Robin – Pan – Baphomet

pan100pan44pan77pan88pan99This morning I found a program wherein Floris Rosemondt comes upon the artist, Bosch, and beholds his art work. Just before this meeting, Floris von Rosenmund and his Indian sidekick, are looking through an illustrated book of fantastic creatures. Was the infamous Baphomet within? Did Bosh come across this creature that is asociated with the Templars and the Masonic Guild?

The name of that episode is ‘Hairy Devil’.

The Rosemondts and Bosch were members of the Swan Brethren, a Guild in Holland. My mother, Rosemary, and her sister, Lilian (two flower names) dated Errol Flynn who played Robin Hood a character compared to Robin Goodfellow, who is compared to Pan and Puck. Floris Rosenmund is a Robin Hood character.

I also found a Niclaus Rosenmund, who was the Master of the Weavers Guild of Basel in 1643. This is the third guild the Rosamond family belonged to. The Gerbenzunft is another. Consider the Rosamond cote of arms that depicts a dancing wolf with the words ‘Duke of the Woods’ . Robin Hood was called Robin Wood. Add to this that Drew Benton’s great grandfather, a Masonic Grand Master, saved Albert Pike’s library, then what we have is a lineage that many have pointed to, but, only a few belong.

I think we have a winner, folks. The contest is over. Is the intellectual approach…….now closed?

Let us come hither with our Fawn, our Fairy, and our Magical Roses!

Jon Presco

Copyright 2012

Floris von Rosemund is a German television series from 1975 in 19 episodes. It is a herverfilming of the Dutch Floris series from 1969, of Paul Verhoeven and Gerard Soeteman with Rutger Hauer in the lead role.
Rutger Hauer also played in the German series starring. However, the role was taken over by the German actor of Sindala Derval de Faria. The series was directed by Ferry Radax, and followed the scenario by Soeteman was written in 1967. The outside shots were rotated in Hungary . Unlike the Dutch black and white series, is the German series recorded on 16 mm color film.

In 1890, the Guild their former master Fritz Rosenmund donated a large gold-plated honorary cup for his victorious fight with the “Championship” because of the Guild’s assets.
Inscription on an oval medallion: the earned Guild master FRITZ ROSENMUND donated by the Guild of tanners Basel 1890, in: J.Fiechter, L.Gally, E.Buser, L. Köhler, A.Raillard, E. Sands, A.Unkel on top the edge of the is engraved: this Cup, as well as respective certificate of commendation were due to lack of male offspring by Max Bächlin’s marriage team, née Rosenmund, E.E.Zunft to tanners on August 16, 1945 kindly refunded. (Height 43 cm, weight 870 g)
The Cup in 1944 came from the hand of the Guild writer to bread basin, Max Bächlin Rosenmund, as a gift to the Guild. It is used today in admissions of Guild brothers as chalice. Also veterans – 40 years membership of the Guild – get a good bite out of this mug on her appointment.
http://gerbernzunft.ch/index.php?id=259

5. the hairy Devil
As Philip the fair a Grand painting bought from Jeroen Bosch put Charles, Duke of guelders are phrases on this painting. Try to obtain the painting, despite long Pier that he as the death appears for all Devils on the painting.

Illustre Lieve Vrouwe Brotherhood
In 1486-1487 he joined the Illustre Lieve Vrouwe Brotherhood, a religious fraternity name in ‘s-Hertogenbosch. In 1488 he was appointed sworn brother of this fraternity, which means that he recorded was in the mental state – albeit in the lowest rank.[10] Through the fraternity acquired a number of commands, such as the Bosch ‘ doors van der staende by our Women rather opt autair tablets ‘ (hatches of the retable standing on the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwe-altar), which today are associated with the work John the Baptist and John the Evangelist. On the right panel he would, prominent above his signature, as pictured, a demon that have Devil chorus all the sins of the man they record and on the day of judgment will use against him. Proof of this is missing, but it is very applicable to Bosch, which many abuses that he saw around him, recorded in his work. In 1493 or 1494, he designed a stained-glass window of the chapel of the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwebroederschap in the Sint-Jan, that by the stained-glass painter Willem Lombart was performed.[7]

http://gerbernzunft.ch/index.php?id=179

It has long been suggested, notably by John Maddicott, that “Robin Hood” was a stock alias used by thieves.[54] The 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica remarks that ‘hood’ was a common dialectical form of ‘wood’; and that the outlaw’s name has been given as “Robin Wood”.[25] There are indeed a number of references to Robin Hood as Robin Wood, or Whood, or Whod, from the 16th and 17th centuries. The earliest recorded example, in connection with May games in Somerset, dates from 1518.[55]

