The Rosy Renaissance of Roelof de Rover

There are very few families that can point to a Renaissance painting, and not only claim their kindred are in this painting, but, rendered this work, and others. Add to this the Roesmont contact with Erasmus, a Renaissance philosopher, as well as members of the Swan Brethren who commisioned the The Renaissance artist, Hieronymus Bosch, then we have what the fictional book the Davinci Code atached itself to. Now add our kinship to the Rover-Montfort family, who could have claimed the throne of Scotland, then we have a real Grail Story here.

Alas add the artist Anthonie van Montfoort, and you have what is called the Dutch and Flemish Renaissance.

The Stone of Destiny is at work here. With the current show of the Benton family artists in Carmel, my dream of founding an Art Guild modeled on the Pre-Raphaelites, has come true: for my DNA material of long ago was witness to one of the world’s greatest creative movements that was all but destroyed and hidden until I asked “What is in a name?”

The Lily and the Rose is born again!

“All’s well, that ends well.”

Jon Presco

The Swan Knight

Copyright 2012

Dutch and Flemish Renaissance painting represents the 16th century response to Italian Renaissance art in the Low Countries. These artists, who span from the Antwerp Mannerists and Hieronymus Bosch at the start of the century to the late Northern Mannerists such as Hendrik Goltzius and Joachim Wtewael at the end, drew on both the recent innovations of Italian painting and the local traditions of the Early Netherlandish artists.

Anthonie Blocklandt van Montfoort, Anthonie van Blocklandt or Anthonie van Montfoort (Montfoort, 1533 or 1534 – Utrecht, 1583) was a Dutch painter
[edit] Life

“Joseph interpreting Pharaoh’s dream” by Anthonie van Montfoort (Centraal Museum)

His father was a mayor of Montfoort. He went to learn under Hendrick Sweersz. in Delft and Frans Floris in Antwerp. In 1552 he returned to Montfoort, where he married the daughter of the then mayor.

I have Catherine of Holland (daughter of Floran V of Holland [1254-1296])c> who was married N. de Montfort de Rover.=== Cut === Male descendants of Roelof van MONTFOORT Page : 1 I.1 Roelof van MONTFOORT (De Rovere),

Jan of Montfoort died with his uncle (Roeland the Rovere) and brother (Willem de Rovere) at his side during this battle.

He married on 21 april 1301 with Catherine of Holland, a bastard daughter of Floris V, count of Holland. By this marriage the couple got 100 pounds of money annually to John II of Avesnes (because of the family relationship with the counts of Holland)[1] and in 1306 William III of Holland gave them a piece of land near schoonhoven. Around 1310 got Van Montfoort estates near Linschoten, but in 1320 he had to cede them back to William III of Holland. There followed a long-running conflict, which by his brother Van Montfoort in Montfoort Roeland the Rovere was besieged.

He is, in fact, Viscount of Montfoort by the intervention of count William III of Holland (29 March 1323) and promises him and his descendants will serve on 14 april 1323 always and help.

1 Zweder (de Rovere) van MONTFOORT, born circa 1280, died on 02-01-1331. Burggraaf van Montfoort. Married on 21-04-1301 to Catharina van HOLLAND, born circa 1280, died on 12-08-1328, daughter of Floris V van HOLLAND (der Keerlen God) and Anna van HEUSDEN. From this marriage: 1. Hendrik van MONTFOORT (see also IV.1).2. Adeline van MONTFOORT, born circa 1305, died on04-04-1325. Married circa 1323 to Johan van ROZENBURG, born circa 1300, died circa 1350.3.

Burggraaf van Montfoort. Married on 29-09-1422 to Kunegonde van BRONKHORST, born circa 1400, died circa 1460, daughter of Gijsbert van BRONKHORST and Hedwig van TECKLENBURG. From this marriage: 1. Hendrik van MONTFOORT, born circa 1400, died circa 1459.

Floris V’s argument was that Earl David had resigned the right of himself and his heirs.[3] Although Floris was not a direct descendent of David I, he claimed that David had given up his right to the throne to his brother William in exchange for a grant of land in Aberdeenshire. If true, this would make Floris the rightful King of Scotland.

A Rosamond family researcher has seen letters exchanged between Gottschalk Rosemondt and the great Erasmus with the seal of a dancing wolf upon them. This is a Bosch seal related somehow to the Janskirk church where attended members of the Swan Brethren. The Renaissance artist, Hieronymus Bosch, executed commissions for the Brethren and their church. One such work is titled the Seven Deadly Sins which is the subject matter of Rosemondt’s book ‘Confessionals’.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hieronymus_Bosch

Anthonie Blocklandt van Montfoort, Anthonie van Blocklandt or Anthonie van Montfoort (Montfoort, 1533 or 1534 – Utrecht, 1583) was a Dutch painter
[edit] Life

“Joseph interpreting Pharaoh’s dream” by Anthonie van Montfoort (Centraal Museum)
His father was a mayor of Montfoort. He went to learn under Hendrick Sweersz. in Delft and Frans Floris in Antwerp. In 1552 he returned to Montfoort, where he married the daughter of the then mayor.
Blocklandt then settled in Delft, where he produced paintings for the Oude Kerk and the Nieuwe Kerk, later lost to the beeldenstorm. Also he painted a work for the Janskerk (Gouda) called De onthoofding van Saint-Jacob, now in the museum there.

In 1572, Blocklandt made a trip to Italy, after which he settled for good in Utrecht, joining a guild there in 1577. In 1579, he painted his best known work, the triptych The Assumption of Mary that is now in the Basilica of St. Martin in Bingen am Rhein.

According to Carel van Mander, Blocklandt painted biblical scenes, mythological subjects and portraits. He is early-Mannerist in style and he and Joos de Beer (another pupil of Floris) were responsible for the Mannerist style begun by Utrecht artists around 1590.

Ida of Boulogne was the sister of Godfrey de Boulogne. She married Herman of Malsen van Cuijk/Cuyck. Their daughter, Heilwig, married Arnold van Rode, thus the niece of Godfrey Bouillon was a van Rode/Roesmont. Ida’s mother was Ida of Lorraine. The name Ida may have come from Saint Oda a Scotish Princess who came to Holland.

Rosemondt’s good friend, Pope Adrien, has been anointed the Vicar of Christ. Before that he led the Inquisition in Holland. He was the tutor of Charles Quint whose cote of arms in seen next to Rosemondt’s Rose Name, that looks very much like the rose emblem of the Swan Brethren that today, only Hollands royalty can wear, except, this rose is in full bloom. This suggest Rosemondt is the Master Rose Swan.

Rosemond is the Master of Louvian, and the Falcon Art College. He is a Renaissance Art professors and theologian that I found frozen in time, he waiting for almost four hundred years for a gifted ancestor to be born, an artist and thesliagon that could recognise him, a Lily amongst the thorns. Here is he motto on the rose:
2:2. As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters.

Sicut lilium inter spinas sic amica mea inter filias
Floris V, Count of Holland, son of William II, Count of Holland, son of Floris IV, Count of Holland, son of William I, Count of Holland, son of Floris III, Count of Holland by his wife Ada, daughter of Henry, Earl of Huntingdon, son of King David I. He claimed that Earl David of Huntingdon had renounced his hereditary rights to throne of Scotland.

