Big Feet In The Big Trees

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I got the BIG STORY! Betsey Johnson’s people came from Minnesota after they cut down all the trees. The BIGGER they are, the harder they fall.

I titled Betsey, Aunt Gooby. Did she ever meet Phil Knight who is famous for making BIG SHOEES for BIG basketball players? Betsey’s folks had to know Frank Buck and the owners of Booth-Kelly. What if Betsey and Phil had won? What would become of Oregon? I started the Biggest Poltical Story of all times, titled…..The Wendlings.

John Presco

Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company[edit]

The Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company was founded in 1901. The founding partners were Michael J. Scanlon, Anson S. Brooks, Dwight F. Brooks, Lester R. Brooks, and Henry E. Gibson. The newly formed company had its headquarters in MinneapolisMinnesota with a large milling facility near Cloquet, Minnesota.[1][2]

Beginning in 1906, Brook-Scanlon started buying timber land in Florida. Two years later, the company began buying timber land in British Columbia as well.[3][4][5] When standing timber in Minnesota became hard to find, the Cloquet mill was closed and the milling equipment was shipped west to a new mill site in British Columbia.[1][6][7][8] In 1911, the company began looking at timber resources in central Oregon.[9]

In 1915, the company purchased 250,000 acres (1,000 km2) of timber land in central Oregon. The following year, Brooks-Scanlon opened a sawmill on the east bank of the Deschutes River on the outskirts of Bend. Within a year of opening, the Brooks-Scanlon sawmill was one of the two largest producers of pine lumber in the world.[10][11][12] Over the following decades, Brooks-Scanlon bought additional tracts of central Oregon timber land from other forest land owners.[13][14]

← The Wendlings

New Wendlings – A Green Newspaper →

Big Bucks in ‘The Big Trees’

Posted on July 10, 2021 by Royal Rosamond Press

The Wendlings

by

John Presco

Royal Rosamond had Dashiell Hammet, and Lilian Hellman onboard. Plans were being made to bring the Wendlings to Marin. After the two big oil spills by Frank Buck’s oil tankers, one in the bay itself, thousands of poor people in Oakland and San Francisco, were up in arms. The Wobleys were going to supply some old trucks and automobiles. In inconspicuous caravans, they headed north. The children of Wendling knew something was up. The frowns their parents wore, was waning, and they caught radiant smiles aimed at them. Their loving parents could look them in the eye again.

I am the grandson of Frank Wesley Rosamond who adopted the pen name ‘Royal’. With the ex-president’s plan to take back the White House in seven days, I have decided to reveal the oppressed history of The Wendlings. Not only must we stop the Second Insurrection, but, we must launch a Revolution to Save Planet Earth!

http://www.trainweb.org/highdesertrails/bslco.html

— are an attempt to make sure Democratic candidate Tina Kotek does not win the statehouse, where a Democrat has held power since 1987.

“[I’m an] anti-Tina person,” he said, according to the Times.

The 84-year-old sneaker mogul switched his allegiance to Drazan because Johnson was lagging in recent polls, Knight told the outlet.

Knight’s infusion of cash has helped even the race. Kotek went from being the frontrunner to the Nov. 6 contest being declared a tossup, with Drazan pulling even or ahead in some polls.

Republican nominee Christine Drazan, left, Democratic nominee Tina Kotek, center, listen to unaffiliated candidate Betsy Johnson speak during the gubernatorial debate.
The candidates — Drazan, Kotek and Johnson — at a July 29 debate.

