Now You See It! Now You Don’t

It isn’t enough that she is a drop-dead gorgeous blonde with a peek-a-boo doo, she’s got to sing and do magic tricks at the same time – too! Veronica Lake was the girl I wanted to spend all my pubescent days with. Just her and I going to the San Francisco Zoo, the Aquarium, and De Young Museum. But, she’s a LA Chic who hangs out in Downtown LA nightclubs entertaining businessen who own stock in Atlantic Richfield. Look at all that sparkle! Some scenes in the movie ‘The Gun For Hire’ were shot in the Richfield Tower.

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/vokoban/sets/72157624736782213/

Veronica starred in this movie with Alan Ladd. Philip Raven gets his hands on secret chemical formula that may be a breakthrough in the oil refining business. Perhaps it is a new way to get high, and thus the makers of alcoholic beverages want this formula – to disappear – like the Richfield Tower, disappeared, because there wasn’t enough square footage for developers to realize a profit. This is somewhat like the crisis Meg Whitman and her backers are having. Guibi is about selling bandwhich, about cramming as many cellphone users as yoy can into a Quickie Megabite. Her  name is associated with the chemical clean up where the California Barrel Company made barrels.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/toxic-forever-chemicals-in-drinking-water-leave-military-families-reeling/ar-BBTW2BE?ocid=spartandhp

When LSD was legal, we Hippies would “drop” and go on a trip for most of the day, or night. I never had to buy a hit because I knew all the chemists. Everyone had their own movie firing off in their brain. We never compared notes, because that was a “bring down”.  For many good reasons, I believe Meg Whitman and her backers, such as the President of Wal-Mart, should divest before they get started, lest they be accused of founding a Monopoly. I suspect they know I got the copyright on California Barrel Company, and thus we should come to terms, because I want to form my movie company with this Brand name.

The California Barrel Movie Company

That said, let me pour out some more good ideas. Million of people want to be in a Mob Movie. I want Tarantino on my team. I want to make specialized Film Noir that caters to the citizens of major cities – all over the world. I love the movie ‘The King of New York’ and ‘LA Confidential. I want to make ‘Richfield’ that will take the viewer back to 1941. The Raven is like ‘The Maltese Falcon’ that takes place in San Francisco. Folks who move into into glass boxes, like the ones Meg Whitman is building out at PPP, can pickup their smart phones, and go to the world they enjoy the most. It was the dream of every teenager who became a sexual human being, to date a beautiful blond dish, who will perform magic tricks – just for you! Who wants Mogul Meg in the picture.

“Don’t tell me you moved into one of Mogul Megs Dead End Boxes! What a witch!”

I will blog on the history of my search for the owner of CBCLLC, next. You would think with all the pre-publicity of her game-changing movie company. Meg Whitman would be glad to call me and give me a personal interview. She had to know I exist. I have contacted many people around her.

I suspect he director Michelangelo Antonioni was turned on to the sad truth the Richfield Tower was being torn down, and, that became the theme of his movie ‘Zabriskie Point’. This is why he put that building in his movie, and, depicts developers and architects as The Villains. I am researching this angle. My City Flicks will take you for a closer look at the schemes of City Planners and Redevelopment. They got internet games where you build cities and interact in them.

I was going to go to the meeting on what do with the waterfront project in Eugene. It’s total bullshit that they worked community feedback into THEIR concepts. This developers are playing Super Monopoly!

https://www.kezi.com/content/news/Eugene-nearing-end-of-design-phase-for-Downtown-Riverfront-Park-505763951.html

“Since then they have taken feedback from the community and worked that into these latest concepts. Tuesday night’s meeting was all about presenting what they’ve come up with and getting feedback from local architects and landscape designers.

Their main focus for this project is the park itself, taking a look at the walking and bike paths as well as artwork to be installed in the area.

They’re aiming to have the park completed before the 2021 world track and field championship, and after receiving feedback from Tuesday’s meeting, Principal Architect Emily Proudfoot said the next step is to create a final design.

“I think we’re going to have a really good idea about pretty much exactly what it’s going to look like by the end of this summer,” Proudfoot said. “We’re going to have construction documents ready to go out to bid this fall.”

