King of the Wends

gameof2

christtory3

CHRIS-W

jong2

jonhood

jutland2

Jutland5For three days I have been working on two blogs regarding the Kings of Demark who also held the title ‘King of the Wends’. To actually know a descendant of the Wends, is rare for anyone. Chris Wandel was my lover in 1967, and has remained my good friend and ally for all these years. She was there for me when my family’s artistic legacy was sold to an outsider, and destroyed. I have compared this tragedy to the War of the Roses that the ‘Game of Thrones’ is based upon. Yesterday, Queen Elizabeth, and the Duke of Edinburgh, visited the set of this very popular series. The Duke’s ancestors and kindred have been at the epicenter of the war over the Danish throne, and this elusive title that is linked to Johan Wandel and the Reformation of Luther. The Duke looks interested in the make-believe, he perhaps still furious his wife refused to take his name. Is he…..Wendish?

In the video below Elizabeth is eyeing the fake throne. I can read her cynical mind, she alas finding a throne for Phillip who holds no royal title…..unless, a descendant of Johan Wandel, give him the title he longs for? But, why stir up trouble?

You know, I am a Nazarite, after the prophet, Samuel, whose moniker was ‘The King Maker’. Christ is also a Nazarite.

Jon Presco

Queen left ‘in tears’ over Duke of Edinburgh’s ‘brutal’ demand she take his name.

“‘I am nothing but a bloody amoeba’, Philip told friends
He wanted royal family known as House of Mountbatten.”

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2069278/Queen-left-tears-Duke-Edinburghs-brutal-demand-name.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_titles_and_honours_of_Prince_Philip,_Duke_of_Edinburgh

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/queen-elizabeth-ii-visits-game-of-thrones-set/

The United Kingdom’s 88-year-old monarch toured the Belfast sets of the hit HBO series “Game of Thrones” and met many of its stars Tuesday beside the show’s sword-covered seat of power, the Iron Throne.
Unlike many visitors to Belfast’s Titanic Studios, the monarch declined to take a seat on the throne created for the ruler of the mythical Seven Kingdoms. But she did take a look at many of the set props during her visit.

“Game of Thrones” creators David Benioff and Dan Weiss escorted the monarch through the show’s custom-made armory, hangars of costumes, and sprawling sets used to shoot the program’s interior scenes and perilous ice-cliff ascents — part of the biggest TV production ever mounted in Europe.
She chatted with actors Lena Headey, Maisie Williams, Sophie Turner, Kit Harington, Rose Leslie and Conleth Hill. The cast members were photographed smiling as they met the queen.

Well, Chris and Stefan, looks like we are on track. Thanks for believing in me and my far-out ideas!
King of the Wends

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The title of King of the Wends denoted sovereignty or claims over once-Slavic lands of southern coasts of the Baltic Sea, those otherwise called Mecklenburg, Holstein and Pomerania, and was used from 12th century to 1972 by Kings of Denmark and from ca 1540 to 1973 by the Kings of Sweden.

The generally accepted interpretation is that the word refers to the Wends, a Slavic people that lived on the south shores of the Baltic Sea, although the situation is further complicated by the existence of the Vends, located between the Finns and the Wends and with somewhat unknown origin. The title’s one poetic explanation also was kingship over the antique people of the Vandals (vandalorum rex), but that idea came only in 16th century. A recent interpretation, not much supported in academic research, has been made that the part “Vend” in the later established titles of the Kings of Sweden (three kingdoms: King of the Svear, Götar and Vends; Svears, Göters och Venders konung) means Finland, the form presumably being akin to Vindland.[citation needed] As such, the Österland—the medieval name for the Finnish part of the Swedish kingdom—was the third part of the realm. However, only forty years after the adoption of the title “king of the Wends”, the Swedish kings began to style themselves as “Grand Prince of Finland” as well.

Kings of Denmark bore the title for eight centuries, after it was first adopted by King Canute VI (reigned 1182 to 1202), who conquered the lands of the Wends in Pomerania and Mecklenburg. In Germanic languages, the name was Wends, and in medieval documentation the Latin name was sclavorum rex, referring to the Slavic peoples in and around the region now known as Mecklenburg. In 16th century, Latin sclavorum was changed to vandalorum also by Danish kings, showing the new poetic idea. The Danish Kings continued to use the title over the next seven hundred years until 1972, when Queen Margrethe II succeeded. She abandoned the use of all the royal titles except for that of Denmark’s King/Queen, which is the royal style today.