1.
Despite appearances, there are notable similarities between three mythical character from English literature. Peter Pan, Robin Hood and Gulliver. All three are linked to nature, and a forest green color. Who noticed that the costume of Peter-at least the one popularized by the cinema, and clothing of Robin Hood are the same? Even green tunic, whose fringes are reminiscent of tree leaves, even little hat decorated with a feather.

1.
Who is Pan?
Who is Pan?
Pan is the demonic pagan god of sexual perversion, pedophilia and rape he’s also portrayed roaming through the forests, penis erect, drunk and lascivious, frolicking with nymphs and piping his way through the wild. We might say he ruled the lower nature of man, its animal side. The attributes or symbols associated with Pan are woods, pastures, umbrella, phallus and the flute(also called Pan flute). He is depicted with goat’s feet and two horns, and wearing a lynx-pelt. 

The goat connection may be even more significant than the cat. It goes back to antiquity. A powerful clan in ancient Greece, the Palentids, claimed they were originally descended from a sacred goat. The horned and hoofed Greek goat-god, Pan, is one of the most important entities of Witchcraft.
Source : Encyclopedia Mythica
Pan is also the god of music, the god of goats, and sheep, and their shepherds

In English folklore, Puck is a mythological fairy or mischievous nature sprite. Puck is also a generalised personification of land spirits. In more recent times, the figure of Robin Goodfellow is identified as a puck.
The Old English “puca” is a kind of half-tamed woodland sprite, leading folk astray with echoes and lights in nighttime woodlands (like the German and Dutch “Weisse Frauen” and “Witte Wieven” and the French “Dames Blanches,” all “White Ladies”), or coming into the farmstead and souring milk in the churn.
Since, if you “speak of the Devil” he will appear, Puck’s euphemistic “disguised” name is “Robin Goodfellow” or “Hobgoblin”,[1] in which “Hob” may substitute for “Rob” or may simply refer to the “goblin of the hearth” or hob. The name Robin is Middle English in origin, deriving from Old French Robin, the pet form for the name Robert (which had cognates in the Old English Hrodberht and Old German Rodbert or Hrodebert, all derived from the Proto-Germanic hrôdberxtas. See Robert). The earliest reference to “Robin Goodfellow” cited by the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1531. After Meyerbeer’s successful opera Robert le Diable (1831), neo-medievalists and occultists began to apply the name Robin Goodfellow to the Devil, with appropriately extravagant imagery.
If you had the knack, Puck might do minor housework for you, quick fine needlework or butter-churning, which could be undone in a moment by his knavish tricks if you fell out of favour with him. Pucks are also known to be inherently lonely creatures, and often share the goal of acquiring friends. “Those that Hob-goblin call you, and sweet Puck, / You do their work, and they shall have good luck” said one of William Shakespeare’s fairies. Shakespeare’s characterization of “shrewd and knavish” Puck in A Midsummer Night’s Dream may have revived flagging interest in Puck.[2]
According to Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (1898):
[Robin Goodfellow is a] “drudging fiend”, and merry domestic fairy, famous for mischievous pranks and practical jokes. At night-time he will sometimes do little services for the family over which he presides. The Scots call this domestic spirit a brownie; the Germans, kobold or Knecht Ruprecht. Scandinavians called it Nissë God-dreng. Puck, the jester of Fairy-court, is the same.
[edit] In English literature
Main article: Puck (A Midsummer Night’s Dream)
Puck, also known as Robin Goodfellow, is a character in William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream, whose nature has been so clearly fixed in the English-speaking imagination that, as Katherine Briggs has remarked,[3] “it no longer seems natural to talk as Robert Burton does in the Anatomie of Melancholy of a puck instead of ‘Puck'”. The audience is introduced to Puck in Act II Scene I when Puck encounters one of Titania’s fairies. She recognizes Puck for
that shrewd and knavish sprite
Call’d Robin Goodfellow: are not you he
That frights the maidens of the villagery;
Skim milk, and sometimes labour in the quern
And bootless make the breathless housewife churn;
And sometime make the drink to bear no barm;
Mislead night-wanderers, laughing at their harm?
Those that Hobgoblin call you and sweet Puck,
You do their work, and they shall have good luck:
Are not you he?
It is Puck’s mischievous and sometimes mistaken doings that provide the convolutions of the plot.
Aside from Shakespeare’s famous use of Puck, many other writers have referred to the spirit as well. An early 17th century broadside ballad, “The Mad Merry Pranks of Robin Goodfellow”—which is so deft and literate it has been taken for the work of Ben Jonson—describes Puck/Robin Goodfellow as the emissary of Oberon, the Faery King, inspiring night-terrors in old women but also carding their wool while they sleep, leading travellers astray, taking the shape of animals, blowing out the candles to kiss the girls in the darkness, twitching off their bedclothes, or making them fall out of bed on the cold floor, tattling secrets, and changing babes in cradles with elflings. All his work is done by moonlight, and his mocking, echoing laugh is “Ho ho ho!”
Robin Goodfellow is the main speaker in Jonson’s 1612 masque Love Restored.
John Milton, in L’Allegro tells “how the drudging Goblin swet / To earn his cream-bowle windy sillica” by threshing a week’s worth of grain in a night, and then, “A weeja-beeba, / Basks at the fire his hairy strength.” Milton’s Puck is not small and sprightly, but nearer to a Green Man or a hairy woodwose. An illustration of Robin Goodfellow from 1639 reflects the influence of Pan imagery giving Puck the hindquarters, cloven hooves and horns of a goat.[4]
Goethe also used Puck in the first half of Faust, in a scene entitled “A Walpurgis Night Dream”, where he played off of the spirit Ariel from The Tempest.