It is utterly outrageous that I have not been sent a public record about who owns California Barrel Company LLC! “Pretty much exactly” What kind of English is this? The paths and the art – is not their main focus! It is the rent by the square foot that they are keen on. I am going to fashion a raven stencil. Here is Proudfoot. Is she a Native American? She is typical of the Eugene Wiccans who conduct Magic Tricks all over the place! Wear some sequins, Emily!

Emily is the end product of politically correct homogenization that has cleansed all traces of Kesey’s Pedagogy from the Emerald Valley. She is atypical of the women who greet you at the door at the Architecture Love Fest, and pretend they give a shit about your ideas. The Architectural Cure All is very spendy, and, has proven not to be the solution! With Meg, they have entered into the Boredom Killing business – big time. Start by getting rid of Emily and her friggen wallpaper! We want – Veronica Lake! And don’t shame us by calling us Sexists! Is that really a Plug-in Emily on the floor, with neon light?

This is why McMurphy wants to get the hell out of the Coo-coo’s nest, and back in the real world. I stayed at Sheltercare, and had to get a advocate attorney to save me. I had to be on psychthroic drugs. I was taking penicillin because I had pneumonia.

“You have been in our homeless system for two months, and no one checked your meds? I’m afraid you’re going to have to leave!”

Of course they want Emily at the door.

“Now, let me show you a slide show of our new and clean Glass Cubicles!”

Play both videos at the same time.

What is curious, the address of the Richfield Tower is 555. The building the David Kirchner bought, is 666. David’s Albatross may bring down the whole Trump family and their Towers of Evil, where Russian Spies came and went.

I found Edward Bond, who I want on my team. What a interesting man. I can’t wait to hear Cohen testify. It will be Film Noir – to the max!

When I was vice president of the Upstairs Art Association, we worked to save the Paramount theatre and turn it into a mecca for the Performing Arts. I have a vision, of Veronica Lake walking to center stage, in a dazzling sequined dress, and performing magic tricks. This may be the last scene I see, before that dark curtain open, and, I must go, get off the set. I want this written in my tombstone.

“Now you see it! Now you don’t!”

I reserve this for my muse’s tombstone:

“I thought you were supposed to be in Paris.”

“I am in Paris.”

John Presco a.k.a. The Raven

Copyright 2019

President: California Barrel Movie Company

WAIT A MINUTE! Stop the presses! How could I be so blind! This Gun For Hire’ was made a year after the Maltese Falcon – that is about a bird! The Raven makes the sign of the Raven. The Bohemian Artist, Haig, made the giant owl at Bohemian Grove. Is it possible that the Bohemian Club tried to take over the movie industry of Hollywood? Consider all the script writers there! Was there a schism amongst club members? Was there civil war between Nortern and Southern California members? Were the fighting over

HELEN OF CALIFORNIA”

YES! This is my great movie, the Last Hollywood Blockbuster! Now know why Mega-Meg grabbed the California Barrel Company that was owned by a member of the Bohemian Club. I want Alex Jones in my movie.

OMG! Look at these movies about birds. There is a Coo-Coo Bird. What! WHAT? What is my kindred wearing on her head when she enters Rome through the arches! It’s a

FALCON!

She is wearing The Eye of Horus! Holy shit! Liz was the Norther contestant for the title ‘Helen of California’ and Veronica was the Southern contest! Holy crap! This is Getty Oil Company verses Arco Richfield! Let me slap a extra copyright on this!

Wait! Hold your horses! There had to be a hidden treasure. Do you think it was buried under the Richfield Tower? Where did Paul Hastings get the money to go Global. Why are they calling his company, a bank? Seth Zachary knows – all! Come clean, Zach!

I think Drake’s Treasure was found, and shipped in barrels to Los Angeles. The treasure hunt is on. I am seeking producers for my movie ‘Helen of California’.

John Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

Copyright 2019

 

Horus was the ancient Egyptian sky god who was usually depicted as a falcon, most likely a lanner or peregrine falcon.[7] His right eye was associated with the sun god, Ra. The eye symbol represents the marking around the eye of the falcon, including the “teardrop” marking sometimes found below the eye. The mirror image, or left eye, sometimes represented the moon and the god Djehuti (Thoth).[8]

http://modernism101.com/products-page/architecture/bayer-herbert-designer-and-david-gebhard-the-richfield-building-1928-1968-los-angeles-atlantic-richfield-company-1970/#.XHF7UndFzIU

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/vokoban/sets/72157624736782213/

From 1997 to 2008, Bond’s plays explored in depth a gloomy vision of a future society (in 2077) where the potential menaces of social breakdown and bio-political control have become real and structural.[citation needed] The first in this cycle, The Crime of the 21st Century, shows a few outcasts who have fled the over-controlled cities to hide in a no-man’s-land where they try in vain to rebuild their humanity by creating a semblance of community. Have I None, Chair and The Under Room show the monotonous life of the cities, where social relationships and memory have been abolished, consumption and possession standardized, and where people are harassed by the resistance of their imagination and panicked by strangers. Born and Innocence follow the actions of militarized policemen, the ‘Wapos’, who perpetrate atrocities on reluctant civilians during mass deportations, but some of whom try to find a human dimension to their lives and desperately attempt to escape the alienated and criminal conditions they are trapped in.[citation needed]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zabriskie_Point_(film)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blowup

In contemporary wartime San Francisco, chemist and blackmailer Albert Baker is killed by hit man Philip Raven, who recovers a stolen chemical formula. Raven is double-crossed by his employer, Willard Gates who pays him with marked bills and reports them to the Los Angeles Police Department as stolen from his company, Nitro Chemical Corporation of Los Angeles. Raven learns of the setup and decides to get revenge. LAPD detective lieutenant Michael Crane, who is vacationing in San Francisco to visit his girlfriend, nightclub singer Ellen Graham, is immediately assigned the case. He goes after Raven, but the assassin eludes him.

Meanwhile, Gates hires Ellen to work in his LA nightclub after an audition where she sings and performs magic tricks. Then she is taken to a clandestine meeting with Senator Burnett, where she learns that Gates and Nitro Chemical are under investigation as suspected traitors, and is recruited to spy on Gates. Unknown to each other, she and Gates board a train for Los Angeles, followed by Raven. By chance, Raven and Ellen sit next to each other. The next morning, Gates is alarmed when he sees them asleep with Raven’s head on her shoulder. He wires ahead to alert the police, but Raven forces Ellen at gunpoint to help him elude them again. He is about to kill her but is interrupted by workmen, allowing Ellen to flee. From Gates’s club, she tries to contact Crane, but he has left San Francisco to return to LA.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L.A._Confidential_(film)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quentin_Tarantino_filmography

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_De_Palma

https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-curse-of-666-fifth-avenue-the-skyscraper-that-could-sink-the-kushners

The 12-floor building was 372 feet (113 m) tall, including a 130-foot (40 m) tower atop the building, emblazoned vertically with the name “Richfield”. Lighting on the tower was made to simulate an oilwell gusher and the motif was reused at some Richfield service stations.[1]

The company outgrew the building, and it was demolished in 1969, much to the dismay of Los Angeles residents and those interested in architectural preservation, to make way for the present ARCO Plaza skyscraper complex. The elaborate black-and-gold elevator doors were salvaged from the building and now reside in the lobby of the new ARCO building (now City National Tower).[3]

Helen of California

Alas, I arrive, at the great travesty. What became of the sculptures that once graced the outside of the Richfield Oil Company? They were done by Haig Patigian who served two terms as president of the Bohemian Club. He did a bust titled ‘Helen of California’. Consider Rena Easton. It was his spirit that has been calling me for thirty years. I have seen Helen at the Oakland Museum. How ironic, that David Hamsher is a partner of Paul Hastings, who works in the building that replaced the Richfield building, that was a work of art, a masterpiece!

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/02/21/the-art-decco-tower-of-richfield/

How odd that David Hamsher is tied to the name ‘California Barrel Company’ that was owned by Frederick Koster, a member of the Bohemian Club. How amazing that I – half in jest – suggest there has been a transference of power – over to me – by some ritual the Bohemian Club performed. Now, I believe it is – real!

https://rosamondpress.com/2017/07/26/the-tower-of-helen-rosamonde/

I can not understand how members of the Bohemian Club allowed their Beautiful Monument to be torn down! Did they rescue the façade? Is the Greek façade on the site of the Potreo Power Plant, all that remains of Haig’s work? Was there a hostile takeover of the Bohemian Club, and, in someway, Hastings is involved? Meg Whitman is at the epicenter of the greatest Art Story ever told. I suspect she is innocent of a vast conspiracy that has sucked her, and other creative people, in! I can make the case I am the rightful president of the Bohemian Club. So be it!

