people of the ‘Prince of
Rosh’ that Ezekiel prophecised against in chaper 38. They are the
horseman of the Russian Steppes who would form the Celtic peoples
when they moved west. The ancestors of the Merovingians are kin to
the Cimri, who they chased into Asia, all the way to Ceylon India.
They are more then likely the Tocharain people who traveled the Silk
Road, and whose mummies are now being unearthed.

Bear Goddess
European scholars find the root for bear in the name of Greek goddess, Artemis.   As Protector of Animals, she had attendants called arktoi, “bear girls.”  Accounts of her ritual worship include the drawing of blood by a slight cut made on the men’s throats by the temple priestesses.  
The cult of Artemis, the bear goddess, flourished at Brauron.  Pre-pubescent girls were dedicated to the bear society where they could behave, according to Marie-Louise von Franz (The Feminine in Fairy Tales) “like tomboys — [they] neither washed nor cared for themselves in any way, spoke roughly, and were called bear cubs … .  In this way, the feminine personality could develop unharmed by the problem of sexuality and go into life with a certain amount of maturity, gained in security under the ugly bearskin.  Otherwise, often only half-developed girls would fall into sex life and at thirty would be old and worn out.” 
If, later in life, they desired the company of men, they were obliged to return the symbols of their dedication, some locks of hair and their girlish toys, at the altar and were barred from the temple precincts forever after.  In more recent times, a festival was held every 5 years at that temple at which two little girls, aged five and ten, performed the bear dance dressed in blond bearskins.  

Artemis (in her later role as a daughter of the Olympians) transformed the nymph Callisto, one of her attendants, into a bear whereupon she became the constellation, Ursa Major (The Great Bear.)   But Ursa Major is also Artemis as the celestial She-bear, the Sow who points the way to the axis around which (from  our perspective,) the heavens turn. 
The Helvetian (Swiss) tribes worshipped the She-Bear, and their town Berne, was named for her.  In 1832, an ancient statue of Artio was dug up there that depicts her offering fruit to a bear.  It bears the inscription Deae Artioni Licinia Sabinilla.   Stone figures of bears dating from the pagan Celtic past were found during the restoration of Ireland’s Armagh Cathedral in 1840.
The Franks, ancestors of the French, were also “people of the Bear,” worshipping the bear goddess as Arduina.

The etymology of the name Bern is uncertain. According to the local legend, based on folk etymology, Berchtold V, Duke of Zähringen, the founder of the city of Bern, vowed to name the city after the first animal he met on the hunt, and this turned out to be a bear. It has long been considered likely that the city was named after the Italian city of Verona, which at the time was known as Bern in Middle High German. As a result of the find of the Bern zinc tablet in the 1980, it is now more common to assume that the city was named after a pre-existing toponym of Celtic origin, possibly *berna “cleft”.[9] The bear was the heraldic animal of the seal and coat of arms of Bern from at least the 1220s. The earliest reference to the keeping of live bears in the Bärengraben dates to the 1440s.

Theodoric I (French: Thierry) (ca. 1045 – 2 January 1105) was a Count of Montbéliard, Count of Bar and lord of Mousson (as Theodoric II) and Count of Verdun. He was the son of Louis de Scarpone, Count of Montbéliard, and Sophie, Countess of Bar and Lady of Mousson.
After his father’s death, he claimed the estate of the Duchy of Lorraine, which his father had already claimed. The claim was dismissed by Emperor Henry IV, confirming the duchy to Theodoric the Valiant. In retaliation, he ravaged the diocese of Metz, but he was defeated by Adalbéron III, bishop of Metz, and the Duke of Lorraine Theodoric the Valiant. Reconciled with the Church, he founded an abbey in 1074 in Haguenau and rebuilt the church at Montbéliard in 1080. He did not participate at the Council of Clermont in 1095, or the Crusades, but rather sent his son Louis in the Crusades. In 1100, the Bishop of Verdun gave the county to Thierry for life, but the relationship between the spiritual and temporal powers were turbulent.
He married Ermentrude of Burgundy (1055–1105), daughter of William I, Count of Burgundy, and Stephanie, in 1065 and had the following issue:

Plantard de Saint Clair
From 1975 Pierre Plantard used the surname Plantard de Saint-Clair, described as an epithet by Jean-Luc Chaumeil, following his interview with Plantard in the magazine l’Ère d’Aquarius.[39] The “Saint-Clair” part of his surname was added to his real surname on the basis that this was the family name associated with the area of Gisors associated with his hoax – according to the mythology of the Priory of Sion “Jean VI des Plantard” married a member of the House of Gisors during the 12th century.[40] Plantard also appropriated the false titles of “Comte de Saint-Clair” and “Comte de Rhédæ” to himself.
[edit] Holy blood
In 1982, authors Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh and Henry Lincoln published Holy Blood Holy Grail. It became a bestseller and publicized Plantard’s Priory of Sion story, treating seriously the content of the Priory of Sion documents of the 1960s and 1970s. The book added a new element to the story, that the Merovingian line of kings had actually been descended from the historical Jesus and Mary Magdalene, and that the purpose of the Priory (and its military arm, the Knights Templar) was to protect the secret of the Jesus bloodline.[4][5] Pierre Plantard was hypothesised as the direct descendant of Jesus Christ.
In February 1982 Plantard dismissed The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail as fiction on a French radio interview,[41] and later even dismissed the Priory of Sion documents of the 1960s and 1970s as false and irrelevant.[4][5]

The story of the Knights Templars is exceedingly interesting because it relates to the Satanic International Bankers of today. The Knights Templars became the first European wide International Bankers.
How their story fits into everything would take to long to tell at this point. At that time period when the Knights Templars took off on their own, the Ordre de Sion became the Prieure de Sion, and also used the names Ormus and Rose-Croix, The Prieure de Sion is intimately connected to the creation and guidance of the Rosicrucians and Freemasons. In the Be Wise As Serpents book, chapter 12 it talks about how the Prieure de Sion set up the Scottish Rite of Freemasonry.
In 1613, the House of Lorraine (part of the Prieure de Sion) joined with the House of Stuart. After that the Prieure de Sion began to display more interest in Scotland. Scotland was one of the few countries wbere the Knights Tempiars had thrived when the order was suppressed by the order of the Pope.

http://web.archive.org/web/20030613113825/http://www.thewatcherfiles.com/bloodlines/index.htm

1044-1073: Louis I de Sundgau ca 1019-1073..1076 (1er)
1073-1105: Thierry I de Sundgau ca 1045-1105 (2e)
1105-1160: Frédéric I de Sundgau †1160 (3e)
1160-1189: Louis II de Sundgau †1189 (4e)
1189-1197: Ulrich I de Sundgau †1197 (5e)
1197-1232: Frédéric II de Sundgau †1232 (6e)
1232-1233: Louis III de Sundgau †1281 (7e)
1233-1275: Ulrich II de Sundgau †1275 (8e)
1275-1309: Thibault de Ferrette de Sundgau †1309/ (9e)
1309-1324: Ulrich III de Sundgau †1324 (10e)
1324-1358: Albert I (II) le Sage de Habsbourg 1298-1358 (12e)
1358-1365: Rodolphe (IV) le Magnanime de Habsbourg 1339-1365 (13e)
1365-1379: Albert III l’Astrologue de Habsbourg 1348-1395 (14e)
1379-1386: Léopold (III) le Preux de Habsbourg 1351-1386 (15e)
1386-1424: Ernest I de Styrie le Duc de Fer de Habsbourg 1377-1424 (16e)
1424-1493: Frédéric (III) A la Grosse Lèvre de Habsbourg 1415-1493 (17e)
1493-1519: Maximilien I le Défenseur du Saint-Siège de Habsbourg 1459-1519 (18e)
1519-1521: Charles I de Habsbourg 1500-1558 (19e)
1521-1564: Ferdinand I de Habsbourg 1503-1564 (20e)
1564-1576: Maximilien II de Habsbourg 1527-1576 (21e)
1576-1612: Rodolphe II de Habsbourg 1552-1612 (22e)
1612-1619: Matthias d’Autriche de Habsbourg 1557-1619 (23e)
1619-1637: Ferdinand II de Habsbourg 1578-1637 (24e)
1637-1648: Ferdinand III de Habsbourg 1608-1657 (25e)

Regents of Hohenzollern

The county of Hohenzollern, or Zollern as it was first called, was during its entire existence an insignificant principality in Swabia. More famous is the dynasty with the same name that ruled Hohenzollern and from 1192 also was burgraves of Nuremberg. The brothers Konrad and Friedrich IV partitioned de Hohenzollern lands so that Konrad got Nuremberg and Friedrich got the county of Hohenzollern. It was from Konrad the electors of Brandenburg and kings of Prussia descended. Thereafter did the county of Hohenzollern play any significant part of German history, continuous partitions contributed to this. Already in 1125 had the Hohenzollern lands been partitioned so that a collateral line ruled over the county of Hohenberg to 1468. Another early partition occurred 1288 when the collateral line became counts of Schalksburg to 1403. The county of Hohenzollern was elevated to a principality 1623 and ceded to Prussia 1849. However the princely branch of the house of Hohenzollern lived on and they became later princes (1866-1881) and kings (1881-1947) of Romania.

Zollern, from 1218 Hohenzollern, was a county of the Holy Roman Empire. Its ruling dynasty was the House of Hohenzollern, a Swabian noble family first mentioned in 1061. They named their estates after Hohenzollern Castle at the Swabian Alb; its capital was Hechingen. Its coat of arms was that of the ruling house.

Hohenzollern Castle
According to the mediæval chronicler Berthold of Reichenau, the nobleman Burkhard I, Count of Zollern (de Zolorin) was born before 1025 and died in 1061. By his name, an affiliation with the Alamannic dynasty of the Burchardings is possible, though not proven. The Zollerns received the c
omital title from Emperor Henry V in 1111. As loyal liensmen of the Swabian Hohenstaufen dynasty, they were able to significantly enlarge their territory. Count Frederick III (c. 1139 – c. 1200) accompanied Emperor Frederick I Barbrarossa against Henry the Lion in 1180 and through his marriage achieved the enfeoffment with the Burgraviate of Nuremberg by Emperor Henry VI of Hohenstaufen in 1191. In 1218 the burgraviate passed to Frederick’s younger son Conrad I, he thereby became the ancestor of the Franconian Hohenzollern branch, which acquired the Electorate of Brandenburg in 1415.
Affected by economic problems and internal feuds, the Hohenzollern counts from the 14th century onwards came under pressure by their mighty neighbours, the Counts of Württemberg and the cities of the Swabian League, whose troops besieged and finally destroyed Hohenzollern Castle in 1423. Nevertheless the Hohenzollerns retained their estates, backed by their Brandenburg cousins and the Imperial House of Habsburg. In 1534, Count Charles I of Hohenzollern (1512–1576) received the counties of Sigmaringen and Veringen as Imperial 1. Edouard de Bar (1307–1336)
2. Jeanne de Bar (1336–1351)
3. Jean de Saint-Clair (1351–1366)
4. Blanche d’Évreux (1366–1398)
5. Nicolas Flamel (1398–1418)
6. René d’Anjou (1418–1480)
7. Iolande de Bar (1480–1483)

Pierre Athanase Marie Plantard (18 March 1920 – 3 February 2000) was a French draughtsman,[1] best known for being the principal perpetrator of the Priory of Sion hoax, by which he claimed from the 1960s onwards that he was a Merovingian descendant of Dagobert II and the “Great Monarch” prophesied by Nostradamus.[2] Today in France he is commonly regarded as a mystificator.[3]

Deception, beguilement, deceit, bluff, mystification and subterfuge are acts to propagate beliefs that are not true, or not the whole truth (as in half-truths or omission). Deception can involve dissimulation, propaganda, and sleight of hand, and well as distraction, camouflage or concealment. There is also self-deception, as in bad faith.

Deception is a major relational transgression that often leads to feelings of betrayal and distrust between relational partners. Deception violates relational rules and is considered to be a negative violation of expectations. Most people expect friends, relational partners, and even strangers to be truthful most of the time. If people expected most conversations to be untruthful, talking and communicating with others would require distraction and misdirection to acquire reliable information. A significant amount of deception occurs between romantic and relational partners.[1]

Regents of Hohenzollern
The county of Hohenzollern, or Zollern as it was first called, was during its entire existence an insignificant principality in Swabia. More famous is the dynasty with the same name that ruled Hohenzollern and from 1192 also was burgraves of Nuremberg. The brothers Konrad and Friedrich IV partitioned de Hohenzollern lands so that Konrad got Nuremberg and Friedrich got the county of Hohenzollern. It was from Konrad the electors of Brandenburg and kings of Prussia descended. Thereafter did the county of Hohenzollern play any significant part of German history, continuous partitions contributed to this. Already in 1125 had the Hohenzollern lands been partitioned so that a collateral line ruled over the county of Hohenberg to 1468. Another early partition occurred 1288 when the collateral line became counts of Schalksburg to 1403. The county of Hohenzollern was elevated to a principality 1623 and ceded to Prussia 1849. However the princely branch of the house of Hohenzollern lived on and they became later princes (1866-1881) and kings (1881-1947) of Romania.

Hugues de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern
(Hugues von Hohenberg)
(Hugo de Hohenzollern)
(Hugues de Hohenzollern)
Titres: comte de Hohenberg à Rottenburg (3e, 1336-1354)

FICHEMÉDIASPARENTÉCORRESPONDANCES
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•Décédé en 1354
•Consanguinité : 0,4%

Parents
•Rodolphe I, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg et de Hohenberg à Rottenburg (2e ,Rodolphe I, 1298-1336), comte de Hohenberg à Haigerloch (3e ,Rodolphe I, après 1304-1336), décédé le 11 janvier 1336 (mercredi) , inhumé – Ehingen, Alb-Danube (Alb-Donau (Ulm)), Tübingen, Bade-Wurtemberg, Allemagne, consanguinité : 0,15%
Marié avec
•Agnès de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg de Tübingen, décédée en juin 1317, consanguinité : 0,14%
Union(s) et enfant(s)
• Marié en 1333 avec Ursule de Ferrette de Sundgau †ca 1367 (Parents : Ulrich III, comte de Ferrette †1324 & Jeanne de Bourgogne d’Ivrée †1347) dont ;

◦Ursule de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern †1380/
Fratrie
◦ Albert de Hohenberg, évêque de Constance †1359
■ Rodolphe II, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg †1335 Marié avec Marguerite de Nassau-Hadamar de Nassau †1370
■ Hugues de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern, comte de Hohenberg à Rottenburg †1354 Marié en 1333 avec Ursule de Ferrette de Sundgau †ca 1367
◦ … de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern
Grands parents paternels, oncles et tantes
■ Albert II, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg ca 1235-1298
◦ … …

■ Agnès de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern
(1282)
1 enfant

◦ Albert III, comte de Hohenberg à Haigerloch †1304/

■ Albert II, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg ca 1235-1298 (1282)
■ Marguerite de Fürstenberg d’Urach †/1295

◦ Euphémie de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern

◦ Adélaïde de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern †1333

◦ Marguerite de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern

◦ Albert IV de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern †1317/

■ Rodolphe I, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg †1336

4 enfants

■ Ermengarde de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern †1315
(1291)
1 enfant

Grands parents maternels, oncles et tantes
■ Hugues II le Borgne, comte de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg †/1307 (1281)
■ Euphémie d’Ortenburg †1316/

◦ Hugues III, comte de Werdenberg-Werdenberg †1334

■ Albert I, comte de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg †1364

1 enfant

■ Agnès de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg de Tübingen †1317

4 enfants

Arbre d’ascendance Arbre de descendance Aperçu de l’arbre
_____| 16_ Bouchard II, comte de Hohenberg †/1225
_____| 8_ Bouchard III, comte de Hohenberg †1253
/ ¯¯¯¯¯| 17_ Wilpurge …
_____| 4_ Albert II, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg ca 1235-1298
/ \ _____| 18_ Rodolphe II, comte palatin de Tübingen †1248/
/ ¯¯¯¯¯| 9_ Mathilde de Tübingen
/ ¯¯¯¯¯| 19_ … de Ronsberg d’Irsee
|2_ Rodolphe I, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg †1336
| \ _____| 20_ Eugène I de Fribourg d’Urach, comte de Fribourg ca 1185-1236
| \ _____| 10_ Henri I, comte de Fürstenberg 1236-1283
| \ / ¯¯¯¯¯| 21_ Adélaïde de Neuffen †1248
| ¯¯¯¯¯| 5_ Marguerite de Fürstenberg d’Urach †/1295
| \ _____| 22_ Frédéric III, comte de Truhendingen †1253
| ¯¯¯¯¯| 11_ Agnès de Truhendingen †1294/
| ¯¯¯¯¯| 23_ Agnès … †1245/
|–1_ Hugues de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern, comte de Hohenberg à Rottenburg †1354
| _____| 24_ Rodolphe I, comte de Montfort †1247
| _____| 12_ Hugues I, comte de Werdenberg-Werdenberg †1280
| / ¯¯¯¯¯| 25_ Clémence de Kyburg de Dillingen †1249/
| _____| 6_ Hugues II le Borgne, comte de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg †/1307
| / \ _____| 26_ Berthold II, comte de Neuffen †1274/
| / ¯¯¯¯¯| 13_ Mathilde de Neuffen †1267/
| / ¯¯¯¯¯| 27_ Berthe de Marstetten d’Irsee †1259/
|3_ Agnès de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg de Tübingen †1317
\ _____| 28_ Hermann I, comte d’Ortenburg †1265
\ _____| 14_ Frédéric I, comte d’Ortenburg †1304
\ / ¯¯¯¯¯| 29_ Elisabeth de Heunburg
¯¯¯¯¯| 7_ Euphémie d’Ortenburg †1316/
\ _____| 30_ Meinard III, comte de Görz /1194-/1258
¯¯¯¯¯| 15_ Adélaïde de Görz †1285
¯¯¯¯¯| 31_ Adélaïde de Tyrol d’Evrasburg †1275..1279

The Duchy of Bar was a historic duchy of both the Holy Roman Empire and the crown of France, though later totally incorporated with Lorraine into France in 1766. The duchy of Bar includes the “pays” of Barrois.

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Rulers of Bar and Pont-à-Mousson
2.1 Counts of Bar
2.2 Dukes of Bar
2.3 Marquises of Pont-à-Mousson
3 References

[edit] HistoryIn the middle of the 10th century, the territory of Bar formed a dependency of the Holy Roman Empire. The first dynasty of Bar were in fact dukes of Upper Lotharingia out of the house of the counts of the Ardennes, descendants of count palatine Wigeric of Lotharingia. They chose their seat at Bar, which was subsequently called Bar-le-Duc. This Ardennes-Bar dynasty became extinct with Duke Frederick III (died 1033) and his sister Countess Sophia of Bar (died 1093).

In the 11th century the lords of Bar were only counts of Bar. They belonged to the house of Mousson-Montbéliard-Ferrette.

Theobald I of Bar was an ally of Philip Augustus, as was also his son Henry II of Bar, who distinguished himself at the Battle of Bouvines in 1214. But sometimes the counts of Bar bore arms against France. In 1301 Henry III of Bar, having made an alliance with Edward I of England, whose daughter he had married, was vanquished by Philip the Fair, who forced him to do homage for a part of Barrois, situated west of the Meuse River, which was then called Barrois mouvant. Since then the duchy of Bar was both part of the Crown of France (for the west of the Meuse River) and part of the Holy Roman Empire (for the rest of the duchy).[1]

In 1354 Robert of Bar, who married a princess of France, was made Marquis of Pont-à-Mousson by the Emperor Charles IV and took the title of Duke of Bar. Hereafter, the title of “Marquis of Pont-à-Mousson” was used by the dukes of Bar or their heirs-apparent. His successor, Edward III of Bar, was killed at Agincourt in 1415.

In 1419 Louis of Bar, brother of the last-named cardinal and bishop of Châlons-sur-Marne, gave the duchy of Bar to René, Duke of Anjou and king of Naples, the grandson of his sister Yolande, who married Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine. Yolande of Anjou, who in 1444 had married Frederick, Count of Vaudémont, became heiress of Nicholas of Anjou, duke of Calabria and of Lorraine, in 1473, and of René of Anjou, duke of Bar, in 1480; thus Lorraine, with Bar added to it, once more returned to the family of its ancient dukes.