Floris V’s argument was that Earl David had resigned the right of himself and his heirs.[3] Although Floris was not a direct descendent of David I, he claimed that David had given up his right to the throne to his brother William in exchange for a grant of land in Aberdeenshire. If true, this would make Floris the rightful King of Scotland. Floris claimed that although he did not possess copies of the documents detailing, the handover of power one must exist somewhere in Scotland, and Edward postponed the court for a full ten months while a search was made through various castle treasuries.[3] No copy was found at the time, but copies later surfaced at Pluscarden.[3] One of the early “certified copies”, dating the certification seals of the bishop of Moray and the prior of Pluscarden to 1291, is currently located in the Hague.[3] This document is thought to be a forgery.[3]

Floris’s case was rejected for lack of evidence. However, there is evidence that he entered into an agreement with Bruce in which if one of them was to successfully claim the throne, he would grant the other one third of the kingdom as a feudal fief.[1] Other clauses in the agreement strongly suggest that of the two, only Bruce could really expect to be a successful claimant. This has been interpreted to mean that Floris and Bruce were in collusion, with Bruce hoping that taken together their arguments could defeat Balliol, with Bruces’s claim then being upheld in favour of Floris’.[3] It is striking that there is no record of Bruce and Floris being at loggerheads during the proceedings.

In reality only four of these men had genuine claims to the throne: John de Hastings, Balliol, Bruce and Floris V. Of these only Bruce and Balliol had realistic grounds on which to claim the crown. The rest merely wished to have their claims put on the legal record.

The Stone of Scone ( /ˈskuːn/; Scottish Gaelic: An Lia Fàil), also known as the Stone of Destiny and often referred to in England as The Coronation Stone, is an oblong block of red sandstone, used for centuries in the coronation of the monarchs of Scotland and later the monarchs of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom. Historically, the artifact was kept at the now-ruined Scone Abbey in Scone, near Perth, Scotland. Other names by which it has sometimes been known include Jacob’s Pillow Stone and the Tanist Stone, and in Scottish Gaelic clach-na-cinneamhain.

Ida of Boulogne (c. 1160–1216) was Countess of Boulogne. She was the eldest daughter of Matthew of Alsace by Marie I, Countess of Boulogne. Her maternal grandparents were King Stephen of England and Matilda I of Boulogne.
Her mother had been placed in a convent, but was removed in order to marry Matthew. As a consequence, her parents’ marriage was rather controversial and they finally divorced in 1170. Her father continued to rule until his death in 1173, when she succeeded.

On the advice of her uncle, Philip I, Count of Flanders, she married first in 1181 to Gerard of Guelders, but he died the same year. Ida quickly remarried to Berthold IV of Zähringen, but he too died in 1186. According to the contemporary historian Lambert of Ardres:

“…so left without a man, [Ida] indulged herself in worldly delights and pleasures of the body. She fell passionately in love with Arnold II of Guînes, and tried as hard as she could to seduce him; or rather, with typical feminine fickleness and deception she feigned that emotion. Emissaries and secret tokens passed back and forth between them as indications of certain love.

Arnold either loved her or with masculine foresight and prudence pretended to; for he aspired to the land and dignity of the County of Boulogne once he could gain the Countess’ favor through love feigned or true.”

Matilda was a younger maternal half-sister of Marie de Champagne and Alix of France. She was a younger sister of William IX, Count of Poitiers and Henry the Young King. She was also an older sister of Richard I of England, Geoffrey II, Duke of Brittany, Leonora of Aquitaine, Joan of England and John of England. Matilda seems to have spent much of her early life in the company of her mother, Queen Eleanor. She was named after her paternal grandmother.

[edit] Marriage

In 1165 Rainald of Dassel, Archbishop of Cologne, arrived at the court of King Henry II at Rouen, to negotiate a German match for Matilda. There was conflict during the negotiations, however, when Robert de Beaumont, 2nd Earl of Leicester refused to greet the archbishop, alleging him to be a schismatic and a supporter of the anti-pope, Victor IV. The original plan to match a daughter of Henry II with a son of Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor, was abandoned, and instead Matilda left England in September 1167 to marry Henry the Lion.

The record, which discloses very little, does not show that Bosch ever left home. Some cautious critics take this to mean that he never did leave home, but his paintings (and a few critics) tell a different story. Slatkes and Harris think he spent some time in Venice, where he met Leonardo and Giorgione. Their evidence is flimsy, their intuition first-rate.

The flimsy evidence: For Leonardo they have a sketch of grotesque faces and one of a wolf (or some other animal) in a boat. For the Giorgione connection they point to the artist’s Three Philosophers, in which they identify Giorgione himself as the first figure, Bosch the second, and Leonardo the third.

I have Catherine of Holland (daughter of Floran V of Holland [1254-1296])c> who was married N. de Montfort de Rover.=== Cut ===Male descendants of Roelof van MONTFOORT Page : 1I.1 Roelof van MONTFOORT (De Rovere), born circa 1200, diedcirca 1260. Married circa 1230 to Odilia van MONTFOORT, born circa 1200. From this marriage:1. Hendrik van MONTFOORT (see also II.1).II.1 Hendrik van MONTFOORT, born circa 1250, died on12-01-1299. Burggraaf van Montfoort. Married circa 1280 to nn van BEUSINCHEM VIANEN, borncirca 1250, died circa 1300, daughter of Sweder van BEUSINCHEM and nn van VLOISTALE?From this marriage:1. Zweder (de Rovere) van MONTFOORT (see also III.1).2. Roelof van MONTFOORT, born circa 1280, died on26-09-1345. Heer van Heulestein. Married circa 1300 to Oda van BENTHEIM, born circa1280, died on 26-09-1345.III.

1 Zweder (de Rovere) van MONTFOORT, born circa 1280, died on 02-01-1331. Burggraaf van Montfoort. Married on 21-04-1301 to Catharina van HOLLAND, born circa 1280, died on 12-08-1328, daughter of Floris Vvan HOLLAND (der Keerlen God) and Anna van HEUSDEN. From this marriage: 1. Hendrik van MONTFOORT (see also IV.1).2. Adeline van MONTFOORT, born circa 1305, died on04-04-1325. Married circa 1323 to Johan van ROZENBURG, born circa 1300, died circa 1350.3. Willem van MONTFOORT (see also IV.5).4. Floris van MONTFOORT, born circa 1310, died circa 1346. Heer van Linschoten. Married circa 1330 to Kunegonde van ZUYLEN, born circa 1310, died circa 1350.IV.