I just found out the fate of Haig’s armored angels. They were sold! There is talk about a Book of Business at Hastings. If Meg and Quibi are in line with Hastings, the Movie and Book Libraries are in peril. They don’t care about Art and Literature. They are a Closed Family of the very rich people who showoff for each other. Trump and his Towers are a part of their Family Busness Book. How about – Putin?

“Heroic in size, impressive in conception, are the sculptural figures designed by Haig Patigian which crown the main walls with a fairly regal procession of silhouetted torsos.

I now believe they got to Rena and made her afraid. Can there be any doubt I am a Seer, born of the lineage of Casandra?

Launch the Ghost Fleet!

I believe my autobiography ‘Capturing Beauty’ is done, and, the proof I am a seer, is in this post. Now what?

I have talked to two people in charge of preserving SF history. Does this include the history of businesses? The names of historic companies should be treated with dignity and respect. Meg Whitman has Quibi locked up tight in a mountain of legal protection, just incase a pirate comes along and kidnaps her baby. She is now a part of the Haig Story.

https://sfplanning.org/preservation

John Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

Copyright 2019

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/09/11/john-dee-sea-lord-of-the-ghost-fleet/

Helen of Britania

renaa6

The central figures of the Tympanum (Navigation, Aviation, Postal Service and Industry) over the main entry were donated by the Atlantic Richfield Company to the UC Santa Barbara Art & Design Museum, negotiated by Professor David Gebhard, noted UCSB architectural historian. He published a small volume on the building before demolition, which is richly illustrated: The Richfield Building 1928-1968. Atlantic Richfield Co., Santa Barbara, 1970. After languishing in university storage for well over a decade, they were mounted outside the UCSB Student Health Center in 1982, where three of the four remain today (34°24’56.47″ N 119°51’08.39″ W). The fourth figure was incomplete and remains in storage.

Richfield Tower was starkly featured in a few scenes of Michelangelo Antonioni‘s 1970 film Zabriskie Point, shot shortly before its demolition.

Unfortunately, “progress” caught up with the gorgeous building. Some people now considered the structure garish, gaudy, and a monstrosity, and new skyscrapers dwarfed its size. The Richfield Co. merged with Atlantic Refining Co. in 1966, and decided that the building was not producing enough revenue. They purchased surrounding buildings, creating a property flagged by Flower, Figueroa, 5th, and 6th Streets, and decided to turn it into a mini Rockefeller Center in 1967, called the Atlantic Richfield Plaza. The site would be composed of two 52-story towers, open space, promenades and other buildings. Louis Ream informed The Times on March 9, 1967, that “We’d like to think as big as possible – the economics of a site like this dictates that we do.” He claimed, “The building is beautiful, but it is only 54% usable. We’re planning on tearing it down, with tears in our eyes.”

Groups immediately opposed the planned destruction, arguing for preservation and inclusion of the building in the new project. Denise Scott Brown, a UCLA professor of urban design, attempted to rally supporters to fight for the building, decrying both Atlantic Richfield’s aim and the city’s destruction of Bunker Hill, “simply because we tend to despise our immediate past.” Instead of the raw and dead land left by urban renewal’s wiping away all traces of the historic past, she suggested renovating and integrating the building into the project, saying its bold design could stand up to the modern, glass structures. Unfortunately, the fledgling historic preservation movement was not strong enough to withstand the powerful forces opposing it.

Wrecking crews entered the building’s interior on Nov. 12, 1968, and began dismantling the building. The elevator doors were saved, but not much was salvaged or preserved. The Cleveland Wrecking Co. was hired to remove the 40 towering figures from the top of the structure. In two weeks, they removed them by tying chokes around their necks and waists before cutting away the concrete, leaving only the top torso of the figures. Two were decapitated, and others suffered broken noses or wing tips in the process. The company removed the figures to their yard, where they were sold for $100 each, the cost it took to remove them from the building.

