Rhode Line de Bouillon

Herman was married to Ida, Ida of Boulogne, daughter of Eustace II of Boulogne and sister of Godfrey de Bouillon first Grand Master of the Knights Templar. Eustace was the first Crusader King of Jerusalem.

They had the following children:
Henry I of Cuijk (1070-1108) x Alverardis of Hochstaden, Viscount of Utrecht and Lord of Cuijk. Founded as the widow Alveradis of Norbertijnerabdij Mariënweerd.
Andries van Cuijk (1075-1139), Bishop of Utrecht.
Godfried van Cuijk (1070-1134)
Helwig of Cuijk (1075-1128), in 1096 married Arnold I of Red.

Arnold de Rode, Red, Rhode begat the Rover-Montfort line that married into my Rosemondt lineage, thus, a real Rose Line associated with the rulers of Jerusalem, the Templars, and the Merovingians.

“Heilwig van Rode ?” The Niece of Godfrey de Bouillon
Ida of Boulogne was the sister of Godfrey de Boulogne. She married
Herman of Malsen van Cuijk/Cuyck. Their daughter, Heilwig, married
Arnold van Rode, thus the niece of Godfrey Bouillon was a van
Rode/Roesmont. Ida’s mother was Ida of Lorraine.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2012

The genus of Cuijk (also spelled ‘ of Cuyck ‘, ‘ van Kuyk ‘ and so on) is an old noble family whose male line back to Herman van Malsen, who was a son of count possible Unruoch III of Teisterbant. Unruoch III and his brother were of high Frankish nobility Ansfried of Utrecht , although their precise origin is unclear.Herman van Malsen

Ancestors of Arnold III van Rode
Show complete ancestor table

Arnold I van Rhode
1060-1116
Heylwyva van Walbeck
± 1065-< 1096
 
 Gijsbrecht I van Rhode
1090-1146
 
Arnold III van Rode
1125-1180
x.
Nn van Tilborgh
± 1125-????

Roelof Rover Van Rode Van Myerle
1160-1220

Household of Arnold III van Rode
He is married to Nn van Tilborgh.
Child(ren):
1. Roelof Rover Van Rode Van Myerle  1160-1220

Ancestors of Hendrik I van Mierlo (Van Rode Van Roovere)
Show complete ancestor table

Arnold III van Rode
1125-1180
Nn van Tilborgh
± 1125-????
 
 Roelof Rover Van Rode Van Myerle
1160-1220
Didradis Hendrix Van Rixtel
± 1170-????

Hendrik I van Mierlo (Van Rode Van Roovere)
± 1195-< 1256
x.(1) ± 1215
Heilwich
± 1195-????

Ermegard van Mierlo
± 1210-????

x.(2) ± 1230
Margaretha van Cuyck
± 1205-????

Gooswijn (Moedel I) van Mierlo
± 1230-< 1280

Gerard van Mierlo (Van Rode Van Roovere)
± 1230-????
Hendrik van Mierlo (Van Rode Van Roovere)
± 1232-< 1278

Hendrik Roelof Gijsbert van Rode van Mierlo, ridder (c.1195 – c.1256)

Herman van Malsen (ca. 1030-after 1080) is the ancestor of the genus of Cuijk.
Herman was Mr van Malsen (may refer to several places in the country rivers) and burgrave of Utrecht for Bishop William of Guelders (in some sources also Willem van Cuijk).
His father was Unruoch III count of possible Teisterbant, the brother of Bishop Ansfried of Utrecht of Utrecht.
Hermans main achievement was that he participated in the battle on 28 June 1061 Nederhemert. The troops of the Bishop and his allies were defeated by count Floris I, count of Holland. Herman raided the army regrouped and resting of Floris. Floris and many of his soldiers were killed. Herman was pledged by Emperor Henry IV with the land of Cuijk.
Herman was married to Ida, Ida of Boulogne, possible daughter of Eustace II of Boulogne and sister of

They had the following children:
Henry I of Cuijk (1070-1108) x Alverardis of Hochstaden, Viscount of Utrecht and Lord of Cuijk. Founded as the widow Alveradis of Norbertijnerabdij Mariënweerd.
Andries van Cuijk (1075-1139), Bishop of Utrecht.
Godfried van Cuijk (1070-1134)
Helwig of Cuijk (1075-1128), in 1096 married Arnold I of Red.
There are also sources that Ermengol of Namur, daughter of Albert II of Namur, as his wife.

http://www2.fiu.edu/~mizrachs/poseur3.html

DaVinci seems to have had a "thing" for John the Baptist, which seems quite consonant with the apparent "PoS" interest in Johannism (the idea that John was the true Messiah and Jesus a false one, or, alternatively, that they were equal co-Messiahs). Johannites believe that there was a secret teaching passed from John the Baptist to John the Beloved Disciple (whose given name was Lazarus, but he took the "alias" of John to honor the Baptist), and to a "John" ever since. (Supposedly, every PoS GrandMaster takes the name "Jean" as an honorary title, in addition to being known as "Nautonnier" or Navigator.) Pincknett and Prince believe Da Vinci put his own face on the Shroud of Turin (despite accounts which suggest it was first shown at Lirey 200 years earlier), which was confirmed to them by someone they believed to be a member of the PoS, "Giovanni".

The Rose: Rosicrucianism, the Rosy Cross, and rose-line symbolism is all over the place in this mystery. In Sauniere's church, St. Germaine de Pribrac releases a bevy of roses from her apron. The "Fleury Mural" seems to show a rose-filled flowery landscape, associated with the Fleury family. Go to Rodez, and you will find a rose-colored cathedral with rose windows emblazoned with the Star of David. In the Middle Ages, the rose was a symbol of esotericism – sub rosa means to do something in secret. The Templars' cross pattee was a red or rose cross.

How interesting, then, to discover, as I have recently, that the name of several places in France – Rhedae/Rennes, Rouen/Rhodom, Rodez/Rhodes, are derived from the Greek Island of Rhodes, whose name itself comes from the rose-goddess Rhoda. Contemporary texts say that the red-haired Celtic "Redones" or "rose people" (Rutheni/Rhodanim) setlled both Rennes in the Midi and Rennes in Brittany – the name derives from the ethnic group. It is said that the resident goddess of Mount Sion-Vaudemont, the "other Sion" of the "priory of Sion" in Switzerland, is Rosemertha – the Rose mother. Interestingly, one interpretation of the King Arthur legends is that "Arthur" or "Ursus" was really Riothamus, a Dark Age Celt ruler of a "thalassocracy" that spanned Brittany in France and Cornwall in England. Many of the places near Breton Rennes are associated with Arthur and the Grail legends, and many of the Breton kings had Judaic names. And some derive Riothamus' name from… Joseph of Arimathea, the supposed bearer of the Grail to Glastonbury.

