The Priory Marast

In 1117, in full spiritual renewal, a Priory was founded in Marast by the canons regular of St Augustine’s Abbey of Chaumosey in the Vosges mountains, under the leadership of two local lords Richard de Montfaucon and Tawk de Rougemont. Decline of the 16th century, the Priory is joined to the Collegiate Church of our Lady of Dole in 1611. During the revolution, it is sold as a national asset in 1792. Unique vestige of the 12th century, the Church Sainte Marie Madeleine is a basical plan, an orphan of its two aisles destroyed in the 19th century. English version: In 1117, under the orders of Richard de Montfaucon and Rougemont Thiebaud, the Augustinians of the Chaumosey Abbey in the Vosges founded a priory at Marast. In 1792, the priory was sold following the Revolution. The original site included a church built in 1117, convent buildings rebuilt in the 16th Century and several outbuildings. Sole vestige of the 17th Century, the church of Sainte Marie Madeleine included a basilica, bereft of its two aisles which were destroyed in the 18th Century. The bell tower, which was removed in 1718, has an imperial style roof. The Marast Church priory is one of the few remaining examples of Roman Ottonian influenced architecture. Rebuilt in 1718, the bell tower stands North of the sanctuary with its roof to the upper deck. The Priory Church of Marast is a rare copy of the Ottonian influenced Romanesque architecture.

Richard III of Montfaucon

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Feudal Castle of Montfaucon
Richard III of Montfaucon, (?) -1230), was count of Montbéliard and Lord of Montfaucon.

Summary
[hide]
1 Biography
2 Family
2.1 Ancestry
2.2 Marriage and succession
3 Notes and references
4 Sources
5 . See also
5.1 Internal links
5.2 External links
Biography[Edit]
In 1192 he met the superior of the monastery of Payerne in the presence of Amadeus I of Gex, son ofAmadeus Ier of Geneva so that they secure Assembly the boundaries of land of Montfaucon, namely: half ofORB and the custody of his Castle, the land ofOulens with lumberOrjulaz extending on both sides of the Talent Bavois Earth with the villages of Corcelles-sur-Chavornay and Suchythe land of Montagny-le-Corbos and rights in Yverdon[1].
Henry VI died in 1197 then that his son Frédéric II was still only a child of three years. Germany big, anxious to avoid a minority like that ofHenri IV, turned to the brother of the deceased: Philip of Swabia was elected in 1198 King of the Romans, in place of his nephew. The Pope immediately aroused him a competitor, the Welf Otto IV for which Richard III and Etienne II of Auxonne, then vassal County of Burgundy, took advantage against the advice ofAmédée de Tramelay, Bishop of Besançon. Hence the excommunication of Richard and Gauthier , after they had made prisoner the Bishop Amédée. A transaction is found in 1199 by which the count of Montbéliard and Lord of Montfaucon renounce their claims on in du Jorat , in return for the lifting of the excommunication[1].
At the beginning of the XIIIe century Richard takes an active part in the war between his brother-in-law Stephen II of Auxonne and Othon of Merania, especially since it occupied the castle ofORB through William IV of Mâcon in order to intercept the relief expected by Étienne III. A few years later he is at war with the count of Ferrette Frédéric II who came to have a fortification at Delle in retaliation for the construction of the castle of Belfort, a mediation is found and sealed by the marriage of the two children of the protagonists promise[1].
Family[Edit]
Ancestry[Edit]
He was the son ofAmadeus II and of Béatrice of Grandson-Joinville or Osilie of Faucogney.
Marriage and succession[Edit]
He married Agnes of Burgundy, or Agnes of Auxonne, daughter of count Etienne II of Auxonne, of which there [2]:
Comtesson, (?-1251), married Humbert II de Cossonay,
Thierry III of Montbéliard count of Montbéliard from 1228, he married Alix, daughter of Frederick II of Ferrette who there Richard said of Montfaucon (he married Catherine daughter of Mathieu II de Lorraine), Sibylle (she married Rudolph IV of Neuchâtel), Beatrix (she married Eudes of Arguel), Agathe (she married Ulrich de Neuchâtel-Aarberg)
Amadeus III,
Richard, (?-1277), Lord of Antigny.