Ironically, in September 1969 an exhibit at the Building Exhibition Center celebrated the centennial of Robert Clements and Associates, the heir to Morgan, Walls and Clements, with drawings of the former Richfield Building.

While the beautiful Richfield Building was lost, it helped galvanize growing support for historic preservation and reuse and adaptation of historic structures, leading to the formation of such groups as Los Angeles Conservancy and Hollywood Heritage. Today, developers and builders are rapidly renovating and rehabbing glorious apartment buildings, hotels, and theatres in downtown Los Angeles, allowing historic structures to once again shine as the lovely monuments they were intended to be.

Unfortunately, “progress” caught up with the gorgeous building. Some people now considered the structure garish, gaudy, and a monstrosity, and new skyscrapers dwarfed its size. The Richfield Co. merged with Atlantic Refining Co. in 1966, and decided that the building was not producing enough revenue. They purchased surrounding buildings, creating a property flagged by Flower, Figueroa, 5th, and 6th Streets, and decided to turn it into a mini Rockefeller Center in 1967, called the Atlantic Richfield Plaza. The site would be composed of two 52-story towers, open space, promenades and other buildings. Louis Ream informed The Times on March 9, 1967, that “We’d like to think as big as possible – the economics of a site like this dictates that we do.” He claimed, “The building is beautiful, but it is only 54% usable. We’re planning on tearing it down, with tears in our eyes.”

Groups immediately opposed the planned destruction, arguing for preservation and inclusion of the building in the new project. Denise Scott Brown, a UCLA professor of urban design, attempted to rally supporters to fight for the building, decrying both Atlantic Richfield’s aim and the city’s destruction of Bunker Hill, “simply because we tend to despise our immediate past.” Instead of the raw and dead land left by urban renewal’s wiping away all traces of the historic past, she suggested renovating and integrating the building into the project, saying its bold design could stand up to the modern, glass structures. Unfortunately, the fledgling historic preservation movement was not strong enough to withstand the powerful forces opposing it.

Wrecking crews entered the building’s interior on Nov. 12, 1968, and began dismantling the building. The elevator doors were saved, but not much was salvaged or preserved. The Cleveland Wrecking Co. was hired to remove the 40 towering figures from the top of the structure. In two weeks, they removed them by tying chokes around their necks and waists before cutting away the concrete, leaving only the top torso of the figures. Two were decapitated, and others suffered broken noses or wing tips in the process. The company removed the figures to their yard, where they were sold for $100 each, the cost it took to remove them from the building.

Ironically, in September 1969 an exhibit at the Building Exhibition Center celebrated the centennial of Robert Clements and Associates, the heir to Morgan, Walls and Clements, with drawings of the former Richfield Building.

While the beautiful Richfield Building was lost, it helped galvanize growing support for historic preservation and reuse and adaptation of historic structures, leading to the formation of such groups as Los Angeles Conservancy and Hollywood Heritage. Today, developers and builders are rapidly renovating and rehabbing glorious apartment buildings, hotels, and theatres in downtown Los Angeles, allowing historic structures to once again shine as the lovely monuments they were intended to be.

Whatever his other flaws as a human being, Jared Kushner is surely afflicted with Skyscraper Envy.

Like his father-in-law the president, Kushner wants his own tower—as big as it can possibly be.

The story of that tower, 666 Fifth Ave., hangs over the fate of the Kushner real estate empire like a curse. It is also part of a great and continuing American saga of how the modern skyline of cities is shaped by a handful of men of genius and others who, in contrast, just see the skyscraper as a way to fill the sky with a money machine.

In the early 1950s Midtown Manhattan seemed ripe for a new boom in high-rise real estate, picking up again from the decade before World War II when three iconic architectural achievements had given New York the most dynamic urban skyline in the world: in 1930 the Chrysler Building with its spiked tip looking like a Buck Rogers rocket; in 1931, the world’s tallest building, the Empire State Building; and the massive Rockefeller Center between Sixth and Fifth Avenues, a multi-tower complex completed in 1939.

Rockefeller Center had, thanks to the largesse of the Rockefeller family, been built to lift American spirits as a counter-punch to the ravages of the Great Depression. Now, after the war, with many European cities in ruins, many of the architects who bore in their minds a dream of what the metropolis of the future should look like, were drawn to America.