Heilwich van Cuijk was born on an unknown date to Herman van Malsen (c1030-aft1080) and Ide de Boulogne (c1055-c1102) and died 1128 of unspecified causes.
Charlemagne (747-814)Charlemagne (747-814)
Notable ancestors include Charlemagne (747-814).
FranceFrance,Germany
Ancestors are from the France, Germany.

"Heilwig van Rode ?" The Niece of Godfrey de Bouillon
Ida of Boulogne was the sister of Godfrey de Boulogne. She married
Herman of Malsen van Cuijk/Cuyck. Their daughter, Heilwig, married
Arnold van Rode, thus the niece of Godfrey Bouillon was a van
Rode/Roesmont. Ida's mother was Ida of Lorraine. The name Ida may
have come from Saint Oda a Scotish Princess who came to Holland. The
Rode family appear to have taken their name from the town and church
they built for this princess, Saint Odenrode. Rode means clearing in
a forest. An elevated place within this glade would be a mound, thus
the name, Rodemound.

"huwelijk (van Rode-van Cuijk):"

Godfrey de Bouillon was titled `Duke of Lorraine'. The Dukes of
Lorraine descend from Ragnar the Viking and are close kin to the
Dukes of Brabant, if not the same family, thus the crossbeams in the
Cross of Lorraine?

There are about a dozen Ida or Oda names that may have been taken
from Saint Oda of Scotland. Robert de Bruce descends from Ida of
Louvain. Maud of Louvain married Count Eustace of Bouillon, and thus
is the great grandmother of Heilwig Roesmont.whose Roesmont
descendant may have carried on her name and that of her husband,
Arnold van Rode.

"Heilwigis Arnoldi Danielis ROESMONT [Parents] married Arnoldus
BERWOUT.
Other marriages:
VAN DER POIRTEN, Arnoldus Rover "

There is a line of Arnold van Kleef (Cleves). Were they the
progenitors the Countess of Cleves throws in the face of Elsa of
Brabant the wife of Hylas, the Swan Knight, only to have him reveal
his own Arnolds? Could they be the same?

Beatrice de Bar married Geofrey the Duke of Lorraine. Beatrice if a
Ferrette who owned Rougemont castle. Here is where the genealogical
search for the source of the Rosamond name, ends, for they belong to
the same family that begot Godfrey de Bouillon, a co-founder of the
Knight Templars, and perhaps the first king of Jerusalem whose large
portrait hung over my late sister's mantle, she the world famous
artist, Rosamond.

I suspect Saint Oda may have originally been a Queen of the Frisians
who born a liniage of Roses, and the Lords of Rode. That Godfrey's
sister, Ida, is disappeared from most geneaologies, along with his
niece Heilwig van Rode, tells me there is a REAL ROSE LINE that could
have been revelead by the Swan Knight.

"The Swan Knight's adventures bring him to the defense of the
dispossessed Duchess of Bouillon, whose land has been seized by
Regnier (Ragnar) of Saxony, whom he challenges to a duel. The Swan
Knight defeats Regnier and wins the daughter of the Duchess in
marriage. They have a daughter, Ida, who can see the future and knows
that she is destined to be the mother of Eustace, Godfrey, and
Baldwin."

On May 9, 2006 I posted on Atland, the Frisian Atlantis. The Frisians
were ruled by Rosamond, the Earth Goddess Mother. Was her mythical
being based on Saint Odarode?

This post is my capstone. Like a blind man I have been groping in the
dark, moving forward, and never wavering. I came to touch the statue
of Oda the blind saint, and all is revealed, all I have written made
clear in what can surely be titled `The Prophecy of Rhodemond'.
Consider the name of Rhodos's father and the name of the Swan Knight,
Hylas.

RHODOS (Rhodos), was, according to Diodorus (v. 55), a daughter of
Poseidon and Halia, and sometimes called Rhode.

Now, with sword in hand, and the flag of Oedenrode, I come to Carmel.
And kick down the door of the Rosamond gallery, and claim it in the
name of my Rode family; for no sooner was my artistic sister dead,
did the parasites get rid of the surviving artist in the family.
Within twenty four hours, we were gone, and the feeding frenzy of the
un-gifted ones began.

As the Red Knight of the Lords of Rode, who were close kin to
Godfrey, I challenge my powerfyll foes, bid them to come out of their
dark hiding place, and face me like a man.

I have recovered my child and grandchild in my recent trip to Santa
Rosa. "All's well, that ends well."

Jon Presco

Lord of the Risen Kingdom of Rhode

Copyright 2007

First records of the settlement called Rhode date from the year 500.
Sint-Oedenrode was a small settlement on an elevated place near the
river Dommel. The settlements on both riverbanks (Rhode and Eerschot)
merged into one larger settlement.

In the 11th century the Lords of Rhode build a castle on the elevated
area (during excavations in 2005 remains of the castle were
uncovered, proving the early records to be valid). The Eerschot part
of the settlement constructed the first church (the church has been
rebuild many times over the centuries, the early base can still be
seen in the church which is nowadays named 'Knoptoren').

The settlement thrived and became an important place in the region.
Sint-Oedenrode was granted city status in 1232 by the Duke of Brabant
(at that time Hendrik I of Brabant). This promoted Sint-Oedenrode to
the capital of the Peel (the name of the region in North Brabant).
RHODE (Rhodê),a daughter of Poseidon by Amphitrite, was married to
Helios, and became by him the mother of Phaeton and his sisters
(Apollod. i. 4. § 4). It should be observed that the names Rhodos and
Rhode are often confounded (Diod. v. 55).

RHODOS (Rhodos), was, according to Diodorus (v. 55), a daughter of
Poseidon and Halia, and sometimes called Rhode. The island of Rhodes
was believed to have derived its name from her. According to others,
she was a daughter of Helios and Amphitrite, or of Poseidon and
Aphrodite, or lastly of Oceanus (Pind. Olymp. vii. 24; Tzetz. ad
Lycoph. 923). She was a sea-nymph, of whom the following legend is
related. When the gods distributed among themselves the various
countries of the earth, the island of Rhodes was yet covered by the
waves of the sea. Helios was absent at the time; and as no one drew a
lot for him, he was not to have any share in the distribution of the
earth. But at that moment the island of Rhodes rose out of the sea,
and with the consent of Zeus he took possession of it, and by the
nymph of the isle he then became the father of seven sons. (Pind. Ol.
vii. 100, &c.; Ov. Met. iv. 204.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/?title=Sint-Oedenrode

Elica Heilwich von Oldenburg (d. date unknown)
Elica Heilwich von Oldenburg died date unknown. She married Hendrik van Tecklenburg, son of Egbert van Tecklenburg and Adelheid van Gelre.