United with Lorraine to France in 1634, the duchy of Bar remained, except for short intervals, part of the royal domain. It was granted in 1738 to Stanislaus Leszczynski, ex-king of Poland, and on his death in 1766 was once more attached to the crown of France.

[edit] Rulers of Bar and Pont-à-Mousson[edit] Counts of BarHouse of the Ardennes (Wigerics)
Frederick I (959–978), son of count palatine Wigeric of Lotharingia
Thierry I (978–1026/1027), son
Frederick II (1026/1027), son
Frederick III (1026/1027–1033), son
Sophie of Bar (countess of Bar 1033; d.1093), daughter of Frederick II
House of Montbelliard
Theodoric II of Bar (1093–1105), son of Sophia of Bar (+1093) and count Louis of Montbelliard (+1071).
Reginald I of Bar, the One-eyed (r. 1105–1150)Reginald II of Bar (r. 1150–1170)
Henry I of Bar (r. 1170–1189)
Theobald I of Bar (r. 1189–1214)
Henry II of Bar (r. 1214–1239)
Theobald II of Bar (r. 1239–1291)
Henry III of Bar (r. 1291–1302)
Edward I of Bar (r. 1302–1337)
Henry IV of Bar (r. 1337–1344)
Edward II of Bar (r. 1344–1352)
[edit] Dukes of BarRobert of Bar (r. 1352–1411)
Edward III of Bar (r. 1411–1415)
Louis of Bar (r. 1415–1431)
René I, king of Naples and Duke of Lorraine (r. 1431–1480)
Yolande (r. 1480–1483)
René II, Duke of Lorraine (r. 1483–1508)
Hereafter united with the Duchy of Lorraine.

[edit] Marquises of Pont-à-MoussonRobert of Bar (r. 1354–1411
Edward III of Bar (r. 1411–1415)
Louis of Bar (r. 1415–1419)
René of Anjou (r. 1419–1441)
Louis of Anjou (r. 1441–1443)
René of Anjou (again) (r. 1443–1444)
John, Duke of Lorraine (r. 1444–1470)
Nicholas, Duke of Lorraine (r. 1470–1473)
vacant (1473–1480)
René II, Duke of Lorraine (r. 1480–1508)

Yolande, Duchess of Lorraine, also known as Yolande de Bar (2 November 1428, Nancy – 23 March 1483, Nancy), was Duchess of Lorraine (1473) and Bar (1480). She was the daughter of Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine, and René of Anjou (King of Naples, Duke of Anjou, Bar and Lorraine, Count of Provence). Because of her various titles she is also known as Yolande de Lorraine and Yolande d’Anjou. Her younger sister was Margaret of Anjou, Queen consort of Henry VI of England.
A romanticised version of her life is given in the play King René’s Daughter by Henrik Hertz, in which she is portrayed as blind, though she is eventually cured. It was later adapted to Tchaikovsky’s opera Iolanta. There is no evidence that she was ever blind.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Marriage and children
2 Legacy
3 Cultural references
4 Notes
[edit] Marriage and children
In 1445 she married her cousin Frederick II, Count of Vaudémont (1420–1470), at Nancy. The marriage was a dynastic alliance, arranged to end the dispute which existed between René of Anjou and Frederick’s father, Antoine of Vaudémont, regarding the succession to the Duchy of Lorraine.
Their children were:
René II (1451–1508), Duke of Lorraine. On 1 September 1485 he married secondly, Phillipa of Guelders, by whom he had issue, from whom descended Mary, Queen of Scots
Nicholas, Lord of Joinville and Bauffremont, died in 1476
Peter, died in 1451
Joan (1458–1480), married in 1474 to Charles IV, Duke of Anjou. There was no issue from the marriage.
Yolande, who died in 1500, married William II, Landgrave of Hesse, by whom she had issue.
Margaret (1463–1521), married René (1454–1492), Duke of Alençon. She had issue, from whom descended King Henry IV of France

The Coat of arms of René in 1420; Composing the arms of Valois-Anjou (top left and bottom right), Duchy of Bar (top right and bottom left), and of the Duchy of Lorraine (superimposed shield). In 1434 were added Hungary, Kingdom of Naples and Jerusalem (top left, top center and top right). The arms of the Crown of Aragon (superimposed shield) were shown from 1443 to 1470. In 1453 the arms of Lorraine were removed and in 1470 Valois-Anjou were substituted for the modern arms of the duchy (superimposed shield). [3]

René of Anjou (Rei Rainièr in Occitan) (16 January 1409 – 10 July 1480), also known as René I of Naples and Good King René (French Le bon roi René), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1435–1442; titular 1442–1480), titular King of Jerusalem (1438–1480) and Aragon (1466–1480) (including Sicily, Majorca, Corsica). He was the father of the English queen Margaret of Anjou, wife of King Henry VI of England and a key figure in the Wars of the Roses.

Joan of Bar (1297 France – 1361 London) was the younger daughter of Henry III, Count of Bar and Princess Eleanor of England, and niece of Edward II of England. She was unhappily married to John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey. In 1354, Joan became the regent of Bar for her great-nephew, Robert I.
Joan was a granddaughter of Edward I of England, “Longshanks”, and Eleanor of Castile. She was close in age to her older brother, Edward I of Bar, born circa 1294/95.
On 25 May 1306, at ten or eleven years old, Joan was married to one of the leading nobles of England, John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey, a “nasty, brutal man with scarcely one redeeming quality.”[1] She lived at the Warenne family estates, Conisbrough Castle and Sandal Castle, abandoned by her husband, who hated her and since 1313 had been trying to divorce her. In England, she was close to the queen consort Isabella of France, her aunt by marriage (Isabella’s husband, Edward II, being Joan’s maternal uncle) who was about her same age, and spent time with her at court. She was probably close to her first cousin Elizabeth de Clare (the daughter of Joan of Acre, her mother’s sister), who left Joan an image of John the Baptist in her will.

Edward I, Count of Bar

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Edward I, Count of Bar
Spouse(s)
Mary of Burgundy
Noble family
House of Montbéliard
Father
Henry III, Count of Bar
Mother
Eleanor of England
Died
November 1336
Famagusta
Edward I (died November 1336), grandson and namesake of Edward I of England, was the Count of Bar from 1302 to his death. He was a minor when he succeeded his father, Henry III, as count and ruled under the regency of his grandfather, as his mother, Eleanor of England, was dead since 1298.
The county was governed on Edward’s behalf by John of Puisaye, Theobald, Bishop of Liège, and Renaud, Bishop of Metz.
In 1308, he accompanied Frederick IV of Lorraine into battle. In 1310, he married Mary, daughter of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy, and was declared to have attained his majority. Then he purchased the lordship of Stenay from his uncle John, the aforementioned lord of Puisaye. In 1313, he was captured in war against Frederick and not ransomed until 1314. He constructed a hydraulic forge at Moyeuvre-Grande in 1323. In 1324, he was again allied in military operations with the duke of Lorraine, and also with the King of Bohemia, John, and the Archbishop of Trier, Baldwin of Luxembourg. This operations was the War of Metz, for each of the allied lords was owed something by the citizens of Metz. Edward demanded compensation for garrisoning the city with his own troops during a conflict with the bishop of Verdun
The Counts de Ferrette are the descendants of LOUIS IV of
MONTBELIARD and SOPHIE of BAR and MONSOON. In 1125, the County of
MONTBELIARD was divided into two and the Eastern part of this one
was set up in County of FERRETTE under the authority of the first
Count Frederic 1st. COUNTS OF FERRETTE

Frederic 1st 1125-1160
Louis the Cross one 1160-1191
Ulrich 1st 1190-1197
Frederic II 1197-1232
Louis says Grimmel 1232-1233
Ulrich II 1233-1275
Thiebaud 1275-1315
Ulrich III 1315-1324
Male absence of heir in 1324.
Marriage of Jeanne of FERRETTE and Albert II of HABSBOURG Archduke
of Austria.
The family of Habsbourg will règnera on Sundgau of 1324 to 1648.

Frederic 1st (1125 – 1160) takes an active part in the government of
the Empire and, in his county, fights against paganism by
encouraging the establishment of monasteries and abbeys, like the
priories clunisiens of Feldbach and Saint-Christophe with Altkirch,
known today under the name of Saint-Morand.

His/her Louis son (about 1160 – 1191) works with roughness to defend
his possessions. He accompanies Frederic Barberousse with the
crusade and dies (perhaps) in Palestine.

Ulrich 1st (1193 – 1197) is assassinated by the Count Palatine Othon
of Burgundy.

His/her brother Frederic II (1197 – 1232) replaces it. Its reign is
shaken by violences and wars. The most known episode of its life is
the removal of the bishop of Basle. This fixed price is worth to him
to be condemned to the sorrow of the “Harnescar”: Frederic must
carry a dog on his shoulders, since Spalenthor of Basle until the
cathedral, follow-up of his noble carrying each one a harness and
inhabitants of Altkirch out of dress of penitent. Arrived on the
square of the cathedral, it must kneel in front of the bishop and
beseech his forgiveness. Frederic II dies a little later
assassinated by one of his Louis sons says “the Furious one”, which
will die excommunicated in 1236.

Ulrich II (1233 – 1275) takes the head of the county with died of
his Frederic father. By a skilful policy, it gets busy to repair the
principal losses of this one. In 1271, it must yield its grounds for
850 marks of money to the bishop of Basle which immediately returns
them to him in stronghold, becoming thus its suzerain.

Thiébaut (1275 – 1315), of a warlike spirit, will know many
vexations. It takes party for Adolphe de Nassau in the war which
opposes it to Rodolphe de Habsbourg aiming to the possession of the
imperial throne. Named Landvogt in 1293, it falls in disgrace with
the fall from its Master in 1298. It is of this time that date the
construction of the castle of Landskron.
The name of Hirtzbach appears in 1274, the locality is then divided
into Niederdorf around the church Saint-Maurice and Oberdorf with
the Sainte-Afre church, on the “Mountain”. It belonged, with
Henflingen and Bettendorf, with the town hall of Bettendorf and the
seigniory of Altkirch. To 3 km from there, was the village now
disappeared, of Leger Saint with his church.
In 1274, the counts de Ferrette give the village in stronghold to
Henri de Hirtzbach, member of a family of ministériaux of Ferrette.
The ministériaux ones were servants, nonfree, lords. In against part
of their work, they received the right of possession. The family of
Hirtzbach is attested of 1274 to 1477. Coming from Altkirch, it is
installed with the castle of the “Wandelbourg”, high on a mound, at
the end of the 13th century, in the south of the village, not far
from the Sainte-Afre vault. It was undoubtedly destroyed in 1446 by
Mulhousiens and Swiss Confédérés in war against the Austrian
nobility.

Ulrich III (1315 – 1324) receives in dowry, of his wife Jeanne of
Montbeliard, the seigniories of Rougemont and Belfort. Its main goal
will be to conquer the valley of Amarin Saint. In the absence of
male heir, it is his Jeanne daughter who succeeds to him the head of
the county in 1324; little time afterwards, it will marry Albert II
of Habsbourg says “the Wise one”. It is the end of the counts de
Ferrette and the entry of Sundgau in the Austrian possessions.

(Visit the site “castles strong and strengthened cities of Alsace” .
You will also find there photographs of the castle of Ferrette
Jeanne de Rougemont/Ferrette/Pfirt von Habsburg

http://perso.orange.fr/jean-paul.caspar/Bereswinthe_2/fp_1c.html#720

http://tinyurl.com/yzjvx3

(Images: Jeanne/Johanna de Rougemont. Ferrette Chateau. Habsburg
Rulers.)

In these genealogies we see how the name Ferrette (also Pfirt) is
connected to the Shroud Family. The Habsburgs came to own Rougemont
(also Rosemont and Rozemont) castle in the Alsace and intermarried
with the Ferrette family who originally owned Rougemont. With the
marriage of Jeanne de Rougemont/Ferrette to Albert de Habsburg, the
Habsburgs begin a dynastic reign that will last hudreds of years,
forming blood ties to most of the Royal Houses of Europe.

http://gilles.maillet.free.fr/histoire/genealogie_bourgogne/comte_fer
rette.htm

http://tinyurl.com/7wawb

http://gilles.maillet.free.fr/histoire/genealogie_bourgogne/comte_mon
tbeliard.htm

http://tinyurl.com/y8vezx

“When Renaud of Burgundy died in 1322, his daughter, Jeanne
ofMontbéliard, the wife of Count Ulrich III of Ferrette, inherited
her father’s domains. Jeanne and Ulrich had 4 daughters and no sons.
When Ulrich died in1324, Jeanne sold her domains (including Belfort)
to Albert of Habsburg, the Duke of Austria. In 1347, Albert of
Habsburg also called Albert the Wise, whose family was important in
the German Empire, married Jeanne of Ferrette, one of the four
daughters of Jeanne and Ulrich. These Habsburgs already held the
title of “Landvogt” of Upper-Alsace. Albert soon bought the
remaining domains of his wife’s parents in Upper-Alsace. This
region, including Belfort, remained part of the Habsburg properties
(directly or indirectly) for thenext 300 years.

de ROUGEMONT, Frédéric
de ROUGEMONT, Frédéric (Ulrich)
de ROUGEMONT, Jean

http://perso.orange.fr/jean-paul.caspar/alsace_etichon.htm

http://perso.orange.fr/jean-paul.caspar/Bereswinthe_2/fm.html

http://perso.orange.fr/jean-paul.caspar/Bereswinthe_2/fe_a.html

The Rougemont/Ferrette von Habsburg DynastySee the COMTES OF FERRETTE
(Photos: Habsburg shield. Von Ferrette and Otto von Habsburg.
Knights of Rougemont. Ruins of Rougemont and Florimont Castle.)

http://www.ferrette-medievale.org/album_photos.php

http://www.ferrette-medievale.org/jeanne_de_ferrette.php

http://www.lisa90.org/histoire/history1.html

“Ursula com de Phirt”[168], many members of the family of Montfort
(that of her second husband) being recorded in the same necrology. m
firstly ([8 Jun/9 Jul] 1333) HUGO I Graf von Hohenberg, son of
RUDOLF I Graf von Hohenberg [Zollern] & his first wife Agnes von
Werdenberg (-26 May 1354). m secondly (1354) WILHELM II Graf von
Montfort in Bregenz (-[18 May 1373/14 Jun 1374]).2. THIEBAUT (-[9
May 1311/1 Apr 1312], bur Thann Barfüsserkirche). Seigneur de
Rougemont 1295. 3. JEAN (-[18 May 1309/1 Apr 1312]). Seigneur de
Rougemont. 4. HERZELANDE (-3 Apr 1317, bur Abtei Neuburg bei
Hagenau). m (before 24 Nov 1299) OTTO V Herr von Ochsenstein (-19
Oct 1327, bur Abtei Neuburg bei Hagenau).5. SOPHIE (-25 Mar 1344,
bur Stuttgart Stiftskirche). m (before 1304, or 1312) ULRICH von
Württemberg, son of EBERHARD I “der Erlauchte” Graf von Württemberg
& his wife Irmgard von Baden (-murdered Alsace 11 Jul 1344, bur
Stuttgart Stiftskirche). He succeeded his father 1325 as ULRICH III
Graf von Württemberg.

6. COMTES de FERRETTE [PFIRT] 1125-1324 20Chapter 7. GRAFEN von
WERDE 24

From the XVII to the XIX

The Lachapelle-under-Lime history is indissociable among that of the
castle of Rosemont and that of our Chaux neighbor. This is why it
appears essential to us to give a rather precise outline of the
history of Rosemont. Lachapelle, since XIe century until the
revolution of 1789, formed part without interruption of the
adventures of Rosemont.

In moved back times, Antiquity, Gallic period, our under-Vosgean
Country was very inaccueuillant, with its wild forests and its
marshes. Very few inhabitants, remaining with difficulty in this
dark and moved back country.

at the time of Astérix …..
It is probable that an important Roman way passed close it Rosemont
in order to to connect Belfort Gap with Lorraine. In addition
Auxelles existed already at the time of the Roman domination (in
Latin axellae of axis, boards). A Roman way, remained unfinished was
to connect Auxelles to Offemont.

A military station has to precede construction by the castle in XIe
century. Between 1024 and 1070 an administration settled depending
on the first count de Montbéliard, Louis de Mousson. The localities
depended on the lieutenant of Rosemont and were divided in three
town halls:
– that of Burg or the valley with Sermamagny, Lime, Lachapelle-under-
Lime, Lepuix, Giromagny, Vescemont, Rougegoutte and Grosmagny,
– that of Evette with Valdoie, Eloie, Essert and Evette,
– that of Banvillars with Urcerey, Argiésans and Banvillars.

All these populations were subjected to serfdom. It were freed in
1467 by the Sigismond archduke from the House from Austria. Their
situation improved only very slowly until the beginning of XIVe
century. As they depended on the seigniory of Belfort, they profited
from the franknesses granted in May 1307 by the count from
Montbeliard, Renaud of Burgundy (that of the boulevard which leads
to Bavilliers), in Belfort, while preserving their former rights and
uses. we become Autrichiens…

The succession of Renaud of Burgundy, dead on March 10, 1321, seems
to be agitated enough. His/her elder daughter, Jeanne, widow of the
count de Ferrette, remariée with the Marquis de Bade, inherited the
seigniory of Belfort and her dependence. This fact the populations
of Rosemont made allégence to the marquis de Bade. This one, dying,
its widow remariant one second time, the field of Rosemont was
allotted to his/her daughter Jeannette, wife of Albert II archduke
of Austria. Thus the populations of Rosemont passed to the house of
Austria. In 1351 Albert repurchased with his sister-in-law Meroux
and Vézelois which were incorporated in the field of Rosemont.
Thereafter, in 1354, it attached to the field the localities of
Etueffont-Haut, Etueffont-Bas, Anjoutey and Petitmagny. You note,
that the things are not simple, already, and we are only in 1351!!

<< ….. It is, appears it, towards the end of this century (XIVe)
which was written the constitution known under the name of Coutumier
of Rosemont. It results from this usual that each town hall had its
particular administration and its justice; that with the top of this
first degree, there was justice seigneuriale. With the top of this
one the justice of the castle of Belfort. The mayors dealt with the
local businesses of common importance to given times of the year.
Justice seigneuriale managed, out of civil matter, the calls
interjectés against the sentences of the mayors. Finally the justice
of the castle of Belfort, on the report/ratio of the lieutenant of
Rosemont, ruled in last spring.

As for high justice, criminal justice, it belonged to justice
seigneuriale. Rosemont thus had its gibet for all the justiciable
ones to its grounds. If, in the first times, justice had its
effective seat with the castle, it was established later in Chaux.
It is there that it sat before the meeting of Rosemont in the county
of Ferrette; it is there that emptied itself by nine judges, under
the presidency of the lieutenant, the disputes or the calls
generated by the sentences of the mayors… It is known that the
archdukes, in spite of their great possessions, frequently had
recourse to the engagement of their fields to get money. Rosemont
especially have this fate. In 1360, it is in Pierre de Bollwiller
that it was given in engagement, with faculty of repurchase; in
1363, it is in Marguerite de Bade that it belonged on the same
basis; in 1447, in Erkinger de Hugenhoven; in 1450, in Pierre de
Morimont; in 1456, in Guntzmann de Brinighoffen; in 1457, in
Rodolphe de Sultz; in 1459, again in Pierre de Morimont. ". Hardly
returned in possession of Rosemont, the Maximilien archduke, needy
like his predecessors, engaged it again, for 25.300 guilders, in
Gaspard de Morimont. The loan rose successively to 52.645 guilders,
which were refunded only in 1534. In consequence of the very long
difficulties caused by liquidation, the house of Austria took again
possession of the field only on January 21, 1563…" ". In the course
of XIVe, XVe, and XVIe centuries, Rosemontois were not tested than
of others by the three principal events which left of so deep traces
in our annals. But, more than of others, they opposed to the enemy a
resistance worthy of a better fate."