When Sweden had made its final breakaway from the Kalmar union that united it with Norway and Denmark, tensions between the two rulers were high, and it showed also in their flags, coat-of-arms and titles. Gustav I of Sweden adopted c 1540 the third “kingdom” to his titles (which hitherto had only included Swedes and Goths): he took “Vandalorumque” rex, “Venders” konung as the third name of the list of kingships. Svears, Göters och Venders konung was used in official documentation up to the accession of Charles XVI Gustav of Sweden in 1973, who was the first proclaimed officially Sveriges konung (“King of Sweden”) and nothing else.

Following the Protestant Reformation when Latin was replaced as the medium of church service by the vernacular languages, the diocese of Schleswig was divided and an autonomous archdeaconry of Haderslev created. On the west coast the Danish diocese of Ribe stopped about 5 km north of the present border. This created a new cultural dividing line in the duchy because German was used for church services and teaching in the diocese of Schleswig and Danish was used in the diocese of Ribe and the archdeaconry of Haderslev. This line corresponds remarkably well with the present border.

From around 1800 to 1840 the Danish speaking population on the Angeln peninsula between Schleswig and Flensburg began to switch to Low German and in the same period many North Frisians also switched to Low German. This linguistic change created a new defacto dividing line between German and Danish speakers north of Tønder and south of Flensburg. From around 1830 large segments of the population began to identify with either German or Danish nationality and mobilized politically. In Denmark, the National Liberal Party used the Schleswig Question as part of their agitation and demanded that the Duchy be incorporated in the Danish kingdom under the slogan “Denmark to the Eider”. This caused a conflict between Denmark and the German states over Schleswig and Holstein which led to the Schleswig-Holstein Question of the 19th century. When the National Liberals came to power in Denmark, in 1848, it provoked an uprising of ethnic Germans who supported Schleswig’s ties with Holstein. This led to the First War of Schleswig. Denmark was victorious and the Prussian troops were ordered to pull out of Schleswig and Holstein following the London Protocol of 1852.
Denmark again attempted to integrate Schleswig, by creating a new common constitution (the so-called November Constitution) for Denmark and Schleswig in 1863, but the German Confederation, led by Prussia and Austria, defeated the Danes in the Second War of Schleswig the following year. Prussia and Austria then assumed administration of Schleswig and Holstein respectively under the Gastein Convention of 14 August 1865. However, tensions between the two powers culminated in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866. In the Peace of Prague, the victorious Prussians annexed both Schleswig and Holstein, creating the province of Schleswig-Holstein. Provision for the cession of northern Schleswig to Denmark was made pending a popular vote in favour of this. In 1878, however, Austria went back on this provision, and Denmark, in a Treaty of 1907, with Germany, recognized that, by the agreement between Austria and Prussia, the frontier between Prussia and Denmark had finally been settled.[6]

The Treaty of Versailles provided for a plebiscite to determine the ownership of the region.[7] Thus, two referendums were held in 1920, resulting in the partition of the region. Northern Schleswig joined Denmark, whereas Central Schleswig voted, by an 80% majority, to remain part of Germany. In Southern Schleswig, no referendum was held, as the likely outcome was apparent. The name Southern Schleswig is now used for all of German Schleswig. This decision left substantial minorities on both sides of the new border.
Following the Second World War, a substantial part of the German population in Southern Schleswig changed their nationality and declared themselves as Danish. This change was caused by a number of factors, most importantly the German defeat and an influx of a large number of refugees from eastern Germany, whose culture and appearance differed from the local Germans, who were mostly descendents of Danish families that had changed their nationality in the 19th century. The change created a temporary Danish majority in the region and a demand for a new referendum from the Danish population in South Schleswig and some Danish politicians, including prime minister Knud Kristensen. But the majority in the Danish parliament refused to support a referendum in South Schleswig, fearing that the “new Danes” were not genuine in their change of nationality. This proved to be the case and, from 1948 the Danish population began to shrink again. By the early 1950s, it nevertheless had stabilised at a level four times higher than the pre-war number.
In the Copenhagen-Bonn declaration of 1955, Germany and Denmark promised to uphold the rights of each other’s minority population. Today, both parts co-operate as a Euroregion, despite a national border dividing the former duchy. As Denmark and Germany are both part of the Schengen Area, there are no controls at the border.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schleswig

