Helen of California

Alas, I arrive, at the great travesty. What became of the sculptures that once graced the outside of the Richfield Oil Company? They were done by Haig Patigian who served two terms as president of the Bohemian Club. He did a bust titled ‘Helen of California’. Consider Rena Easton. It was his spirit that has been calling me for thirty years. I have seen Helen at the Oakland Museum. How ironic, that David Hamsher is a partner of Paul Hastings, who works in the building that replaced the Richfield building, that was a work of art, a masterpiece!

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/02/21/the-art-decco-tower-of-richfield/

How odd that David Hamsher is tied to the name ‘California Barrel Company’ that was owned by Frederick Koster, a member of the Bohemian Club. How amazing that I – half in jest – suggest there has been a transference of power – over to me – by some ritual the Bohemian Club performed. Now, I believe it is – real!

https://rosamondpress.com/2017/07/26/the-tower-of-helen-rosamonde/

I can not understand how members of the Bohemian Club allowed their Beautiful Monument to be torn down! Did they rescue the façade? Is the Greek façade on the site of the Potreo Power Plant, all that remains of Haig’s work? Was there a hostile takeover of the Bohemian Club, and, in someway, Hastings is involved? Meg Whitman is at the epicenter of the greatest Art Story ever told. I suspect she is innocent of a vast conspiracy that has sucked her, and other creative people, in! I can make the case I am the rightful president of the Bohemian Club. So be it!

I just found out the fate of Haig’s armored angels. They were sold! There is talk about a Book of Business at Hastings. If Meg and Quibi are in line with Hastings, the Movie and Book Libraries are in peril. They don’t care about Art and Literature. They are a Closed Family of the very rich people who showoff for each other. Trump and his Towers are a part of their Family Busness Book. How about – Putin?

“Heroic in size, impressive in conception, are the sculptural figures designed by Haig Patigian which crown the main walls with a fairly regal procession of silhouetted torsos.

I now believe they got to Rena and made her afraid. Can there be any doubt I am a Seer, born of the lineage of Casandra?

Launch the Ghost Fleet!

I believe my autobiography ‘Capturing Beauty’ is done, and, the proof I am a seer, is in this post. Now what?

I have talked to two people in charge of preserving SF history. Does this include the history of businesses? The names of historic companies should be treated with dignity and respect. Meg Whitman has Quibi locked up tight in a mountain of legal protection, just incase a pirate comes along and kidnaps her baby. She is now a part of the Haig Story.

https://sfplanning.org/preservation

John Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

Copyright 2019

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/09/11/john-dee-sea-lord-of-the-ghost-fleet/

Helen of Britania

renaa6

 

Haig Patigian (Armenian: Հայկ Բադիկեան; January 22, 1876 – September 19, 1950), was an Armenian-American sculptor

Biography[edit]

Patigian was born in the city of Van in the Ottoman Empire. His parents were teachers at the American Mission School in Armenia. He was largely self-taught as a sculptor.Patigian spent most of his career in San Francisco, California and most of his works are located in California. The Oakland Museum in Oakland, California, includes a large number of his works in its collection, and more can be seen in and around San Francisco City Hall.

Patigian was an active member of the Bohemian Club, serving two terms as club president. He designed the Owl Shrine, a 40-foot high hollow concrete and steel structure which was built in the 1920s to have the appearance of a natural rock outcropping which happened to resemble an owl.[1] The Owl Shrine became the centerpiece of the Cremation of Care ceremony at the Bohemian Grove in 1929.[2]

This work resided in the Capitol Building in Washington D.C. as one of California’s contributions to the National Statuary Hall Collection until being replaced by a statue of Ronald Reagan in 2009.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_Lincoln_(Patigian)

https://www.geni.com/people/Haig-Patigian/6000000021423493535

https://www.crockerart.org/oculus/weve-just-acquired-a-rare-patigian-sculpture

Patigian married Blanche Hollister of Courtland, California, in 1908.[3]

From the Archives: Richfield Building sculptures in wrecking yard

From the Archives: Richfield Building sculptures in wrecking yard
April 9, 1969: Some of the 40 figures that were removed from the Richfield Building lie at the Cleveland Wrecking Yard on East Washington Boulevard. (John Malmin / Los Angeles Times)

In 1969, the Richfield Building – also known as the Richfield Tower – was demolished. The building’s terra cotta angels were saved and put up for sale.