1 Hendrik van MONTFOORT, born circa 1305, died on15-10-1333. Burggraaf van Montfoort.Married circa 1322 to Agnes van AMSTEL, born circa1310, died on 17-01-1360, daughter of Arend Arnold vanAMSTEL and Maria van AVESNES.From this marriage:1. Johan van MONTFOORT, born circa 1325, died on26-09-1345. Heer van Montfoort. Married circa 1340 to Maria van POLANEN, born circa1325, died circa 1375, daughter of Jan van POLANENand Catharina van BREDERODE.2. Zweder van MONTFOORT (see also V.3).V.3 Zweder van MONTFOORT, born circa 1330, died on01-08-1375. Burggraaf van Montfoort. Married on 10-04-1348 to Mechtild van CULEMBORG, borncirca 1330, died on 27-02-1390, daughter of Hubert van CULEMBORG and Jutta van der LECK. From this marriage:1. Hendrik van MONTFOORT (see also VI.1).VI.1 Hendrik van MONTFOORT, born circa 1350, died on29-10-1402. Burggraaf van Montfoort. Married on 30-05-1378 to Oda van POLANEN, born circa 1350, died on 07-01-1407, daughter of Jan van POLANEN and Oda van HORN. From this marriage:1. Jan van MONTFOORT (see also VII.1).2. Lodewijk van MONTFOORT, born circa 1385, died on 24-05-1451, heer van Hazerswoude.3. Willem van MONTFOORT (see also VII.4).VII.1 Jan van MONTFOORT, born circa 1380, died on 17-01-1448.

Burggraaf van Montfoort. Married on 29-09-1422 to Kunegonde van BRONKHORST, born circa 1400, died circa 1460, daughter of Gijsbert van BRONKHORST and Hedwig van TECKLENBURG. From this marriage: 1. Hendrik van MONTFOORT, born circa 1400, died circa 1459. Burggraaf van Montfoort. Married circa 1432 to Margarethe van CROY, born circa 1410, died circa 1480, daughter of Antoine deCROY and Maria van ROUBAIX.VII.4 Willem van MONTFOORT, born circa 1389, died circa 1468.Married circa 1410 to nn van MONTFOORT? Born circa1390, van onbekende herkomst.From this marriage:1. Oda van MONTFOORT, born circa 1410, died circa1462. Married circa 1435 to Johan van der AA van RANDERODE, born circa 1410.IV.5 Willem van MONTFOORT, born circa 1310, died circa 1345 in Warns, heer van Montfoort. Married circa 1335 to Katharina van de NESSE, born circa 1310, died circa 1351. From this marriage:1. Hendrik (de Roover) van MONTFOORT, born circa 1340, died circa 1387.Married circa 1360 to Meyne van SWIETEN, born circa 1340, died circa 1390. Vrouwe van Swieten.

In 1320 Roelof get the rover, the brother of the Viscount of Montfoort, a piece ground on the flow back between Montfoort and Linschoten in leen of earl Willem III of the Netherlands. The previous feudatory, Janne of collaborate, have died. Roelof build here as a feudatory of the earl of the Netherlands a castle that he ‘Heulestein’ calls. The Viscount of Montfoort is not happy with the continuing attempts of the earl of the Netherlands its extend power area and the understanding between Roelof and its brother Zweder goes not ahead. The earl of the Netherlands even quarters a Dutch bezetting on Heulestein. But Zweders zoon hendrik are Dutch disposed and as from the moment that he succeeds its father, the family draws the rover jointly at strijde. In 1345 sneuvelt Roelof in the army of earl Willem IV of the Netherlands in the friese Warns. With him fall Viscount Jan the rover of Montfoort and Willem the rover, the founder of castle the Nesse. Roelofs zoon hendrik return heavily wounded to Heulestein, but repair. For the memory he lets make a painting on which its father and cousins have kneeled for Maria have been represented. The family the rover is meanwhile a power factor on the border of founds and the Netherlands becomes and in their striving towards an independent position they undertake also strooptochten by founds.

In 1353 the army of the bishop besieges castle Heulestein. The citadel is taken and is devastated, but also rapidly built. After the death of hendrik the castle comes in 1361 in the hands of its sister Hadewich. Also she has the castle in leen of the earl of the Netherlands and supports the earl therefore in the war of 1373-1375 with founds. In the winter of 1374 and 1375 a Dutch bezetting on Heulestein has been quartered. Hadewich do not live on the castle. In 1376 its zoon draws Jan van Zuylen in Heulestein, without authorisation of Hadewich and its second spouse. They accuse the Viscount of Montfoort of it that he has incited Jan, but the Viscount denies. Eventually Jan he promises van Zuylen that the leen will transfer to Hubrecht of Montfoort, the brother of the Viscount. Thus Heulestein in the hands of the family the rover remains.

Viscount Jan II of Montfoort are thesaurier and city holder of the Netherlands under Jacoba of Bavaria. It is a restless time: Jacoba are in war with its uncle Jan concerning the county the Netherlands. In 1418, as Jacoba to the losing hand, asks the Viscount authorisation is to be allowed break Heulestein finished. He is frightened for a hostile Dutch troop power this way dense at its own Montfoort. At the old castle area a farm is built. The current farm dates from 1659. the place where the castle has stood, is still recognizable by the grachten.

I have Catherine of Holland (daughter of Floran V of Holland [1254-1296])who was married N. de Montfort de Rover. Another Carherine of Holland(daughter of Johann I of Holland [1281-1299]) was married Zweden I burggraf of Montfort de Rover. I have 3 questions: 1) Is this information right?; 2)what way are these two persons relatives (if any)?; is there any relations berween Montfort de Rover family and house Montfort-d’Amoury?d

Establishment in 1318In the year 1318 the offici’le establishment took place of a brotherhood for the ere van Maria in s hertogenbosch. The original oprichtingsacte have been kept remained and are themselves in the file of the brotherhood. The members of the brotherhood met in their own vault in the St Janskerk where they among other things vespers fourth. Later they built to twice a new vault; the last is the current saint sacrament vault beside the they chancel. Beside the worship of Maria the brotherhood was active in the field of the poor relief. Also the brotherhood has to a great extent contributed as from the 14e centuries to the development of s hertogenbosch as an important centre of late medieval music. In the 15e centuries took place as a result of the institute of outside members, an enormous extension of the number of members to far in the current Belgi and Germany. In the course of the 16th century the number of members decreased drastically, whereas when also the mental devotionele element lost meaning.Meetings in its own house in the form of loving meals with music will take an always more important place. Under the members of the brotherhood one in 15e and the 16th century fameuze persons of numerous nature finds, which link here Willem of oranje as well as Jeroen cannot remain bosch certainly unmentioned. Also important lines like of nassau, Van Egmond, Van Wassenaar, Van Brederode, Bronkhorst and Van Bylandt had been represented in the brotherhood.In the eighty-year-old war the brotherhood experienced difficult times, but also after the conquest of pine bosch in 1629 Fredrik hendrik she continued exist. In 1641 the Protestant governor of s hertogenbosch with some of its friends admission to the brotherhood requested. Their request was remunerated.

There new statutes, which stipulated among others, came that the brotherhood would exist as of now from 18 members (broeders) in the rooms catholic and 18 members in the reformational line. This is until now the case. Beside these 36 Broeders the brotherhood knows now incl candidaatleden and candidandi.Royal membersAnd to royal persons the eretitel in addition is of Zwanenbroeder is offered. The Illustre kind Vrouwe brotherhood ensure for its secular materi’le and immateri’le cultural heritage, promote the mutual Christian solidarity and the fraternal link, and keep thereby always eye for the developments and problems in the modern time.Of the contributions which the members of the brotherhood in the form of contribution and grants pay annually the major part at behoeve of realisation of its idee’le and its cultural aims zomede is applied for the maintenance of the Zwanenbroedershuis including the collectie.