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holstein

Holstein, was given to a cadet branch of the House of Oldenburg, to which the kings of Denmark belonged.
Between 1533 and 1544 King Christian III of Denmark ruled the entire Duchies of Holstein and of Schleswig also in the name of his then still minor half-brothers John the Elder and Adolf. In 1544 they partitioned the Duchies of Holstein (a fief of the Holy Roman Empire) and of Schleswig (a Danish fief) in an unusual way, following negotiations between the brothers and the Estates of the Realm of the duchies, which had constituted in 1460 by the Treaty of Ribe and strictly opposed a factual partition. The elder three brothers determined their youngest brother Frederick for a career as Lutheran administrator of an ecclesiastical state within the Holy Roman Empire.[3]

Following the death of King Frederick VII of Denmark (House of Oldenburg) in 1863, the inheritance of Schleswig and Holstein was disputed. The new king, Christian IX (House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, a cadet branch of the House of Oldenburg), made his claim to the Danish throne through a female line. The Duke of Augustenborg, a minor scion from another cadet line of the House of Oldenburg, claimed the Duchies, and soon the German Confederation, led by Prussia and Austria, went to the Second Schleswig War with Denmark, quickly defeating it in 1864 and forcing it to cede the duchies.
However, the duchies were not given to the Duke of Augustenborg. In 1865 an arrangement was worked out between Prussia and Austria where the Austrians occupied and administered Holstein, while the Prussians did the same in Schleswig. This arrangement came to an end with the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, which resulted in Schleswig and Holstein both being incorporated into Prussia as the Province of Schleswig-Holstein. Holstein, meanwhile including former Saxe-Lauenburg (as of 1876) and the former Free and Hanseatic City of Lübeck and Region of Lübeck (both as of 1937) regained statehood, now united with Schleswig, in 1946, when the British occupation government elevated the province to the State of Schleswig-Holstein, followed by the official dissolution of Prussia in 1947.

The House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (Danish: Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Lyksborg, also spelled -Glücksborg), also known as the House of Glücksburg, is a German ducal house.
Junior branches of the House include the royal houses of Denmark, Norway, and Greece. The Prince of Wales, who is the heir apparent to the thrones of the United Kingdom and the other Commonwealth realms,[1][2] belongs officially to the House of Windsor,[3] but also belongs to a cadet branch of the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Gl%C3%BCcksburg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margrethe_II_of_Denmark

The House is named after Glücksburg in northernmost Germany. It is itself a cadet branch of the House of Oldenburg, that is descended from Count Christian of Oldenburg, who became King of Denmark in 1448 and King of Norway in 1450. As the original House of Oldenburg and the House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg became extinct in 1863 and 1931, respectively, the House of Glücksburg is now the senior surviving branch of the House of Oldenburg.

House of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg[edit]
The House of Oldenburg—in one of its cadet branches—is the royal house of Denmark (since 1448) and Norway (1450–1818 and since 1905), and has been the royal house of several other countries including Greece, Sweden and Russia;[3] it also includes the heir to the throne of the United Kingdom. As such, he is the head of the family that today includes Margrethe II of Denmark,[4] Harald V of Norway, Constantine II of Greece and, patrilineally,[5] Charles, Prince of Wales. Christoph is the senior male line descendant of Christian III of Denmark, and as such the heir to the headship of the entire Kalmar Union. His great-great-grandfather, Friedrich, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, was the older brother of Christian IX of Denmark, and through him Christoph is heir by masculine primogeniture to the Danish title Duke of Glucksburg conferred by the Danish crown in 1825.[3] Christoph is also, cognatically, a descendant of Queen Victoria and Alexander II of Russia, and is in the line of succession to the British throne.[6]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christoph,_Prince_of_Schleswig-Holstein

Christian III (12 August 1503 – 1 January 1559) reigned as king of Denmark and Norway from 1534 until his death. He was the eldest son of King Frederick I and Anna of Brandenburg.[1]
Inspired by his tutors, who were devout Lutherans, Christian established Lutheranism as the state religion of his realms in a reformation. Lutheranism remains as the state religion in both Norway and Denmark in the present day.