But Knight’s support of Drazan could get Nike into hot water because of the Republican’s pro-life views in the wake of the Supreme Court’s striking down Roe v. Wade. Nike has vowed to cover the abortion expenses of its employees who live in states with restrictive abortion laws.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nike_sweatshops

Protests against Nike[edit]

In 2005, protesters at over 40 universities demanded that their institutions endorse companies who use “sweat-free” labor. Many anti-sweatshop groups were student-led, such as the United Students Against Sweatshops. At Brown University, Nike went so far as to pull out from a contract with the women’s ice hockey team because of efforts by a student activist group that wanted a code of conduct put in place by the company.[10]

Since March 2021, a coalition of over 200 unions and labour rights organizations called upon brands to negotiate directly with unions in the sector on an enforceable agreement on wage assurance, severance, and basic labour rights to fill the pandemic-era wage gap, ensure workers who are terminated receive their full severance, support stronger social protections for all workers, and to ensure basic labour rights are respected. Nike has participated into this right

Big Bucks in ‘The Big Trees’

Posted on June 9, 2021 by Royal Rosamond Press

Brooks Resources

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Brooks Resources logo
TypePublic
IndustryReal estate development
PredecessorBrooks-Scanlon Lumber Company
Founded1969; independent corporation 1979
HeadquartersBend, Oregon, US
Key peopleMike Hollern, board chairman
Websitewww.brooksresources.com

Brooks Resources is a real estate development company with significant land holdings in Central OregonUnited States. The company was formed in 1969 as a subsidiary of Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company. It became an independent corporation in 1979. Brooks Resources develops residential neighborhoods, vacation rental properties, commercial complexes, and mixed-use communities. The company headquarters is located in Bend, Oregon.

Contents

Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company[edit]

The Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company was founded in 1901. The founding partners were Michael J. Scanlon, Anson S. Brooks, Dwight F. Brooks, Lester R. Brooks, and Henry E. Gibson. The newly formed company had its headquarters in MinneapolisMinnesota with a large milling facility near Cloquet, Minnesota.[1][2]

Beginning in 1906, Brook-Scanlon started buying timber land in Florida. Two years later, the company began buying timber land in British Columbia as well.[3][4][5] When standing timber in Minnesota became hard to find, the Cloquet mill was closed and the milling equipment was shipped west to a new mill site in British Columbia.[1][6][7][8] In 1911, the company began looking at timber resources in central Oregon.[9]

In 1915, the company purchased 250,000 acres (1,000 km2) of timber land in central Oregon. The following year, Brooks-Scanlon opened a sawmill on the east bank of the Deschutes River on the outskirts of Bend. Within a year of opening, the Brooks-Scanlon sawmill was one of the two largest producers of pine lumber in the world.[10][11][12] Over the following decades, Brooks-Scanlon bought additional tracts of central Oregon timber land from other forest land owners.[13][14]

Real estate development[edit]

In 1969, Brooks-Scanlon created a subsidiary corporation called Brooks Resources. The new company was created to develop Brooks-Scanlon property for uses other than timber production. The first project undertaken by Brooks Resources was the development Black Butte Ranch, begun in 1970. Black Butte Ranch is located just off U. S. Route 20, west of Sisters, Oregon.[15][16] That project was followed by the Mount Bachelor Village resort in 1974. However, when the international oil crisis drove up fuel prices in the mid-1970s, recreational travel became very expensive. As a result, Brooks Resources offered everyone who had purchased property at Mount Bachelor Village the opportunity to cancel their purchase contracts. Every buyer but one took advantage of the cancellation offer. Once oil prices stabilized, property sales at Mount Bachelor Village picked up again and the project was completed as planned.[17][18]

View of Black Butte Ranch resort landscape

In 1979, Brooks Resources was officially separated from the Brooks-Scanlon company.[15][19][20] In the 1980s, Brooks Resources started two new projects, Shevlin Center begun in 1981 and their Awbrey Butte development that broke ground in 1984. Shevlin Center was a 205-acre (83 ha) office and light industry park located on the site of the old Shevlin-Hixon sawmill. Eventually, the Shevlin Center area included the Les Schwab Amphitheater and significant public space along the river.[10][21][22] In addition, Black Butte Ranch and Mount Bachelor Village remained profitable during that period. Nevertheless, Brooks Resources lost money on its operations. In 1982 alone, the company lost $8.7 million, reducing the company’s equity by approximately one third.[23] Significant losses continued into 1983.[24]

Eventually, the business recovered. Starting in the early 1990s, Brooks Resources’ equity began growing ten percent a year.[10] This was helped by projects like the Awbrey Glen golf community begun in 1993 and Shevlin RiverFront, a 1996 project. The Mount Bachelor Village conference center was built in 1999 and Century Washington Center was developed in 2000. Finally, the joint venture NorthWest Crossing mixed-use community was started in 1999 and began selling homes in 2002.