Zwanenbroedershuis

Since 1483 its own house has had the brotherhood to the Hinthamerstraat at s hertogenbosch, on approximately 100 meters distance of the sint Jan lain and therefore near its vault. The original house, which was cultivated partially in the 16th century in Renaissance style, collapsed in 1839, mainly. In 1846, the house now existing in neogotische style arose on the same spot. It is a very early example of neogotische construction art in our country both to exterieur and interieur. The architect is J.H. LaffertŽe. The house, which acts tevens as a museum and as such has been incorporated in the Dutch museum register, is a realm monument.FileThe file of the brotherhood has been given in preservation to the Brabantine historical information centre. The inventory is realise on http://www.bhic.nl (will by means of ‘ documents ‘ to zoeken ‘ commonly ‘; give as zoekterm on: ‘ illustre kind vrouwe brotherhood ‘).

In the vitrine large chancel books also nine lie from the sixteenth century which contains polyphonic music: seven graphemes and two press. The manuscripts are very particular: beside this zevental in s hertogenbosch are themselves music in the Netherlands only still in Leiden six similar chancel books with polyphonic. Three of the graphemes of the brotherhood from the work shop from the boasted muziekkopiist Petrus originating Alamire are. Alamire were a multi-purpose character, which mainly worked for the Habsburgse court, but also for several other frost houses and banker families in Europe. Three other chancel books, as well as the polyphonic music in the further gregorian codex Smijers is, of the hand of Philippus the Spina. The Spina worked thirty-five years as a zanger for the brotherhood, but had s hertogenbosch during the picture storm of august 1566 suddenly leave because of sympathies with the new belief. Beside the polyphonic chancel books in the file of the brotherhood find graphemes still six with gregorian, has been among others written by the Broeders of malicious living, the forward rate agreement-delicate of s hertogenbosch. The appeared as accompaniment of in 2002, book: “given pine Sangeren” of Véronique Roelvink seven work have been taken by the Egidius quartet (http://www.egidiuskwartet.nl). Click on mentioned below left to hear some examples:

Jan van Wintelroy: “already pine tijt now doloreus, the mey staet are clean”

Anonymously: “o Salutaris Hostia”

Anonymously: “now sijt willecome”

Unique also the collection of eighteen tinnen drinkkannen from the sixteenth and seventeenth century is. The kannen were used by the Broeders during their meals to drink wine from; every sworn Broeder had own drinkbeker be. On the abdomen of the kannen an image of the lelie between the thorns with the word Sicut stands. On deksels of the kannen is the name of the user and weapon has been engraved. The brotherhood has now still the kannen of among others Willem of oranje and the sepulchres of neighbours (Frederik, Floris and Maximilaan van Egmond). Tinnen drinkkannen became obsolete at a certain moment and was replaced by glazen. The brotherhood has still a collection glass work, which comes from the end from the 19th century.

End nineteenth century left the brotherhood 560-delig a servies in the colours blue and blank designs by the Porceleyne bottle at dig. The servies was made between 1881 and 1885 and the different components contain the emblem of the brotherhood (the lelie between the thorns) and the zinspreuk Sicut Lilium inter Spinas. The servies has been used a lot of years during the fraternal meal, but the most beautiful pieces, among which two large soup tureens are themselves, nowadays in the vitrinekast.In the large room neogotische a alcove is visit. Neogotische the character of the zwanenbroedershuis is retrieve also at other places. Thus neogotische a stove on first deepening, which is in the winter still in use, is himself. Several neogotische castes decorate the partitions of the different rooms. Two of the castes has been given by the ridderschap of noord-Brabant, with which the Illustre kind Vrouwe brotherhood maintain good contacts.

In the rooms stand be based on wide fifty ancient, of which foresee the backs be of the family weapons of members of the brotherhood. In the Zwanenbroedershuis family weapons are see at a lot of places. This way there are the weapon paintings which our tones which were in previous centuries member of the brotherhood and the weapon wapenborden with the weapons of the current members. Beside this everyone visible weapon far tone, there are the weapon books; senior has been moored in 1606. in the later weapon books the weapons of the Broeders has been signed; with the signature the membership was ratified officially. Several objects in the house show Zwanenbroeders. There its paintings of queen Juliana and princess Beatrix, and busts of Willem of oranje, queen Wilhelmina and prince hendrik.

Wilhelmina and hendrik schonken the brotherhood in 1904, gilded zilveren jumbo derrick eel, of which foresees the lid is of a swan opvliegende. The jumbo derrick eel is used year still every during the fraternal meal for the dronk on Her Majesty. Also remainders of the medieval brotherhood house are still kept in the current Zwanenbroedershuis: two of the shutters which determined part pand modernised of in the years thirty of the sixteenth century that Gijsbert of of the poorten the Broeders had given. Also schilderijtje in the current Zwanenbroedershuis, which show the then house in its full glorie, hang. The house drew obviously the attention of several artists, because several images of have been confessed. The current Zwanenbroedershuis breathe an environment of secular traditions. One of the oldest habits to which the Illustre kind Vrouwe brotherhood attach still much value, common consuming a meal is. Once per year this happens in a massive manner in the form of the fraternal meal, which is still kept in its own house.

http://www.zwanenbroedershuis.nl/kunst.php

Ghisburtus was the master of Saint Janskerk, and a member of Lieve-Vrouwe-broederschap that met in Janskerk church. Hieronymus Bosch was a member of the Zwanenbroeders (swan brothers) and was commissioned by the master of Janskerk to do a stained-glass window for the church. The Zwanenbroeders commissioned Bosch to do other work the most important being ‘The Marriage Feast at Cana’. This painting has symbols that relate to the Zwanenbroeders and thus this painting may constitute the only true riddle involving a brotherhood of men and a supper where Jesus is centerpiece. The worship of Our Lady is eluded to in the swan being served up on a platter. The swan is a symbol of Venus, but, with the presence of the crescent moon and the boar’s head, then this Lady is Artemis/Diana who unleashed the Calydonian Boar that was killed by the Arganots. This is interesting as Radbod made a treaty with Grimoald the Merovingian Frank and gave his daughter, Theodelindis in marriage. The Frankish nobles rose up against the usurpation in the palace of the Franks and bid Radbod to intervene with an armed force, which he did.

Above is the oldest Dutch painting in existence. It show four generations of Roover leaders in knights armour being led by Saint George, the pataon saint of knights before Maria. I am entertaining a theory that these Rovers see themselves as Arganots, and may be the source of the name Huguenots, or Haguenots of Hague where King Floris built his castle.

With the discovery of the original spelling of the ROESMONT family, I conclude that the the fictional movie knight, Floris von Rosemondt, is based upon a member of the Roesmont family. Perhaps a producer saw the coat of arms for Roesmont in the hall of Zwanenbroedershuis.

http://herebedragons.weebly.com/family-tree.html

“Kinderen/Children ;1: Hilla Henricx {Roesmont van Rode} Roesmont
(*/+)M : Rudolph Godsclack Roesmont”

Today, August 7, 2007, I found the castle of the Rosemont/Rode
family. Through the mists of time, the Red Knight has come home.

Arnold graaf van had three sons, Ghijsbert van Rode, and Roelof
(Rover) van Rode, and Hendrick van Rode. There is a Horst castle that
was once called ‘castellum Rode’. This is the Rosemont family. Rode
means “red” Ghijsbert was a ridder, a knight. Here is a real Red
Knight that appear in Arthurian legends. This family has intermarried
for several generations, they passing down the same names.