List of the counts of Montbéliard

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The County of Montbéliard was within the County of Burgundy (current Franche-Comté), which depended on the Holy Roman Empire Germanic.
By succession, the counts of Montbéliard were German princes from the XVe centurywho reigned over a Principality sovereign until its incorporation in revolutionary France in 1793.

Summary
 [masquer] 
1 House of Montbéliard
2 House of Montfaucon
3 House of Württemberg-Montbéliard
4 See also
Maison de Montbéliard[modifier]
1042-1073 
Louis de Montbéliard – EP Sophie of Bar – count of Montbéliard, Count of Bar, count of monsoon and count of Ferrette
1073-1105 
Thierry Ier of Montbéliard – EP. Ermentrude of Burgundy (daughter of count Guillaume Ier of Burgundy) – County of Montbéliard, count of Bar, count of monsoon and count of Ferrette

counts of Montbéliard.
1105-1162 
Theodoric II of Montbéliard – EP Gertrude of Austria – count of Montbéliard.
House of Montfaucon [Edit]

counts of the House of Montfaucon-Montbéliard.
1162-1195 
Amadeus II of Montfaucon – son of Richard II of Montfaucon and Sophie of Montbéliard († 1148, daughter of Thierry II of Montbéliard) – EP Béatrice of Grandson – Joinville – count of Montbéliard and Lord of Montfaucon
1195-1227 
Richard III de Montfaucon – brother – EP. Agnes of Burgundy, daughter of count Etienne Ier of Burgundy – count of Montbéliard and Lord of Montfaucon
1227-1283 
Thierry III of Montbéliard – says the Grand Baron – their son – EP. Adélaïde de Ferrette, daughter of Frédéric, count of Ferrette – County of Montbéliard
1283-1322 
Renaud of Burgundy – son of count Hugues de Bourgogne and Adélaïde Ire de Bourgogne – EP Guillemette de Neufchâtel, daughter ofAmédée Ier of Neufchâtel, count of Neuchâtel – count of Montbéliard
1322-1332 
Othenin de Montbéliard – his son – Montbéliard County under the tutelage of his uncle, count Hugues de Bourgogne (brother benjamin count Renaud of Burgundy)
1332-1367 
Henri de Montfaucon – son Gauthier II of Monfaucon and Mahaut de Chand – EP Montbéliard Agnes Countess of Montbéliard, 3rd daughter of Renaud de Bourgogne – count of Montbéliard and Lord of Montfaucon
1367-1397 
Étienne de Montfaucon – their son – EP. Marguerite of Chalon-Arlay , daughter of Jean II of Chalon-Arlay, Lord ofArlay – count of Montbéliard and Lord of Montfaucon
1397-1444 
Henriette of ORB – daughter of Henri de Montbéliard (Lord of ORB in Switzerland), and Marie de Châtillon, granddaughter of Étienne de Montfaucon – EP in 1407 the count Eberhard IV of Württemberg. It is only on the death of her husband (1419) – Countess of Montbéliard
Upon his death, the County of Montbéliard and the other possessions in the Montfaucon family pass to his son Louis of Württemberg, and in the House, creating the branch of Württemberg-Montbéliard.
House of Württemberg-Montbéliard[Edit]
List of rulers of Württemberg, counts of Montbéliard
1444-1450 
Louis IV of Württemberg – their son – EP. Mathilde of Palatinate – County of Montbéliard and Württemberg County
1450-1457 
Louis V of Württemberg – their son – County of Montbéliard and Württemberg County
1457-1473 and 1482-1496 
Eberhard V of Württemberg said the bearded – brother – thick Beard of Gonzaga, daughter of the marquis Louis III of Mantua – County of Montbéliard and County of Württemberg. Raised to the dignity of Duke of Württemberg by Emperor Maximilian i. of Württemberg, and this elevation takes the name of Duke Eberhard i. of Württemberg
1473-1482 
Henry of Württemberg – son of Ulrich V of Württemberg and Elisabeth of Bavaria, grandson ofEberhard IV of Württemberg andHenriette of ORB – EP Elisabeth, daughter of Simon de Wecker, count of Zweibrücken (city of Zweibrücken), then Eve, daughter of Jean VII de Salm – County of Montbéliard – County supported foolishness, it is internal
1496-1498 
Eberhard VI of Württemberg – brother – thick copper Elisabeth of Hohenzollern, daughter of Albert of Brandenburg – County of Montbéliard