None was more visionary or more regarded as a founding hand in shaping the city of the future—or, as it was often described, the city of the Machine Age—than Mies van der Rohe.

Mies (as he was always known) was one of a cadre of architects who fled Nazi Germany when their progressive ideas nurtured at the legendary Bauhaus design school were, like all modern art, dismissed as decadent.

When he came to America Mies went not to New York but to the city where Louis Sullivan gave birth to the skyscraper in the 1890s, the city regarded as the most creatively sympathetic host to modernism in the world: Chicago. In his first buildings there, two 26-story apartment towers, Mies instantly became to modern architecture what Steve Jobs became later to the cellphone: He stripped the form down to the pure essentials of function and, in doing so, created a singular, austere beauty.

The technique he used, in which the glass is hung on a steel frame, known as a curtain wall, had been used in the late 1940s by the Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer for the United Nations building on New York’s East River, but Mies had suggested it much earlier in sketches made at the Bauhuas and in Chicago he refined it with a finesse that was mimicked in many future towers, but rarely as well.

However, it was in New York where Mies would produce his masterwork. The Canadian Bronfman family, owners of the Seagram distillers corporation, chose a site on Park Avenue between 52nd Street and 53rd streets for a new headquarters and Mies, working directly with Phyllis Lambert, the daughter of the Seagram CEO, Samuel Bronfman, produced what was, at $41 million, the world’s most expensive skyscraper at the time, the 38-story Seagram Building.

These twin office peaks, 699 feet tall, have an underground shopping center at their feet. Desite changes in ownership — the buildings are now owned by City National Bank and Paul Hastings Bank — the complex remains known as ARCO Plaza. The towers were completed in 1971.

When you have been compiling your family history for twenty five years, you take great notice when some vital part of that history ends up in someone else’s pile – and they are not related to you! I speak of the California Barrel Company. I’m still trying to find out who owns this company. I suspect Seth Zachary knows, and may choose not to tell me – for reasons yet to be discovered. The actress, Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor, is in my family tree. Lara Roozemond may be related to us, and all the thespians Liz bonded with. What would she think of Quibi?

https://rosamondpress.com/2013/02/13/my-letter-to-andrew-cuomo/

I was instructed to e-mail Seth Zachary, which I did. I said there was a major disconnect when it came to saving the Richfield Building. There are old buildings (in red) at the Potrero Power Plant, that are up in the air as to what will be done with them. The history of motion picture making may be bulldozed to the ground with Meg Whitman’s Quibi. We trace our ancestors to Holland. New Amsterdam is no more. New York is being stained by Cohen and his boss, whose tower is a monument to – LYING!

https://irenebrination.typepad.com/irenebrination_notes_on_a/2010/06/vena-cava-vs-zabriskie-point-.html

For over a week I have sought an explanation for what is written in the second paragraph. If I do not get an answer by Tuesday, I am going to the Big Press – and Media! Whitman was still the CEO of Hewlett Packard when she invested money in the PPP project. (HP Enterprises) I suspect the CBC  is a straw dog company created as part of a divestment, and is a tax loophole. I know next to nothing about business. There are reporters all over America, who do.

https://www.sfstation.com/2017/09/25/plans-revealed-for-enormous-waterfront-development-in-potrero/

John Presco

http://fortune.com/2018/06/22/hewlett-packard-enterprise-antonio-neri-cloud/

After the epic split, Whitman spent the remainder of her tenure divesting of parts of HPE’s business it no longer wanted, like its software business that it spun off to U.K.-based software firm Micro Focus in a deal worth about $8.8 billion.

Cleanup is currently underway at the industrial area surrounding the old Potrero Power Plant site and adjacent shoreline. Draft plans were recently created and unveiled for a 29-acre Central Waterfront site at 1201 Illinois Street (bounded by Illinois, the Bay, 22nd and 23rd Streets). This area is being prepared for over 5 million square feet of development rising up to 300 feet in height.

The project is currently funded and led by California Barrel Company, with support from Associate Capital and Meg Whitman, the CEO of HP Enterprise. The overall development would introduce up to 2,700 new housing units, 220 hotel rooms, 600,000 square feet of office space and more than 100,000 square feet of retail (including a new grocery store).

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Now You See It! Now You Don’t

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    I saw the BIG PICTURE!

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