Ghisburtus van Roesmont was a Dutch nobleman of some importance. His
mother was jonkvrouw Adriana Theodorici ROVER. the daughter of Dirk
Edmondszn ROOVER. The Roover family appears to descend from one of
the Radbot rulers of Holland who was given the name Roover, or Rover
due to conquest of the Netherlands. The Roover family would build
Montfoort castle one of the most prestigious castles in Holland.
These two families were keen on forming a marriage alliance as Arnold
Rover married Heilwigis Arnoldi Danielis ROESMONT. For this reason I
suspect the Roesmont Wolf names came from Roelof the Roover R +
Odilia van Montfoort. Perhaps the Roovers owned Wolfhouse where the
Roesmonts came to live in 1450. Ghisburtus was the master of Saint
Janskerk, and a member of Lieve-Vrouwe-broederschap that met in
Janskerk church. Hieronymus Bosch was a member of the Zwanenbroeders
(swan brothers) and was commissioned by the master of Janskerk to do
a stained-glass window for the church.

I am going to visit my daughter and grandson my family who appear out
of nowhere. I have taken on powerful people, and I have prevailed.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2007

Henric Godscalck {Rosemont} Roesmont, Gestorven/Died Voor/Before 9
SEP 1401 =>Codes==LWNr.839.074+AvdW.Ks.314.786==Zoon van / Son of :
Godscalck Roesmont & NN moeder -Huwt/Marr W : (Luytgart) – => Codes :
==LWNr.839.075+AvdW.Ks.314.787==
Kinderen/Children ;1: Hilla Henricx {Roesmont van Rode} Roesmont (*/+)
M : Rudolph Godsclack Roesmont

http://osdir.com/ml/culture.templar.history/2007-01/msg00008.html

Van Der Rode, Roover & Stakenburg
Van Der Rode, Roover & Stakenburg

Here is the Stakenburg geneology that shows the De Rode and Roover
family are related. The coat of Arms at the top is that of Willem de
Roover Van Statenburg. It depiects the mill-part with a swan denoting
Willem was a member of the Swan Brethren. This mill-part appears in
the coat of amrs of the Breugel, Cuijst, Brockhoven, Boest, Dinther,
and Wolfswinkle familes, the later owning Wolf House that also
belonged to the Rosemont family. At the bottom we see the De
Roode/Rode coat of arms.

The Roover family legend says they descend from Radbot/Radbart.
Radbart is also Robert.

Here is Horst Castle home to the Van Rode family.

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gedachtenistafel_van_de_heren_van_Montfoort

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_I_van_Montfoort

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hendrik_II_van_Montfoort

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zweder_I_van_Montfoort

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hendrik_I_van_Montfoort

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floris_V_van_Holland

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Montfoort

The Lords of Montfoort are depicted between the Holy Anna and Sint-Joris. From left to right are this Viscount John I de Roovere of Montfoorde, his former Uncle Roeloff de Roovere of Montfoorde, the brother of Viscounts Jan I and II Zweder Willem de Roovere of Nesse and Hendrik de Roovere of Montfoorde, the son of Roeloff. Henry is detained by Sint-Joris. This is symbolic of the fact that he was the only of the depicted persons survived the battle of Warns . The others fell by the wayside, like their captain Willem van Henegouwen. This died the male line of the House of Holland, which, like that of Montfoort stemmed from the genus of red. Under the performance state the following text:

int jaer vijfentveertich sante hondert on us heeren dusent three Saints cosmas and Damian dach do doot that remained in grave willem van heynegouwen of vriesen hollant from//Zeland and Lord of Mr jan van Vrieslant Montfoorde Mr Montfoorde Mr willem van Montfoorde with lots of roeloff hare stomachs friends and under//stakeholders. haer prays for all souls.

(In the year of the Lord 1345 Saints Cosmas and Damian on [26 september] found along with William of Hainaut, count of Holland and Zeeland, Lord of Friesland, the death against the Frisians Mr Jan of Montfoort, Lord Roelof van Montfoort, Mr Willem van Montfoort and many of their relatives, friends and staanden under their command. Prays for their all souls.)

Viscount of Montfoort

Period 1333-1345
Predecessor Hendrik II van Montfoort

Successor II Zweder van Montfoort

Father Zweder
Mother Catherine

Jan van Montfoort (second from left, first kneeling).
John I Zwederszoon (the robber) van Montfoort (ca. 1318- battle of Warns , september 26 1345) was the 4th Viscount Of Montfoort, Mr van heeswijk, achthoven, Wiliskop.
[Edit] Life Course

He was a son of I Zweder van Montfoort and Catharina van Holland. Jan followed in 1333 his brother Hendrik II van Montfoort , he functioned as a sort of regent on actually-Viscount because his brother had a three-year son. The appointment of Viscount could also come about by count William III of Holland. He contributed to the construction of Heulenstein Castle and followed like his brother through a Dutch politics to join the count of Holland. This brought him regularly in conflict with the Bishop of Utrecht. Jan Willem IV of Holland supported in the siege of Utrecht (1345) and then followed him to the Dutch army Friesland, where by a tactical blunder was defeated at Warns. Jan of Montfoort died with his uncle (Roeland the Rovere) and brother (Willem de Rovere) at his side during this battle. Jan was married to Maria Polanen, a daughter of Jan I van Polanen, their marriage remained childless. He was succeeded by his nephew Zweder II van Montfoort.

[Edit] Memorial table

John I is one of the four Lords of Montfoort that are pictured on the Memorial tablet of the Lords of Montfoort. The Lords of Montfoort are depicted between Maria and Sint-Joris. From left to right these are: Jan I van Montfoort, his great-uncle Roelof de Rover, his uncle or brother Willem de Rover and presumably Henry the Rover Willemsz. The first three were killed under William of Hainault. The latter is held by Sint-Joris. This is symbolic of the fact that he was the only of the depicted persons survived the battle of Warns .
Henry Zwederszoon the Rovere van Montfoort (13??- 15 October 1333) was the third Viscount of Montfoort and Mr van heeswijk, achthoven, Wiliskop, Blokland, Cats pants and Dijkgraaf of Lopikerwaard (1325/33). He would but two years Viscount, but during the reign of his father between 1323/27 he was also appointed by Viscount William III of Holland but not recognized by the bishopric of Utrecht.

[Edit] Life Course
He was a son of Zweder van Montfoort I and Catherine of Holland. The marriage with Agnes of IJsselstein was against the wishes of his parents, which he with help from his father-in-law Gijsbrecht van IJsselstein caught nam. He is, in fact, Viscount of Montfoort by the intervention of count William III of Holland (29 March 1323) and promises him and his descendants will serve on 14 april 1323 always and help. He eventually reconciles with his father and carries him again about the Board of Montfoort on 26 april 1327.