Coat of arms of the counts of Montbéliard and Württemberg from 1504.
1503-1519 and 1534-1550 
Ulrich VI of Württemberg – son ofHenry of Württemberg and Elisabeth, daughter of count Simon de Wecker (first marriage) – EP Sabine of Bavaria, daughter of Duke Albert IV of Bavaria – County of Montbéliard and Duke of Württemberg
1526-1534 and 1553-1558 
George i. of Württemberg – son ofHenry of Württemberg and Elisabeth, daughter of the late Earl Jean VII of Salm (second marriage) – EP Barbara of Hesse – County of Montbéliard and Duke of Württemberg
1550-1553 
Christopher of Württemberg – son ofUlrich VI of Württemberg and Sabine de Wittelsbach – EP Anne-Marie of Hohenzollern – County of Montbéliard and Duke of Württemberg died in 1568
1568-1608 
Frederick i. of Württemberg – son of George i. of Württemberg and Barbara of Hesse – EP Sybille of Anhalt – County of Montbéliard and Duke of Württemberg (from 1593)
1608-1617 
Jean-Frédéric of Württemberg (1608-1628) – their son – County of Montbéliard – gives the County he brother: Louis-Frédéric
1608-1631 
Louis-Frédéric of Württemberg – brother – EP. Elisabeth of Hesse, and then Anne of Nassau – Duke of Württemberg – Montbéliard count – beginning of the thirty years war (Catholic and reformed Catholic)
1640-1662 
Léopold-Frédéric of Württemberg – son of the first bed – Sqr Sybille of Württemberg – Duke of Württemberg and count of Montbéliard
1662-1699 
George II of Württemberg – his half-brother (2e bed of Louis-Frédéric of Württemberg) – thick copper Anne de Coligny, daughter of count Gaspard III de Coligny (Ain) – Duke of Württemberg and count of Montbéliard
1699-1723 
Leopold Eberhard of Württemberg – their son – EP. Anne-Sabine Hedwiger and Elisabeth Charlotte Curie – Duke of Württemberg and count of Montbéliard
1723-1733 
Duke Eberhard Ludwig of Württemberg – EP Jeanne-Élisabeth, daughter of Frédéric III, margrave of Baden-Durlach. No heirs – County of Montbéliard
1723-1737 
Karl Alexander of Württemberg – son Frédéric-Eugène of Württemberg andEleonore of Brandenburg – EP Augusta – Duke of Württemberg and count of Montbéliard.
1744-1793 
Charles II of Württemberg – their son – EP. Elisabeth of Hohenzollern – Duke of Württemberg and count of Montbéliard

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_des_seigneurs_de_Rougemont

Here is the premiere family of the Shroud of Turin that some suggest
was owned by the Knight Templars.

http://tinyurl.com/yku9cw

Amédée de Tramelay is kin to Bernard de Dramelay/Tramelay.

Archbishops of Besancon resided over the Knights of Saint-George who
met at Rougemont Castle.

1180-1190 : Thierry II de Montfaucon
1191-1193 : Etienne de Vienne
1993-1220 : Amédée de Tramelay
1221-1225 : Gérard de Rougemont

Jon Presco

The Rougemonts
The Premiere Shroud Family

http://tinyurl.com/yku9cw

by

Jon Presco Copyright 2003

http://rougeknights.blogspot.com

http://tinyurl.com/ycfnto

http://tinyurl.com/wnjq4

http://tinyurl.com/ykfrds

Bernard de Tramelay/Dramelay was a Grand Master of the Knight
Templars who is said to have died just after he and forty Knight
Templars breached the walls of Ascalon during the Crusades.
Information on Bernard is very scarce, it suggested his greed got
him and the forty Templars killed, as the first to conquer a city
got the lion’s share of the spoils. There is a suggestion there was
a falling out between the Templars and the Christian forces who did
not follow Bernard into the breach. When the Muslim defenders saw
this, they closed on Bernard who I suspect was trying to capture the
Ark of the Covenant that Joseph Flavius said was in Ascalon. The
Templars were very keen to own the Ark, and when they first arrived
at the temple grounds they began to dig extensively, especially atop
the Mount of Olives where they built a substantial fortress. Did
they suspect what I have put forth, that the Ark was either the
Oracle of Delphi, or kin to this object and the process which
allowed great men and women to see their fate? I suspect Absalom was
an Oracle, the angel Ariel/Uriel.

