The Thorny Crown of the Scapegoat

There are two trees associated with John the Baptist, the carob and the Acacia. The later has large thorns similar to the thorns that make up the crucifixion crown of Jesus. I believe the Acacia and Rachia tree mentioned in Barnabas 7:8 are the same tree.

Barnabas 7:8 And do ye all spit upon it and goad it, and place scarlet wool
about its head, and so let it be cast into the wilderness. And when it is so
done, he that taketh the goat into the wilderness leadeth it, and taketh off the
wool, and putteth it upon the branch which is called Rachia, the same whereof we
are wont to eat the shoots when we find them in the country. Of this briar alone
is the fruit thus sweet.

The fruit of this tree is sweet for a time, and then it turns bitter – as sweet as honey, and as bitter as a locust. John lived on the Honey Locust or Three Thorned Acacia Tree that grew in the Jordan valley where John Baptized. I was named after John because I was born three days after the Day of Atonement during an amazing star shower.

In Genesis Abraham is about to make a human sacrifice of his son, but spots a substitute, a goat caught by its horns in the thorns of the Acacia tree – John’s tree – whose ministry was all about Atonement!

In the painting above we see scarlet wool entwined in the horns of the Scapegoat. I was a born scapegoat. I died for many sins, the foremost being, what the Germans did to the Jews – and the world!

John was to be a Nazarite while in his mother’s womb, until the moment of his death. Consider Matthew 27:53 that depicts a premeditated human sacrifice for a specific purpose. This is what Paul’s church has been hiding from you. This sacrifice has everything to do with the Jews – and not the Gentiles!

“It is done!”

Jon the Nazarite

Copyright 2012

In Genesis 22, God asks Abraham to sacrifice his only son, Isaac. On the journey to Moriah, Isaac becomes curious (or even nervous) that they have brought everything necessary for the holocaust except the offering itself. Verses 7-8 (NAB) state: As the two walked on together, Isaac spoke to his father Abraham. “Father!” he said. “Yes, son,” he replied. Isaac continued, “Here are the fire and the wood, but where is the sheep for the burnt offering?” “Son,” Abraham answered, “God himself will provide the sheep for the burnt offering.” Then the two continued going forward. As Abraham is about to deliver the fatal stroke with his knife, his hand is stayed by an angel. Abraham then looks for a suitable replacement for the sacrifice. Genesis 22:13 (NAB) states: As Abraham looked about, he spied a ram caught by its horns in the thicket. So he went and took the ram and offered it up as a burnt offering in place of his son.

The thorns of the honey locust are thorns indeed-modified branches that branch again, and are rooted in the very pith of the twig that bears them. The “thorns” of the yellow locust are prickles-merely skin deep. Occasionally a leaf appears on the side of a young thorn to strengthen the evidence that the thorn is a branch changed to a special form to serve a special use. But the thorns stop growing when they reach about a foot in length, and remain indefinitely in their places, ranging along the branches or clustered on the trunk, even encircling it in some instances with the most formidable chevaux-de-frise -a barrier to the ambitions of climbing boys, and to cropping cows which like the taste of locust foliage. There is a thornless variety which is the delight of boys who climb for the sweet pods in summer time.

Honey Locust or Three Thorned Acacia Tree

The foliage mass of the honey locust is wonderfully light and graceful. New leaves with a silvery sheen upon them are constantly appearing; some once, some twice compound, on the same tree. The colour of them is a clear, intense emerald. The pods in midsummer show many shades of changeable red and green velvet against the leaves, and are as beautiful in form as in colour and texture.
In this stage of growth the pods contain a sweet, edible pulp which later dries and turns bitter. An Old-World tree has pods that are thicker but otherwise resemble those of the honey locust; these sweetish pods are sold on the streets of New York as “St. John’s Bread,” and are believed to be the locusts eaten by John the Baptist in the wilderness.