He is, after the death of his father, by the Bishop of Utrecht on 21 January 1331 mortgaged with the House Montfoort as a erfleen and with all of the good that his father the Bishop has held. Henry unexpectedly died at a young age, on 15 October 1333 makes Henry of Loenersloot, Dean of Sint Jans kapittel in Utrecht a charters with the Rover as witnesses Roelof van Montfoort, Jan of Montfoort, Willem van Montfoort and Arend van der Hurst; that his home and Lands be held in honor and about being act like the three-year Zweder van Montfoort II to reach maturity was responsible young man. Henry was opgevolgt as Viscount Jan of Montfoort by.
[Edit] Credentials

I Zweder van Montfoort
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Zweder I
1270-1331

Viscount of Montfoort

Period 1299-1331
Predecessor Hendrik I van Montfoort

Successor Hendrik II van Montfoort

Father Henry I
Mother Odila or Zwedersdochter
Zweder Hendriks son the Rovere (ca. 1270- 2 January 1331) was the second Duke of Montfoort Zweder van Montfoort, Viscount and Lord of Wiliskop, Blokland, heeswijk and achthoven.
[Edit] Life Course

He was a son of Henry I of Montfoort and Odila of Montfoort or Zwedersdochter of Bosichem. He succeeded his father around 1300 and had sitting in the ministerialiteit of the Bishop of Utrecht. Van Montfoort was part of the faction of the Council who belonged to the lichtenbergers. At some point against the Bishop came various Council men in revolt. On 4 July 1301 escalated the conflict in the battle High Woerd, where the Stichtse Bishop Willem berthout was killed. Van Montfoort belonged to the insurgents and joined to Dutch side.

He married on 21 april 1301 with Catherine of Holland, a bastard daughter of Floris V, count of Holland. By this marriage the couple got 100 pounds of money annually to John II of Avesnes (because of the family relationship with the counts of Holland)[1] and in 1306 William III of Holland gave them a piece of land near schoonhoven. Around 1310 got Van Montfoort estates near Linschoten, but in 1320 he had to cede them back to William III of Holland. There followed a long-running conflict, which by his brother Van Montfoort in Montfoort Roeland the Rovere was besieged.

After the conflict was terminated followed in the following: 1322 Van Montfoort was not behind the marriage of his son Hendrik II van Montfoort with Agnes of IJsselstein, daughter of Gijsbrecht van IJsselstein, therefore no income and gave him more. Henry II knew with help from his father-in-law to take the castle of Montfoort and took his father caught. Count William III of Holland solved the problem in 1323 on by everyone in his rights to recover and by certain privileges to enter. In 1329 Treaty signed Van Montfoort still to the construction of a dike at the Lek; This is the last time that there was something learned from him in writing.
[Edit] Children
• Hendrik II van Montfoort (-1332) third Viscount of Montfoort
• Jan I van Montfoort (-1345) fourth Viscount of Montfoort
• Adilise van Montfoort (-1325) was married to Jan van rozenburg
• Willem van Montfoort (-1345) Lord of Nesse

Van Montfoort
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The mill irons to the sides of the castle towers (in arms) are submitted by the genus and so the robber in the coat of arms of the city of Montfoort processed.
Van Montfoort was a medieval noble who had possession of genus Montfoort and over the years several delicacies and crafts were in their possession, such as The scary, Abbenbroek, Blokland, hekendorp, heeswijk, cats pants, Linschoten, long Linschoter hair, Linschoten, Purmerend, Purmerland and Ilpendam, Rateles, Velgersdijk, Vlooswijk, Reyerscop, Snelrewaard, Willeskoop, IJsselvere, and Waarder Wulverhorst.
Montfoort was probably built between 1156 and 1178 if strength or the castle of the County of Holland against expansionism. The Bishop of Utrecht, Godfried van Rhenen named when a person from his ministriaal or a vassal to kastelein of the strength to ensure that the security in the South of the Sticht Utrecht remained guaranteed. In a century kasteleinen, the last time there were four generations was Willem who had a daughter named Odila. She married Henry de Rover, submitted by a genus of Flanders. This generation knew more fame to amass and brought ten Viscounts on the genus, De Merode took over in 1545.
Content
[hide]
• 1 Brief history
• 2 Rulers of Montfoort
• 3 See also
• 4 Credentials

[Edit] Brief history

Tribe weapon the Rover-van Montfoort
From 1260, it was clear that the genus the Rover had done their onset, they followed a politics that all sides could not shy away from arguments and even family went. So was a loyal ally to the Zweder I Bishop of Utrecht, while his brother Roeland at the count of Holland in the favor was cases and dispute each other to the estate of Linschoten (1320). Zweder’s successor Henry II hung back to the politics of Holland, precisely what the peace with the neighbouring Linschoten, the ratio was only the beklonk again with Archdiocese of Utrecht less. The family was distinguished at the battle of Warns unforgettable in 1345, where three quarters of the members present at the Head Of Montfoorts was killed with Jan I van Montfoort. They were immortalized on a painting that now known as oldest in Netherlands .
The Van Montfoorts were frantic corners in the hook and cod wars. Jan II was a faithful vassal of Jacoba of Bavaria who supported her when she the establishment triangle Gouda-Oudewater-schoonhoven had ingested but couldn’t prevent the siege of Gouda in 1428 was not dismayed. End of 15th century was actually a mini-state with its own policy Montfoort, it was the only city in the low countries who supported the Jonker and Fransoorlog for each other even got to take in the name of Woerden in Frans van Brederode, Jan III van Montfoort loved there even in the Castle of Woerden his seat for some time.

In 1672 the French blew up just before their departure from the medieval castle Montfoort. it was rumored that also the last Lord, Maximilian is located in the building. After this event the genus died out and Montfoort henceforth heard to the Union of Utrecht.
[Edit] Rulers of Montfoort
kasteleinen
• Everard van Montfoort (killed at the battle of Ane in 1227)
• Willem van Montfoort (d. 1244)
• Wouter Willemszn van Montfoort (d. 1265)
• Willem Wouterszn van Montfoort (d. ca. 1279)
The Rover
• Hendrik I van Montfoort (Hendrik de Rover) (appointed in 1280/81-d. 9 January 1299)

Memorial tablet of the Lords of Montfoort,
the oldest preserved painting that was manufactured in the current Netherlands (ca. 1400)
• I Zweder van Montfoort (d. between 28 may 1329-2 January 1331)
• Hendrik II van Montfoort (d. 1333)
• Jan I van Montfoort (d. 1345)
• II Zweder van Montfoort (d. 15 August 1375)
• Hendrik III van Montfoort (ca. 1350-28 June 1402)
• Jan II van Montfoort (1382-16 June 1448)
• Henry IV of Montfoort (1414-1459)
• Jan III van Montfoort or Johan van Montfoort (1448-28 March 1522)
• Joost van Montfoort ( – 1538)
• Hendrik V van Montfoort (1515-1545)
• Jan IV van Montfoort, died in 1580 the inherited by his sister glory Montfoort , after which it is in the genus De Merode.
De Merode
• Philippa the Rovere viscountess van Montfoort (1535-1592) was the daughter of Joost/Josse de Rovere Viscount van Montfoort (1510-1535) (son of Jan III van Montfoort) and Anna de Lalaing (1509-1602)
• Johan van Merode Briffeul Lord of Morialmé, Ham-Sur-Heure Nalinnes, Rocquignies, Mergame and Sauthour, and Lord of Houffalize (1530-1592), married Philippa de Rovere viscountess of Montfoort
• Anna de Merode-Montfoort (1570-1625) Lady of Houffalize and Montfoort was the daughter of Johan van Merode Briffeul Lord of Morialmé, Ham-Sur-Heure Nalinnes, Rocquignies, Mergame and Sauthour, and Lord of Houffalize (died 1590) and Philippa the Rovere viscountess of Montfoort.
• Philip I of Merode-pietersheim Lord of pietersheim and Westerlo (1568-1627), husband of Anna de Merode-Montfoort
• Floris de Merode (1598-1638), married on 16 december 1624 to Steyn with Anna Maria Sidonia van Bronckhorst-batenburg-Steyn. He was the son of Philip I of Merode-westerloo-Montfoort pietersheim and Ana.