For two years now I have been looking at the name Fromond de
Dramelay who married a “dame de Rougemont”. He is shown in many
genealogies (including a Rougemont chart) to be the son of Amedee,
the Archbishop of Besancon, which is located fifty miles or so from
Rougemont in the Franche-Comte where it is said Bernard was born.
His father was named Humbert. All the Humbert names I have found on
the net belong to the Ferrette/Rougemont family. Several Rougemonts
were the Archbishops of Besancon.

The Templars were also in possession of the Shroud of Turin that was
given to Amedee by Othen de la Roche (of the small rock). It has
been concluded that Bernard de Tramelay is the related to Amedee.
The de la Roche family is kin to the Rougemont and Dramelay family.
j.

Jean de Montreaux (Montrose) married Marguerite de Rougemont. Jean
is a Ferrette who built Montreux castle that is fifty miles from
Rougemont. Their daughter Alix married Fromond of Saint-Loup where
the Templars are said to have brought their treasure. The Marquis
d’Auxelles came to live in the rebuilt castle of Rougemont. Chambrun
d’Uxeloup de Rougemont bought Arginy castle and began to look for
the lost Templar treasure. The name Uxeloup come from Saint-Loup and
Auxelles a castle that was built by the Ferrette family who dwelt in
Rougemont castle. Members of the ‘Arginy Renaissance’ are said to be
descendants from Knight Templars, even a Grand Master in regards to
Guillaume de Beajeau, but, I suspect this group knew who Bernard
Tramelay was…..and what he captured at Ascalon?

Marguerite de Saint Loup d’Auxelles married Thibaut 4 of Rougemont.
Richard d’Auxelles married Thibaut’s daughter, Helvuis, whose
grandfather was Humbert. This Humbert appears to be the Archbishop
of Besancon, a name that means “house of light”. Here is a quote
about the Rougemonts and Counts of Champagne who commisioned some of
the Grail legends; “By skillful policy, “always acquiring never
alienating” the family formed matrimonial alliances with the great
families, Montbeliard, Commercy, Chatteauvillian, Geroldseck, Chalon-
Auxere, Montague, Ray, Rougemont, Joinville, and Grandson.”

Shround of Turin and Knights of Saint-George

The Knights of Saint-George met at Rougemont Castle and had a room
in a tower in Besancon. The Archbishop of Besancon resided over a
ritual there that involved ceratin relics. Was the Shroud of Turnin
one of them?

“A room in the tower of Montmartin was granted to him by a treaty
with the town of Besancon, as well as the exemption of the housing
of people of war for the knights residing in Besancon. The knights
of Saint-George were besides only noble city of Besancon has to
profit from this inappreciable privilege.

“These portraits like that of the prince of COP, special guard of
the brotherhood decorated the superb room with the Large Carmelite
friars of Besancon, unfortunately destroyed at the time of the
Revolution. The plank of the woodworks of the room was decorated
series of the blasonnés ecus of the alive knights, with their
confined inscriptions of their four districts, which one descended
at the time of their death to be carried in ceremony with the
church, then suspended with their row in the nave where one saw a
great number of it which had decorated a long time the vault with
Rougemont.”

Archbishops of Besancon

1180-1190 : Thierry II de Montfaucon
1191-1193 : Etienne de Vienne
1993-1220 : Amédée de Tramelay
1221-1225 : Gérard de Rougemont

http://gilles.maillet.free.fr/histoire/genealogie_bourgogne/famille_r
ougemont_faucogney.htm

The daughter of Geoffrey II de Charny, Marguerite de Charny, marries
Jean de Beaufremont who will be killed at the battle of Azincourt in
1415. In 1418 Marguerite de Charny marries again, to Humbert de
Villersexel, seigneur de Saint Hippolyte sur le Doubs.