Kipling’s Puck of Pook’s Hill, painted by Arthur Rackham
Puck’s trademark laugh in the early ballads is “Ho ho ho.”[5]
The folklore of Puck was magisterially assembled by William Bell, in two volumes that appeared in 1852[6] that have been called a “monument to nineteenth-century antiquarianism gone rampant.”[7]
In Rudyard Kipling’s Puck of Pook’s Hill (1906), Puck, the last of the People of the Hills and “the oldest thing in England”, charms the children Dan and Una with a collection of tales and visitors out of England’s past.
[edit] Etymology and Origins
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the etymology of the name Puck is “unsettled”, and it is not clear even whether its origin is Germanic (cf. Old Norse puki, Old Swedish puke, Icelandic puki, Frisian Puk), or Celtic (Welsh pwca[8] Cornish Bucca and Irish púca).
One inference would surmise that a theoretical Proto-Indo-European original for both is earlier than the linguistic split.[9]
According to Paul Devereux, the names of various creatures from Celtic folklore, including the Irish, “púca,” Welsh, “pwca” or “pwca,” could be from the same Celtic family as the term “pixies” (in Cornwall, “Piskies”),[10] however “piskie” could be related to the Swedish word “pyske” meaning “small fairy.”
Other likely names:
Bosworth and Toller list only “púcel” (puucel) in Old English.[11]
In Friesland, there is a “Puk”
In old German, the “putz” or “butz” is a being not unlike the original English Puck.
In Icelandic a “Púki” is a little devil. “Púkinn” with the definite article suffix “-inn”, “The Puck”, means the Devil.
“Pukje” is the Norwegian word for a similar malevolent spirit creature.[12]
In modern Cornwall folklore are Buccas, good and bad.