Anthonie van Montfoort
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Anthonie van Montfoort

Anthonie van Montfoort
Born 1533 or 1534
Montfoort

Died 1583
Utrecht

Nationality Dutch

Field Painting

Movement Mannerism

Anthonie Blocklandt van Montfoort, Anthonie van Blocklandt or Anthonie van Montfoort (Montfoort, 1533 or 1534 – Utrecht, 1583) was a Dutch painter
[edit] Life

“Joseph interpreting Pharaoh’s dream” by Anthonie van Montfoort (Centraal Museum)
His father was a mayor of Montfoort. He went to learn under Hendrick Sweersz. in Delft and Frans Floris in Antwerp. In 1552 he returned to Montfoort, where he married the daughter of the then mayor.
Blocklandt then settled in Delft, where he produced paintings for the Oude Kerk and the Nieuwe Kerk, later lost to the beeldenstorm. Also he painted a work for the Janskerk (Gouda) called De onthoofding van Saint-Jacob, now in the museum there.
In 1572, Blocklandt made a trip to Italy, after which he settled for good in Utrecht, joining a guild there in 1577. In 1579, he painted his best known work, the triptych The Assumption of Mary that is now in the Basilica of St. Martin in Bingen am Rhein.
According to Carel van Mander, Blocklandt painted biblical scenes, mythological subjects and portraits. He is early-Mannerist in style and he and Joos de Beer (another pupil of Floris) were responsible for the Mannerist style begun by Utrecht artists around 1590. Van Mander wrote that De Beer had many paintings by Blocklandt in his workshop that his pupil Abraham Bloemaert later copied.[1] Few works can definitely be attributed to him. One of these is “Joseph interpreting Pharaoh’s dream”, now in the Centraal Museum in Utrecht.
He was also the teacher of the Delft portrait painter Michiel Jansz van Mierevelt.
Frans Floris, or more correctly Frans de Vriendt, called Floris (1517 – 1 October 1570) was a Flemish painter. He was a member of a large family trained to the study of art in Flanders.
Contents
[hide]
• 1 Biography
• 2 Works
• 3 Legacy
• 4 References
• 5 External links

[edit] Biography

Young boy, 1553
Most of what we know of his youth is handed down from Karel van Mander’s biography of him, which was at ten pages long, one of the most detailed biographies in his Schilder-boeck. Frans was the son of the stonecutter Cornelis I de Vriendt (died 1538), whose family name was Floris, but who was so friendly that he took on the name Vriendt, or Friend, and this became the last name of his gifted stone-cutting son, Cornelis Floris de Vriendt (1514–1575). Frans had two other brothers who were excellent artists; Jacques Floris, a glass painter, and Jan Floris, a famous porcelain baker who entered the service of Philip II of Spain. Jan traveled to Spain to conduct his art there and died young, but according to Van Mander, Frans had many examples of his work in his workshop that delighted his disciples. Like his brothers, Frans began as a student of sculpture, but later gave up carving for painting. At the age of twenty he went to Liege and took lessons from Lambert Lombard, who highly encouraged studying in Italy.
Floris traveled to Rome and quickly became enamored with the painting (particularly Michelangelo) he found in Rome. He made many sketches in red chalk that his disciples eagerly etched. Upon his return home, he opened a workshop on the Italian model and enjoyed such a grand success that it went to his head and he took to drinking. According to Van Mander, Dirk Volkertsz Coornhert sent him a letter in which he claimed Albrecht Dürer felt that Floris had more thought for his art than for his own life. Apparently Coornhert was not the only one concerned, but Floris’ wife Clara was also worried about him, and it was at this point in his career that his brother Cornelis built a palace for him in Antwerp with a facade of blue limestone (Orduyn-steen) and with luxurious decorations such as gilded leather wall-coverings in the bedroom. It was hoped that with his own palace with a workshop he would become a better manager and housefather, but according to Van Mander, the contrary happened, and his yearly income slid from an almost incredible 1000 guilders per year (a fortune in those days) to nothing but debts in his old age. It must have been fun for the pupils and other workers in his workshop however, because it was said that he could even drink a Franckfoorder under the table. His pupils loved him, and when his old teacher Lambert Lombard came to visit and claimed he was nothing but an idea thief, Frans’s pupils nearly lynched him, and he was saved by Frans himself, who just laughed it off.[1] Van Mander even goes on to state that he nearly always had a large commission in the workshop that he would work on late at night, and the pupils who stayed latest would undress him (taking off his shoes and stockings) and put him to bed before they left. Van Mander claims that according to Frans Menton, Floris was loved by his pupils for allowing them more freedom than other Antwerp masters, and a list of 120 of his disciples was put together by a small group of them who met for a reunion after his death.[2]
[edit] Works
Van Mander includes a list of leading Antwerp church altars as coming from his workshop, but according to his story, these were then not only by Floris himself, but created from a team of changing pupils under his guidance. Floris painted a series of large pictures for the country houses of Spanish nobles and the villas of Antwerp patricians. He is known to have illustrated the fable of Hercules in ten compositions, and the liberal arts in seven for Nicolaas Jongelinck, a merchant of Antwerp, and adorned the duke of Arschot’s palace of Beaumont with fourteen colossal panels.
Comparatively few of his works have descended to us, possibly because many were destroyed in the iconoclastic uprisings in Antwerp of the second half of the sixteenth century, and partly because this era in Flemish painting has fallen out of favor in art circles. The earliest extant canvas by Floris is the Mars and Venus ensnared by Vulcan in the Berlin Museum (1547). There are other works at Aalst, Antwerp, Copenhagen, Dresden, Florence, Zoutleeuw, Madrid, St Petersburg, Châlons-en-Champagne and Vienna.
The boldness and force Floris’ works possess reflect the monumental style of their Italian models. Their technical execution reveals a rapid hand, bright coloring, and a mastery of anatomy not always evident in Netherlandish art of the time. Floris owed much of his repute to the cleverness with which his works were transferred to copper by Jerome Cock, Cornelis Cort, and Theodor Galle.
[edit] Legacy
Van Mander lists more than 20 disciples, but also claimed that according to Frans Menton, Frans Floris was loved by his pupils for allowing them more freedom than other Antwerp masters, and a list of 120 disciples were counted in total by a small group of them who got together for a reunion after he died. Whilst Floris was engaged on a Crucifixion of 9.7 m, and a Resurrection of equal size, for the grand prior of Spain, he was seized with illness, and died on 1 October 1570 at Antwerp. His paintings for the grand prior were finished by Frans Pourbus the Elder and Crispin van den Broeck[1] He had a motto; Als ick werck, dan leef ick: als ick spelen gae, dan sterf ick.[1] This means “When I work, I live: when I play, I die.” Poems were written about him by Dominicus Lampsonius and the poet-painter Lucas de Heere, who according to Van Mander, was his disciple.[1]
According to the RKD, his pupils were Joos de Beer (later teacher of Abraham Bloemaert), George Boba, Hendrick van den Broeck, Marten van Cleve, Ambrosius Francken, Frans Francken I, Frans Menton (known for schutterstukken in Alkmaar), and Isaac Claesz van Swanenburg.[3] Van Mander’s list was Crispin van den Broeck, Joris van Ghent (who served Philip II of Spain), Marten (and his brother Hendrick) van Cleve, Lucas de Heere, Anthonie Blocklandt van Montfoort, Thomas van Zirickzee, Simon van Amsterdam, Isaac Claesz van Swanenburg (spelled Isaack Claessen Cloeck), Frans Menton, George Boba, the 3 Francken brothers Jeroen, Frans and Ambrosius, Joos de Beer, Hans de Maier van Herentals, Apert Francen van Delft, Lois van Brussel, Thomas van Coelen, Hans Daelmans van Antwerpen, Evert van Amersfoort, Herman van der Mast, Damiaen van der Goude, Jeroen van Vissenaken, Steven Croonenborgh uyt den Hage, and Dirck Verlaen van Haerlem.[1]