". In 1365, in fact the bands of the archpriest Arnaud de Cervole,
after having guerroyé with the Metz-native country, devastated the
campaigns of Low-Alsace, were badgered by Rosemontois when they
passed to Burgundy. When, nine years later, in 1375, Enguerrand,
lord de Coucy, had again gathered the bands of lorry drivers, who
were not dissolved, Rosemont was invaded the first of the countries
of Austria. It had to suffer much, but the history did not preserve
us any detail of the horrors which it reports in other localities. "

In 1444, in fact the armies of king de France invade Rosemont,
called by the Sigismond archduke in war against the Swiss ones. ,
Rosemontois were reduced to misery and despair. In 1445, they
revolted and beat the enemy, whom it expelled. Tschas are irritated!
In 1525, with the rising of the peasants 15.000 men (?) led by Jean
Neury de Vescemont and Richard Prévot de Chaux, invest Belfort and
especially, recover "all the pigs, all the sheep, all the nasty
trick." that the clergy and the nobility had confiscated to them.
Perhaps would have-T' they "to pass by Angeot", to go to the priory
of Saint Nicolas's Day where the spoils would have been much more
important.

Ulrich III de Ferrette, (? – 10 mars 1324), comte de Ferrette et sire de Rougemont-le-Château[1].
Mariage et succession[2] :
Il épouse en 1309 Jeanne de Montbéliard, (? – 1350), fille de Renaud de Bourgogne. Après son décès son corps est inhumé dans l'église de Thann et son cœur à l'abbaye de Lucelle. Il a :
Jeanne, (1300/10 – 15 novembre 1351), elle épouse Albert II d'Autriche en 1324,
Ursule, (? – 1367), épouse en premières noces Hugues Ier comte de Hohenberg, puis Guillaume II comte de Montfort.

http://gw5.geneanet.org/soudet2?lang=fr;p=hugues;n=de+hohenzollern

Hugues de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern
(Hugues von Hohenberg)
(Hugo de Hohenzollern)
(Hugues de Hohenzollern)
Titres: comte de Hohenberg à Rottenburg (3e, 1336-1354)
FICHE
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CORRESPONDANCES

Décédé en 1354
Consanguinité : 0,4%

Parents
Rodolphe I, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg et de Hohenberg à Rottenburg (2e ,Rodolphe I, 1298-1336), comte de Hohenberg à Haigerloch (3e ,Rodolphe I, après 1304-1336), décédé le 11 janvier 1336 (mercredi) , inhumé – Ehingen, Alb-Danube (Alb-Donau (Ulm)), Tübingen, Bade-Wurtemberg, Allemagne, consanguinité : 0,15%
Marié avec
Agnès de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg de Tübingen, décédée en juin 1317, consanguinité : 0,14%
Union(s) et enfant(s)

Marié en 1333 avec Ursule de Ferrette de Sundgau †ca 1367 (Parents : Ulrich III, comte de Ferrette †1324 &  Jeanne de Bourgogne d'Ivrée †1347) dont ;
Ursule de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern †1380/
Fratrie
Albert de Hohenberg, évêque de Constance †1359
Rodolphe II, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg †1335 Marié avec Marguerite de Nassau-Hadamar de Nassau †1370
Hugues de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern, comte de Hohenberg à Rottenburg †1354 Marié en 1333 avec Ursule de Ferrette de Sundgau †ca 1367
… de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern
Grands parents paternels, oncles et tantes
Albert II, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg ca 1235-1298
… …

Agnès de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern
(1282)
1 enfant

Albert III, comte de Hohenberg à Haigerloch †1304/

Albert II, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg ca 1235-1298 (1282)
Marguerite de Fürstenberg d'Urach †/1295

Euphémie de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern

Adélaïde de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern †1333

Marguerite de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern

Albert IV de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern †1317/

Rodolphe I, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg †1336

4 enfants

Ermengarde de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern †1315
(1291)
1 enfant

Grands parents maternels, oncles et tantes
Hugues II le Borgne, comte de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg †/1307 (1281)
Euphémie d'Ortenburg †1316/

Hugues III, comte de Werdenberg-Werdenberg †1334

Albert I, comte de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg †1364

1 enfant

Agnès de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg de Tübingen †1317

4 enfants

Arbre d'ascendance Arbre de descendance Aperçu de l'arbre

                                                                                    _____| 16_ Bouchard II, comte de Hohenberg †/1225
                                                        _____| 8_ Bouchard III, comte de Hohenberg †1253
                                                       /                            ¯¯¯¯¯| 17_ Wilpurge …
                           _____| 4_ Albert II, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg ca 1235-1298
                          /                           \                             _____| 18_ Rodolphe II, comte palatin de Tübingen †1248/
                         /                             ¯¯¯¯¯| 9_ Mathilde de Tübingen
                        /                                                           ¯¯¯¯¯| 19_ … de Ronsberg d'Irsee
|2_ Rodolphe I, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg †1336
|                       \                                                           _____| 20_ Eugène I de Fribourg d'Urach, comte de Fribourg ca 1185-1236
|                        \                              _____| 10_ Henri I, comte de Fürstenberg 1236-1283
|                         \                            /                            ¯¯¯¯¯| 21_ Adélaïde de Neuffen †1248
|                          ¯¯¯¯¯| 5_ Marguerite de Fürstenberg d'Urach †/1295
|                                                     \                             _____| 22_ Frédéric III, comte de Truhendingen †1253
|                                                      ¯¯¯¯¯| 11_ Agnès de Truhendingen †1294/
|                                                                                   ¯¯¯¯¯| 23_ Agnès … †1245/
|–1_ Hugues de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern, comte de Hohenberg à Rottenburg †1354
|                                                                                   _____| 24_ Rodolphe I, comte de Montfort †1247
|                                                       _____| 12_ Hugues I, comte de Werdenberg-Werdenberg †1280
|                                                      /                            ¯¯¯¯¯| 25_ Clémence de Kyburg de Dillingen †1249/
|                          _____| 6_ Hugues II le Borgne, comte de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg †/1307
|                         /                           \                             _____| 26_ Berthold II, comte de Neuffen †1274/
|                        /                             ¯¯¯¯¯| 13_ Mathilde de Neuffen †1267/
|                       /                                                           ¯¯¯¯¯| 27_ Berthe de Marstetten d'Irsee †1259/
|3_ Agnès de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg de Tübingen †1317
                        \                                                           _____| 28_ Hermann I, comte d'Ortenburg †1265
                         \                              _____| 14_ Frédéric I, comte d'Ortenburg †1304
                          \                            /                            ¯¯¯¯¯| 29_ Elisabeth de Heunburg
                           ¯¯¯¯¯| 7_ Euphémie d'Ortenburg †1316/
                                                       \                            _____| 30_ Meinard III, comte de Görz /1194-/1258
                                                        ¯¯¯¯¯| 15_ Adélaïde de Görz †1285
                                                                                    ¯¯¯¯¯| 31_ Adélaïde de Tyrol d'Evrasburg †1275..1279

Ursule de Ferrette de Sundgau
(Ursule von Pfirt)
(Ursula de Sundgau)
(Ursule de Sundgau)

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CORRESPONDANCES

Décédée vers 1367
Consanguinité : 0,8%

Parents
Ulrich III, comte de Ferrette (10e ,Ulrich III, après 1309-1324), seigneur de Rougemont, décédé le 23 mars 1324 (jeudi), consanguinité : 0,54%
Marié le 28 juillet 1303 (samedi) avec
Jeanne de Bourgogne d'Ivrée, décédée le 26 août 1347 (samedi), consanguinité : 0,62%
Union(s) et enfant(s)

Mariée en 1333 avec Hugues de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern, comte de Hohenberg à Rottenburg †1354 (Parents : Rodolphe I, comte de Hohenberg à Hohenberg †1336 &  Agnès de Werdenberg-Heiligenberg de Tübingen †1317) dont ;
Ursule de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern †1380/

Mariée en 1354 avec Guillaume II, comte de Montfort-Bregenz †1373 (Parents : Guillaume I le Riche, comte de Montfort-Tettnang †1350 &  Cunégonde de Rappoltstein d'Urslingen) dont ;
Hugues IX, comte de Montfort-Bregenz 1357-1423
Fratrie
Jeanne de Ferrette de Sundgau, comtesse de Ferrette 1300-1351 Mariée en 1314, Bâle, Bâle-ville, Suisse, avec Albert II le Sage, duc d'Autriche 1298-1358
Ursule de Ferrette de Sundgau †ca 1367 Mariée en 1333 avec Hugues de Hohenberg de Hohenzollern, comte de Hohenberg à Rottenburg †1354
Ursule de Ferrette de Sundgau †ca 1367 Mariée en 1354 avec Guillaume II, comte de Montfort-Bregenz †1373
Grands parents paternels, oncles et tantes
Thibault de Ferrette de Sundgau, comte de Ferrette †1309/
Catherine de Klingen †/1299

Sophie de Ferrette de Sundgau †1344
(1312)
1 enfant

Ulrich III, comte de Ferrette †1324
(1303)
2 enfants

Grands parents maternels, oncles et tantes
Renaud de Bourgogne d'Ivrée, comte (jure uxoris) de Montbéliard †1322 (1282)
Guillemette de Neuchâtel, comtesse de Montbéliard †1317

Alix de Bourgogne d'Ivrée
(1317)
5 enfants

Agnès de Bourgogne d'Ivrée 1295-1377
(1320)
2 enfants

Jeanne de Bourgogne d'Ivrée †1347
(1303)
2 enfants

Marguerite de Montbéliard d'Ivrée

2 enfants

Arbre d'ascendance Arbre de descendance Aperçu de l'arbre

                                                                                    _____| 16_ Frédéric II, comte de Ferrette †1232
                                                        _____| 8_ Ulrich II, comte de Ferrette †1275
                                                       /                            ¯¯¯¯¯| 17_ Helvis d'Urach
                           _____| 4_ Thibault de Ferrette de Sundgau, comte de Ferrette †1309/
                          /                           \                             _____| 18_ Guillaume I de Vergy de Semur, sire de Mirebeau †1240
                         /                             ¯¯¯¯¯| 9_ Agnès de Vergy de Semur, dame de Morey †1268
                        /                                                           ¯¯¯¯¯| 19_ Clémence, dame de Fouvent
|2_ Ulrich III, comte de Ferrette †1324
|                       \                                                           _____| 20_ Ulrich II, bailli de Klingen †/1248
|                        \                              _____| 10_ Gauthier III, chevalier de Klingen †1286
|                         \                            /                            ¯¯¯¯¯| 21_ Ita de Tegerfelden †1249
|                          ¯¯¯¯¯| 5_ Catherine de Klingen †/1299
|                                                     \                             _____| 22_ Hermann III, comte de Froburg †1237
|                                                      ¯¯¯¯¯| 11_ Sophie de Froburg †1291/
|                                                                                   ¯¯¯¯¯| 23_ Heilwig de Habsbourg †1263/
|–1_ Ursule de Ferrette de Sundgau †ca 1367
|                                                                                   _____| 24_ Jean I de Chalon le Sage d'Ivrée, comte de Chalon 1190-1267
|                                                       _____| 12_ Hugues II, seigneur de Salins 1220-1266/
|                                                      /                            ¯¯¯¯¯| 25_ Mahaut de Bourgogne Capet 1190-1242
|                          _____| 6_ Renaud de Bourgogne d'Ivrée, comte (jure uxoris) de Montbéliard †1322
|                         /                           \                             _____| 26_ Othon I, duc de Méranie ca 1171-1234
|                        /                             ¯¯¯¯¯| 13_ Alix de Bourgogne de Nordgau, comtesse de Bourgogne †1279
|                       /                                                           ¯¯¯¯¯| 27_ Béatrice II, comtesse de Bourgogne 1192-1231
|3_ Jeanne de Bourgogne d'Ivrée †1347
                        \                                                           _____| 28_ Rodolphe III, seigneur de Neuchâtel †1263
                         \                              _____| 14_ Amédée, seigneur de Neuchâtel †1287/1288
                          \                            /                            ¯¯¯¯¯| 29_ Sibylle de Montfaucon †1277
                           ¯¯¯¯¯| 7_ Guillemette de Neuchâtel, comtesse de Montbéliard †1317
                                                       \                            _____| 30_ Aymon de Granson, seigneur de la Sarraz †1269
                                                        ¯¯¯¯¯| 15_ Jordane de Granson, dame de Belmont
                                                                                    ¯¯¯¯¯| 31_ Marguerite …

1044-1073: Louis I de Sundgau ca 1019-1073..1076 (1er)
1073-1105: Thierry I de Sundgau ca 1045-1105 (2e)
1105-1160: Frédéric I de Sundgau †1160 (3e)
1160-1189: Louis II de Sundgau †1189 (4e)
1189-1197: Ulrich I de Sundgau †1197 (5e)
1197-1232: Frédéric II de Sundgau †1232 (6e)
1232-1233: Louis III de Sundgau †1281 (7e)
1233-1275: Ulrich II de Sundgau †1275 (8e)
1275-1309: Thibault de Ferrette de Sundgau †1309/ (9e)
1309-1324: Ulrich III de Sundgau †1324 (10e)
1324-1358: Albert I (II) le Sage de Habsbourg 1298-1358 (12e)
1358-1365: Rodolphe (IV) le Magnanime de Habsbourg 1339-1365 (13e)
1365-1379: Albert III l'Astrologue de Habsbourg 1348-1395 (14e)
1379-1386: Léopold (III) le Preux de Habsbourg 1351-1386 (15e)
1386-1424: Ernest I de Styrie le Duc de Fer de Habsbourg 1377-1424 (16e)
1424-1493: Frédéric (III) A la Grosse Lèvre de Habsbourg 1415-1493 (17e)
1493-1519: Maximilien I le Défenseur du Saint-Siège de Habsbourg 1459-1519 (18e)
1519-1521: Charles I de Habsbourg 1500-1558 (19e)
1521-1564: Ferdinand I de Habsbourg 1503-1564 (20e)
1564-1576: Maximilien II de Habsbourg 1527-1576 (21e)
1576-1612: Rodolphe II de Habsbourg 1552-1612 (22e)
1612-1619: Matthias d'Autriche de Habsbourg 1557-1619 (23e)
1619-1637: Ferdinand II de Habsbourg 1578-1637 (24e)
1637-1648: Ferdinand III de Habsbourg 1608-1657 (25e)

http://gw5.geneanet.org/soudet2?lang=fr;pz=olivier;nz=soudet;ocz=0;p=thibault;n=de+sundgau

Thierry I de Bar de Sundgau
Sosa : 402 679 012
(Thierry de Sundgau)
Titres: comte de Bar (5e ,Thierry I, 1093-1105),comte d'Altkirch (Thierry I, entre 1073 et 1076-1105),comte de Ferrette (2e ,Thierry I, entre 1073 et 1076-1105),comte de Verdun (12e ,Thierry II (I), 1095-1105),seigneur de Commercy (2e, après 1080-1103)
FICHE
MÉDIAS
PARENTÉ
CORRESPONDANCES

Né vers 1045
Décédé le 2 janvier 1105 (lundi) , à l’âge de peut-être 60 ans
Consanguinité : 0,21%
Parents
Louis II, comte de Sundgau (Louis II), comte de Montbéliard (Louis II, -entre 1073 et 1076), comte d'Altkirch (1044-entre 1073 et 1076), comte de Ferrette (1er ,Louis I, 1044-entre 1073 et 1076), comte (jure uxoris) de Mousson, né vers 1019, décédé entre 1073 et 1076
Marié vers 1040 avec
Sophie de Mousson Wigéricides, comtesse de Mousson (1028-1093), comtesse de Bar (4e, 1028-1093), comtesse de Sarreguemines et d'Amance, bailli de Saint-Mihiel, née vers 1018, décédée le 21 janvier 1093 (samedi) à l’âge de peut-être 75 ans, consanguinité : 0,76%
Union(s) et enfant(s)
Marié vers 1065 avec Ermentrude de Bourgogne d'Ivrée ca 1055-1105 (Parents : Guillaume I le Grand, comte de Bourgogne 1017..1018-1087 &  Etiennette de Longwy Matfriedides) dont
Agnès de Bar de Sundgau ca 1095-1147/
Mathilde de Bar de Sundgau
Frédéric I, comte de Ferrette †1160
Thierry III, comte de Montbéliard ca 1080-1163
Renaud I le Borgne, comte de Bar ca 1090-1149..1150
Etienne de Bar de Sundgau, évêque de Metz †1162
Fratrie
Béatrice de Ferrette de Sundgau †1092 Mariée en 1056 avec Berthold I le Barbu, duc de Zähringen †1078
Thierry I, comte de Bar ca 1045-1105 Marié vers 1065 avec Ermentrude de Bourgogne d'Ivrée ca 1055-1105
Sophie de Sundgau Mariée avec Volmar I, comte de Froburg †1076/
Mathilde de Sundgau 1091..1105 Mariée avec Hugues VIII, comte d'Egisheim †1089
Louis de Sundgau, seigneur de Commercy †1080/

Henry III, Count of Bar

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Henry III, Count of Bar

Henry III, Count of Bar
Spouse(s)
Eleanor of England
Noble family
House of Scarpone
Father
Thibault II of Bar
Mother
Jeanne de Toucy
Born
1259
Died
September 1302
Naples
Henry III of Bar (French: Henri III de Bar; 1259 – Naples, September 1302) was Count of Bar from 1291 to 1302. He was the son of Thibault II of Bar and Jeanne de Toucy.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Life
2 Family
3 Source
4 References
[edit] Life
His introduction to military life came as he was made a knight in a conflict between his father and the Bishop of Metz. He then served Frederick III, Duke of Lorraine. He was preparing to go on crusade when his father died.
In 1284 Joan I of Navarre, countess of Champagne, had married the future Philip IV of France, making the county of Bar adjacent to the French royal domain. Henry's reaction was a marriage to Eleanor, daughter of Edward I of England. When war broke out in short order between France and England, Henry was drawn in. The fighting ceased after the 1301 Treaty of Bruges. Under its terms, Henry gave up some fortresses and paid homage to Philip for part of his lands, then called the Barrois mouvant. He also undertook to fight in Cyprus against the Muslim forces.
Henry therefore made his way to the Kingdom of Naples. In assisting Charles II of Naples against the invading forces of Frederick I of Sicily, he was wounded in fighting, and died soon afterwards.
[edit] Family
He married Eleanor of England (1269-1298), daughter of Edward I of England and Eleanor of Castile, at Bristol on 20 September 1293.[1] Their children were :
Edward I of Bar (1294–1336), Count of Bar
Eleanor (b. 1295), who reputedly married Llewelyn ap Owain. .[2]
Joan of Bar (1295–1361), who married John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey. The marriage was annulled 1315. Joan became regent of Bar in 1354.
These Habsburg properties were called the "VorderÖsterreich", with
the city of Ensisheim as the capital.1324-51 Sovereign Countess
Johanna von Pfirt und Rougemont Daughter of Count Ulrich III von
Pfirt and Jeanne de Bourgogne, and the heiress of vast lands in
Austria and thereby added to the wealth of her husband, Albrecht von
Habsburg, Count of Pfirt, Duke of Austria, Styria, Carinthia,
Carniola and South Tyrol (1330-58). He suffered from reumathics and
was partly paralyzed at times, and she was left in charge of the
government at those occations and remained very influential. After
15 years of marriage, she gave birth to her first child at the age
of 39 and had five other children in 1342, 1346, 1347, 1348 and died
two weeks after giving birth to the last at the age of 51. She lived
(1300-51).

THIEBAUT de Ferrette, son of ULRIC II Comte de Ferrette [Pfirt] &
his second wife Agnes de Vergy (-Basel [4 Dec 1310/7 Feb 1311]). He
succeeded his father in 1275 as THIEBAUT Comte de Ferrette. The
Annales Basilienses record that "dominus episcopus Basiliensis"
bought the county of Ferrette in 1276 and confirmed the purchase by
letters[164], presumably a confirmation of the purchase in 1271
noted above. Châtelain de Rougemont 1295. m firstly (before Oct
1273) as her second husband, KATHARINA von Klingen, widow of RUDOLF
von Lichtenberg, daughter of WALTER III Herr von Klingen (-1296). m
secondly ([1304/05]) as her second husband, MARGUERITE de Blamont,
widow of JEAN de Bourgogne Seigneur de Montaigu [Bourgogne-Comté],
daughter of HENRI I Seigneur de Blamont. children of first marriage:
1. ULRICH von Pfirt (-Basel 11 Mar 1324, bur Thann Barfusserkirche).
Seigneur de Rougemont 1305/1309. He succeeded his father in 1311 as
ULRICH III Comte de Ferrette. m (Betrothed 19 Nov 1295, 1303 before
28 Jul) as her first wife, JEANNE de Bourgogne, daughter of RENAUD
de Bourgogne [Comté] Comte de Montbéliard & his wife Guillemette de
Neuchâtel Ctss de Montbéliard (-[26 Aug 1347/11 Sep 1349]). She
married secondly (before 23 Feb 1326) Rudolf Hesso Markgraf von
Baden. a) JEANNE ([1300/1310]-Vienna 15 Nov 1351, bur Kloster
Gaming). Genealogies such as Europäische Stammtafeln[165] state that
Jeanne was born in 1300. This seems unlikely given that her youngest
son was born in 1351. It also does not fit with her parents'
marriage (1303 before 28 Jul), and the birth dates of her mother's
immediate family (younger sister born around 1295). It is more
reasonable to suppose that she was born around 1310. She succeeded
her father as Comtesse de Ferrette [Pfirt] 11 Mar 1324.