In English folklore, Puck is a mythological fairy or mischievous nature sprite. Puck is also a generalised personification of land spirits. In more recent times, the figure of Robin Goodfellow is identified as a puck.
The Old English “puca” is a kind of half-tamed woodland sprite, leading folk astray with echoes and lights in nighttime woodlands (like the German and Dutch “Weisse Frauen” and “Witte Wieven” and the French “Dames Blanches,” all “White Ladies”), or coming into the farmstead and souring milk in the churn.
Since, if you “speak of the Devil” he will appear, Puck’s euphemistic “disguised” name is “Robin Goodfellow” or “Hobgoblin”,[1] in which “Hob” may substitute for “Rob” or may simply refer to the “goblin of the hearth” or hob. The name Robin is Middle English in origin, deriving from Old French Robin, the pet form for the name Robert (which had cognates in the Old English Hrodberht and Old German Rodbert or Hrodebert, all derived from the Proto-Germanic hrôdberxtas. See Robert). The earliest reference to “Robin Goodfellow” cited by the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1531. After Meyerbeer’s successful opera Robert le Diable (1831), neo-medievalists and occultists began to apply the name Robin Goodfellow to the Devil, with appropriately extravagant imagery.
If you had the knack, Puck might do minor housework for you, quick fine needlework or butter-churning, which could be undone in a moment by his knavish tricks if you fell out of favour with him. Pucks are also known to be inherently lonely creatures, and often share the goal of acquiring friends. “Those that Hob-goblin call you, and sweet Puck, / You do their work, and they shall have good luck” said one of William Shakespeare’s fairies. Shakespeare’s characterization of “shrewd and knavish” Puck in A Midsummer Night’s Dream may have revived flagging interest in Puck.[2]
According to Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (1898):
[Robin Goodfellow is a] “drudging fiend”, and merry domestic fairy, famous for mischievous pranks and practical jokes. At night-time he will sometimes do little services for the family over which he presides. The Scots call this domestic spirit a brownie; the Germans, kobold or Knecht Ruprecht. Scandinavians called it Nissë God-dreng. Puck, the jester of Fairy-court, is the same.
[edit] In English literature
Main article: Puck (A Midsummer Night’s Dream)
Puck, also known as Robin Goodfellow, is a character in William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream, whose nature has been so clearly fixed in the English-speaking imagination that, as Katherine Briggs has remarked,[3] “it no longer seems natural to talk as Robert Burton does in the Anatomie of Melancholy of a puck instead of ‘Puck'”. The audience is introduced to Puck in Act II Scene I when Puck encounters one of Titania’s fairies. She recognizes Puck for
that shrewd and knavish sprite
Call’d Robin Goodfellow: are not you he
That frights the maidens of the villagery;
Skim milk, and sometimes labour in the quern
And bootless make the breathless housewife churn;
And sometime make the drink to bear no barm;
Mislead night-wanderers, laughing at their harm?
Those that Hobgoblin call you and sweet Puck,
You do their work, and they shall have good luck:
Are not you he?
It is Puck’s mischievous and sometimes mistaken doings that provide the convolutions of the plot.
Aside from Shakespeare’s famous use of Puck, many other writers have referred to the spirit as well. An early 17th century broadside ballad, “The Mad Merry Pranks of Robin Goodfellow”—which is so deft and literate it has been taken for the work of Ben Jonson—describes Puck/Robin Goodfellow as the emissary of Oberon, the Faery King, inspiring night-terrors in old women but also carding their wool while they sleep, leading travellers astray, taking the shape of animals, blowing out the candles to kiss the girls in the darkness, twitching off their bedclothes, or making them fall out of bed on the cold floor, tattling secrets, and changing babes in cradles with elflings. All his work is done by moonlight, and his mocking, echoing laugh is “Ho ho ho!”
Robin Goodfellow is the main speaker in Jonson’s 1612 masque Love Restored.
John Milton, in L’Allegro tells “how the drudging Goblin swet / To earn his cream-bowle windy sillica” by threshing a week’s worth of grain in a night, and then, “A weeja-beeba, / Basks at the fire his hairy strength.” Milton’s Puck is not small and sprightly, but nearer to a Green Man or a hairy woodwose. An illustration of Robin Goodfellow from 1639 reflects the influence of Pan imagery giving Puck the hindquarters, cloven hooves and horns of a goat.[4]
Goethe also used Puck in the first half of Faust, in a scene entitled “A Walpurgis Night Dream”, where he played off of the spirit Ariel from The Tempest.