More About Elica Heilwich von Oldenburg:
Record Change: October 1, 2003

Children of Elica Heilwich von Oldenburg and Hendrik van Tecklenburg are:
i. +Simon van Tecklenburg, d. date unknown.

Ida of Boulogne (c. 1160–1216) was Countess of Boulogne. She was the eldest daughter of Matthew of Alsace by Marie I, Countess of Boulogne. Her maternal grandparents were King Stephen of England and Matilda I of Boulogne.
Her mother had been placed in a convent, but was removed in order to marry Matthew. As a consequence, her parents' marriage was rather controversial and they finally divorced in 1170. Her father continued to rule until his death in 1173, when she succeeded.
On the advice of her uncle, Philip I, Count of Flanders, she married first in 1181 to Gerard of Guelders, but he died the same year. Ida quickly remarried to Berthold IV of Zähringen, but he too died in 1186. According to the contemporary historian Lambert of Ardres:
"…so left without a man, [Ida] indulged herself in worldly delights and pleasures of the body. She fell passionately in love with Arnold II of Guînes, and tried as hard as she could to seduce him; or rather, with typical feminine fickleness and deception she feigned that emotion. Emissaries and secret tokens passed back and forth between them as indications of certain love. Arnold either loved her or with masculine foresight and prudence pretended to; for he aspired to the land and dignity of the County of Boulogne once he could gain the Countess' favor through love feigned or true."
This relationship came to naught when Ida was abducted in 1190 by Count Renaud de Dammartin, who carried her off to Lorraine. This was a common enough fate for medieval heiresses. The situation became complicated when Arnold of Guînes received messages of enduring love from Ida. He promptly rode to her rescue, only to be captured and imprisoned by friends of Renaud in Verdun. Arnold was only freed due to the intervention of William, Archbishop of Reims. Ida was supposed to have purposely deceived him to lead Arnold into a trap. Whatever the truth, she remained with Renaud and produced a daughter, Matilda II of Boulogne (died 1258).

Matilda was a supporter of the Knights Templar. She founded Cressing Temple in 1137 and Temple Cowley in 1139.[2]. Like her predecessor, Matilda of Scotland, she had a close relationship with the Holy Trinity Priory at Aldgate. She took the prior as her confessor and two of her children were buried there[3].

Cressing Temple is an ancient monument situated between Witham and Braintree in Essex and was founded in 1137 by Matilda of Boulogne[1], the wife of King Stephen. It was the headquarters of the first grant of land given to the religious order of the Knights Templar in England. The two barns and the templar well which exist on the site, originate from this period. The Wheat Barn and the Barley Barn are the two finest Templar-built barns in Europe while the Barley Barn is recognised as the oldest timber-framed barn in the world.
In 1310 Cressing Temple was handed over to the Knights Hospitallers who built new stone buildings and expanded the site. Following the Reformation, in the late 16th Century there was a mansion on the site, now called the 'Great House', but it was demolished in the 18th Century and only the farmhouse, granary, wagon lodge and stableyards remain. The Tudor brick garden also stands and has been developed by Essex County Council who acquired the barns for the people of Essex in 1987. Extensive archaeological investigations were carried out as part of a programme of improvements and updates in the 1990s.
Cressing Temple is open to the public and is host to many conferences and events throughout the year. The website gives extensive details of the history and archaeology of the site.
Cressing was the largest and most important of the Templar Knights landholdings in Essex. Such an estate would have been in the charge of a preceptor accompanied by two or three resident knights or sergeant-at-arms, together with a chaplain, a bailiff and numerous household servants. The estate would have employed agricultural labourers and craftsmen and thus functioned as a large estate farmed for profit to help the Order pay for the war effort in the Holy Land.
We know relatively little about the Templar buildings on site as only the two great barns and the stone well survive. The inventory of 1313 gives the clearest picture of the buildings. This mentions a chapel, two chambers, a hall, a pantry, a buttery, a kitchen, a larder, a bakehouse, a brewhouse, a dairy, a granary and a smithy.
The barns appear large and dominating in the landscape when viewed externally but stepping inside is an awesome experience. The open space inside is huge and the roof and wall timbers are a magnificent sight.

Ermengarde of Hesbaye (born about 778 , but in any case before 784 , died Oct. 3 818 to Angers (not to Agen as is sometimes claimed), also called Irmingard.
Haar vader Ingram van de Haspengouw kon haar in 794 uithuwelijken aan Lodewijk de Vrome , die op dat moment nog maar derde in lijn voor de troonopvolging van Karel de Grote was. Her father Ingram of Haspengouw in 794 was her marriage to Louis the Pious , who at that time but third in line to the throne of Charlemagne was. Dat veranderde toen Lodewijks beide oudere broers Pepijn en Karel respectievelijk in 810 en 811 overleden. That changed when Louis's two older brothers Pepin and Charlemagne , respectively 810 and 811 deceased. Zo werd Ermengarde in 814 koningin der Franken en in 816 keizerin van het Westen. Thus, Ermengarde Queen of the Franks in 814 and 816 Empress of the West. Zij behartigde aan haar hof de belangen van haar familie en onderhield banden met de kerkhervormers uit Aquitanië. She looked after her court to the interests of her family and maintained ties with the church reformers of Aquitaine. Er zijn speculaties dat haar relatie met Lodewijk pas na de kroning een volwaardig huwelijk was. There are speculations that her relationship with Louis after the coronation was a full-fledged marriage. Ze is overleden op reis met haar man, na een ziekbed van drie dagen. She is traveling with her deceased husband, after an illness of three days.
Ze had met haar echtgenoot de volgende kinderen: She had with her husband the following children:
Lotharius (± 795-855), koning van Italië, volgde zijn vader op als keizer en werd koning van het Middenrijk . Lothair (± 795-855), king of Italy, succeeded his father as emperor and became king of the Middle Kingdom .
Pepijn (± 797-838), koning van Aquitanië ; hij stierf nog vóór het Frankische Rijk in 843 met het Verdrag van Verdun definitief kon worden verdeeld; Pippin (± 797-838), king of Aquitaine , he died before the Frankish Empire in 843 the Treaty of Verdun could definitively be divided;
Rotrude (± 800-?) Rotrude (± 800 -?)
Bertha, waarvan het geboortejaar onbekend gebleven is; Bertha, whose birth is unknown;
Hildegarde, (± 802/804 – 857), abdis van Notre Dame en Saint Jean te Laon , steunde Lotharius tegen Karel de Kale. Hildegarde, (± 802/804 – 857), abbess of Notre Dame and Saint Jean to Laon , supported Lothair against Charles the Bald.
Lodewijk (± 806-876), koning van Beieren en na 843 van het Oost-Frankische Rijk Louis (± 806-876), king of Bavaria, and after 843 of the East Frankish Empire