1418

The Shroud is given to Humbert de Villersexel by the Canons of
Lirey. It will be conserved in the chateau de Monfort, near
Montbard, then transferred to Saint Hippolyte sur le Doubs, in the
Chapelle des Buessarts.

1438

Death of Humbert de Villersexel ; the canons of Lirey want to
recover the Shroud. Marguarite de Charny refuses. The case is
carried before the parliament of Dole (May 1443), then to the Court
of Besancon (July 1447). Both decide in favour of Marguarite de
Charny. The canons refuse to accept this judgment, and ask for the
excommunication of Marguarite de Charny. In 1459 they abandon their
claim in return for financial compensation. The quarrel had lasted
21 years !

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jamesdow/s025/f001534.htm

The PEDIGREE of Ermentrude de MONTBELLIARD
Born: abt. 1120 Died: abt. 1171

Husband/Partner: Eudes (Othon) de la ROCHE-SUR-OGNON Child: Pons I
de la ROCHE-SUR-OGNON

Louis I de MOUSSON +

“The commune of the Mount was joined together with that of Dramelay
on March 19, 1825.

At the time Gallic, it was the oopida surrounding populations. A
tower, placed at Chaitelot, rose in the region along the way which
went the Saline ones in Izernore. The tradition populates spirits
the Wood of the Fairy which shade the foot of the mountain. The
Temple of Bacchus was replaced by a church dedicated to Saint
Martin’s day, substitution all the more constant as, not far from
the church, is a space of ground called as a Bacchus. These places
known as prove the high antiquity of Dramelay. Let us note in the
passing that there was the pagan Temple dedicated to Segomon Mars in
Arinthod, and the menhir of the small valley of Vogna.
With the fall of the Roman empire, Burgundes take this southern
region of the Jura. The Lords de Dramelay obtain a prerogative
between Suran and Valouse, to the river of Ain.
Lords: TheReferees made him return freedom. The marriage which took
place between Jean de Chalons II and Alix of Burgundy in 1317,
inserted the baronnie of Dramelay in the house of the Lords of
Orgelet.
On March 6, 1365, a division grants Tristan de Chalons Arinthod,
Dramelay, Boutavent.
Jean, Lord de Chalons, wire of Tristan, bequeath by will of May 3,
1396, in Alix of Trawl-nets his sister, married in 1384 in François
de Sassenage, Montfleur, Arinthod, Chavannes and Dramelay.

Alix remarie in 1403 in Guillaume of Saulieu. She bequeaths all her
goods to her nephew, Louis of Trawl-nets-Arlay III, in 1426. And the
house of Trawl-net-Arlay will preserve the ground of Dramelay until
the beginning of the XVI eme century.

Philiberte of Luxembourg sells it in 1512 to Philippe-François de
Luyrieux.
This last resells it in Louis of Saix, repurchases it in 1531 with
its successors.
In March 1643, it passes from Charles of the Room and Isabelle de
Luyrieux to Jean de Méria and Jean Mouchet.

Successive owners: Philibert of the Room, its sons Claude and Jean
of the Room
The latter find a ground grévée of debts. On October 29, 1561, their
uncle bishop of Belley and their curator authorizes them to sell to
Nicolas Chupin and Louise Battefort her wife. Leonel de Battefort,
wire of Louise de Battefort succeeds.”

“The only city to have claimed to possess the Shroud from 1208 to
1329 was the French city of Besançon. The theory is that during the
Fourth Crusade, the Burgundian knight who commanded the district of
Blachernae where the Shroud was kept, Othon de la Roche, Duke of
Athens and Sparta, received it as part of his recompense.”

Hugues de ROUGEMONT Seigneur de VILLERSEXEL

Born: ? Died: abt. 1227

Wife/Partner: Beatrice de FAUCOGNEY Possible Child:

Aymon de FAUCOGNEY Alternative Father of Possible Child: Aymon de
FAUCOGNEY

— Thiebaut I de ROUGEMONT

/
— Thiebaut II de ROUGEMONT (? – 1173+)

/
\
— Poncette de TRAVES (? – 1156+)
/
— Humbert II de ROUGEMONT (? – by 1227)
/
\
— Alais
– Hugues de ROUGEMONT
\
/
— Odon de BESANCON
\
— Sibille de BESANCON