In 2004, the company moved its headquarters to a new location in downtown Bend.[10][21][25]

In 2006, Brooks Resources began developing a mix-use community called Yarrow on a 900 acres (360 ha) site near Madras, Oregon.[26] However, work on the Yarrow site was curtailed when a major economic recession hit central Oregon in 2008. Local real estate prices did not begin to recover until 2013. During this period, Brooks Resources remained the area’s largest real estate development company. Nevertheless, the company turned over Awbrey Butte common lands to an owners’ association in 2008 and sold its Awbrey Glen assets to home owners in that development the following year. Brooks Resources sold its Yarrow property to the Bean Foundation in 2015.

In 2018, the company sold its Mount Bachelor Village assets to the Oksenholt Companies.[17][21][27]

Business model[edit]

Brooks Resources has been a leading real estate developer in central Oregon for more than 50 years.[10][25][28] Today, the company develops mixed-use communities, resort rental properties, and residential neighborhoods throughout central Oregon. It also sells homesites and other properties through its Brooks Resources Realty offices. Beginning in 2017, the company began offering real estate development services for private clients.

In 2019, the company began looking for opportunities to develop smaller urban parcels as well as large-tract projects while still focusing its business in central Oregon.[21][25][29][30]

Brooks Resources maintains its headquarters in Bend, Oregon.[29][30] The company has a track record of working with local governments to effectively plan and control growth while meeting community housing and commercial development needs. The company is also known for its commitment to preserving the natural environment as part of its project designs. Its projects typically include natural areas, walking trails, parks, and other public spaces built into environmentally friendly neighborhoods and community-based retail centers.[12][25][28][31]

Philanthropy and awards[edit]

The Bend Foundation is a non-profit organization founded by the Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Company in 1947 to help injured loggers and sawmill workers. Today, Brooks Resources remains a major contributor to the Foundation which currently supports a wide range of community institutions and philanthropic programs throughout central Oregon. The Foundation funds scholarships, public artwork, and a wide variety of other community programs and environmental projects. Brooks Resources often joins forces with the Foundation to increase the impact of their gifts. For example, in 2017, the Bend Foundation gave Oregon State University – Cascades $500,000 for a new math, science, technology, and engineering building and Brooks Resources gave a separate $75,000 gift for the same purpose.[10][28][32][33]

BR donated land for the High Desert Museum

In 1982, Brooks Resources helped Donald M. Kerr establish the High Desert Museum, south of Bend. The company donated 135 acres (55 ha) of forest land along U.S. Route 97 as the location for the museum.[34] Over the years, Brooks Resources has continued to support the museum. In April 2019, Brooks Resources celebrated its 50th business anniversary at the museum. To celebrate, the company subsidized a community appreciation day with free admission for everyone visiting the museum.[10][15][33][34]

Today, Brooks Resources gives a minimum of 3 percent of its pre-tax profits to local charities designated by an employee-led committee. Among the local institutions that have benefited from this giving program are the High Desert Museum, Bethlehem Inn (a shelter for homeless families), the BendFilm Festival, Bend’s Art on Public Places project, the historic Tower Theatre, and Oregon State University – Cascades.[10][28][33] In addition, when Brooks Resources began developing its North Rim homes project, it contributed two percent of the homesite sales revenue to the Oregon Community Foundation to help improve the Deschutes River watershed. Over the course of the project, approximately $1 million was contributed to Foundation watershed projects.[35]