Robertians
Last updated 5 months ago

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The Robertians, or Robertines, were a prominent Frankish predecessor family centered in the Western Frankish Kingdom, West Francia and fathers of what became the Capetians, holding power through the whole period of the Carolingian Empire and between 888-988 were the last Carolingian Kingdom existing. The family included a large number of forms of Robert including Robert of Hesbaye (b. 770), Robert III of Worms (b. 800), Robert the Strong (b. 820), and Robert I of France (b. 866). They figured prominently amongst Carolingian nobility and married into this royal family. Eventually the Robertians delivered Frankish kings themselves such as Odo, Robert I and Hugh Capet. Those Robertians ruled in the Frankish kingdom Western Francia.
In (systematic application of) Historiography, Hugh Capet is known as the "last Frankish king" and the first king of France. He is the founder of the Capetians, the family that (via the spin-off dynasty, The Bourbon dynasty of Spain and France) ruled France until the founding of the Second French Republic (1848–1852)— save during the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars from 1792 to 1814/1815) and is still ruling Spain and Luxembourg. In contemporary times, both King Juan Carlos of Spain and Grand Duke Henri of Luxembourg are members of this family, both through the Bourbon branch of the dynasty.

Contents
 [hide] 
1 Origin
2 From Robert the Strong
3 Family branches
4 Sources
[edit] Origin
The oldest known Robertians probably originated in the county Hesbaye, around Tongeren in modern-day Belgium. The first certain ancestor is Robert the Strong count of Paris, probably son of Robert III of Worms, grandson of Robert of Hesbaye, and nephew of Ermengarde of Hesbaye, daughter of Ingram, wife of Louis the Pious. Other related family includes Cancor, founder of the Lorsch Abbey, his sister Landrada and her son Saint Chrodogang, archbishop of Metz.
[edit] From Robert the Strong
The sons of Robert the Strong were Odo and Robert, who were both king of Western Francia and ruled during the Carolingian era. His daughter Richildis married a count of Troyes. The family became Counts of Paris under Odo and "Dukes of the Franks" under Robert, possessing large parts of the ancient Neustria. Although quarrels continued between Robert's son Hugh the Great and Louis IV of France, they were mended upon the ascension of Lothair I of France (954-986). Lothair granted Hugh Duchy of Burgundy and Aquitaine, both rich and influential territories, arguably two of the richest in France expanding the Robertian dominions.
The Carolingian dynasty ceased to rule France upon the death of Louis V (d. 987). After the death of Louis, the son of Hugh the Great, Hugh Capet was chosen as king of the Franks, nominally the last ruler of West Francia. Given the resurgence of the Holy Roman Empire title and dignities in the West Francian kingdom, Europe was later believed to have entered a new age, so became to be known in historiography as the first king of France, as western civilization was perceived to have entered the High Middle Ages period. Hugh was crowned at Noyon on July 3, 987 with the full support from Holy Roman Emperor Otto III, Holy Roman Emperor. With Hugh's coronation, a new era began for France, and his descendants came to be named, after him, the Capetians. They ruled France as the Capetians, Valois, and Bourbons until the French Revolution. They returned after 1815 and ruled until Louis Philippe was deposed in 1848.
However they continue to rule Spain, with two republican interruptions, through the Bourbon Dynasty right down to Juan Carlos of Spain.
[edit] Family branches
Ro(d)bert (-764), dux of Hesbaye from 732, married Williswinda of Worms
Ingerman of Hesbaye
Ermengarde of Hesbaye (780-818), wife of Emperor Louis the Pious
Cancor (-782), founder of Lorsch Abbey
Heimrich (-795), count in the Lahngau
Poppo of Grapfeld (-839/41), ancestor of the Frankish House of Babenberg
Landrada, married Sigram
Saint Chrodogang (-766), Archbishop of Metz, Abbot of Lorsch Abbey
Robert II of Hesbaye (770-807)
Robert III of Worms (800-822)
Robert IV the Strong (820-866)
Odo of Paris (860-898), king of West Francia from 888, married Théodrate of Troyes
Raoul
Arnulf
Guy
Richildis, or Regilindis, married William I of Périgueux, son of Count Wulgrin I of Angoulême
Robert (866-923), king of West Francia from 922, second marriage to Béatrice of Vermandois
Emma (894-934), married Rudolph of Burgundy
Adela, married Herbert II, Count of Vermandois
Hugh the Great (898-956), married for the 3rd time to Hedwige of Saxony, daughter of German king Henry the Fowler
Béatrice (939-987), married Frederick of Bar
Hugh Capet (940-996), ancestor of the Capetian dynasty
Otto of Paris (944-965), Duke of Burgundy from 956
Odo-Henry (946-1002), Duke of Burgundy from 965
Emma (-966), married Richard I, Duke of Normandy
Herbert (-994), Bishop of Auxerre

Ermengarde of Hesbaye (or Irmengarde) (c. 778 – 3 October 818) was Queen of the Franks and Holy Roman Empress as the wife of Emperor Louis I. She was Frankish, the daughter of Ingeram, count of Hesbaye, and Hedwig of Bavaria. Her family is known as the Robertians.
In 794/5 Ermengarde married Louis the Pious, king of Aquitania, king of Franks, king of Italy, ruler of the Holy Roman Empire.
She had six children:
Lothair I, born 795 in Altdorf, Bavaria
Pepin I of Aquitaine, born 797
Adelaide, born ca. 799
Rotrude, born 800
Hildegard / Matilda, born ca. 802
Wife of Gerard, Count of Auvergne, possible mother of Ranulf I of Poitiers.
Louis the German, born ca. 805
She died at Angers, France on 3 October 818. A few years after her death, her husband remarried to Judith of Bavaria, who bore him Charles the Bald.