Dutch and Flemish Renaissance painting represents the 16th century response to Italian Renaissance art in the Low Countries. These artists, who span from the Antwerp Mannerists and Hieronymus Bosch at the start of the century to the late Northern Mannerists such as Hendrik Goltzius and Joachim Wtewael at the end, drew on both the recent innovations of Italian painting and the local traditions of the Early Netherlandish artists. Antwerp was the most important artistic centre in the region. Many artists worked for European courts, including Bosch, whose fantastic painted images left a long legacy. Jan Mabuse, Maarten van Heemskerck and Frans Floris were all instrumental in adopting Italian models and incorporating them into their own artistic language. Dutch and Flemish painters were also instrumental in establishing new subjects such as landscape painting and genre painting. Joachim Patinir, for example, played an important role in developing landscape, while Pieter Bruegel the Elder and Pieter Aertsen helped popularise genre painting.

The Fall of Icarus, now considered a copy of Pieter Bruegel the Elder

Hell, the right panel from the triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights by Hieronymus Bosch

Cornelis Aerentsz van der Dussen by Jan van Scorel (c.1535) Panel, Weiss Gallery, London
Contents
[hide]
• 1 Stylistic evolution
• 2 Painters
• 3 See also
• 4 References

[edit] Stylistic evolution
Italian Renaissance influences begin to show on Early Netherlandish painting around 1500, but in many ways the older style was remarkably persistent. Antwerp Mannerism is a term for painters showing some Italian influence, but mainly continuing the style and subjects of the older masters. Hieronymus Bosch is a highly individual artist, whose work is strange and full of seemingly irrational imagery, making it difficult to interpret.[1] Most of all it seems surprisingly modern, introducing a world of dreams that seems more related to Gothic art than the Italian Renaissance, although some Venetian prints of the same period show a comparable degree of fantasy. The Romanists were the next phase of influence, adopting Italian styles in a far more thorough way.
After 1550 the Flemish and Dutch painters begin to show more interest in nature and beauty “in itself”, leading to a style that incorporates Renaissance elements, but remains far from the elegant lightness of Italian Renaissance art,[2] and directly leads to the themes of the great Flemish and Dutch Baroque painters: landscapes, still lifes and genre painting – scenes from everyday life.[1]

Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (October 28,[1] 1466? – July 12, 1536), known as Erasmus of Rotterdam, was a Dutch Renaissance humanist, Catholic priest, social critic, teacher, and theologian.

Erasmus was a classical scholar who wrote in a pure Latin style. He was an early proponent of religious toleration, and enjoyed the sobriquet “Prince of the Humanists”; he has been called “the crowning glory of the Christian humanists.”[2] Using humanist techniques for working on texts, he prepared important new Latin and Greek editions of the New Testament. These raised questions that would be influential in the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation. He also wrote The Praise of Folly, Handbook of a Christian Knight, On Civility in Children, Copia: Foundations of the Abundant Style, Julius Exclusus, and many other works.

“Today, August 7, 2007, I found the castle of the Rosemont/Rode family. Through they mists of time, the Red Knight has come home.Arnold graaf van had three sons, Ghijsbert van Rode, and Roelof (Rover) van Rode, and Hendrick van Rode. There is a Horst castle that was once called ‘castellum Rode’. This is the Rosemont family. Rode means “red” Ghijsbert was a ridder, a knight. Here is a real Red Knight that appear in Arthurian legends. This family has intermarried for several generations, they passing down the same names..Ghisburtus van Roesmont was a Dutch nobleman of some importance. His mother was jonkvrouw Adriana Theodorici ROVER. the daughter of Dirk Edmondszn ROOVER. The Roover family appears to descend from one of the Radbot rulers of Holland who was given the name Roover, or Rover due to conquest of the Netherlands. The Roover family would build Montroort castle one of the most prestigious castles in Holland. These two families were keen on forming a marriage alliance as Arnold Rover married Heilwigis Arnoldi Danielis ROESMONT. For this reason I suspect the Roesmont Wolf names came from Roelof the Roover R + Odilia van Montfoort. Perhaps the Roovers owned Wolfhouse where the Roesmonts came to live in 1450. Ghisburtus was the master of Saint Janskerk, and a member of Lieve-Vrouwe-broederschap that met in Janskerk church. Hieronymus Bosch was a member of the Zwanenbroeders (swan brothers) and was commissioned by the master of Janskerk to do a stained-glass window for the church. Ida of Boulogne was the sister of Godfrey de Boulogne. She married Herman of Malsen van Cuijk/Cuyck. Their daughter, Heilwig, married Arnold van Rode, thus the niece of Godfrey Bouillon was a van Rode/Roesmont. Ida’s mother was Ida of Lorraine. The name Ida may have come from Saint Oda a Scotish Princess who came to Holland. The Rode family appear to have taken their name from the town and church they built for this princess, Saint Odenrode. Rode means clearing in a forest. An elevated place within this glade would be a mound, thus the name, Rodemound.“huwelijk (van Rode-van Cuijk):”Godfrey de Bouillon was titled ‘Duke of Lorraine’. The Dukes of Lorraine descend from Ragnar the Viking and are close kin to the Dukes of Brabant, if not the same family, thus the crossbeams in the Cross of Lorraine?There are about a dozen Ida or Oda names that may have been taken from Saint Oda of Scotland. Robert de Bruce descends from Ida of Louvain. Maud of Louvain married Count Eustace of Bouillon, and thus is the great grandmother of Heilwig Roesmont.whose Roesmont descendant may have carried on her name and that of her husband, Arnold van Rode.”
I suspect Saint Oda may have originally been a Queen of the Frisians who born a liniage of Roses, and the Lords of Rode. That Godfrey’s sister, Ida, is disappeared from most geneaologies, along with his niece Heilwig van Rode, tells me there is a REAL ROSE LINE that could have been revelead by the Swan Knight

1. Voorouders uit Roermond?

Godschalk Rosemondtstraat

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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