The Brooks companies have been working with the Bend community on park and recreation programs since the 1920s, when Brooks-Scanlon donated 1,000 acres (400 ha) to the City of Bend to establish Shevlin Park. More recent, Brooks Resources helped fund a riverway study along the Deschutes River corridor that identified 54 projects needed to complete the river trail network. The company has also donated a number of undeveloped properties to the Bend Park and Recreation District that are now Compass Park, Rim Rock Natural Area, Archie Briggs Canyon Natural Area, and Tree Farm (a 312-acre (126 ha) addition to Shevlin Park).[citation needed]

As of 2019, the company was working with the park district to expand Discovery Park in the NorthWest Crossing neighborhood.[31][36][37] In addition, Brooks Resources worked with the City of Bend to improve its traffic roundabouts, providing company resources to landscape and add public artwork to 20 city roundabouts.[38]

As a result of the long-term partnership between Brooks Resources and the Bend Park and Recreation District, the Oregon Recreation and Parks Association recognized Brooks Resources with its 2017 Private Sector Partner Award. The partner award honors an Oregon-based corporation or non-profit organization that has made a significant contribution to community parks and recreation programs.[31]

Nike founder Phil Knight donates millions in bid to keep Democrat from winning Oregon gov race

By 

Lisa Fickenscher

October 17, 2022 4:14pm 

 Updated

Today’s Video Headlines: 11/18/22

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Nike co-founder Phil Knight has thrown his largess behind the Republican candidate in Oregon’s race for governor because he’s fed up with his state’s left-leaning policies, the reticent billionaire said.

In a rare interview, the richest resident in the liberal Pacific Northwest bastion panned Oregon’s lenient drug laws — which decriminalized the possession for personal use of small amounts of all drugs, including cocaine, heroin, LSD — and its misguided priorities such as the 2019 ban on plastic straws.

“One of the political cartoons after our legislative session had a person snorting cocaine out of a mountain of white,” Knight told The New York Times over the weekend. “It said, ‘Which of these is illegal in Oregon?’ And the answer was the plastic straw.”

With current Democratic Oregon Gov. Kate Brown unable to run because of term limits, Knight has donated $1 million to Republican candidate Christine Drazan this month. He had also given $3.75 million to Independent candidate Betsy Johnson.

Knight’s donations — which represent the single largest financial support for both Johnson and Drazan — are an attempt to make sure Democratic candidate Tina Kotek does not win the statehouse, where a Democrat has held power since 1987.

“[I’m an] anti-Tina person,” he said, according to the Times.

The 84-year-old sneaker mogul switched his allegiance to Drazan because Johnson was lagging in recent polls, Knight told the outlet.

Knight’s infusion of cash has helped even the race. Kotek went from being the frontrunner to the Nov. 6 contest being declared a tossup, with Drazan pulling even or ahead in some polls.

Republican nominee Christine Drazan, left, Democratic nominee Tina Kotek, center, listen to unaffiliated candidate Betsy Johnson speak during the gubernatorial debate.
The candidates — Drazan, Kotek and Johnson — at a July 29 debate.

But Knight’s support of Drazan could get Nike into hot water because of the Republican’s pro-life views in the wake of the Supreme Court’s striking down Roe v. Wade. Nike has vowed to cover the abortion expenses of its employees who live in states with restrictive abortion laws.

Drazan has said the state’s initiative to support women who travel to Oregon for abortions is “outside the mainstream.”

Knight is chairman Emeritus of Nike’s board and he attends its meetings as a non-voting observer, according to the company’s website. 

Phil Knight wearing all black.
Knight said he is “more conservative than Nike.”

“Nike has good leadership. They make choices, whatever they want, but I think I’m more conservative than Nike,” he told the Times when asked about the company’s policy in aiding employees seeking an abortion. 148

What do you think? Post a comment.

It’s not the first time, Knight has backed a Republican in his state. In 2018, the billionaire Knight donated $2.5 million to the campaign of Oregon Republican gubernatorial candidate Knute Buehler in his bid to unseat Brown. Buehler ended up losing 50.0% to 43.9%.

Knight also gave $1 million to the Republican Governors’ Association, which supported Buehler’s campaign.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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