Ermengarde, Princess of Hesbaye, b. 778 in Hesbaye, Liege, Belgium, d. 3 October 818 in Angers, Maine et Loire, France
Father: 2. Ingram, Count of Hesbania, b. 752
Mother: 2. Hedwig of Bavaria
Spouse: Louis I (Ludwig) "The Pious", b. 16 April 778 in Chasseneuil, Lot-et-Garonne, France, m. Judith of Bavaria, 819, d. 20 June 840 in Ingelheim, Rhinehessen, Hesse, He became King of Aquitaine 781 in Aquitaine, France, He became King of France 814 in Paris, France, He became ruler of the Holy Roman Empire 814 in Rome, Italy
Father: Charlemagne (Charles "the Great"), b. 2 April 742 in Ingolheim, Germany, d. 28 January 814 in Aachen, Rhineland, Germany, Became King of the Franks 768, Associated with Madelgard, ca. 795, Associated with Gersvind, ca. 797, Associated with Regina, ca. 799, He was made Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 800 in Rome, Italy, Became Emperor of the Byzantine Empire 812
Mother: Hildegarde of Vinzgau, b. 758 in Aachen, Rhineland, Germany, d. 30 April 783
Married 798.
Children:
1. Lothar I, b. 795 in Altdorf, Bavaria, m. Ermengarde of Orleans and Tours, 821, d. 29 September 855 in Pruem, Rhineland, Prussia
2. Pepin I, King of Aquitaine, b. 797
3. Adelaide (2), b. ca. 799
4. Rotrud (2), b. 800
5. Hildegard, b. ca. 802, m. Gerard I of Auvergne, d. 841
6. Louis II "the German", King of East Franks, b. ca. 805, m. Emma of Bavaria

2. Ingram, Count of Hesbania, b. 752
Father: 3. Gunderland, Count of Hesbania, b. 730, d. 778
Spouse: 2. Hedwig of Bavaria
Married.
Children:
1. 1. Ermengarde, Princess of Hesbaye, b. 778 in Hesbaye, Liege, Belgium, m. Louis I (Ludwig) "The Pious", 798, d. 3 October 818 in Angers, Maine et Loire, France

3. Gunderland, Count of Hesbania, b. 730, d. 778
Father: 4. Sigrand, Count of Hesbaye, b. 685
Mother: 4. Landree of Hesbaye, b. 712
Children:
1. 2. Ingram, Count of Hesbania, b. 752, m. Hedwig of Bavaria

4. Sigrand, Count of Hesbaye, b. 685
Father: 5. Lambert de Hesbaye, b. 640
Spouse: 4. Landree of Hesbaye, b. 712
Father: 9. Charles "The Hammer" Martel, King of the Franks, b. ca. 676 in Heristal, Liege, Belgium, d. 22 October 741 in Quierzy, Aisne, France
Mother: 9. Chrotrud (Rotrude), Duchess of Austrasia, b. ca. 690 in Austrasia, France, d. 724
Married.
Children:
1. 3. Gunderland, Count of Hesbania, b. 730, d. 778

5. Lambert de Hesbaye, b. 640
Father: 6. Guerin, Count de Poitiers, b. ca. 612 in Austrasia, d. 677/87
Mother: 6. Gunza de Treves, b. 612
Children:
1. 4. Sigrand, Count of Hesbaye, b. 685, m. Landree of Hesbaye

6. Guerin, Count de Poitiers, b. ca. 612 in Austrasia, d. 677/87
Father: 7. Bodilon, Count and Bishop of Treves, b. 590
Spouse: 6. Gunza de Treves, b. 612
Father: 8. Clodule, Bishop of Metz
Married.
Children:
1. 5. Lambert de Hesbaye, b. 640

7. Bodilon, Count and Bishop of Treves, b. 590
Children:
1. 6. Guerin, Count de Poitiers, b. ca. 612 in Austrasia, m. Gunza de Treves, d. 677/87
Spouse: Singrada
Married.

8. Clodule, Bishop of Metz
Children:
1. 6. Gunza de Treves, b. 612, m. Guerin, Count de Poitiers

HEILWIG of CUIJK, geb. ca. 1075, died. After 1128.

From his first marriage (of red-van Valkenburg (Voeren)): [99]
a. Arnold II of Red, geb. ca. 1090, died. ca. 1125, listed 1119, 1123, 1125, tr. ca. 1120 [100] Adele of Cuijk, geb. ca. 1100, Lady of Osning, daughter of Hendrik van Cuijk (van Malsen) and Count of Hochstaden (see kw No. ⇒ 232014729).
b. Gijsbert count of Red, geb. ca. 1095, died. After 1146, Knight.
From him: [101]
1. (Arnold) count of Red, geb. ca. 1125, tr. ca. 1155 [102] NN van Tilburg, geb. ca. 1135, Dr. of Henry of countries.
From this marriage: [103]
aa. Gijsbert of red, geb. ca. 1155, Chimere. After 1207, Knight, count of Red (up to 1200).
bb. Roelof (Rover) of red, geb. ca. 1160. This posterity, not (yet) further investigated
cc. Hendrik van Red, geb. ca. 1160, presumed ancestor of the genus Stakenborch.
From his second marriage (of red-van Cuijk): [104]
a. Rutger van Red, geb. ca. 1100, (= kw. nr. 1856145514).
d. Herman van Heusden, geb. ca. 1105, Chimere. After 1144, kastelein of Heusden.
From him: [105]
1. Arnout I of Heusden, geb. ca. 1130.
From him: [106]
aa. Jan I van Heusden, geb. ca. 1160. This posterity, not (yet) further investigated.