Kipling’s Puck of Pook’s Hill, painted by Arthur Rackham
Puck’s trademark laugh in the early ballads is “Ho ho ho.”[5]
The folklore of Puck was magisterially assembled by William Bell, in two volumes that appeared in 1852[6] that have been called a “monument to nineteenth-century antiquarianism gone rampant.”[7]
In Rudyard Kipling’s Puck of Pook’s Hill (1906), Puck, the last of the People of the Hills and “the oldest thing in England”, charms the children Dan and Una with a collection of tales and visitors out of England’s past.
[edit] Etymology and Origins
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the etymology of the name Puck is “unsettled”, and it is not clear even whether its origin is Germanic (cf. Old Norse puki, Old Swedish puke, Icelandic puki, Frisian Puk), or Celtic (Welsh pwca[8] Cornish Bucca and Irish púca).
One inference would surmise that a theoretical Proto-Indo-European original for both is earlier than the linguistic split.[9]
According to Paul Devereux, the names of various creatures from Celtic folklore, including the Irish, “púca,” Welsh, “pwca” or “pwca,” could be from the same Celtic family as the term “pixies” (in Cornwall, “Piskies”),[10] however “piskie” could be related to the Swedish word “pyske” meaning “small fairy.”
Other likely names:
Bosworth and Toller list only “púcel” (puucel) in Old English.[11]
In Friesland, there is a “Puk”
In old German, the “putz” or “butz” is a being not unlike the original English Puck.
In Icelandic a “Púki” is a little devil. “Púkinn” with the definite article suffix “-inn”, “The Puck”, means the Devil.
“Pukje” is the Norwegian word for a similar malevolent spirit creature.[12]
In modern Cornwall folklore are Buccas, good and bad.
http://hesternic.tripod.com/robinhood.htm

Floris is a Dutch television series, written by Gerard Soeteman, and directed by Paul Verhoeven. The main roles were played by Rutger Hauer (Floris), and Jos Bergman (Sindala). The twelve black-witafleveringen in 1969 were broadcast by the NTS and his repeated several times afterwards.