This photo by staff photographer John Malmin appeared in the April 10, 1969, Los Angeles Times. In an accompanying story, staff writer Dave Felton reported:

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For 40 years they stood guard over the black-gold fortress at Flower and 6th Sts. that was the Richfield Building.

From 15 floors they watched Los Angeles around them grow from simple order to smoggy complexity. They saw the gaudiness of their own building turn to art.

Now they lie strewn about a Cleveland Wrecking Co. yard like a defeated army.

Soldiers? Is that what these mysterious creatures were supposed to be? Soldiers with golden wings?

Maybe angels. But angels with Roman helmets and breastplates?

“I don’t know what the heck they’re called,” an employee at Cleveland Wrecking said Wednesday while poring over invoices.

“I know we’re selling ’em for a hundred bucks each. It cost us that to tear ’em down.”

He said they were hauled into the yard at 3170 E. Washington Blvd. about a month ago. There are 40 of them.

Workmen arranged them in several rows, some sitting straight up like a Harvard crew, some lying on their backs. A few have fallen forward, their gold-colored Roman noses buried in asphalt.

Other than being ripped from the building at waist level, the figures suffered few casualties – a broken nose here, a clipped wing there. Two were decapitated.

After 40 years in sun and rain their brilliant gold glaze remains only in recesses, their eye sockets, their navels, the insides of their wings.

During all that time they faced only one real test as guardians of the Richfield Building. And they blew it.

The Cleveland Wreckers picked them off easily, one by one. “It took about two weeks,” said Dick Laws, superintendent of the job. “We put a choke around the neck and one around the waist and just cut away the concrete.

“I’ll say this, they came down a lot harder than they went up.”

Laws didn’t know what the figures were supposed to be called. “They usually call those things gargoyles, don’t they? At least they served that purpose,” he said.

Neither did Mickey Parr, a public relations man at Atlantic Richfield.

I guess nobody around here has ever bothered to ask,” he explained. However, he dug out a 1930 copy of Arts and Architecture and read the following caption:

“Heroic in size, impressive in conception, are the sculptural figures designed by Haig Patigian which crown the main walls with a fairly regal procession of silhouetted torsos.

“This figure is a highly conventionalized suggestion of motive power.”

“I don’t know what it means either,” said Parr.

“Perhaps the oil executives of the day considered them merely expansive hood ornaments.”

A few of the guards have survived. In 2010, staff writer Bob Pool reported on one of the guards: Watching Over an old L.A Sentry.

I’ve posted two photos from that story below.

This post was originally published on May 24, 2016.

Dec. 17, 2010: Eric Lynxwiler has a giant terra cotta angel in his Los Angeles living room that was once a decorative figure on the old Richfield Building.
Dec. 17, 2010: Eric Lynxwiler has a giant terra cotta angel in his Los Angeles living room that was once a decorative figure on the old Richfield Building. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Dec. 17, 2010: Eric Lynxwiler with a former Richfield Building terra cotta angel in his Los Angeles living room.
Dec. 17, 2010: Eric Lynxwiler with a former Richfield Building terra cotta angel in his Los Angeles living room. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)
Undated (probably before 1956) photo of Richfield Tower, also known as the Richfield Oil Co. Building, that was constructed between 1928 and 1929 and served as the headquarters of Richfield Oil. in downtown Los Angeles.
Undated (probably before 1956) photo of Richfield Tower, also known as the Richfield Oil Co. Building, that was constructed between 1928 and 1929 and served as the headquarters of Richfield Oil. in downtown Los Angeles. (Richfield Oil Corp.)

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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