Descendants of Hedwig van Tecklenburg
Here are up to five generations of the children of Hedwig van Tecklenburg ( m. Gijsbert van Bronkhorst ). Icons after childrens' names link to their family tree charts and descendant lists . (Other views are available from their pages, including ancestor lists , printable trees , shareable trees and relationship to you .) Click here for Hedwig van Tecklenburg's ancestors.
1. Willem van Bronckhorst (1392 – March 4, 1429) m. Hedwig von Götterswick
2. Kunegonde van Bronkhorst Borculo (1395 – 1460) m. Johan II van Montfoort m. Ludolf VIII von Steinfurt
1. Oda de Roover van Montfoort (1425 – ) m. Jacob van Zuijlen van Nijevelt
3. Otto van Bronkhorst Borculo (1395 – February 23, 1458) m. Elisabeth van Nassau Beilstein m. Agnes van Solms

Johan II van Montfoort Burggraaf
Born about 1380 [location unknown]
Son of Hendrik III van Montfoort Burggraaf and Oda van Wassenaar Polanen
Brother of Willem van Montfoort heer van L and Lodewijk van Montfoort heer van H
Husband of Kunegonde van Bronkhorst Borculo — married September 29, 1422 [location unknown]
Husband of Bely Willem Gijsbertsd — married [date unknown] in Not Married
Father of Oda de Roover van Montfoort

Descendants of Hedwig van Tecklenburg
Here are up to five generations of the children of Hedwig van Tecklenburg ( m. Gijsbert van Bronkhorst ). Icons after childrens' names link to their family tree charts and descendant lists . (Other views are available from their pages, including ancestor lists , printable trees , shareable trees and relationship to you .) Click here for Hedwig van Tecklenburg's ancestors.
1. Willem van Bronckhorst (1392 – March 4, 1429) m. Hedwig von Götterswick
2. Kunegonde van Bronkhorst Borculo (1395 – 1460) m. Johan II van Montfoort m. Ludolf VIII von Steinfurt
1. Oda de Roover van Montfoort (1425 – ) m. Jacob van Zuijlen van Nijevelt
3. Otto van Bronkhorst Borculo (1395 – February 23, 1458) m. Elisabeth van Nassau Beilstein m. Agnes van Solms

“The name ‘Nassau’, which was borne first by Nassau Thomas Senior (d 1786),
elder son of (Moses) Aaron Senior (d 1736), may have originally been adopted in
honour of John Maurice of Nassau (1604-1679), Prince of Nassau-Siegen and
Governor of the Dutch territories in Brazil, prior to the reconquest of these
territories by the Portuguese in 1654, when over 5,000 Jews fled that country.
One ship carrying 23 Jewish refugees from Brazil went to New Amsterdam (New
York), where they formed the nucleus of the Sephardic Jewish community in the
USA. Joseph Senior Saraiva’s uncle, David Senior (who was born in about 1575 in
Amarante, Portugal, and who died in Recife, Brazil, in 1650) was one of the
leading members of the Jewish community in Recife. A more probable alternative
is that the name ‘Nassau’ was adopted in honour of William of Orange-Nassau
(1650-1702), that is William III, whose seizure of the throne of England in 1688
was financed by Jews, possibly including the Senior family. Jews also financed
William III’s later wars against Louis XIV and did much to help London replace
Amsterdam as the centre of European finance, a position it holds to this day. It
is a curious fact that, on this basis, the famous Bill of Rights of 1689, one of
the cornerstones of British democracy, was largely made possible by Jewish
finance.”

In 1593 these Marranos arrived in Amsterdam after having been refused admission to Middelburg and Haarlem. These Jews were important merchants and persons with in-demand skills. They labored assiduously in the cause of the people and contributed materially to the prosperity of the country. They became strenuous supporters of the House of Orange and were in return protected by the stadholder. At this time the commerce of Holland was increasing; a period of development had arrived, particularly for Amsterdam, to which Jews had carried their goods and from which they maintained their relations with foreign lands. Thus they had connections with the Levant and with Morocco. The Emperor of Morocco had an ambassador at The Hague named Samuel Pallache (1591–1626), through whose mediation, in 1620, a commercial understanding was arrived at with the Barbary States.
In particular, the relations between the Dutch and South America were established by Jews; they contributed to the establishment of the Dutch West Indies Company in 1621, of the directorate of which some of them were members. The ambitious schemes of the Dutch for the conquest of Brazil were carried into effect through Francisco Ribiero, a Portuguese captain, who is said to have had Jewish relations in Holland. As some years afterward the Dutch in Brazil appealed to Holland for craftsmen of all kinds, many Jews went to Brazil; about 600 Jews left Amsterdam in 1642, accompanied by two distinguished scholars – Isaac Aboab da Fonseca and Moses Raphael de Aguilar. In the struggle between Holland and Portugal for the possession of Brazil the Dutch were supported by the Jews.
With various countries in Europe also the Jews of Amsterdam established commercial relations. In a letter dated 25 November 1622, King Christian IV of Denmark invites Jews of Amsterdam to settle in Glückstadt, where, among other privileges, the free exercise of their religion would be assured to them.

The following comes primarily from http://www.gmilne.demon.co.uk/tree.htm#index11 which has a lot of detail about the Senior family and the arms that go with.

"The earliest traceable ancestor in this line is Moses Aaron Senior, who was naturalized on 12 September 1723. His wife was Elizabeth Baldrick. Referred to as a 'native of Spain', this is almost certainly incorrect and he probably came from Amsterdam, Hamburg, the West Indies (his wife came from Barbados) or South America. The family probably had trading interests (and relatives) in all these places."

The Senior family were originally Spanish Jews (Sephardim), some of whom converted to Catholicism in 1492 when the Jews were expelled from Spain. The leading member of the family at that time was Don Abraham Senior, Chief Rabbi of Castile (a Court appointment), who did convert and was therefore not expelled. This was partly because he was an old man in his 80s and partly due to personal pressure from the King and Queen, Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile, of whom he was a great favourite and who acted as sponsors at his baptism. Don Abraham had been instrumental in arranging their marriage, and therefore the union of the Aragon and Castile, and had also effected a reconciliation between Isabella and her brother, Henry IV, which allowed Isabella to succeed to the throne of Castile. Don Abraham was one of a small group of leading Jews, some of whom financed Christopher Columbus's voyage to America. Stephen Birmingham, in his book 'The Grandees' states (p. 45), with regard to Columbus' expedition, that 'when still more money was needed, and when Isabella was on the point of abandoning the project for lack of funds, Abravanel turned to other Jewish bankers, including Luis de Santangel, Gabriel Sanchez, and Abraham Senior, who had played such an important role in bringing Isabella and Ferdinand to the alter. It was because of these bankers that the expedition was able to leave Spain under a Spanish flag and, as a result of their part in the undertaking, Columbus' first word back to Spain about his discovery was addressed not to the Queen – which would have been courteous – but to Senores Santangel, Sanchez and Senior, his bankers, which was practical. As a result of these activities, Professor H. P. Adams of John Hopkins has commented: "Not jewels, but Jews, were the real financial basis of the first expedition of Columbus".'