The necrology of Gaming records the death "1351 XVII Kal Dec"
of "Iohanna ducissa Austria in Phyrt quidam genta hic sepulta"[166].
The necrology of Heiligenkreuz records the death "XVI Kal Oct"
of "Iohanna ux ducis Alberti"[167]. This date is not corroborated by
other sources and should be viewed with caution in light of the
number of inaccuracies noted in this necrology. m (15 Feb 1324)
ALBRECHT of Austria, son of ALBRECHT I King of Germany, Duke of
Austria & his wife Elisabeth von Görz-Tirol (Habsburg 12 Dec 1298-
Vienna 20 Jul 1358, bur Gaming). He succeeded his brother in 1330 as
ALBRECHT II "der Weise" Duke of Austria and Steiermark, Duke of
Carinthia, Krain and South Tirol. b) URSULA (-5 or 15 May after
1367). Dame de Belfort 1347. Dame de Rougemont until 1350. Dame de
Dannemarie [Dammerkirche], Traubach and Pfetterhausen [Pfetterhouse]
until1351. The necrology of Augiæ Maioris records the death "III Non
Mai" of

"Ursula com de Phirt"[168], many members of the family of Montfort
(that of her second husband) being recorded in the same necrology. m
firstly ([8 Jun/9 Jul] 1333) HUGO I Graf von Hohenberg, son of
RUDOLF I Graf von Hohenberg [Zollern] & his first wife Agnes von
Werdenberg (-26 May 1354). m secondly (1354) WILHELM II Graf von
Montfort in Bregenz (-[18 May 1373/14 Jun 1374]).2. THIEBAUT (-[9
May 1311/1 Apr 1312], bur Thann Barfüsserkirche). Seigneur de
Rougemont 1295. 3. JEAN (-[18 May 1309/1 Apr 1312]). Seigneur de
Rougemont. 4. HERZELANDE (-3 Apr 1317, bur Abtei Neuburg bei
Hagenau). m (before 24 Nov 1299) OTTO V Herr von Ochsenstein (-19
Oct 1327, bur Abtei Neuburg bei Hagenau).5. SOPHIE (-25 Mar 1344,
bur Stuttgart Stiftskirche). m (before 1304, or 1312) ULRICH von
Württemberg, son of EBERHARD I "der Erlauchte" Graf von Württemberg
& his wife Irmgard von Baden (-murdered Alsace 11 Jul 1344, bur
Stuttgart Stiftskirche). He succeeded his father 1325 as ULRICH III
Graf von Württemberg.

6. COMTES de FERRETTE [PFIRT] 1125-1324 20Chapter 7. GRAFEN von
WERDE 24

From the XVII to the XIX

The Lachapelle-under-Lime history is indissociable among that of the
castle of Rosemont and that of our Chaux neighbor. This is why it
appears essential to us to give a rather precise outline of the
history of Rosemont. Lachapelle, since XIe century until the
revolution of 1789, formed part without interruption of the
adventures of Rosemont.

In moved back times, Antiquity, Gallic period, our under-Vosgean
Country was very inaccueuillant, with its wild forests and its
marshes. Very few inhabitants, remaining with difficulty in this
dark and moved back country.

at the time of Astérix …..
It is probable that an important Roman way passed close it Rosemont
in order to to connect Belfort Gap with Lorraine. In addition
Auxelles existed already at the time of the Roman domination (in
Latin axellae of axis, boards). A Roman way, remained unfinished was
to connect Auxelles to Offemont.

A military station has to precede construction by the castle in XIe
century. Between 1024 and 1070 an administration settled depending
on the first count de Montbéliard, Louis de Mousson. The localities
depended on the lieutenant of Rosemont and were divided in three
town halls:
– that of Burg or the valley with Sermamagny, Lime, Lachapelle-under-
Lime, Lepuix, Giromagny, Vescemont, Rougegoutte and Grosmagny,
– that of Evette with Valdoie, Eloie, Essert and Evette,
– that of Banvillars with Urcerey, Argiésans and Banvillars.

All these populations were subjected to serfdom. It were freed in
1467 by the Sigismond archduke from the House from Austria. Their
situation improved only very slowly until the beginning of XIVe
century. As they depended on the seigniory of Belfort, they profited
from the franknesses granted in May 1307 by the count from
Montbeliard, Renaud of Burgundy (that of the boulevard which leads
to Bavilliers), in Belfort, while preserving their former rights and
uses. we become Autrichiens…

The succession of Renaud of Burgundy, dead on March 10, 1321, seems
to be agitated enough. His/her elder daughter, Jeanne, widow of the
count de Ferrette, remariée with the Marquis de Bade, inherited the
seigniory of Belfort and her dependence. This fact the populations
of Rosemont made allégence to the marquis de Bade. This one, dying,
its widow remariant one second time, the field of Rosemont was
allotted to his/her daughter Jeannette, wife of Albert II archduke
of Austria. Thus the populations of Rosemont passed to the house of
Austria. In 1351 Albert repurchased with his sister-in-law Meroux
and Vézelois which were incorporated in the field of Rosemont.
Thereafter, in 1354, it attached to the field the localities of
Etueffont-Haut, Etueffont-Bas, Anjoutey and Petitmagny. You note,
that the things are not simple, already, and we are only in 1351!!

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/
— Friedrich V (Burgrave) von NURNBERG

/  
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— Elisabeth von HENNEBERG   +
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/
— Friedrich I (Elector) von BRANDENBURG

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— Elisabeth von THURINGIA   +
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— Albert Achilles (Elector) von BRANDENBURG

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— Elisabeth (Duchess) of BAVARIA   +
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— Johann Cicero (Elector) von BRANDENBURG  (1455 – 1499)

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— Bernard I ZAHRINGEN (Margrave) of BADEN   +
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— James I ZAHRINGEN (Margrave) of BADEN


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— Margaret ZEHRINGEN of BADEN
/  

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— Catherine de LORRAINE   +
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– Ursule de HOHENZOLLERN

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— Frederick I (IV) de WETTIN (Elector) of SAXONY   +
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— Wilhelm III `the Brave' (Duke) von SACHSEN

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\
— Katherina (WELF) of BRUNSWICK-LUNEBURG   +
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— Margarethe von SACHSEN (THURINGEN)  (1449? – 1501)


/
— Albert V von HAPSBURG   +
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— Anna von OESTERREICH  (1432 – 1462)


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— Zikmund of BOHEMIA (Holy Roman EMPEROR)   +
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\
— Eliska (Elisabeth) (Princess) of BOHEMIA

\
— Barbara of CILLY   +

Zollern, from 1218 Hohenzollern, was a county of the Holy Roman Empire. Its ruling dynasty was the House of Hohenzollern, a Swabian noble family first mentioned in 1061. They named their estates after Hohenzollern Castle at the Swabian Alb; its capital was Hechingen. Its coat of arms was that of the ruling house.

Hohenzollern Castle
According to the mediæval chronicler Berthold of Reichenau, the nobleman Burkhard I, Count of Zollern (de Zolorin) was born before 1025 and died in 1061. By his name, an affiliation with the Alamannic dynasty of the Burchardings is possible, though not proven. The Zollerns received the comital title from Emperor Henry V in 1111. As loyal liensmen of the Swabian Hohenstaufen dynasty, they were able to significantly enlarge their territory. Count Frederick III (c. 1139 – c. 1200) accompanied Emperor Frederick I Barbrarossa against Henry the Lion in 1180 and through his marriage achieved the enfeoffment with the Burgraviate of Nuremberg by Emperor Henry VI of Hohenstaufen in 1191. In 1218 the burgraviate passed to Frederick's younger son Conrad I, he thereby became the ancestor of the Franconian Hohenzollern branch, which acquired the Electorate of Brandenburg in 1415.
Affected by economic problems and internal feuds, the Hohenzollern counts from the 14th century onwards came under pressure by their mighty neighbours, the Counts of Württemberg and the cities of the Swabian League, whose troops besieged and finally destroyed Hohenzollern Castle in 1423. Nevertheless the Hohenzollerns retained their estates, backed by their Brandenburg cousins and the Imperial House of Habsburg. In 1534, Count Charles I of Hohenzollern (1512–1576) received the counties of Sigmaringen and Veringen as Imperial

Yolande, Duchess of Lorraine, also known as Yolande de Bar (2 November 1428, Nancy – 23 March 1483, Nancy), was Duchess of Lorraine (1473) and Bar (1480). She was the daughter of Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine, and René of Anjou (King of Naples, Duke of Anjou, Bar and Lorraine, Count of Provence). Because of her various titles she is also known as Yolande de Lorraine and Yolande d'Anjou. Her younger sister was Margaret of Anjou, Queen consort of Henry VI of England.
A romanticised version of her life is given in the play King René’s Daughter by Henrik Hertz, in which she is portrayed as blind, though she is eventually cured. It was later adapted to Tchaikovsky's opera Iolanta. There is no evidence that she was ever blind.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Marriage and children
2 Legacy
3 Cultural references
4 Notes
[edit] Marriage and children
In 1445 she married her cousin Frederick II, Count of Vaudémont (1420–1470), at Nancy. The marriage was a dynastic alliance, arranged to end the dispute which existed between René of Anjou and Frederick's father, Antoine of Vaudémont, regarding the succession to the Duchy of Lorraine.
Their children were:
René II (1451–1508), Duke of Lorraine. On 1 September 1485 he married secondly, Phillipa of Guelders, by whom he had issue, from whom descended Mary, Queen of Scots
Nicholas, Lord of Joinville and Bauffremont, died in 1476
Peter, died in 1451
Joan (1458–1480), married in 1474 to Charles IV, Duke of Anjou. There was no issue from the marriage.
Yolande, who died in 1500, married William II, Landgrave of Hesse, by whom she had issue.
Margaret (1463–1521), married René (1454–1492), Duke of Alençon. She had issue, from whom descended King Henry IV of France

The Coat of arms of René in 1420; Composing the arms of Valois-Anjou (top left and bottom right), Duchy of Bar (top right and bottom left), and of the Duchy of Lorraine (superimposed shield). In 1434 were added Hungary, Kingdom of Naples and Jerusalem (top left, top center and top right). The arms of the Crown of Aragon (superimposed shield) were shown from 1443 to 1470. In 1453 the arms of Lorraine were removed and in 1470 Valois-Anjou were substituted for the modern arms of the duchy (superimposed shield). [3]

René of Anjou (Rei Rainièr in Occitan) (16 January 1409 – 10 July 1480), also known as René I of Naples and Good King René (French Le bon roi René), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1435–1442; titular 1442–1480), titular King of Jerusalem (1438–1480) and Aragon (1466–1480) (including Sicily, Majorca, Corsica). He was the father of the English queen Margaret of Anjou, wife of King Henry VI of England and a key figure in the Wars of the Roses.

Joan of Bar (1297 France – 1361 London) was the younger daughter of Henry III, Count of Bar and Princess Eleanor of England, and niece of Edward II of England. She was unhappily married to John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey. In 1354, Joan became the regent of Bar for her great-nephew, Robert I.
Joan was a granddaughter of Edward I of England, "Longshanks", and Eleanor of Castile. She was close in age to her older brother, Edward I of Bar, born circa 1294/95.
On 25 May 1306, at ten or eleven years old, Joan was married to one of the leading nobles of England, John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey, a "nasty, brutal man with scarcely one redeeming quality."[1] She lived at the Warenne family estates, Conisbrough Castle and Sandal Castle, abandoned by her husband, who hated her and since 1313 had been trying to divorce her. In England, she was close to the queen consort Isabella of France, her aunt by marriage (Isabella's husband, Edward II, being Joan's maternal uncle) who was about her same age, and spent time with her at court. She was probably close to her first cousin Elizabeth de Clare (the daughter of Joan of Acre, her mother's sister), who left Joan an image of John the Baptist in her will.

Edward I, Count of Bar

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This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (November 2007)
Edward I, Count of Bar
Spouse(s)
Mary of Burgundy
Noble family
House of Montbéliard
Father
Henry III, Count of Bar
Mother
Eleanor of England
Died
November 1336
Famagusta
Edward I (died November 1336), grandson and namesake of Edward I of England, was the Count of Bar from 1302 to his death. He was a minor when he succeeded his father, Henry III, as count and ruled under the regency of his grandfather, as his mother, Eleanor of England, was dead since 1298.
The county was governed on Edward's behalf by John of Puisaye, Theobald, Bishop of Liège, and Renaud, Bishop of Metz.
In 1308, he accompanied Frederick IV of Lorraine into battle. In 1310, he married Mary, daughter of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy, and was declared to have attained his majority. Then he purchased the lordship of Stenay from his uncle John, the aforementioned lord of Puisaye. In 1313, he was captured in war against Frederick and not ransomed until 1314. He constructed a hydraulic forge at Moyeuvre-Grande in 1323. In 1324, he was again allied in military operations with the duke of Lorraine, and also with the King of Bohemia, John, and the Archbishop of Trier, Baldwin of Luxembourg. This operations was the War of Metz, for each of the allied lords was owed something by the citizens of Metz. Edward demanded compensation for garrisoning the city with his own troops during a conflict with the bishop of Verdun

Rudolph, Duke of Lorraine

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Rudolph, Duke of Lorraine

Rudolph, Duke of Lorraine
Spouse(s)
Eleanor of Bar
Mary of Valois
Noble family
House of Metz
Father
Frederick IV, Duke of Lorraine
Mother
Elisabeth of Austria
Born
1320
Died
26 August 1346(1346-08-26)
Crécy-en-Ponthieu
Rudolph (1320 – 26 August 1346 in the Battle of Crécy), called the Valiant (le Vaillant), was the Duke of Lorraine from 1329 to his death.[1] He was the son and successor of Frederick IV and Elisabeth, daughter of Albert I of Germany, a Habsburg, whence his name. Though he was but nine years of age when his father died and he succeeded to the duchy under the regency of his mother (until 1334), he was a warrior prince, taking part in four separate wars in Lorraine, France, Brittany, and Iberia.
In 1337, Count Henry IV of Bar refused to do homage for a few seignories he held of the duke. Rudolph was forced to devastate Pont-à-Mousson and its environs. In a series of reprisals, Henry ravaged the west of Lorraine and Rudolph attacked the Barrois. Only by the intervention of Philip VI of France was the war ended. By that time, the ties of Lorraine to France had become very strong. They were to become stronger under the half-Habsburg Rudolph. His second marriage was to the daughter of a French lord, Guy I of Blois, and niece of the king of France. He also assisted Philip with troops to lift Edward III of England's Siege of Tournai (1340) in the opening phase of the Hundred Years' War.
During a brief Anglo-French peace, he journeyed to the Iberian Peninsula to aid Alfonso XI of Castile in the Reconquista. He battled the Moors of Granada and shone in the Battle of Gibraltar on 3 November 1340.
On his return to France, he came to the aid of his French brother-in-law, Charles of Blois, in the War of the Breton Succession. He returned to Philip's side at the Battle of Crécy and was killed there, along with many illustrious French cavaliers, on 26 August 1346.
His first wife was Eleanor (Aliénor), daughter of Edward I of Bar, and Mary of Burgundy. Their marriage took place at Pont-à-Mousson in 1329, but they had no children before Eleanor's death in 1332. He was remarried to Mary (1323–1380), daughter of the aforementioned Guy and Margaret of Valois, the sister of King Philip. They had three children:
twins (died before 31 July 1343)
John (1346–1390), his successor

In 1282 his father, the first German monarch from the House of Habsburg, invested him and his younger brother Rudolph II with the duchies of Austria and Styria, which he had seized from late King Ottokar II of Bohemia. By the 1283 Treaty of Rheinfelden his father entrusted Albert with their sole government, while Rudolph II ought to be compensated by the Further Austrian Habsburg home territories. Albert and his Swabian ministeriales appear to have ruled the duchies with conspicuous success, overcoming the resistance by local nobles.
King Rudolph I was unable to secure the succession to the German throne for his son, especially due to the objections raised by Ottokar's son King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia, and the plans to install Albert as successor of the assassinated King Ladislaus IV of Hungary in 1290 also failed. Upon Rudolph's death in 1291, the Prince-electors, fearing Albert's power and the implementation of a hereditary monarchy, chose Count Adolph of Nassau-Weilburg as King of the Romans. A rising among his Styrian dependents compelled Albert to recognize the sovereignty of his rival, and to confine himself for a time to the government of the Habsburg lands at Vienna.

n 1274 Albert had married Elizabeth, daughter of Count Meinhard II of Tyrol, who was a descendant of the Babenberg margraves of Austria who predated the Habsburgs' rule. The baptismal name Leopold, patron saint margrave of Austria, was given to one of their sons. Queen Elizabeth was in fact better

connected to mighty German rulers than her husband: a descendant of earlier kings, for example Emperor Henry IV, she was also a niece of the Wittelsbach dukes of Bavaria, Austria's important neighbor.

Originally from Bamberg in Franconia, now northern Bavaria, an apparent branch of the Babenbergs or Babenberger went on to rule Austria as counts of the march and dukes from 976–1248, before the rise of the house of Habsburg.

Albert had failed in his attempt to seize the counties of Holland and Zeeland, as vacant fiefs of the Holy Roman Empire, on the death of Count John I in 1299, but in 1306 he secured the crown of Bohemia for his son Rudolph III on the death of King Wenceslaus III. He also renewed the claim made by his predecessor, Adolph, on Thuringia, and interfered in a quarrel over the succession to the Hungarian throne. The Thuringian attack ended in Albert's defeat at the Battle of Lucka in 1307 and, in the same year, the death of his son Rudolph weakened his position in eastern Europe. His action in abolishing all tolls established on the Rhine since 1250, led the Rhenish prince-archbishops and the Elector of the Palatinate to form a league against him. Aided by the Imperial cities, however, he soon crushed the rising.

he Duke of Swabia went on to become the last great house of German Emperors, the Hohenstaufen.[1] Swabia was one of the five stem duchies of the medieval German kingdom, and its dukes were thus among the most powerful magnates of Germany. The most notable family to hold Swabia were the Hohenstaufen, who held it, with a brief interruption, from 1079 until 1268. For much of this period, the Hohenstaufen were also Holy Roman Emperors. With the death of Conradin, the last Hohenstaufen duke, the duchy itself disintegrated, although King Rudolf I attempted to revive it for his Habsburg family in the late-13th century.

Merovingian dukes
Butilin (539–554), with…
Leuthari I (before 552–554), with…
Haming (539–554), with…
Lantachar (until 548, Avenches diocese)
Magnachar (565, Avenches diocese)
Vaefar (573, Avenches diocese)
Theodefrid
Leutfred (until 588)
Uncilin (588–607)
Gunzo (613)
Chrodobert (630)
Leuthari II (642)
Gotfrid (until 709)
Willehari (709–712, in Ortenau)
Lantfrid (709–730)
Theudebald (709–744)

Rudolph I (also known as Rudolph of Habsburg) (German: Rudolf von Habsburg, Latin: Rudolphus, Czech: Rudolf Habsburský) ((1218-05-01)1 May 1218 – 15 July 1291(1291-07-15)) was King of the Romans from 1273 until his death. Rudolph was the first of the count-kings, so-called by the historian, Bernd Schneidmüller.
He played a vital role in raising the Habsburg dynasty to a leading position among the Imperial feudal dynasties. Originally a Swabian count, he was the first Habsburg to acquire the duchies of Austria and Styria, territories that would remain under Habsburg rule for more than 600 years and would form the core of the Habsburg Monarchy and the present-day country of Austria.