The House of Oldenburg—in one of its cadet branches—is the royal house of Denmark (since 1448) and Norway (1450–1818 and since 1905), and has been the royal house of several other countries including Greece, Sweden and Russia;[3] it also includes the heir to the throne of the United Kingdom. As such, he is the head of the family that today includes Margrethe II of Denmark,[4] Harald V of Norway, Constantine II of Greece and, patrilineally,[5] Charles, Prince of Wales. Christoph is the senior male line descendant of Christian III of Denmark, and as such the heir to the headship of the entire Kalmar Union. His great-great-grandfather, Friedrich, Duke of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, was the older brother of Christian IX of Denmark, and through him Christoph is heir by masculine primogeniture to the Danish title Duke of Glucksburg conferred by the Danish crown in 1825.[3] Christoph is also, cognatically, a descendant of Queen Victoria and Alexander II of Russia, and is in the line of succession to the British throne.[6]

Cognatic kinship is a mode of descent calculated from an ancestor or ancestress counted through any combination of male and female links, or a system of bilateral kinship where relations are traced through both a father and mother.

Christian IX (8 April 1818 – 29 January 1906) was King of Denmark from 1863 to 1906. From 1863 to 1864, he was concurrently Duke of Schleswig, Holstein and Lauenburg.
Growing up as a prince of Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg, a junior branch of the House of Oldenburg which had ruled Denmark since 1448, Christian was originally not in the immediate line of succession to the Danish throne. However, in 1852, Christian was chosen as heir to the Danish monarchy in light of the expected extinction of the senior line of the House of Oldenburg. Upon the death of King Frederick VII of Denmark in 1863, Christian acceded to the throne as the first Danish monarch of the House of Glücksburg.
The beginning of his reign was marked by the Danish defeat in the Second Schleswig War and the subsequent loss of the duchies of Schleswig, Holstein and Lauenburg which made the king immensely unpopular. The following years of his reign were dominated by political disputes as Denmark had only become a constitutional monarchy in 1849 and the balance of power between the sovereign and parliament was still in dispute. In spite of his initial unpopularity and the many years of political strife, where the king was in conflict with large parts of the population, his popularity recovered towards the end of his reign, and he became a national icon due to the length of his reign and the high standards of personal morality with which he was identified.
Christian married his second cousin, Princess Louise of Hesse-Kassel, in 1842. Their six children married into other royal families across Europe, earning him the sobriquet “the father-in-law of Europe”. Most current European monarchs are descended from him, including Queen Margrethe II of Denmark, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom, King Philippe of Belgium, King Harald V of Norway, and Grand Duke Henri of Luxembourg. The consorts Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, and Queen Sofía of Spain are also agnatic descendants of Christian IX, as is Constantine II, the former and last King of the Hellenes.

Mother
Frederika of Hanover
Born
(1938-11-02) 2 November 1938 (age 75)
Psychiko, Athens, Greece
Signature

Religion
Roman Catholicism
prev. Greek Orthodox
Queen Sofía of Spain (Spanish pronunciation: [soˈfi.a]; Greek: Σοφία; born 2 November 1938) is the wife of King Juan Carlos. Born a princess of Greece and Denmark, she became Queen of Spain upon her husband’s accession in 1975.[1][2] On 2 June 2014, Juan Carlos announced that he would abdicate in favour of their son, Felipe VI, who assumed the throne on 19 June 2014.[3]

Princess Sofia of Greece and Denmark was born in Psychiko, Athens, Greece on 2 November 1938, the eldest child of King Paul and his wife, Princess Frederica of Hanover. Sofia is a member of the Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg dynasty. Her brother is the deposed King Constantine II and her sister is Princess Irene of Greece and Denmark. However, since the abolition of the Greek monarchy, these royal titles are, apart from the British royal family, only recognized by the Dutch Monarchy and the Danish Royal Family.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queen_Sof%C3%ADa_of_Spain

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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