Content
[hide]
1 production and background
2 Cast
3 Episodes
4 Characters
5 summary episodes
6 external links
[Edit] Production and background
To make the series was decided in 1967 by Carel Enkelaar, Director of the NTS. Enkelaar saw that the British series Ivanhoe, the French Thierry la Fronde and the Flemish series series Johan and the Alverman, who all played in the middle ages , had much success. He found that Netherlands had to have such a television series and also gave drama translator Gerard Soeteman command to come up with a proposal. This then wrote a scenario for a series about a Knight and a fakir, Floris and the Fakir called.
A striking point is that the Burgundians are portrayed in the series as heroes and their enemies (guelders and Long Pier) as immoral rogues and conquerors, while they correct for their own freedom against the Burgundian conquerors fought. The recordings took place in 1968; for a large part on Castle doornenburg and in addition, under more on Castle Hernen, Loevestein, and in Ghent and Bruges. For the lead role of Floris had one Carol van Herwijnen in mind, but that could be because of other obligations not freeing. Rutger Hauer, when working at the Compagnie Nord was as a replacement cast. Although Soeteman had written a scenario with two equivalent protagonists, hit Jos Bergman quickly eclipsed by Hauer.
Director Verhoeven got from producer Max Apple tree a free hand, and exceeded the budget by 300 percent, to the displeasure of the NTS that the facilities strong versoberde and finally the recordings left stop. The episode was split into two parts The Rook to be able to conclude the series. The intended thirteenth part is never created. Though still followed a making ofdocumentary. Also a sequel series should not be created.
The twelve episodes were aired from 5 October to 21 december 1969. The first episode attracted viewers 2,790,000; the third installment more than 3.5 million viewers. Floris was in 1969 best viewed program on Dutch television. There appeared Floris-Floris-Floris books, comics, and a-feature plate. Floris was also the beginning of the successful cooperation between Soeteman, Verhoeven, Hauer, such as those under more stature and got in Turkish delight (1973) and soldier of Orange (1977).
In 1975 was a German remake of the series created under the title Floris von Rosemund. Hauer played the lead role again. The role of fakir was portrayed by the German actor Derval de Faria. The Director was of Ferry Radax.
In the documentary The Knight and the Fakir (1999) Paul Versteegen looks back on the series key stakeholders. Cameraman tells how he Tonnes Buné brand-new Director Verhoeven using the slap Board had to learn.
In 2004 was the premiere of a movie about the grandson of Floris, directed by Jean van de Velde. This movie is called also Floris. In the film are old images from the television series.
[Edit] Roles
Character
Actor/Actress
Floris van Rosemondt
Rutger Hauer
Sindala
Jos Bergman
Reinbout
Cees Pijpers
Wolter of Oldenstein
Ton Vos
Maarten van Rossem (Rossum)
Hans Culeman
Sergeant
Tim Beekman
Long Pier
Hans Boskamp
Countess Ada of Couwenberg
Diana Marlet
Chambermaid Viola
Ida Bons
[Edit] Episodes
Read warning: text Below contains details of the plot and/or the end of the story.
1. the Stolen Castle
Floris van Rosemondt returns after years of traveling back home to his legacy, a castle, on demand. This has, however, in use as a toll House and guelders Maarten van Rossem let Floris and his travel companion Sindala detention under the guise of spying for one Wolter of Oldenstein. However, for the door soon that State itself to save them.
2. The Copper Dog
Oldenstein is besieged by Van Rossem, that the enormous Cannon the Copper Dog let tweak. Floris Sindala, which are outside the Castle, and must see to sabotage.
3. the black Bullets
In a robbery on a weapon transport there appears to be a traitor on Oldenstein. The question is who? But not for one hole to catch Sindala is and has a plan.
4. the Man of Ghent
A Gentenaar, called guy of Sugar belly, comes along with the message that Oldenstein Van Rossem intends to attack, which Mr Wolter Oudewater sends aid. Than Long Pier on arrival to the chapel turns out to plunder, which Wolter and Floris with the last soldiers out. Sindala stays behind with sugar belly. But goes Long Pier to the Chapel, or is he something else of plan?
5. the hairy Devil
As Philip the fair a Grand painting bought from Jeroen Bosch put Charles, Duke of guelders are phrases on this painting. Try to obtain the painting, despite long Pier that he as the death appears for all Devils on the painting.

Illustre Lieve Vrouwe Brotherhood
In 1486-1487 he joined the Illustre Lieve Vrouwe Brotherhood, a religious fraternity name in ‘s-Hertogenbosch. In 1488 he was appointed sworn brother of this fraternity, which means that he recorded was in the mental state – albeit in the lowest rank.[10] Through the fraternity acquired a number of commands, such as the Bosch ‘ doors van der staende by our Women rather opt autair tablets ‘ (hatches of the retable standing on the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwe-altar), which today are associated with the work John the Baptist and John the Evangelist. On the right panel he would, prominent above his signature, as pictured, a demon that have Devil chorus all the sins of the man they record and on the day of judgment will use against him. Proof of this is missing, but it is very applicable to Bosch, which many abuses that he saw around him, recorded in his work. In 1493 or 1494, he designed a stained-glass window of the chapel of the Onze-Lieve-Vrouwebroederschap in the Sint-Jan, that by the stained-glass painter Willem Lombart was performed.[7]

Floris von Rosemund

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Floris von Rosemund
Genre
Drama
Playing Time
26 minutes
Main Roles
Rutger Hauer
Derval de Faria
Director
Ferry Radax
Scenario
Gerard Soeteman
Country
Germany
Language
German

(and) IMDb-profile
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Television

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Robin – Pan – Baphomet

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    My Great Muse was showing me what I had gathered and stored in this blog that Marilyn Reed and Kathy Vrzak do not want to be associated with. They shame me in their message. They use the false alligations I am stalking Belle to throw a monkey wrench in my professional production. They let my enemies know they are not on my side, and are on their side. Outrageous! They stabbed me in the back. My Muse came to my aid – and healed me! Who is she?

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