Albert IV (or Albert the Wise) (ca. 1188 – December 13, 1239) was Count of Habsburg in the Aargau and a progenitor of the royal House of Habsburg.
He was the son of Count Rudolph II of Habsburg and Agnes of Staufen. About 1217 Albert married Hedwig (Heilwig), daughter of Count Ulrich of Kyburg (died 1237) and Anna of Zähringen. Upon the death of his father in 1232 he divided his family's estates with his brother Rudolph III, whereby he retained the ancestral seat at Habsburg Castle. A follower of Emperor Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, he died on the 1239 crusade of King Theobald I of Navarre near Ashkelon.
Albert was the father of King Rudolph I of Germany, and a mutual ancestor of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and of his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg[1] He is also an ancestor of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom.

The House of Kyburg was family of Grafen or counts from Zürich in Switzerland. The family was one of the three most powerful noble families in the Swiss plateau beside the Habsburg and the House of Savoy during the 11th and 12th Centuries. With the extinction of the male line in 1263, Rudolph of Habsburg laid claim to the Kyburg lands and annexed them to the Habsburg holdings, which marked the beginning of the Habsburg rise to power.

1. Edouard de Bar (1307–1336)
2. Jeanne de Bar (1336–1351)
3. Jean de Saint-Clair (1351–1366)
4. Blanche d'Évreux (1366–1398)
5. Nicolas Flamel (1398–1418)
6. René d'Anjou (1418–1480)
7. Iolande de Bar (1480–1483)
House of Hohenberg

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House of Hohenberg

arms of the Dukes of Hohenberg as designed in 1917
Titles
Duke of Hohenberg
Prince of Hohenberg
Founder
Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg
Current head
Georg, Duke of Hohenberg
Founding
1900
Ducal Family of Hohenberg

HH The Duke
HH The Duchess
HSH Prince Nikolaus
HSH Princess Marie
HSH Prince Karl
HSH Princess Johanna
HSH Princess Teresa
HSH Princess Sophie
HSH Princess Henriette
HSH Prince Maximilian
HSH Princess Emilia
HSH Prince Nikolaus
HSH Princess Luisa
HSH Prince Leopold
Extended family[show]

HH Princess Anita
HH Princess Sophie

HSH Prince Albrecht
HSH Princess Leontine
HI&RH Archduchess Margarete of Austria
HSH Prince Leo Johannes
HSH Princess Rosalind
HSH Princess Geneviève
HSH Prince Adrien
HSH Princess Johanna
HSH Princess Katharina
HSH Princess Johannes
HSH Princess Sophie
HSH Prince Stephan
HSH Princess Leonie
HSH Princess Philippa
HSH Princess Antonia
HSH Prince Nepomuk
HSH Prince Georg
HSH Princess Valerie
HSH Princess Isabelle
HSH Prince Peter
HSH Princess Christine-Maria
HSH Princess Marie-Christine
HSH Princess Marie-Therese, Mrs. Anthony Bailey
HSH Prince Gerhard

HSH Princess Heide
HSH Prince Franz Ferdinand
HSH Princess Christiane
HSH Princess Ernst
HSH Princess Margaretha
HSH Princess Eva
v
t
e

Hugo von Montfort (1357 – 4 April 1423) was an Austrian minstrel of the Late Middle Ages.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Life
2 Works
3 Recordings
4 Further reading
[edit] Life
Hugo VII was a scion of the comital house of Montfort at Bregenz, head of an old and influential Swabian family of nobles, holding numerous high administrative posts. By his mother Countess Ursula of Ferrette (Pfirt), he was related with the Austrian House of Habsburg. About 1373 he married the Styrian countess Margaret, granddaughter of Count Ulrich V of Pfannberg and widow of Count Hans of Cilli. With his wife's estates around Pfannberg in the Mur valley, he vastly increased the area controlled by the House of Montfort. Upon Margarte's death about 1395, he secondly married Countess Clementia of Toggenburg. In 1399 he also acquired Festenburg Castle in eastern Styria. In 1402 Hugo married, for the third time, the Bohemian noble Anna of Neuhaus, widow of the Styrian governor Hans of Stadeck.

Montfort statue, Bregenz
As second-born son, he had prepared for an ecclesiastical career, but spent most of his adult life as a politician in the Habsburg service: as commander in chief of the ducal Austrian troops in Italy, as Hofmeister of Duke Leopold IV, as governor of Styria (1412–1415), and as Landvogt in the Thurgau, Aargau, and Black Forest regions of Further Austria. Hugo died aged 66 at Pfannberg and was buried in the parish church of Bruck an der Mur in Upper Styria.
[edit] Works
Hugo wrote songs and Minnebrief rhymes, as well as political and didactic speeches. About 1402 he had a first manuscript of his works drawn up. Approximately 40 of his texts are preserved in an elaborate 1414 codex. Though still standing in the shadow of his famous contemporary Oswald von Wolkenstein, he is today considered one of the last importatnt representatives of the German Minnesang.

A minstrel was a medieval European bard who performed songs whose lyrics told stories of distant places or of existing or imaginary historical events. Although minstrels created their own tales, often they would memorize and embellish the works of others. [1] Frequently they were retained by royalty and high society. As the courts became more sophisticated, minstrels were eventually replaced at court by the troubadours, and many became wandering minstrels, performing in the streets and became well-liked until the middle of the Renaissance, despite a decline beginning in the late 15th century. Minstrelsy fed into later traditions of travelling entertainers, which continued to be moderately strong into the early 20th century, and which has some continuity down to today's buskers or street musicians.

Minnesang was the tradition of lyric and song writing in Germany which flourished in the 12th century and continued into the 14th century. People who wrote and performed Minnesang are known as Minnesingers (Minnesänger). The name derives from the word minne, Middle High German for love which was their main subject, and an individual song was a minnelied. The Minnesänger were similar to the Provençal troubadours and northern French trouvères; they wrote love poetry in the courtly love tradition in Middle High German in the High Middle Ages.

Social status
In the absence of reliable biographical information, there has been debate about the social status of the Minnesänger. Some clearly belonged to the higher nobility – the 14th century Codex Manesse includes songs by dukes, counts, kings, and the Emperor Henry VI. Some Minnesänger, as indicated by the title Meister (master), were clearly educated commoners, such as Meister Konrad von Würzburg. It is thought that many were ministeriales, that is, members of a class of lower nobility, vassals of the great lords. Broadly speaking, the Minnesänger were writing and performing for their own social class at court, and should be thought of as courtiers rather than professional hired musicians. Friedrich von Hausen, for example, was part of the entourage of Friedrich Barbarossa, and died on crusade. As a reward for his service, Walther von der Vogelweide was given a fief by the Emperor Frederick II.
Several of the best known Minnesingers are also noted for their epic poetry, among them Heinrich von Veldeke, Wolfram von Eschenbach and Hartmann von Aue.
[edit] History
The earliest texts date from perhaps 1150, and the earliest named Minnesänger are Der von Kürenberg and Dietmar von Aist, clearly writing in a native German tradition in the third quarter of the 12th century. This is referred to as the Danubian tradition.
From around 1170, German lyric poets came under the influence of the Provençal troubadours and the Northern French trouvères. This is most obvious in the adoption of the strophic form of the canzone, at its most basic a seven-line strophe with the rhyme scheme ab|ab|cxc, and a musical AAB structure, but capable of many variations.
A number of songs from this period match trouvère originals exactly in form, indicating that the German text could have been sung to an originally French tune, which is especially likely where there are significant commonalities of content. Such songs are termed contrafacta. For example, Friedrich von Hausen's "Ich denke underwilen" is regarded as a contrafactum of Guiot de Provins's "Ma joie premeraine".
By around 1190, the German poets began to break free of Franco-Provençal influence. This period is regarded as the period of Classical Minnesang with Albrecht von Johansdorf, Heinrich von Morungen, Reinmar von Hagenau developing new themes and forms, reaching its culmination in Walther von der Vogelweide, regarded both in the Middle Ages and in the present day as the greatest of the Minnesänger.
The later Minnesang, from around 1230, is marked by a partial turning away from the refined ethos of classical minnesang and by increasingly elaborate formal developments. The most notable of these later Minnesänger, Neidhart von Reuental introduces characters from lower social classes and often aims for humorous effects.
[edit] Melodies
Only a small number of Minnelied melodies have survived to the present day, mainly in manuscripts dating from the 15th century or later, which may present the songs in a form other than the original one. Additionally, it is often rather difficult to interpret the musical notation used to write them down. Although the contour of the melody can usually be made out, the rhythm of the song is frequently hard to fathom.
There are a number of recordings of Minnesang using the original melodies, as well as Rock groups such as Ougenweide performing songs with modern instruments.
[edit] Later developments
In the 15th century, Minnesang developed into and gave way to the tradition of the Meistersingers. The two traditions are quite different, however; Minnesingers were mainly aristocrats, while Meistersingers usually were commoners.
At least two operas have been written about the Minnesang tradition: Richard Wagner's Tannhäuser and Richard Strauss' Guntram.

The minnesinger Konrad von Altstetten in the arms of his lady-love and feeding a falcon. Early 14th century Heidelberg Lieder manuscript.

Georg Friedrich Ferdinand, Prince of Prussia, (legal name: Georg Friedrich Ferdinand Prinz von Preußen)[a] (born 10 June 1976) is the current head of the House of Hohenzollern, the former ruling dynasty of the German Empire and of the Kingdom of Prussia. He is the great-great-grandson and historic heir of William II, the last German Emperor and King of Prussia, who was deposed and, initially, went into exile upon Germany's defeat in World War I in 1918.

House of Hohenzollern
Georg Friedrich succeeded his grandfather, Prince Louis Ferdinand I of Prussia as Head of the House of Hohenzollern[3] on 26 September 1994. He learned to appreciate the history and responsibility of his heritage during time spent with his paternal grandfather, who often recounted to him anecdotes from the life in exile of his own grandfather, the last Kaiser.[4] When asked about the burden of the Prussian dynasty's house laws, which made Georg Friedrich the ex-Kaiser's heir despite the seniority of two of his late father's living brothers, he commented "Our family has very strict rules about marriage. Only God knows who I shall marry, but I want to be with someone who at least understands my responsibilities…So it is likely that this might be a person from the same background as mine."[4]
His position as sole heir to the estate of his grandfather was challenged by his uncles, Friedrich Wilhelm and Michael who filed a lawsuit claiming that, despite their renunciations as dynasts at the time of their marriages, the loss of their inheritance rights based on their selection of spouse was discriminatory and unconstitutional.[5] His uncles were initially successful, the Regional Court of Hechingen and the higher Regional Court of Stuttgart ruling in their favour in 1997 on the grounds that the requirement to marry equally was "immoral".[6] However, the Federal Court of Justice of Germany overturned the original rulings in favour of Georg Friedrich's uncles, the case being remanded to the courts at Hechingen and Stuttgart. This time both courts ruled in favour of Georg Friedrich. His uncles then took their case to the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany which overruled the previous court rulings in Georg Friedrich's favour.[5] On 19 October 2005, a German regional court ruled that Georg Friedrich was indeed the principal heir of his grandfather, Louis Ferdinand (who was the primary beneficiary of the trust set up for the estate of Wilhelm II), but also concluded that each of the children of Louis Ferdinand was entitled to a portion of the Prussian inheritance.[7]
[edit] Marriage
On 21 January 2011, Georg Friedrich announced his engagement to Princess Sophie Johanna Maria of Isenburg (born 7 March 1978), who studied business administration in Freiburg and Berlin and works at a firm that offers consulting services for nonprofit business.[8] The civil wedding took place in Potsdam on 25 August 2011,[1] and the religious wedding took place at the Church of Peace in Potsdam on 27 August 2011, in commemoration of the 950th anniversary of the founding of the House of Hohenzollern.[9][10] The religious wedding was also broadcast live by local public television.[1]
Princess Sophie's parents are Franz-Alexander, Prince of Isenburg and his wife, née Countess Christine von Saurma-Jeltsch.[11] The couple share descent (being 6th cousins once-removed) from Charles II, the first reigning Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and a brother of Charlotte of Mecklenburg, queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom. Princess Sophie's father is head of the senior branch of the mediatised princely House of Isenburg, known under the Holy Roman Empire and subsequent German Empire as the Büdingen-Birstein line. In 1913 Franz Alexander's grandfather, Franz Joseph, dropped the und Büdingen zu Birstein suffix from his title as Fürst von Isenburg.
The princess has two brothers, and her elder sisters are, respectively, Archduchess Katharina (born 1971), wife since 2004 of Archduke Martin of Austria-Este, and Princess Isabelle (born 1973), wife since 1998 of Carl, Prince of Wied

Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was the Queen consort of the United Kingdom as the wife of King George III. She was also the electress consort of Hanover in the Holy Roman Empire until the promotion of her husband to King of Hanover on 12 October 1814, which made her Queen consort of Hanover.
Queen Charlotte was a patroness of the arts, known to Johann Christian Bach and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, among others. She was also an amateur botanist who helped expand Kew Gardens. George III and Charlotte had 15 children, 13 of whom survived to adulthood.

Queen Charlotte's apparent African features could have been inherited three to six times over from one ancestor nine generations removed, Margarita de Castro e Souza, a 15th century Portuguese noblewoman, who traced her ancestry to King Afonso III of Portugal (1210–1279) and one of his mistresses, Madragana (c. 1230–?). Critics of this theory do not deny the link but argue that Margarita's and Madragana's distant perch in the queen's family tree – nine and 15 generations removed respectively – makes any African ancestry that they bequeathed to Charlotte negligible.[44] Like everyone else, Charlotte had 32,768 ancestors in the 15th generation up her family tree, and she shared descent from Madragana with a large proportion of Europe's royalty and nobility. Moreover, it is not certain that Madragana was a Black African woman. In fact, the notion that Madragana was a "Moor" appears to have originated centuries after her death, with an author named Duarte Nunes de Leão, writing in 1600.[45] And, in the context of the Iberian Reconquista, any Muslim, regardless of ethnic origin, including Europeans who had converted to Islam, were referred to as "Moors". Some researchers believe Madragana to have been a Mozarab: an Iberian Christian of Sephardi Jewish origin, living in Spain when it was under Muslim control:[46]

Prince of Orange is a title of nobility, originally associated with the Principality of Orange, in what is now southern France. In French it is la Principauté d'Orange.
The title is carried by members of the House of Orange-Nassau, as heirs to the crown of the Netherlands. Rival claims to the title are made by members of the House of Hohenzollern and the family of Mailly. The current holders of the title are Prince Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands (Orange-Nassau), Georg Friedrich, Prince of Prussia (Hohenzollern), and Guy, Marquis de Mailly-Nesle (Mailly).

http://erhj.blogspot.com/2012/03/prince-georg-friedrich-of-prussia-to.html

Hohenzollern Castle (German:  Burg Hohenzollern (help·info)) [n 1] is a castle about 50 kilometers (31 mi) south of Stuttgart, Germany. It is considered the ancestral seat of the Hohenzollern family, which emerged in the Middle Ages and eventually became German Emperors.
The castle is located on top of Berg (Mount) Hohenzollern at an elevation of 855 meters (2,805 ft) above sea level, 234 m (768 ft) above surrounding Hechingen [n 2] and nearby Bisingen to the south, both located at the foothills of the Schwäbische Alb. It was originally constructed in the first part of the 11th century.
When the family split into two branches, the castle remained the property of the Swabian branch, which was dynastically senior to the Franconian/Brandenburg branch which eventually acquired an imperial throne. The castle was completely destroyed after a 10-month siege in 1423 by the imperial cities of Swabia. A second, larger and sturdier castle was constructed from 1454 to 1461 and served as a refuge for the Catholic Swabian Hohenzollerns during wartime, including during the Thirty Years' War. By the end of the 18th century, however, the castle was thought to have lost its strategic importance and gradually fell into disrepair, leading to the demolition of several dilapidated buildings. Today, only the chapel remains from the medieval castle.
The third version of the castle, which stands today, was constructed for Frederick William IV of Prussia between 1846 and 1867, under the direction of Friedrich August Stüler, who based his design on English Neo-Gothic style as well as the castles of the Loire Valley.[1] Because the castle was built as a family memorial, no member of the Hohenzollern family took residence in this third castle until 1945, when it became home to the last Prussian Crown Prince Wilhelm; he and his wife, Crown Princess Cecilie, are buried there

The Castle of Artstetten commemorative coin
The Ducal House of Hohenberg is an Austrian noble family, descended from Countess Sophie Chotek (1868-1914) who in 1900 married Archduke Francis Ferdinand of Austria-Este (1863-1914), the heir presumptive to the throne of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. As their marriage was a morganatic one, none of their four children were in the line of succession to the Austro-Hungarian throne.
The House of Hohenberg was established by imperial decree of Emperor Francis Joseph of Austria when upon the couple's marriage in 1900, he created Francis Ferdinand's wife Princess of Hohenberg (in German: Fürstin von Hohenberg) in her own right with the style of Serene Highness (in German: Durchlaucht), and the specifiation that this name and title should also be borne by her descendants.
In 1909, the Emperor raised Sophie to the more senior title of Duchess of Hohenberg (in German: Herzogin von Hohenberg) with the style Highness (in German: Hoheit) for her life. This title expired upon Sophie's assassination in 1914.
In 1917, Emperor Charles of Austria regulated the titles within the Hohenberg family and awarded them a coat of arms (shown above). The Head of the House would be titled Duke with the style Highness, the other male members would be titled Prince and female members titled Princess with the style of Serene Highness. Thus, Sophie's eldest son, Prince Maximilian of Hohenberg, became the first Duke of Hohenberg. This title was created to be hereditary among Sophie's and Francis Ferdinand's male agnatic descendants according to the rule of agnatic primogeniture. Following the collapse of the Monarchy, all Austrian titles of nobility were abolished by law in 1919 and since then their names consist only of a forename and surname, without the "von" or any title.
In 1938, several members of the family who were opposed to Adolf Hitler were arrested by the Nazis and sent to Dachau concentration camp, most notably Duke Maximilian and his brother Ernst. They were only released on liberation in 1945. The current Head of the House, Georg Hohenberg, was Ambassador of the Republic of Austria to the Holy See under part of the pontificate of Pope John Paul II. He is also a Knight of the Golden Fleece.
Members of the House of Hohenberg are not only descended from, and married into, the House of Habsburg-Lorraine, but are also through marriage related to many other European dynasties including the Grand Ducal Family of Luxembourg and the Princely House of Liechtenstein.
The Hohenberg family has left such a legacy behind that their Castle of Artstetten was selected as a main motive for a very recent commemorative coin: the 10 euro The Castle of Artstetten commemorative coin minted on October 13, 2004. The reverse shows the entrance to the crypt of the Hohenberg family. There are two portraits to the left, showing Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg.

The Counts of Hohenberg were an ancient swabian dynasty in the southwest of the present-day Germany, in the State of Baden-Württemberg. In the 13th century the dynasty of Hohenberg was one of the most prominent lineages in Southwestern Germany. In 1381 however, Rudolf III, Count of Hohenberg sold – highly indebted and with no male successor – the core of the County to the House of Habsburg. Some 100 years later the last sideline died out. The County of Hohenberg persisted de jure until 1806.

Eliska (Elisabeth) (Princess) of BOHEMIA

     de LUXEMBOURG
     Born:  Prague 1409    Died:  1442 Raab

Ursule de HOHENZOLLERN

     aka Ursula von BRANDENBURG
     Born:  1488    Died:  1510

HM George I's 3-Great Grandmother.       HRE Charles VI's 6-Great Aunt.       Lady Diana's 14-Great Aunt.       P.M. Cameron's 13-Great Grandmother.       HRH Albert II's 13-Great Grandmother.       Louis XVII's 7-Great Grandmother.       HM Margrethe II's 11-Great Grandmother.       HM Umberto II's 11-Great Grandmother.       `Red Baron' Richthofen's 11-Great Aunt.       HRH Catharina-Amalia's 13-Great Grandmother.
Please click here and LISTEN!! — (won't take long … she speaks quickly!)

 Husband/Partner:       Heinrich III (V; Duke) of MECKLENBURG-SCHWERIN
 Child:       Sophie (Sofie) (Princess) of MECKLENBURG-SCHWERIN

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— Johann II (Burggraf) von NURNBERG   +
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— Friedrich I (Elector) von BRANDENBURG

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— Albert Achilles (Elector) von BRANDENBURG

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— Johann Cicero (Elector) von BRANDENBURG  (1455 – 1499)

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Zollern, from 1218 Hohenzollern, was a county of the Holy Roman Empire. Its ruling dynasty was the House of Hohenzollern, a Swabian noble family first mentioned in 1061. They named their estates after Hohenzollern Castle at the Swabian Alb; its capital was Hechingen. Its coat of arms was that of the ruling house.