\
— Julienne

“The theory that the Templars may have possessed the Shroud is
supported by the discovery in 1944 of a painting of the Holy Face
(circa 1280) on a wooden panel in the village of Templecombe,
England. This village was owned by the Knights Templars from about
1185. Rex Morgan, a Shroud scholar, hypothesized that the wooden
panel may actually have been a lid to a wooden box which contained
the Shroud when it was transferred from France to England during the
suppression of the Templars. “The Templecombe panel has 125 points
of congruence with the Shroud face . . . The fleur-de-lis decoration
of the painting strongly suggests French influence and the
quatrefoil design is recurrent in Templar . . . decorative motifs.”

The theory is very plausible, except that the Templars never
admitted to possessing the Shroud. The only city to have claimed to
possess the Shroud from 1208 to 1329 was the French city of
Besançon. The theory is that during the Fourth Crusade, the
Burgundian knight who commanded the district of Blachernae where the
Shroud was kept, Othon de la Roche, Duke of Athens and Sparta,
received it as part of his recompense. The claim that the Shroud was
in Athens is attested to directly in a letter by Theodore of Epirus
dated August 1, 1205, and indirectly by Nicholas of Otranto, abbot
of the monastery of Casole. Othon, in turn, sent the cloth to his
father, Ponce de la Roche, who then handed it over to the Bishop of
Besançon, who placed it in the Cathedral of St. Etienne where it was
exposed for veneration each year on Easter until 1349. In that year
a fire burned down the Cathedral causing slight damage to the
Shroud. In the midst of all the confusion, the Shroud disappeared.
According to a dubious sixteenth-century account kept in the second
church of Lirey, the Shroud was given to King Philip VI. He
subsequently gave it to a friend whose name, coincidentally, was the
same as the Templar Grand Master who was burned at the stake,
Geoffrey I de Charny!

http://www.tanbooks.com/doct/shroud_turin.htm

Archbishops of Besancon

1180-1190 : Thierry II de Montfaucon
1191-1193 : Etienne de Vienne
1993-1220 : Amédée de Tramelay
1221-1225 : Gérard de Rougemont
1225-1227 : Jean 1er HAlgrin
1229-1235 : Nicolas de Flavigny
1236-1241 : Geoffroy
1245-1268 : Guillaume II de la Tour
1269-1301 : Eudes de Rougemont
1302-1311 : Hugues de Chalon (ex évêque de Liège)
1312-1333 : Vital de Maignaut
1333-1355 : Hugues VI de Vienne
1355-1361 : Jean IIII de Vienne
1361-1362 : Louis de Montbéliard
1363-1370 : Aymon de Villersexel
1371-1391 : Guillaume II de Vergy
1391-1404 : Gerard III d’Athies
1405-1429 : Thiébaudde Rougemont
1430-1437 : Jean III de Rochetaille
1437-1438 : François Ier Condomieri
1438-1439 : Jean IV de Norry
1439-1462 : Quentin Ménard
1462-1498 : Charles de Neufchâtel

The noble association of the knights of Saint-George was founded in
Rougemont about the year 1300 by the sovereigns of the county of
Burgundy to gather Burgundian gentlemen of former knighthood. Their
badge at that time was a medal representing holy George with horse
embanking a dragon, suspended with a gold chain. This brotherhood
was destroyed at the end of XIVe century by the wars. She was
restored by Philibert of MOLLANS (3), knight comtois who would have
brought back Holy Land of the relics of Saint-George. He
consequently thought of offering them to the nobility of the county
of Burgundy. He thus joins together about 1435 or 1440, a certain
number of knights comtois to honour these relics in a vault which he
had with the castle of Rougemont. And it solved to celebrate each
year the festival of a saint, that the nobility regarded as its
owner, because it was knight and that one represented it with horse
armed with a lance. Philibert of MOLLANS was undoubtedly the first
governor of the order elected by the body of the knights.
Consequently, the largest lords of the country hastened to be made
receive in the brotherhood, and were assembled each year in the
vault of Rougemont on April 22, day before the George Saint.
Philippe the Good authorized the order to like carry the suspended
medal to a red ribbon that of the Golden Fleece. In 1648, the
brotherhood settled in Besancon and not in Dole, then capital county
of Burgundy, indeed the brotherhood had already a political role
while being opposed to the Parliament of Pares.