The Senior family were the leading Jewish family in Spain at the time. See the chapter on 'The Senior Dynasty' (pages 413-500) in 'The Expulsion of the Jews from Spain' by Haim Beinart. Page 420 quotes a letter of 1487 from the Jews of Castile to the Jews of Rome and Lombardy in which Don Abraham Senior is referred to as the 'Exilarch who is over us'. The term 'Exilarch' referred to (or used to refer to – the term originated during the period of the Babylonian exile from 587-539 B.C.) descendants of the House of David who were secular rulers (princes) of the Jews in exile (see II Kings xxv. 27 and I Chron. iii. 17 et seq.) but I have found no further information on Don Abraham Senior's ancestry. It would appear, on this basis, that Don Abraham Senior might have been the last Exilarch of the Jews in Spain, if not also generally.

Interestingly, the Senior name seems to still carry some weight amongst the rich Jewish matriachs of New York as recorded by Stephen Birmingham in his book 'The Grandees' where he states (p. 39) 'The two principal matchmakers [in relation to the marriage between Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castile] were Don Abraham Senior of Castile and Don Selemoh of Aragon, men of such prominence that they had never taken the trouble to be baptized. ("Yes", Aunt Ellie would assure the children when she spoke of these great men, "We are connected, we are connected.")'.

Note also there is a reference to an Abraham Senior (Seneor), a Spanish financier from Segovia, who later assumed name of Fernando Perez Coronel, b.1422 (1412) d. 1500 (1493); also Solomon Senior in 16th Century in Segovia, born as a Marrano and called Juan Perez, father to Dr. Francisco Coronel.

Pedigree Knaapen » Hendrik I van Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)
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Personal data Hendrik I van Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)  
He was born about 1195.
He died before 1256, he was 61 years old.
Ancestors of Henry I of Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)
Show complete ancestor table

Arnold III of Red
1125-1180
Nn van Tilborgh
± 1125-????
 
 

Roelof Myerle Of Red Rover
1160-1220
Didradis Hendrix Van Rixtel
± 1170-????

Hendrik I van Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)
± 1195-< 1256
x. (1) ± 1215
Heilwich
± 1195-????

Ermegard van Mierlo
± 1210-????

x. (2) ± 1230
Margaret of Cuyck
± 1205-????

Goos wine (Moedel I) van Mierlo
± 1230-< 1280

Gerard van Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)
± 1230-????
Hendrik van Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)
± 1232-< 1278

Household or Hendrik I van Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)
He is married to (1) Heilwich about 1215.
Child (ren):
1. Ermegard van Mierlo  ± 1210-????
He is married to (2) Margaret of Cuyck about 1230.
Child (ren):
1. Goos wine (Moedel I) van Mierlo  ± 1230-< 1280
2. Gerard van Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)  ± 1230-????
3. Hendrik van Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)  ± 1232-< 1278
Notes by Hendrik I van Mierlo (of Red Of Roovere)
Hendrik I van MIERLO (of red of Roovere), (o. a in 1245) Knight, Mr van Mierlo/Rixtel, patroonheer of the Church of Mierlo, 1245 vassal of the Duke of Brabant, born circa 1195, died before 1256, circa 1223 he does a donation to the Church of Mierlo regarding the tithing on a number of houses in the parish of Mierlo. Later, he has probably done a donation to the monastery Binderen draw.
Mentioned in a deed of 1245 regarding the transfer of the tithes of Wenonah to the Abbey of Averbode.
Son of Roelof Rover of red (of Myerle) and Didradis van RIXTEL
Married for the Church (1) with approximately 1215 Heilwig.
Married for the Church (2) 1245 with Margaret of CUIJK.
From the second marriage:
1. Goos wine (Moedel) I.
2. Henry, priest of Mierlo (1263), Canon of the Collegiate Church of red, died before 1278, weapon: 3 mill irons.
3. Roelof ROVER, ancestor of the Viscounts of Montfoort.
4. Gerard.

Stamboom Knaapen » Arnold III van Rode
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Personal data Arnold III van Rode  
He was born 1125.
He died 1180, he was 55 years old.
Matches in other publications
This person also appears in the publication Stamboom Baijens en Gelens.
Ancestors of Arnold III van Rode
Show complete ancestor table

Arnold I van Rhode
1060-1116
Heylwyva van Walbeck
± 1065-< 1096
 
 

Gijsbrecht I van Rhode
1090-1146
 

Arnold III van Rode
1125-1180
x.
Nn van Tilborgh
± 1125-????

Roelof Rover Van Rode Van Myerle
1160-1220

Household of Arnold III van Rode
He is married to Nn van Tilborgh.
Child(ren):
1. Roelof Rover Van Rode Van Myerle  1160-1220

Ancestors of Hendrik I van Mierlo (Van Rode Van Roovere)
Show complete ancestor table

Arnold III van Rode
1125-1180
Nn van Tilborgh
± 1125-????
 
 

Roelof Rover Van Rode Van Myerle
1160-1220
Didradis Hendrix Van Rixtel
± 1170-????

Hendrik I van Mierlo (Van Rode Van Roovere)
± 1195-< 1256
x.(1) ± 1215
Heilwich
± 1195-????

Ermegard van Mierlo
± 1210-????

x.(2) ± 1230
Margaretha van Cuyck
± 1205-????

Gooswijn (Moedel I) van Mierlo
± 1230-< 1280

Gerard van Mierlo (Van Rode Van Roovere)
± 1230-????
Hendrik van Mierlo (Van Rode Van Roovere)
± 1232-1056

Managed by:
Henrik Sætness
Last Updated:
May 21, 2012
view all 33
Immediate Family