Hohenzollern Castle
According to the mediæval chronicler Berthold of Reichenau, the nobleman Burkhard I, Count of Zollern (de Zolorin) was born before 1025 and died in 1061. By his name, an affiliation with the Alamannic dynasty of the Burchardings is possible, though not proven. The Zollerns received the comital title from Emperor Henry V in 1111. As loyal liensmen of the Swabian Hohenstaufen dynasty, they were able to significantly enlarge their territory. Count Frederick III (c. 1139 – c. 1200) accompanied Emperor Frederick I Barbrarossa against Henry the Lion in 1180 and through his marriage achieved the enfeoffment with the Burgraviate of Nuremberg by Emperor Henry VI of Hohenstaufen in 1191. In 1218 the burgraviate passed to Frederick's younger son Conrad I, he thereby became the ancestor of the Franconian Hohenzollern branch, which acquired the Electorate of Brandenburg in 1415.
Affected by economic problems and internal feuds, the Hohenzollern counts from the 14th century onwards came under pressure by their mighty neighbours, the Counts of Württemberg and the cities of the Swabian League, whose troops besieged and finally destroyed Hohenzollern Castle in 1423. Nevertheless the Hohenzollerns retained their estates, backed by their Brandenburg cousins and the Imperial House of Habsburg. In 1534, Count Charles I of Hohenzollern (1512–1576) received the counties of Sigmaringen and Veringen as Imperial

Yolande, Duchess of Lorraine, also known as Yolande de Bar (2 November 1428, Nancy – 23 March 1483, Nancy), was Duchess of Lorraine (1473) and Bar (1480). She was the daughter of Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine, and René of Anjou (King of Naples, Duke of Anjou, Bar and Lorraine, Count of Provence). Because of her various titles she is also known as Yolande de Lorraine and Yolande d'Anjou. Her younger sister was Margaret of Anjou, Queen consort of Henry VI of England.
A romanticised version of her life is given in the play King René’s Daughter by Henrik Hertz, in which she is portrayed as blind, though she is eventually cured. It was later adapted to Tchaikovsky's opera Iolanta. There is no evidence that she was ever blind.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Marriage and children
2 Legacy
3 Cultural references
4 Notes
[edit] Marriage and children
In 1445 she married her cousin Frederick II, Count of Vaudémont (1420–1470), at Nancy. The marriage was a dynastic alliance, arranged to end the dispute which existed between René of Anjou and Frederick's father, Antoine of Vaudémont, regarding the succession to the Duchy of Lorraine.
Their children were:
René II (1451–1508), Duke of Lorraine. On 1 September 1485 he married secondly, Phillipa of Guelders, by whom he had issue, from whom descended Mary, Queen of Scots
Nicholas, Lord of Joinville and Bauffremont, died in 1476
Peter, died in 1451
Joan (1458–1480), married in 1474 to Charles IV, Duke of Anjou. There was no issue from the marriage.
Yolande, who died in 1500, married William II, Landgrave of Hesse, by whom she had issue.
Margaret (1463–1521), married René (1454–1492), Duke of Alençon. She had issue, from whom descended King Henry IV of France

The Coat of arms of René in 1420; Composing the arms of Valois-Anjou (top left and bottom right), Duchy of Bar (top right and bottom left), and of the Duchy of Lorraine (superimposed shield). In 1434 were added Hungary, Kingdom of Naples and Jerusalem (top left, top center and top right). The arms of the Crown of Aragon (superimposed shield) were shown from 1443 to 1470. In 1453 the arms of Lorraine were removed and in 1470 Valois-Anjou were substituted for the modern arms of the duchy (superimposed shield). [3]

René of Anjou (Rei Rainièr in Occitan) (16 January 1409 – 10 July 1480), also known as René I of Naples and Good King René (French Le bon roi René), was Duke of Anjou, Count of Provence (1434–1480), Count of Piedmont, Duke of Bar (1430–1480), Duke of Lorraine (1431–1453), King of Naples (1435–1442; titular 1442–1480), titular King of Jerusalem (1438–1480) and Aragon (1466–1480) (including Sicily, Majorca, Corsica). He was the father of the English queen Margaret of Anjou, wife of King Henry VI of England and a key figure in the Wars of the Roses.

Joan of Bar (1297 France – 1361 London) was the younger daughter of Henry III, Count of Bar and Princess Eleanor of England, and niece of Edward II of England. She was unhappily married to John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey. In 1354, Joan became the regent of Bar for her great-nephew, Robert I.
Joan was a granddaughter of Edward I of England, "Longshanks", and Eleanor of Castile. She was close in age to her older brother, Edward I of Bar, born circa 1294/95.
On 25 May 1306, at ten or eleven years old, Joan was married to one of the leading nobles of England, John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey, a "nasty, brutal man with scarcely one redeeming quality."[1] She lived at the Warenne family estates, Conisbrough Castle and Sandal Castle, abandoned by her husband, who hated her and since 1313 had been trying to divorce her. In England, she was close to the queen consort Isabella of France, her aunt by marriage (Isabella's husband, Edward II, being Joan's maternal uncle) who was about her same age, and spent time with her at court. She was probably close to her first cousin Elizabeth de Clare (the daughter of Joan of Acre, her mother's sister), who left Joan an image of John the Baptist in her will.

Edward I, Count of Bar

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Edward I, Count of Bar
Spouse(s)
Mary of Burgundy
Noble family
House of Montbéliard
Father
Henry III, Count of Bar
Mother
Eleanor of England
Died
November 1336
Famagusta
Edward I (died November 1336), grandson and namesake of Edward I of England, was the Count of Bar from 1302 to his death. He was a minor when he succeeded his father, Henry III, as count and ruled under the regency of his grandfather, as his mother, Eleanor of England, was dead since 1298.
The county was governed on Edward's behalf by John of Puisaye, Theobald, Bishop of Liège, and Renaud, Bishop of Metz.
In 1308, he accompanied Frederick IV of Lorraine into battle. In 1310, he married Mary, daughter of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy, and was declared to have attained his majority. Then he purchased the lordship of Stenay from his uncle John, the aforementioned lord of Puisaye. In 1313, he was captured in war against Frederick and not ransomed until 1314. He constructed a hydraulic forge at Moyeuvre-Grande in 1323. In 1324, he was again allied in military operations with the duke of Lorraine, and also with the King of Bohemia, John, and the Archbishop of Trier, Baldwin of Luxembourg. This operations was the War of Metz, for each of the allied lords was owed something by the citizens of Metz. Edward demanded compensation for garrisoning the city with his own troops during a conflict with the bishop of Verdun

Rudolph, Duke of Lorraine

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Rudolph, Duke of Lorraine

Rudolph, Duke of Lorraine
Spouse(s)
Eleanor of Bar
Mary of Valois
Noble family
House of Metz
Father
Frederick IV, Duke of Lorraine
Mother
Elisabeth of Austria
Born
1320
Died
26 August 1346(1346-08-26)
Crécy-en-Ponthieu
Rudolph (1320 – 26 August 1346 in the Battle of Crécy), called the Valiant (le Vaillant), was the Duke of Lorraine from 1329 to his death.[1] He was the son and successor of Frederick IV and Elisabeth, daughter of Albert I of Germany, a Habsburg, whence his name. Though he was but nine years of age when his father died and he succeeded to the duchy under the regency of his mother (until 1334), he was a warrior prince, taking part in four separate wars in Lorraine, France, Brittany, and Iberia.
In 1337, Count Henry IV of Bar refused to do homage for a few seignories he held of the duke. Rudolph was forced to devastate Pont-à-Mousson and its environs. In a series of reprisals, Henry ravaged the west of Lorraine and Rudolph attacked the Barrois. Only by the intervention of Philip VI of France was the war ended. By that time, the ties of Lorraine to France had become very strong. They were to become stronger under the half-Habsburg Rudolph. His second marriage was to the daughter of a French lord, Guy I of Blois, and niece of the king of France. He also assisted Philip with troops to lift Edward III of England's Siege of Tournai (1340) in the opening phase of the Hundred Years' War.
During a brief Anglo-French peace, he journeyed to the Iberian Peninsula to aid Alfonso XI of Castile in the Reconquista. He battled the Moors of Granada and shone in the Battle of Gibraltar on 3 November 1340.
On his return to France, he came to the aid of his French brother-in-law, Charles of Blois, in the War of the Breton Succession. He returned to Philip's side at the Battle of Crécy and was killed there, along with many illustrious French cavaliers, on 26 August 1346.
His first wife was Eleanor (Aliénor), daughter of Edward I of Bar, and Mary of Burgundy. Their marriage took place at Pont-à-Mousson in 1329, but they had no children before Eleanor's death in 1332. He was remarried to Mary (1323–1380), daughter of the aforementioned Guy and Margaret of Valois, the sister of King Philip. They had three children:
twins (died before 31 July 1343)
John (1346–1390), his successor

In 1282 his father, the first German monarch from the House of Habsburg, invested him and his younger brother Rudolph II with the duchies of Austria and Styria, which he had seized from late King Ottokar II of Bohemia. By the 1283 Treaty of Rheinfelden his father entrusted Albert with their sole government, while Rudolph II ought to be compensated by the Further Austrian Habsburg home territories. Albert and his Swabian ministeriales appear to have ruled the duchies with conspicuous success, overcoming the resistance by local nobles.
King Rudolph I was unable to secure the succession to the German throne for his son, especially due to the objections raised by Ottokar's son King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia, and the plans to install Albert as successor of the assassinated King Ladislaus IV of Hungary in 1290 also failed. Upon Rudolph's death in 1291, the Prince-electors, fearing Albert's power and the implementation of a hereditary monarchy, chose Count Adolph of Nassau-Weilburg as King of the Romans. A rising among his Styrian dependents compelled Albert to recognize the sovereignty of his rival, and to confine himself for a time to the government of the Habsburg lands at Vienna.

n 1274 Albert had married Elizabeth, daughter of Count Meinhard II of Tyrol, who was a descendant of the Babenberg margraves of Austria who predated the Habsburgs' rule. The baptismal name Leopold, patron saint margrave of Austria, was given to one of their sons. Queen Elizabeth was in fact better

connected to mighty German rulers than her husband: a descendant of earlier kings, for example Emperor Henry IV, she was also a niece of the Wittelsbach dukes of Bavaria, Austria's important neighbor.

Originally from Bamberg in Franconia, now northern Bavaria, an apparent branch of the Babenbergs or Babenberger went on to rule Austria as counts of the march and dukes from 976–1248, before the rise of the house of Habsburg.

Albert had failed in his attempt to seize the counties of Holland and Zeeland, as vacant fiefs of the Holy Roman Empire, on the death of Count John I in 1299, but in 1306 he secured the crown of Bohemia for his son Rudolph III on the death of King Wenceslaus III. He also renewed the claim made by his predecessor, Adolph, on Thuringia, and interfered in a quarrel over the succession to the Hungarian throne. The Thuringian attack ended in Albert's defeat at the Battle of Lucka in 1307 and, in the same year, the death of his son Rudolph weakened his position in eastern Europe. His action in abolishing all tolls established on the Rhine since 1250, led the Rhenish prince-archbishops and the Elector of the Palatinate to form a league against him. Aided by the Imperial cities, however, he soon crushed the rising.

he Duke of Swabia went on to become the last great house of German Emperors, the Hohenstaufen.[1] Swabia was one of the five stem duchies of the medieval German kingdom, and its dukes were thus among the most powerful magnates of Germany. The most notable family to hold Swabia were the Hohenstaufen, who held it, with a brief interruption, from 1079 until 1268. For much of this period, the Hohenstaufen were also Holy Roman Emperors. With the death of Conradin, the last Hohenstaufen duke, the duchy itself disintegrated, although King Rudolf I attempted to revive it for his Habsburg family in the late-13th century.

Merovingian dukes
Butilin (539–554), with…
Leuthari I (before 552–554), with…
Haming (539–554), with…
Lantachar (until 548, Avenches diocese)
Magnachar (565, Avenches diocese)
Vaefar (573, Avenches diocese)
Theodefrid
Leutfred (until 588)
Uncilin (588–607)
Gunzo (613)
Chrodobert (630)
Leuthari II (642)
Gotfrid (until 709)
Willehari (709–712, in Ortenau)
Lantfrid (709–730)
Theudebald (709–744)

Rudolph I (also known as Rudolph of Habsburg) (German: Rudolf von Habsburg, Latin: Rudolphus, Czech: Rudolf Habsburský) ((1218-05-01)1 May 1218 – 15 July 1291(1291-07-15)) was King of the Romans from 1273 until his death. Rudolph was the first of the count-kings, so-called by the historian, Bernd Schneidmüller.
He played a vital role in raising the Habsburg dynasty to a leading position among the Imperial feudal dynasties. Originally a Swabian count, he was the first Habsburg to acquire the duchies of Austria and Styria, territories that would remain under Habsburg rule for more than 600 years and would form the core of the Habsburg Monarchy and the present-day country of Austria.

Albert IV (or Albert the Wise) (ca. 1188 – December 13, 1239) was Count of Habsburg in the Aargau and a progenitor of the royal House of Habsburg.
He was the son of Count Rudolph II of Habsburg and Agnes of Staufen. About 1217 Albert married Hedwig (Heilwig), daughter of Count Ulrich of Kyburg (died 1237) and Anna of Zähringen. Upon the death of his father in 1232 he divided his family's estates with his brother Rudolph III, whereby he retained the ancestral seat at Habsburg Castle. A follower of Emperor Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, he died on the 1239 crusade of King Theobald I of Navarre near Ashkelon.
Albert was the father of King Rudolph I of Germany, and a mutual ancestor of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and of his wife Sophie, Duchess of Hohenberg[1] He is also an ancestor of Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom.

The House of Kyburg was family of Grafen or counts from Zürich in Switzerland. The family was one of the three most powerful noble families in the Swiss plateau beside the Habsburg and the House of Savoy during the 11th and 12th Centuries. With the extinction of the male line in 1263, Rudolph of Habsburg laid claim to the Kyburg lands and annexed them to the Habsburg holdings, which marked the beginning of the Habsburg rise to power.

1. Edouard de Bar (1307–1336)
2. Jeanne de Bar (1336–1351)
3. Jean de Saint-Clair (1351–1366)
4. Blanche d'Évreux (1366–1398)
5. Nicolas Flamel (1398–1418)
6. René d'Anjou (1418–1480)
7. Iolande de Bar (1480–1483)

Pierre Athanase Marie Plantard (18 March 1920 – 3 February 2000) was a French draughtsman,[1] best known for being the principal perpetrator of the Priory of Sion hoax, by which he claimed from the 1960s onwards that he was a Merovingian descendant of Dagobert II and the "Great Monarch" prophesied by Nostradamus.[2] Today in France he is commonly regarded as a mystificator.[3]

Deception, beguilement, deceit, bluff, mystification and subterfuge are acts to propagate beliefs that are not true, or not the whole truth (as in half-truths or omission). Deception can involve dissimulation, propaganda, and sleight of hand, and well as distraction, camouflage or concealment. There is also self-deception, as in bad faith.
Deception is a major relational transgression that often leads to feelings of betrayal and distrust between relational partners. Deception violates relational rules and is considered to be a negative violation of expectations. Most people expect friends, relational partners, and even strangers to be truthful most of the time. If people expected most conversations to be untruthful, talking and communicating with others would require distraction and misdirection to acquire reliable information. A significant amount of deception occurs between romantic and relational partners.[1]

The bloodline relatives of the de Medicis and the House of Lorraine, Queen
Isabella of Castile and King Ferdinand of Spain, were also sponsors of Columbus
when he “discovered” the Americas.
This bloodline also includes:
1. the Habsburgs, the most powerful family in Europe under the Holy Roman Empire
2. Geoffrey Plantagenet and the Plantagenet royal dynasty in England
3. King John, who signed the Magna Carta
4. King Henry Ist, II, and III, who were extremely close to the Knights Templar,
as was King John
5. Mary Stuart and the Stuart Dynasty, including King James Ist of England,
sponsor of the King James version of the Bible
6. King George Ist, II, and III
7. Edward Ist, II, and III, Queen Victoria
8. Edward VII
9. George V and VI
10. Queen Elizabeth II
11. Prince Charles and Elizabeth’s other offspring, Anne, Andrew and Edward
12. Princes William and Harry from Charles’ “marriage” to Princess Diana
13. US Presidents, George Washington, John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Thomas
Jefferson, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and George Bush are all named in the
charts as strands of this bloodline
14. it was passed on to the year 2000 US presidential favorite, George W. Bush
Jr., and his brother, Jeb Bush, the Governor of Florida
In fact if you go deeply enough into the genealogical research you will find
that ALL the presidents are from this line.

Archduke Otto von Habsburg, son of the last Austro-Hungarian emperor…
In 1922 he became the head of the House of Habsburg: “Your Majesty” to legitimists, and by the Grace of God “Emperor of Austria; King of Hungary and Bohemia, Dalmatia, Croatia, Slavonia, Galicia and Lodomeria; King of Jerusalem, etc; Archduke of Austria; Grand Duke of Tuscany and Cracow; Duke of Lorraine, Salzburg, Styria, Carinthia, Carniola and Bukowina; Grand Prince of Transylvania; Margrave of Moravia; Duke of Silesia, Modena, Parma, Piacenza, Guastalla, Auschwitz and Zator, Teschen, Friaul, Dubrovnik and Zadar; Princely Count of Habsburg and Tyrol, of Kyburg, Gorizia and Gradisca; Prince of Trento and Brixen; Margrave of Upper and Lower Lusatia”. His other titles were more minor.  http://www.economist.com/node/18956124
The late Herbert W. Armstrong used to believe that Otto von Habsburg was one to watch as a leader in Europe. Otto von Habsburg was quite influential in helping put together what is now the 500,000,000 person empire called the European Union.
As I have mentioned before, all the emperors of the old “Holy Roman Empire” were part of what has been known as the Habsburg line. Charlemagne was crowned the first Holy Roman Emperor, reputedly with the crown shown above, by Pope Leo III in Rome on Christmas Night, 800 AD. And now, over 1200 years later, the descendants of that family are still influential in and near Europe.
Although he does not have the word “Habsburg” in his incredibly long name, Baron Karl Theodor Maria Nikolaus Johann Jacob Philipp Franz Joseph Sylvester Freiherr von und zu Guttenberg’s mother was a Habsburg which means that the Baron is a descendant of that line too–hence he may “legally” also be entitled to the use of the King of Jerusalem title (especially if some ceremony “officially transfers” that title to him).  He is one to watch in European politics as I have often written. He, for example, may just become the final one that the Bible refers to as the King of the North (Daniel 11:21-45) and Beast (Revelation 13). If the Baron is the one, having influential distant relatives may assist his attainment to power.
The legacy of Otto von Habsburg is likely to be favorable towards Karl zu Guttenberg.
Furthermore, both biblical and Catholic (Roman and Eastern Orthodox) prophecy tell of a leader who will spend time in Jerusalem.  This militaristic political leader, known that the final Beast or King of the North in Bible prophecy and the Great Monarch in Catholic prophecy, may find that having the title “King of Jerusalem” a justification for some of his actions.
Here is some information from my book 2012 and the Rise of the Secret Sect that documents some of the prophecies about this leader being in Jerusalem:
Now, in the book of Daniel there is another prophecy related to the end times that states:
26 And the people of the prince who is to come Shall destroy the city and the sanctuary.  The end of it shall be with a flood, And till the end of the war desolations are determined. 27 Then he shall confirm a covenant with many for one week; But in the middle of the week He shall bring an end to sacrifice and offering. And on the wing of abominations shall be one who makes desolate, Even until the consummation, which is determined, Is poured out on the desolate (Daniel 9:26-27).
Notice that there is a “prince to come” from the people who destroy “the city” (probably Jerusalem; cf. Revelation 11:2) and that he will stop sacrifices and be related to an abomination that brings desolation. This leader will apparently change from a peaceful one to a militaristic one (cf. Isaiah 10:5–11)…

Also: "When Franco's regime was challenged in the late 1960s by members of Opus Dei and other reformer, Franco designated Prince Juan Carlos as king of Spain at the moment Franco died. It has been claimed that Franco initially invited Otto von Habsburg to become the new king, but Otto refused and recommended Juan Carlos. Franco, Juan Carlos, and Otto von Habsburg all were Knights of Malta".