A room in the tower of Montmartin was granted to him by a treaty
with the town of Besancon, as well as the exemption of the housing
of people of war for the knights residing in Besancon. The knights
of Saint-George were besides only noble city of Besancon has to
profit from this inappreciable privilege. However, it seems to have
met several times at Vesoul, city which has as Saint-George patron
saint.

Then on April 25, 1661, the brotherhood is assembled in Salins and
decides that henceforth it will meet in Besancon, with the convent
of the Large Carmelite friars, rested by a fellow-member: Jean of
VIENNA. After the conquest, Louis XIV decided to tolerate the
brotherhood, in spite of his resistance to the invader. He made it
possible even to the knights to carry their medal of Saint-George
suspended to a blue moire ribbon like that about the Holy Spirit,
this in order to adapt has lower cost part of the nobility comtoise,
which would provide him executives devoted for its army. Besides
Louis XV & Louis XVI, continued the policy of the Sun king with
regard to the brotherhood, they addressed to the company portraits
the them same ones, in foot, where one could read: “Given by the
king the knights of George Saint of his county of Burgundy.”.

These portraits like that of the prince of COP, special guard of the
brotherhood decorated the superb room with the Large Carmelite
friars of Besancon, unfortunately destroyed at the time of the
Revolution. The plank of the woodworks of the room was decorated
series of the blasonnés ecus of the alive knights, with their
confined inscriptions of their four districts, which one descended
at the time of their death to be carried in ceremony with the
church, then suspended with their row in the nave where one saw a
great number of it which had decorated a long time the vault with
Rougemont. The church which was papered blazons of the knights of
George Saint was also paved of their tombs, “as if they had wanted
to join together in this place the emblems of human vanity to the
testimony of his nothing”. At the time of the general assembly of
April 25, 1768, new statutes were written, they will be studied here.

Article II – If the governor or ordering province wants to attend
these assemblies, the four appointed knights will accompany it
instead of the assembly, where it will take the row and the meeting
due to his load and the sovereign which it represents, which is the
chief of the knighthood.Article III – The archbishops and bishops,
knights of the order, will be drawn from their row of reception, in
consideration of their dignities joined together with that of
knight, and will immediately have meeting after the governor of the
order, in armchairs placed at its left and with the top of the
table, and the other knights will sit each one with their row of
reception.
y go down from the sovereign Counts of Burgundy.

Bernard de Dramelay: (1134) figure at the court of Renaud III of
Bourgogne.Il goes to the crusade préchée by Saint-Bernard in 1147,
fights with the head office of Ascalon, and obtains the
distinguished title of Large Maitre of the Temple of Midsummer’s Day
of Jerusalem.
Hugues de Dramelay: (1175) He is constable of the county of Burgundy.

Amédée de Dramelay becomes Archevêque of Besancon at the end of the
XII eme century. Put to the test by its political options, it was
locked up with the Castle of Montbeliard a few months in 1199.
Returned to freedom, it goes back on its seat, but the count Etienne
of Burgundy often devastated his fields. Wearied troubles which its
canons caused him, it left for the crusade in 1218 and died out of
Holy Land in 1220. In him the family of the Lords de Dramelay died
out.
Etienne of Burgundy, owner of Baronnie d’ Orgelet, joins together
Baronnie de Dramelay with his fields. The descendants of Guillaume
de Dramelay, nephew of Bernard, do not preserve any right on this
ground.

Jean de Chalons collected the baronnie of Dramelay, in the
succession of his father in 1248. He lays out about it in favour of
Philippe de Courtenay, and in August 1248 gives it into stronghold-
liege to Raoul de Courtenay and his successors, by stipulating that
the castle would be jurable and rendable with him or (and?) with
those of the children whom it would have of Isabelle de Courtenay
his wife. What enabled him to return in possession of this property
when good would seem to him; what did not delay since in 1262
his/her son ainé Hugues entered in property of this ground. The
latter was allocated to the son of Hugues, named Renaud, who did not
want to recognize any more Jean de Chalons for his suzerain. This
last made him the war and did it captive.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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