Herman van Cuijk van Malsen
husband

? Van Malsen
son

? Van Malsen
son

? Van Malsen
son

Conon de Montaigu
husband

Eustache II, Comte de Boulogne
father

Ida de Basse-Lorraine
mother

Eustace III, Comte de Boulogne
brother

William de Boulogne
brother

Godefroy IV de Bouillon, Duc de Basse-Lotharingie
brother

Baldwin I, King of Jerusalem
brother

Hugh FitzEustace
brother

Duke of Lower Lorraine and first King of Jerusalem, son of Eustache II, Count of Boulogne, and of Ida, daughter of Godfrey the Bearded, Duke of Lower Lorraine; b. probably at Boulogne-sur-Mer, 1060; d. at Jerusalem, 18 July, 1100 (according to a thirteenth-century chronicler, he was born at Baisy, in Brabant; see Haigneré, Mémoires lus à la Sorbonne, Paris, 1868, 213). The history of his early years has been distorted by legend, according to which he slew with his own hand the anti-king Rodolphe at the battle of Moelsen (1080), and was first to enter Rome after it had been besieged by Henry IV (1084). What appears certain is that he was chosen to succeed his uncle Godfrey the Hunchback, Duke of Lower Lorraine, who was assassinated in 1076. But Henry IV took Lorraine, leaving to Godfrey only the marquessate of Antwerp. As a vassal of the German Empire Godfrey took sides with the army of Henry IV in the War of the Investitures and followed the emperor on his expedition to Italy against Gregory VII (1080-1084). In the interval he was compelled to return in order to defend his possessions which had been attacked by the Count of Namur, and about 1089 Henry IV restored to him the legacy of Godfrey the Hunchback by creating him Duke of Lower Lorraine. The new duke’s authority was extremely weak when opposed to the feudal power which had developed in the vicinity. At this time the whole north of France was aroused by the letter of Urban II, who besought the nobility of Flanders to go on the Crusade. Godfrey was among the first to take the cross, together with his two brothers, Eustache and Baldwin (1096). To procure resources he sold or pledged many of his estates. Many nobles at once arrayed themselves under his banner, and about 15 August, 1096, he departed at the head of 10,000 knights and 30,000 foot soldiers. His army was composed of Walloons and Flemings. “Born at the frontier of the two nations and himself speaking both languages”, he served as the link between them, and by his authority appeased the quarrels provoked by their national self-esteem (Otto of Freisingen, Mon. Germ. Hist.: Script., XX, 250).

Fleming and Walloon, members of the two predominant cultural and linguistic groups of modern Belgium. The Flemings, who constitute more than half of the Belgian population, speak Netherlandic (Flemish) and live mainly in the north and west. The Walloons, who make up about one-third of the Belgian population, speak dialects of French and live in the south and east. The vast majority of both groups are Roman Catholic.
Originally, the area of Belgium was a part of Gaul in Roman times and was inhabited by Romanized Celts. Gradually the land was infiltrated by groups of Gothic Germans, until finally in the 3rd and 4th centuries ad, a new wave of Germans, the Salic Franks, began pressing down from the northeast. Eventually they pushed back the Romans and took up a line generally corresponding to the present north-south division between Flemings and Walloons, a natural line of formerly dense forests. Only later, in the 5th century, after the withdrawal of the Roman frontier garrisons, did many Franks push on southward and settle much of Gaul proper. The northern Franks retained their Germanic language (which became modern Netherlandic), whereas the Franks moving south rapidly adopted the language of the culturally dominant Romanized Gauls, the language that would become French. The language frontier between northern Flemings and southern Walloons has remained virtually unchanged ever since.

I believe that people get lost in certain obsessive details regarding this mystery, in particular details having to do with the life of Jesus, the idea of some type of mysterious bloodline with genes from (G-d/aliens/angels/Nephilim/Merovech/take your pick), lost artefacts (the Shroud of Turin, the Ark of the Covenant, the Holy Grail, the head of John the Baptist, etc.), or conspiracy theories (on the part of the Catholic Church, the French Geographic Institute/IGN, and various ludicrous New World Orders). In this essay, I’m going to attempt to present my current, “millennial” take on this mystery. I will actually attempt to argue beyond the mere basis of statements a and b, but I will attempt to present why I believe this is the case. Since this is not a scholarly essay, it will not be heavily referenced and footnoted, but I believe all assertions in here are defensible, and can present the sources on which I think they are based. Many ideas in here come from the three years of discussion I have had on the priory-of-sion egroups list, with a wide-ranging variety of erudite minds.
In lieu of writing a book on this subject, which I really at this time don’t want to do, I think this essay is one of the better ways to communicate my current thoughts on this subject. I apologize for any errors in advance, but cannot claim infallibility, only a desire for accuracy. Should any of these things be proved false, I am fully willing to withdraw those statements. Unlike others writing on this subject, I have no agenda, no desire to manipulate or deceive, only to deal with the information and offer my theories and interpretations. I have decided the best way to present this data is chronologically.
Some would begin this story back in the hoary mists of prehistory, or in the time of Jesus, or with the coming of the Merovingian Franks to Gaul, or in ancient Sumeria. I prefer to start at one particular place.
1090 – 1188 The Ordre de Sion
According to the “prieure documents,” a conclave of Calabrian monks who left from the Belgian Abbey of Orval in 1090 helped secure the election of Godfroi de Bouillion as de facto king of Jerusalem during the First Crusade (but as is well known, he refused the title, accepting only Defender of the Holy Sepulchre), based on their belief that he was a descendant of the Merovingians, and by that fact, according to these documents, also a descendant of King David through Jesus and Merovech. In return, Godfroi secured their installation into an Abbey on Mount Sion. These documents also claim that the Ordre of Sion and the Order of the Temple (officially, the Poor Knights of the Temple of Solomon, later known as the Knights Templar, and officially recognized as such in 1118) were, until 1188, one unified organization with the same leadership.
Is there any basis to these claims? Here is what it is apparently true: there was indeed an Order of Sion based on Mt. Sion, and according to a papal bull of the 12th century, it had monasteries and abbeys elsewhere in Palestine (in particular, Mount Carmel), in southern Italy (Calabria), and in France. There is little in the official histories linking Godfroi to this order, but he is said to have founded the Order of the Holy Sepulchre, whose relationships to these other orders (the Temple and Sion) are unclear. And the official histories do not indicate any overlap between these monks and the soldier-monks of the Knights Templar. The Order seems to have occupied its “mother” abbey, Notre Dame de Sion/St. Mary of Mt. Zion, built on the foundations of the original apostolic Cenacle or Coelaneum, up until around 1291 or so, when like many Crusader holdings, it was overwhelmed by the Moslem onslaught. It actually was in the hands of the Franciscans for several more centuries, until it finally was lost to Christian ownership and was converted to a mosque.

http://www2.fiu.edu/~mizrachs/poseur3.html

DaVinci seems to have had a “thing” for John the Baptist, which seems quite consonant with the apparent “PoS” interest in Johannism (the idea that John was the true Messiah and Jesus a false one, or, alternatively, that they were equal co-Messiahs). Johannites believe that there was a secret teaching passed from John the Baptist to John the Beloved Disciple (whose given name was Lazarus, but he took the “alias” of John to honor the Baptist), and to a “John” ever since. (Supposedly, every PoS GrandMaster takes the name “Jean” as an honorary title, in addition to being known as “Nautonnier” or Navigator.) Pincknett and Prince believe Da Vinci put his own face on the Shroud of Turin (despite accounts which suggest it was first shown at Lirey 200 years earlier), which was confirmed to them by someone they believed to be a member of the PoS, “Giovanni”.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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