From early in World War II in 1940 to after the Allied invasion of France in 1944, Habsburg lived in Washington D.C., before returning to Europe to live in France, and then in Poecking, Germany after 1954.
Still, he was not allowed to return to Austria until 1966, five years after he officially renounced the crown. He later claimed to be baffled by the hostility and criticism he faced in his home country.
Despite his opposition to the Nazis, Habsburg was at times faulted at home for being too rightwing.
In 1961, Spanish dictator Francisco Franco offered to make him king of Spain after his own death. Habsburg declined, but later praised the fascist leader for helping refugees, calling him a "dictator of the south American type … not totalitarian like Hitler or Stalin."

Otto von Habsburg saw the crumbling of the empire his family had ruled for centuries and emerged from its ashes as a champion of a united and democratic Europe.
The oldest son of Austria-Hungary's last emperor fought Nazism and Soviet communism during his long decades of exile from his homeland, and was lionized by leaders across the continent as "a great European."
Habsburg died Monday at age 98 in his villa in Poecking in southern Germany, where he had lived since the 1950s, with his seven children nearby, his spokeswoman Eva Demmerle told The Associated Press.
Habsburg used his influence in a vain struggle to keep the Nazis from annexing Austria before World War II, then campaigned for the opening of the Iron Curtain in the decades after the war.
With the fall of the Berlin Wall, he used his seat in European Parliament to lobby for expanding the European Union to include former Eastern bloc nations.

In 1913, Kaiser Wilhelm of Germany tried to obtain the Spear before launching a war. He sent a letter to Habsburg Emperor Franz Joseph in Vienna, asking to borrow it, as well as the Crown of the Holy Roman Emperor, for an exhibition in Germany. His request was wisely denied. One year later, Franz Joseph’s nephew, Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife were assassinated on June 28, 1914. Franz Joseph declared WWI to avenge the death. He died in the middle of the war and Charles I took over. It was him who was forced to abdicate the throne in 1918, having lost the war.

moderates have had their candidate in 2008 and they had their candidate in 2012. And they got crushed in both elections. Now they tell us we have to keep moderating. If we do that, will we win?” said Bob Vander Plaats, president of the Family Leader. Vander Plaats is an influential Christian conservative who opposed Romney in the Iowa caucuses 10 months ago and opposed Sen. John McCain’s candidacy four years ago.
The conservative backlash sets up an internal fight for the direction of the Republican Party, as many top leaders in Washington have proposed moderating their views on citizenship for illegal immigrants, to appeal to Latino voters. In addition, many top GOP officials have called for softening the party’s rhetoric on social issues, following the embarrassing showing by Senate candidates who were routed after publicly musing about denying abortion services to women who had been raped.
Ted Cruz, a tea party favorite, trounced Texas’s establishment candidate in a primary on his way to becoming the second Hispanic Republican in the Senate, and the battle he waged in the Lone Star State epitomizes the fight between the two sides. Although he is considered a rising star with a personal biography that GOP leaders wish to promote, Cruz falls squarely in the camp that thinks Romney was not conservative enough and did not fully articulate a conservative contrast to President Obama, except during the first presidential debate.
“It was the one time we actually contested ideas, presented two viewpoints and directions for the country,” he said at the Federalist Society’s annual dinner in Washington. “And then, inevitably, there are these mandarins of politics, who give the voice: ‘Don’t show any contrasts. Don’t rock the boat.’ So by the third debate, I’m pretty certain Mitt Romney actually French-kissed Barack Obama.”
Rick Santorum, a former senator from Pennsylvania who finished second to Romney in the GOP primary, lampooned Romney’s assertion that Obama’s victory was fueled by “gifts” to core liberal constituencies in the form of legislative favors.
“The American people do not want ‘gifts’ from their leaders, particularly when these gifts leave a steep bill for our children to pay, but they do want us to be on their side,” Santorum wrote in a USA Today op-ed published Monday. He placed the blame on the national party, saying it lacked an appealing agenda: “We as a party, the party of Ronald Reagan and ‘Morning in America,’ failed to provide an agenda that shows we care.”
The dispute began to take shape soon after Obama was declared the winner and Republicans, who had hoped to claim the Senate majority, lost two seats. Two days after the election, House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) told ABC News that the Republicans’ mission was to appeal to nonwhite voters: “How do we speak to all Americans? You know, not just to people who look like us and act like us, but how do we speak to all Americans?”

http://www.raptureready.com/

The humanists seem to think that Christianity is so naturally offensive it needs to be excluded from areas of public life.

All end-time minded Christians should know that at some point freedom and liberty will be surrendered to a global government.

Thankfully, one day, when Christ reigns and rules on earth, the humanistic form of governance will be a long-past memory.

“President Obama is not the Antichrist. But what I am saying is this: the course he is choosing to lead our nation is paving the way for the future reign of the Antichrist.”

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/10/20/breaking-postal-contract-with-santa-claus/

Moonshine, also known as corn squeezins, white lightenin, ruckus juice and thump whiskey, hails back to the 1700’s when Scotsmen immigrated to the Appalachian Mountains of Western Pennsylvania.  They brought with them their knowledge of still making; and many Appalachian moonshiners were descended from these very folks.  
So named because it was done by the light of the moon to hide the smoke it produced, moonshining has been a clandestine craft since the days of the Revolutionary War when our government began trying to get what they considered their fair share of home-brewed hooch.  

Evangelical leaders and conservative activists have a simple message for establishment Republicans about Mitt Romney’s failed presidential bid: We told you so.
After nearly two weeks of listening to GOP officials pledge to assert greater control over the party and its most strident voices in the wake of Romney’s loss, grass-roots activists have begun to fight back, saying that they are not to blame for the party’s losses in November.

In deed, all of the Scriptures, prove the prophecies are one hundred per cent accurate and this despite the efforts of the nay Sayers or athiests to say they do not exist.
My effort is to continually “disprove” the aims of the non-believer. To prove the veracity of the Word of God as absolute truth! They have devised a machine that can calculate the age of anything according to the breakdown of carbon in the unit and then amass a table of contents that tells them how old the particular piece is. The problem is this: Are they able to secure the accuracy of this machine? Are they able to falsify any attempts to change the parameters of the machine to fit their own wants and desires? This is especially significant when they predicate the age of dinosaurs, for example.

Nov 19, 2012
The Six-Week War
Now that the death cult Hamas has decided to go out Bonnie and Clyde-style, word comes that Israel’s leadership is preparing for a two-month engagement. Let us all fervently pray that they completely destroy the terror entity that has plagued the region (including the Palestinians) for a quarter-century.

There’s more. Perhaps, America needs to decline so the EU can replace her on the world scene. Perhaps, America needs an inept President so the Antichrist can step forward with grandiose ideas for leading the world. Perhaps, God gave these Church members the leader they wanted because they are supporting abominable things and He thinks its time to judge America, move her out of the way and take the world to the next level in Bible prophecy: the Antichrist, world government and the Tribulation Period.
Understand that Pres. Obama loves the idea of world government. Also, that God said there will be one more world government, it will be led by the Antichrist and it will fail. Perhaps, God wants us to have a President who supports world government because He wants to show us that we need to depend on Jesus not a fake Santa Claus in the Oval office. When that fake Santa Claus fails and America starts down the drain Globalists will cry out for a powerful leader to run a world government. God will let it exist for seven years during the Tribulation Period, but it will fail and people will gladly accept the government of Jesus (His Millennial earthly reign). America’s recent election may prove to be far more significant than most people realize. The Bride of Christ may soon be separated from the lukewarm Mother of Harlots and Hurricane Sandy will seem like a picnic.

http://www.raptureready.com/featured/duck/dd83.html

It was recently reported that Robert Jeffress, the senior pastor at the First Baptist Church in Dallas, said, “Should Obama win (re-election), his victory would lead to the reign of the Antichrist.” He added, “President Obama is not the Antichrist. But what I am saying is this: the course he is choosing to lead our nation is paving the way for the future reign of the Antichrist.”

m

Hodges: Christian right must soften its tone, widen its agenda
By Corey J. Hodges
Special to The Tribune
First Published Nov 14 2012 11:20 am • Last Updated Nov 16 2012 06:07 pm
In the election aftermath, many conservative evangelicals are being forced into introspection.
The results confirmed that our country has experienced a paradigm shift. Culturally, we are becoming more diverse, with the number of minorities steadily rising.

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Ideologically, the nation is embracing more liberal views — voters in four states backed ballot measures that favor same-sex marriage. Compare that to 2008, when such initiatives lost across the board.
Conservative evangelicals have to change if we intend to remain influential in the public arena. Changing our core values is not the solution. Christians derive their values from immutable biblical principles. But some shifting is necessary.
First, the tone of our discourse must change. It is expected that we will disagree at times with elected officials, but there is no place for intolerance and the divisive language that have dominated our politics in the past decade. It is possible to disagree with the policy and still respect the politician. It is also not enough for Christians to refrain from hateful rhetoric, we should vehemently oppose it.
Second, the Christian right must expand its agenda. In an interview with the Los Angeles Times, Jim Daly, the head of Focus on the Family, noted that evangelicals have made a mistake by marching lockstep with the Republican Party. Neither party has all the answers.
Our focus has almost entirely been on opposing abortion and gay marriage. We have neglected issues such as poverty, health care and immigration reform, which arguably have just as much biblical support as the agendas we oppose. After all, the scriptures command us to exhibit love and compassion and to care for the less fortunate.
The elections are behind us. We may have deep disagreements with the winning candidates, but, as Christians, we have a responsibility to pray for our nation and our elected officials. Any Christian who spews hate and promotes discord is violating biblical precepts.
The Apostle Paul exhorted Christians in Rome to "be subject to the governing authorities" and reminded them that "whoever rebels against the authority is rebelling against what God has instituted." Paul was in no way suggesting that government officials are acting on God’s behalf or even that we are to obey the authorities blindly. Rather, Paul is appealing to Christians to respect those whom God has allowed to govern and strive to live peaceably under the elected establishment.
Evangelicals, conservative or otherwise, must heed these words and help our country move forward

Sometimes, Mr. Lincoln's interventions needed to be more direct between officials competing for his attention and power. "It was generally believed by many of the friends of Mr. Seward, that the latter ran the administration," wrote Massachusetts Congressman John B. Alley. "Nothing could be farther from the fact. I know, of my own personal knowledge, that Mr. Lincoln would not allow Mr. Seward to send any very important dispatch to England, until he had first shown it to Senator Sumner, who was chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations. Mr. Lincoln once told me that he had the greatest confidence in the judgement of our Massachusetts Senator in everything pertaining to foreign relations. One day Mr. Seward wrote a dispatch, to be sent to England, to which Mr. Sumner strongly objected. Both gentlemen were summoned to the White House with the dispatch. Mr. Lincoln said that it must not be sent. He took his pen, erased a portion and interlined his own words. He said that he feared a war with England, should the dispatch, as first written, be sent. It was sent as corrected by the President."8

Blame was another divisive commodity in ample supply in Mr. Lincoln's Washington. Historian Brodie wrote that "Stevens blamed [Secretary of State William H.] Seward for Lincoln's reluctance. 'I have accused the prime minister to his face for having gone back from the faith he taught us,' he said, 'and instead of arming every man, black or white, who would fight for this Union, withholding a well-meaning President from doing so.'"9 In addition to emancipation, Stevens was also one of the foremost proponents of using black troops in battle. "When it was protested in Congress that to employ Negro soldiers would mean Negroes commanding white troops, Stevens pointed out that non-commissioned officers only.' He went on bitterly: 'I do not expect to live to see the day when, in this Christian land, merit shall counterbalance the crime of color. True, we propose to give them an equal chance to meet death on the battle-field. But even then their great achievements, if equal to those of Dessalines, would give them no hope of honor. The only place where they can find equality is in the grave. There all God's children are equal."10

One point of contention was the use of black soldiers in the war. Stevens Biographer Samuel W. McCall wrote: "Stevens still kept up his fight to the enlistment of negro soldiers. After waiting in vain for action by the military committee, he boldly presented his bill to the House, and secured an assignment for its consideration without awaiting the report of any committee."11 Historian Richard Nelson Current wrote that President "Lincoln continued to show a lack of enthusiasm for black troops, accepting them much more slowly than Stevens demanded. Stevens blamed this on the influence of border-state politicians — in particular, the influence of the Blair family. Old man Blair, once a member of Andrew Jackson's 'kitchen cabinet,' lived in Silver Spring, Maryland, just outside Washington, and still considered himself an unofficial adviser too whoever happened to be president. His son Montgomery was Lincoln's postmaster general. His other son, Francis, Jr., was both a member of Congress and a general in the army. Regarding Montgomery Blair, Stevens wrote in the fall of 1863: 'If such men are to be retained in Mr. Lincoln's Cabinet, it is time we were consulting about his [Lincoln's] successor.'"12

Generally, positions on slavery hardened during the Civil War. But among Mr. Lincoln's supporters, not all moved to the hard position. Maryland's Montgomery Blair came from a slaveholding family but he had taken the legal side of black slave Dred Scott in the 1857 Dred Scott decision of the Supreme Court. He was the lone Cabinet hardliner on defending Fort Sumter in March 1861. His brother Frank was a leading anti-slavery Republican in Missouri before the war. Frank Blair was also a leading advocate of black colonization outside the U.S. borders, but during the Civil War Frank became a leading opponent of emancipationists, inside and outside the Lincoln Administration.

Illinois Senator Orville H. Browning went from supporting General John C. Fremont's emancipation proclamation in the summer of 1861 to opposing President Lincoln's emancipation proclamation in the fall of 1862. William H. Seward was known for speaking of an 'irrepressible conflict" in 1858, but as Secretary of State-designate in early 1861, he was a leading proposing of compromise. Seward biographer Glyndon Van Deusen wrote Seward felt that slavery was on its way to extinction and that the balance of sectional political power "had been shattered by the pro-slavery fanatics. They had plunged the country into a war which threatened the existence of the Union…."13

ncoln also wondered what to do with the emancipated slave. He toyed with the idea of establishing a colony for freed blacks in Central or South America or even as far away as Africa. Some black leaders, however, argued that the American Negroes had contributed more than their fair share in the building of the United States and deserved to share in the fruits of their labor here rather than elsewhere. Moreover, the Negro of the 1860s was a different person from the slave who was brought to the United States in the 1600s. So many social and cultural changes had occurred that it would have been a traumatic experience for many slaves to have had to adapt to the ancient African ways of life. Given the objections to this plan from American Negroes themselves, Lincoln quickly abandoned the idea.
Lincoln was faced with a dilemma as President. Even though he wanted to rid the United States of slavery, Lincoln felt that the Constitution did not give him or Congress the authority to infringe on an individual state�s right to allow slavery. Only the Civil War could serve as the vehicle by which he could give the �peculiar institution� its fatal blow. A moving argument that Lincoln could have used to justify emancipation and citizenship of the slave would have been to allow blacks to serve in the Civil War as soldiers. (This argument had been used to grant freedom to slaves who had served in the American Revolutionary War.) Lincoln was reluctant to use the slave as soldiers, however, because he feared the border states� reaction to this policy and the racial conflict that might erupt in the northern communities. Lincoln decided to use the slaves as soldiers only when he became convinced that their use would weaken the South and shorten the war. This was coupled with the fact that there was a shortage of Union soldiers caused by heavy casualties and conscription problems.
It must be noted that, had the southern states not seceded, Lincoln would have been content to allow slavery in the South and merely restrict it from spreading into the new territories. But such was not the case. Two major events of the war give an insight into how Lincoln wanted to handle the slavery issue. The first event involved the reconstruction of Louisiana while the Civil War was still in progress and part of Louisiana was still in the control of the Confederate army. Lincoln was a staunch advocate of states� rights. He felt that the federal government could not require a state to abolish slavery. In fact, on two separate occasions when Major Generals Fremont and Hunter took it upon themselves to emancipate slaves in Union-occupied territories, Lincoln countermanded their orders, insisting that they did not have the authority to make such decisions.

Hugo von Montfort (1357 – 4 April 1423) was an Austrian minstrel of the Late Middle Ages.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Life
2 Works
3 Recordings
4 Further reading
[edit] Life
Hugo VII was a scion of the comital house of Montfort at Bregenz, head of an old and influential Swabian family of nobles, holding numerous high administrative posts. By his mother Countess Ursula of Ferrette (Pfirt), he was related with the Austrian House of Habsburg. About 1373 he married the Styrian countess Margaret, granddaughter of Count Ulrich V of Pfannberg and widow of Count Hans of Cilli. With his wife's estates around Pfannberg in the Mur valley, he vastly increased the area controlled by the House of Montfort. Upon Margarte's death about 1395, he secondly married Countess Clementia of Toggenburg. In 1399 he also acquired Festenburg Castle in eastern Styria. In 1402 Hugo married, for the third time, the Bohemian noble Anna of Neuhaus, widow of the Styrian governor Hans of Stadeck.

Montfort statue, Bregenz
As second-born son, he had prepared for an ecclesiastical career, but spent most of his adult life as a politician in the Habsburg service: as commander in chief of the ducal Austrian troops in Italy, as Hofmeister of Duke Leopold IV, as governor of Styria (1412–1415), and as Landvogt in the Thurgau, Aargau, and Black Forest regions of Further Austria. Hugo died aged 66 at Pfannberg and was buried in the parish church of Bruck an der Mur in Upper Styria.
[edit] Works
Hugo wrote songs and Minnebrief rhymes, as well as political and didactic speeches. About 1402 he had a first manuscript of his works drawn up. Approximately 40 of his texts are preserved in an elaborate 1414 codex. Though still standing in the shadow of his famous contemporary Oswald von Wolkenstein, he is today considered one of the last importatnt representatives of the German Minnesang.

A minstrel was a medieval European bard who performed songs whose lyrics told stories of distant places or of existing or imaginary historical events. Although minstrels created their own tales, often they would memorize and embellish the works of others. [1] Frequently they were retained by royalty and high society. As the courts became more sophisticated, minstrels were eventually replaced at court by the troubadours, and many became wandering minstrels, performing in the streets and became well-liked until the middle of the Renaissance, despite a decline beginning in the late 15th century. Minstrelsy fed into later traditions of travelling entertainers, which continued to be moderately strong into the early 20th century, and which has some continuity down to today's buskers or street musicians.

Minnesang was the tradition of lyric and song writing in Germany which flourished in the 12th century and continued into the 14th century. People who wrote and performed Minnesang are known as Minnesingers (Minnesänger). The name derives from the word minne, Middle High German for love which was their main subject, and an individual song was a minnelied. The Minnesänger were similar to the Provençal troubadours and northern French trouvères; they wrote love poetry in the courtly love tradition in Middle High German in the High Middle Ages.

Social status
In the absence of reliable biographical information, there has been debate about the social status of the Minnesänger. Some clearly belonged to the higher nobility – the 14th century Codex Manesse includes songs by dukes, counts, kings, and the Emperor Henry VI. Some Minnesänger, as indicated by the title Meister (master), were clearly educated commoners, such as Meister Konrad von Würzburg. It is thought that many were ministeriales, that is, members of a class of lower nobility, vassals of the great lords. Broadly speaking, the Minnesänger were writing and performing for their own social class at court, and should be thought of as courtiers rather than professional hired musicians. Friedrich von Hausen, for example, was part of the entourage of Friedrich Barbarossa, and died on crusade. As a reward for his service, Walther von der Vogelweide was given a fief by the Emperor Frederick II.
Several of the best known Minnesingers are also noted for their epic poetry, among them Heinrich von Veldeke, Wolfram von Eschenbach and Hartmann von Aue.
[edit] History
The earliest texts date from perhaps 1150, and the earliest named Minnesänger are Der von Kürenberg and Dietmar von Aist, clearly writing in a native German tradition in the third quarter of the 12th century. This is referred to as the Danubian tradition.
From around 1170, German lyric poets came under the influence of the Provençal troubadours and the Northern French trouvères. This is most obvious in the adoption of the strophic form of the canzone, at its most basic a seven-line strophe with the rhyme scheme ab|ab|cxc, and a musical AAB structure, but capable of many variations.
A number of songs from this period match trouvère originals exactly in form, indicating that the German text could have been sung to an originally French tune, which is especially likely where there are significant commonalities of content. Such songs are termed contrafacta. For example, Friedrich von Hausen's "Ich denke underwilen" is regarded as a contrafactum of Guiot de Provins's "Ma joie premeraine".
By around 1190, the German poets began to break free of Franco-Provençal influence. This period is regarded as the period of Classical Minnesang with Albrecht von Johansdorf, Heinrich von Morungen, Reinmar von Hagenau developing new themes and forms, reaching its culmination in Walther von der Vogelweide, regarded both in the Middle Ages and in the present day as the greatest of the Minnesänger.
The later Minnesang, from around 1230, is marked by a partial turning away from the refined ethos of classical minnesang and by increasingly elaborate formal developments. The most notable of these later Minnesänger, Neidhart von Reuental introduces characters from lower social classes and often aims for humorous effects.
[edit] Melodies
Only a small number of Minnelied melodies have survived to the present day, mainly in manuscripts dating from the 15th century or later, which may present the songs in a form other than the original one. Additionally, it is often rather difficult to interpret the musical notation used to write them down. Although the contour of the melody can usually be made out, the rhythm of the song is frequently hard to fathom.
There are a number of recordings of Minnesang using the original melodies, as well as Rock groups such as Ougenweide performing songs with modern instruments.
[edit] Later developments
In the 15th century, Minnesang developed into and gave way to the tradition of the Meistersingers. The two traditions are quite different, however; Minnesingers were mainly aristocrats, while Meistersingers usually were commoners.
At least two operas have been written about the Minnesang tradition: Richard Wagner's Tannhäuser and Richard Strauss' Guntram.

The minnesinger Konrad von Altstetten in the arms of his lady-love and feeding a falcon. Early 14th century Heidelberg Lieder manuscript.

Georg Friedrich Ferdinand, Prince of Prussia, (legal name: Georg Friedrich Ferdinand Prinz von Preußen)[a] (born 10 June 1976) is the current head of the House of Hohenzollern, the former ruling dynasty of the German Empire and of the Kingdom of Prussia. He is the great-great-grandson and historic heir of William II, the last German Emperor and King of Prussia, who was deposed and, initially, went into exile upon Germany's defeat in World War I in 1918.

House of Hohenzollern
Georg Friedrich succeeded his grandfather, Prince Louis Ferdinand I of Prussia as Head of the House of Hohenzollern[3] on 26 September 1994. He learned to appreciate the history and responsibility of his heritage during time spent with his paternal grandfather, who often recounted to him anecdotes from the life in exile of his own grandfather, the last Kaiser.[4] When asked about the burden of the Prussian dynasty's house laws, which made Georg Friedrich the ex-Kaiser's heir despite the seniority of two of his late father's living brothers, he commented "Our family has very strict rules about marriage. Only God knows who I shall marry, but I want to be with someone who at least understands my responsibilities…So it is likely that this might be a person from the same background as mine."[4]
His position as sole heir to the estate of his grandfather was challenged by his uncles, Friedrich Wilhelm and Michael who filed a lawsuit claiming that, despite their renunciations as dynasts at the time of their marriages, the loss of their inheritance rights based on their selection of spouse was discriminatory and unconstitutional.[5] His uncles were initially successful, the Regional Court of Hechingen and the higher Regional Court of Stuttgart ruling in their favour in 1997 on the grounds that the requirement to marry equally was "immoral".[6] However, the Federal Court of Justice of Germany overturned the original rulings in favour of Georg Friedrich's uncles, the case being remanded to the courts at Hechingen and Stuttgart. This time both courts ruled in favour of Georg Friedrich. His uncles then took their case to the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany which overruled the previous court rulings in Georg Friedrich's favour.[5] On 19 October 2005, a German regional court ruled that Georg Friedrich was indeed the principal heir of his grandfather, Louis Ferdinand (who was the primary beneficiary of the trust set up for the estate of Wilhelm II), but also concluded that each of the children of Louis Ferdinand was entitled to a portion of the Prussian inheritance.[7]
[edit] Marriage
On 21 January 2011, Georg Friedrich announced his engagement to Princess Sophie Johanna Maria of Isenburg (born 7 March 1978), who studied business administration in Freiburg and Berlin and works at a firm that offers consulting services for nonprofit business.[8] The civil wedding took place in Potsdam on 25 August 2011,[1] and the religious wedding took place at the Church of Peace in Potsdam on 27 August 2011, in commemoration of the 950th anniversary of the founding of the House of Hohenzollern.[9][10] The religious wedding was also broadcast live by local public television.[1]
Princess Sophie's parents are Franz-Alexander, Prince of Isenburg and his wife, née Countess Christine von Saurma-Jeltsch.[11] The couple share descent (being 6th cousins once-removed) from Charles II, the first reigning Grand Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz and a brother of Charlotte of Mecklenburg, queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom. Princess Sophie's father is head of the senior branch of the mediatised princely House of Isenburg, known under the Holy Roman Empire and subsequent German Empire as the Büdingen-Birstein line. In 1913 Franz Alexander's grandfather, Franz Joseph, dropped the und Büdingen zu Birstein suffix from his title as Fürst von Isenburg.
The princess has two brothers, and her elder sisters are, respectively, Archduchess Katharina (born 1971), wife since 2004 of Archduke Martin of Austria-Este, and Princess Isabelle (born 1973), wife since 1998 of Carl, Prince of Wied

Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was the Queen consort of the United Kingdom as the wife of King George III. She was also the electress consort of Hanover in the Holy Roman Empire until the promotion of her husband to King of Hanover on 12 October 1814, which made her Queen consort of Hanover.
Queen Charlotte was a patroness of the arts, known to Johann Christian Bach and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, among others. She was also an amateur botanist who helped expand Kew Gardens. George III and Charlotte had 15 children, 13 of whom survived to adulthood.

Queen Charlotte's apparent African features could have been inherited three to six times over from one ancestor nine generations removed, Margarita de Castro e Souza, a 15th century Portuguese noblewoman, who traced her ancestry to King Afonso III of Portugal (1210–1279) and one of his mistresses, Madragana (c. 1230–?). Critics of this theory do not deny the link but argue that Margarita's and Madragana's distant perch in the queen's family tree – nine and 15 generations removed respectively – makes any African ancestry that they bequeathed to Charlotte negligible.[44] Like everyone else, Charlotte had 32,768 ancestors in the 15th generation up her family tree, and she shared descent from Madragana with a large proportion of Europe's royalty and nobility. Moreover, it is not certain that Madragana was a Black African woman. In fact, the notion that Madragana was a "Moor" appears to have originated centuries after her death, with an author named Duarte Nunes de Leão, writing in 1600.[45] And, in the context of the Iberian Reconquista, any Muslim, regardless of ethnic origin, including Europeans who had converted to Islam, were referred to as "Moors". Some researchers believe Madragana to have been a Mozarab: an Iberian Christian of Sephardi Jewish origin, living in Spain when it was under Muslim control:[46]

Prince of Orange is a title of nobility, originally associated with the Principality of Orange, in what is now southern France. In French it is la Principauté d'Orange.
The title is carried by members of the House of Orange-Nassau, as heirs to the crown of the Netherlands. Rival claims to the title are made by members of the House of Hohenzollern and the family of Mailly. The current holders of the title are Prince Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands (Orange-Nassau), Georg Friedrich, Prince of Prussia (Hohenzollern), and Guy, Marquis de Mailly-Nesle (Mailly).

http://erhj.blogspot.com/2012/03/prince-georg-friedrich-of-prussia-to.html

Hohenzollern Castle (German:  Burg Hohenzollern (help·info)) [n 1] is a castle about 50 kilometers (31 mi) south of Stuttgart, Germany. It is considered the ancestral seat of the Hohenzollern family, which emerged in the Middle Ages and eventually became German Emperors.
The castle is located on top of Berg (Mount) Hohenzollern at an elevation of 855 meters (2,805 ft) above sea level, 234 m (768 ft) above surrounding Hechingen [n 2] and nearby Bisingen to the south, both located at the foothills of the Schwäbische Alb. It was originally constructed in the first part of the 11th century.
When the family split into two branches, the castle remained the property of the Swabian branch, which was dynastically senior to the Franconian/Brandenburg branch which eventually acquired an imperial throne. The castle was completely destroyed after a 10-month siege in 1423 by the imperial cities of Swabia. A second, larger and sturdier castle was constructed from 1454 to 1461 and served as a refuge for the Catholic Swabian Hohenzollerns during wartime, including during the Thirty Years' War. By the end of the 18th century, however, the castle was thought to have lost its strategic importance and gradually fell into disrepair, leading to the demolition of several dilapidated buildings. Today, only the chapel remains from the medieval castle.
The third version of the castle, which stands today, was constructed for Frederick William IV of Prussia between 1846 and 1867, under the direction of Friedrich August Stüler, who based his design on English Neo-Gothic style as well as the castles of the Loire Valley.[1] Because the castle was built as a family memorial, no member of the Hohenzollern family took residence in this third castle until 1945, when it became home to the last Prussian Crown Prince Wilhelm; he and his wife, Crown Princess Cecilie, are buried there

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Burg Hohenzollern. Prince Georg Friedrich of Prussia is to separate from the biggest jewel in the Prussian crown. The "Beau Sancy" diamond which once adorned Marie de Medici and Mary Stuart will be auctioned at Sotheby's.

The Beau Sancy is one of the most precious diamonds in the world. In the declaration of the auction house Sotheby's, on the occasion of the sale of this beautiful piece, on May 15 in Geneva, it is said: "Passed down from generation to generation by four royal families, the famous stone is witness more than four hundred years of European history ". 
This gem of 34.98 carats adorned Marie de Medici on the occasion of her coronation as wife of King Henry IV in 1610. Since 1702, this diamond has been the property of the House of Prussia. King Frederick I was responsible for adding the jewel to the new royal crown.

olfram von Eschenbach (died c. 1230) is generally regarded as the greatest of the medieval German narrative poets. It is thought that he was a member of a Bavarian family of the lower nobility, that he served for a time at the court of a Franconian lord and later that of Hermann, Landgrave of Thuringia. Wolfram left some brilliant lyric poems but is chiefly respected for his narrative poems, including Parzival, the work that is often said to have inspired Wagner's Parsifal. Wolfram and his patron appear as characters in Wagner's Tannhäuser.
Wolfram's Sources
hrétien's work, together with additional information that Wolfram claims was provided by one Kyot of Provence, formed the basis for Wolfram's book. Kyot might have told stories that he had heard in Spain, where there were both Moslem and Jewish philosophers, or the Oc region of southern France, a region strong in heresy. Wolfram claims that Kyot learnt about the Grail in Toledo. In Wolfram's account, both the Grail and the Question are quite different from their counterparts in Chrétien; but his Condrie is recognisably the same character as the Loathly Damsel. Wolfram gives names to some previously nameless characters, including Titurel, Anfortas, Sigune, Condwiramurs, and Condrie. He adds some further details about the latter, including her knowledge of herbal medicines which she used to bring relief to the stricken Anfortas (Parzival, book 11).
Wolfram and Chretien
hese poets were working in a wider and developing tradition of Grail romances. R.S.Loomis drew attention to six elements of Wolfram's poem that were not found in Chrétien or the First Continuation (which might not originally have been a continuation of Chrétien's unfinished poem, but a separate and independent story about Gawain), although some of them were found in later works. In his view, these elements were part of the older Celtic and Old French Grail tradition, possibly known to Wolfram, who was familiar with French literature. This is revealed by the names of some of his characters. Many of the names used by Wolfram, such as Anfortas, Condwiramurs, and Repanse de Schoye, suggest an origin in an otherwise unknown Old French text.

Right: Parzival meets the pilgrims on Good Friday in this painting from Ludwig's castle of Neuschwanstein.
Wagner and Wolfram
here are many elements of Wagner's Parsifal that were without doubt derived, at least in part, from Wolfram's epic poem. It is not accurate however to say, although it often is said, that Wagner's drama was "based upon" Wolfram, or even that (as Jessie L. Weston put it) Wolfram's poem was "the" source of Wagner's drama. Wagner was dismissive of the alleged influence of the medieval poet. He told Cosima that Wolfram's text was irrelevant; when he first read the epic (at Marienbad in 1845, after which he did not look at it again until Mathilde Wesendonk sent him a new edition in 1859) he had said to himself that nothing could be done with it, but a few things stuck in my mind – the Good Friday, the wild appearance of Condrie. That is all it was. On another occasion he said of Parzival, I almost agree with Frederick the Great who, on being presented with a copy of Wolfram, told the publisher not to bother him with such stuff! According to an entry in Cosima Wagner's diary, he was irritated by a letter from a man in Duisburg, wanting to link a study of Parsifal to a study of Wolfram's Parzival… [Richard] says, 'I could just as well have been influenced by my nurse's bedtime story'.

Right: A painting by Hermann Hendrich (1854-1931)
mong the elements that Wagner included from Wolfram were his account of Parzival's boyhood, some of his account of the brotherhood at Monsalvat, the encounters between Parzival and his cousin Sigune (who became incorporated into Wagner's Kundry), the castle containing a very old king and a wounded king, the meeting with the hermit on Good Friday and as Wagner himself mentioned, the wild appearance of Condrie. Those he rejected included the identification of the Grail with a stone, all of the story of Gawain except for the liberation of the Castle of Maidens, the healing question and Wolfram's primary theme of constancy versus inconstancy. Some elements of Wolfram's poem that were adapted by Wagner are common to many of the medieval Grail romances, such as the arch structure of the Grail myth: youth arrives at the Grail Castle where he fails to ask the healing question; youth grows from folly to wisdom through experience; youth returns to the domain of the grail where he heals the wounded king. This arch became the underlying form of Wagner's drama, although within it he changed important details: the question was replaced in the inner action by understanding through compassion and in the outer action by the recovery of the spear.
he progress of the title character is central both to Wolfram's poem and to Wagner's drama. In the latter however it is a particular kind of progress: the gaining of wisdom through compassion for suffering. As in Tristan und Isolde the theme of suffering (a central idea of Schopenhauer's philosophy) is present through all three acts of Parsifal. Whilst on the surface it might appear (as it did to Jessie Weston) that Wagner was following Wolfram and the Grail romances in general in showing how the title character was able to bring healing to the wounded king, on closer examination it is clear that Parsifal does more than this: he brings to an entire community both healing (although it is a misreading that he heals a wasted land) and the spiritual leadership that will enable the knights to go out into the world again, in order to bring healing to that world. There is irony in Kundry's words to Parsifal: redeem the world, if that is your mission.
t is often stated that Wagner found inspiration for Parsifal in Wolfram's poem. It was not until I sat in the garden of the Villa Wesendonck, under the ancient linden tree looking out over the lake, that I realised that this was partly true. In that garden on a spring morning in 1857, I believe, Wagner found his inspiration by identifying Wolfram's sheltered youth venturing out into the world with another sheltered youth to whom old age, sickness and death were revealed for the first time on a day that changed his life.

The counts of Montfort

The genealogically to the counts Palatine of Tübingen Swabian nobility family worked from about 1200 to the extinction of sex in 1787 through six centuries embossing on the Lake Constance region, not only politically, but also in literature and art.
The sons of count Palatine of Hugo of Tübingen († 1182), of his wife Elisabeth the inheritance of the counts of Bregenz (albeit in reduced size) had begun, shared – after a long joint management – her paternal inheritance so that the older Rudolf Tübingen possession, the younger Hugo took over until after Oberrätien albeit Bregenz heritage. From 1200 he was elected state name (perhaps in reference to the famous French and Anglo-Norman noble family) under the Hugo I. von Montfort the progenitor of a new dynastic family; at the same time he moved the previous reign of Bregenz in the city of Feldkirch was founded by him in cheaper traffic, not least with the intention of increasing its influence in Raetia. Establishing a territorial domination, where he was particularly keen to expand the transport routes through the Alps managed first count Hugo I. The establishment of a Commandry in Feldkirch reveals his strong commitment to the idea of the crusade; probably, he repeatedly visited the Holy Land and died there in 1228 during the crusade of Emperor Frederick II.
The sons of count Palatine of Hugo of Tübingen († 1182), of his wife Elisabeth the inheritance of the counts of Bregenz (albeit in reduced size) had begun, shared – after a long joint management – her paternal inheritance so that the older Rudolf Tübingen possession, the younger Hugo took over until after Oberrätien albeit Bregenz heritage. From 1200 he was elected state name (perhaps in reference to the famous French and Anglo-Norman noble family) under the Hugo I. von Montfort the progenitor of a new dynastic family; at the same time he moved the previous reign of Bregenz in the city of Feldkirch was founded by him in cheaper traffic, not least with the intention of increasing its influence in Raetia. Establishing a territorial domination, where he was particularly keen to expand the transport routes through the Alps managed first count Hugo I. The establishment of a Commandry in Feldkirch reveals his strong commitment to the idea of the crusade; probably, he repeatedly visited the Holy Land and died there in 1228 during the crusade of Emperor Frederick II.

The second generation announced the Division of the family. While Hugo II. excelled as a vehement supporter of Hohenstaufen (the poet Rudolf von EMS, d. 1254, contextualizes the staufen policy was his Ministerialis), the sons of his late brother Rudolf I. founded a new gender, which partly entered into a violent feud with the counts of Montfort as counts of Werdenberg. As younger sons from the second marriage, Heinrich I. persecuted as a member of the Dominican order and papal penitentiary, and Friedrich I. the Papal line. It does appear, as this party would want to use at the Council of Lyon, which deposed Emperor Frederick II., and imposed the ban on him, where Hugo II. Friedrich I., but came after the death of the Emperor 1250 to an understanding. The 1st Division of fortification to 1258, which brought the secession of the counts of Werdenberg (which constituted in the southern parts of the country and founded new towns in Bludenz, Sargans and Werdenberg), followed in 1270 the 2nd division among the sons of Hugo II., emerged from the three lines of fortification: Rudolf II. (d. 1302) founded the Feldkircher line (died 1390), Ulrich I. (d. 1287) the (so-called older) Bregenz line (died 1338) and Hugo III (d. 1309) (older) Tettnanger line (died in 1574). Two counts, who made a spiritual career, remained outside this inheritance: Friedrich II. as Bishop of Chur (1283-1290) and Wilhelm I as the Abbot of St. Gall (1281-1301). All brothers stood in sharp contrast to King Rudolf I. Habsburg von, because they had usurped during the interregnum Imperial goods, the King endeavored to its re debt collection. It repeatedly resulted in armed conflict. in 1298, the anti-Habsburg policy of the counts of Montfort at the battle of Göllheim (for worms) failed. The younger generation gave up the resistance against the Habsburgs and consequently an independent policy. The Montfort were subsequently vassals of the Habsburgs; all montfortischen areas reached 1780 Austrian owned.

For the Vorarlberg country's history was the line of Montfort-Feldkirch is the most important. The city and town of Feldkirch Rudolf II. brought the best part of itself. After the early death of his heirs Hugo IV. (d. 1310), whose spiritual brothers, Rudolf III (d. 1334) and Ulrich II (d. 1350), the Government took over. Rudolf III. may arguably the most important politicians of his family considered: the lawyer educated in Bologna was Vicar of Chur, 1310 1322 Bishop of Chur (up to 1325), 1322 Bishop of Konstanz and 1330/33 next also administrator of the Abbey of St. Gallen has become. With Emperor Ludwig IV. fallen out ('Bayer') and the Pope, died in the excommunication, Montfort is considered but the real architect of the Pro-Habsburg politics of the House. His brother back in the secular State opposite Ulrich II. – He also had studied in Bologna – Castle the eternal 1337 Federal with the Dukes of Austria. His long reign led him from 1343 in a conflict with his nephew, who forced him to a waiver of the rule. The Government appointed the last count of the Feldkircher line, Rudolf v (d. 1390), first many years Canon and Provost in Chur and only after a late, childless marriage, sold 1375 the city and Feldkirch in Austria, whose Vögte 1379 moved in Feldkirch. In connection with the sale, he granted the city of Feldkirch, the great freedom letter from 1376th Rudolf V. became not only the most popular count in his family: the purchase price obtained from Austria, he invested in an expansion of the city and many foundations in favor of citizenship.

The Bregenzer line extinct with the death of count Hugo V. 1338 was succeeded by the (older) Tettnanger line. Count Wilhelm II. of Tettnang (died 1354), which once again United the estates Bregenz and Tettnang, came as Imperial Governor in Lombardy to great wealth. His offspring repeatedly divided their possessions. All counts of Tettnang made careers in the imperial service, or even under the Habsburgs and occurred after the splitting of the faith for an uncompromising defense of the Catholic faith. The (older) Tettnanger line died out in 1574 with the artistically minded Ulrich VI..

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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