Honey locusts, Gleditsia triacanthos, can reach a height of 20–30 m (66–100 ft), with fast growth, and are relatively short-lived; their life spans are typically about 120 years, though some live up to 150 years. They are prone to losing large branches in windstorms. The leaves are pinnately compound on older trees but bipinnately compound on vigorous young trees. The leaflets are 1.5–2.5 cm (smaller on bipinnate leaves) and bright green. They turn yellow in the fall (autumn). Leafs out relatively late in spring, but generally slightly earlier than the black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia). The strongly scented cream-colored flowers appear in late spring, in clusters emerging from the base of the leaf axils.
The fruit of the Honey locust is a flat legume (pod) that matures in early autumn. The pods are generally between 15–20 cm. The pulp on the insides of the pods is edible, unlike the Black locust, which is toxic. The seeds are dispersed by grazing herbivores such as cattle and horses, which eat the pod pulp and excrete the seeds in droppings; the animal’s digestive system assists in breaking down the hard seed coat, making germination easier.
Honey locusts commonly have thorns 3–10 cm long growing out of the branches, some reaching lengths over 20 cm; these may be single, or branched into several points, and commonly form dense clusters. The thorns are fairly soft and green when young, harden and turn red as they age, then fade to ash grey and turn brittle when mature. These thorns are thought to have evolved to protect the trees from browsing Pleistocene megafauna which may also have been involved in seed dispersal.[1] Thornless forms (Gleditsia triacanthos inermis) are occasionally found growing wild and are available as nursery plants.
Ranchers and farmers, though, do deem this species as invasive because it quickly can move into pastures and grazing lands out-competeing grasses for living space.
[edit] Uses
Despite its name, the honey locust is not a significant honey plant. The name derives from the sweet taste of the legume pulp, which was used for food by Native American people, and can also be fermented to make beer. The long pods, which eventually dry and ripen to brown or maroon, are surrounded in a tough, leathery skin that adheres very strongly to the pulp within. The pulp – bright green in unripe pods – is strongly sweet, crisp and succulent in unripe pods. Dark brown tannin-rich beans are found in slots within the pulp.

Unripe honey locust pods
Its cultivars are popular ornamental plants, especially in the northern plains of North America where few other trees can survive and prosper. It tolerates urban conditions, compacted soil, road salt, alkaline soil, heat and drought. The popularity is in part due to the fact that it transplants so easily. The fast growth rate and tolerance of poor site conditions make it valued in areas where shade is wanted quickly, such as new parks or housing developments, and in disturbed and reclaimed environments, such as mine tailings. It is resistant to Gypsy moths but is defoliated by another pest, the mimosa webworm. Spider mites, cankers, and galls are a problem with some trees. Many cultivated varieties do not have thorns.

Following Genesis 3:18— “thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee…” (KJV) — thorns were seen by Christian writers as emblems of the Fall of Man.
In Genesis 22, God asks Abraham to sacrifice his only son, Isaac. On the journey to Moriah, Isaac becomes curious (or even nervous) that they have brought everything necessary for the holocaust except the offering itself. Verses 7-8 (NAB) state: As the two walked on together, Isaac spoke to his father Abraham. “Father!” he said. “Yes, son,” he replied. Isaac continued, “Here are the fire and the wood, but where is the sheep for the burnt offering?” “Son,” Abraham answered, “God himself will provide the sheep for the burnt offering.” Then the two continued going forward. As Abraham is about to deliver the fatal stroke with his knife, his hand is stayed by an angel. Abraham then looks for a suitable replacement for the sacrifice. Genesis 22:13 (NAB) states: As Abraham looked about, he spied a ram caught by its horns in the thicket. So he went and took the ram and offered it up as a burnt offering in place of his son.
In Old Testament times, ‘horns’ were considered as a sign of power or authority. The symbol of ‘sheep’, in general, was used for humanity. The sheep in question here is mentioned specifically as a “ram” (male) versus a “ewe” (female). The “ram” thus serves as a forshadowing of Jesus Christ. He (the Messianic God-Man) is the male leader over every nation, serving as the only suitable replacement sacrifice to God in the place of all humanity, which had been sentenced to eternal death for their disobedience in the Garden of Eden [Genesis 2:16-17 (NAB) & Genesis 3:2-3,19 (NAB)]. Of note here is that the “ram” is caught about the “horns” (head) “in a thicket” (bushes or branches) prior to its being sacrificed, thus forshadowing the Crown of Thorns.

The scapegoat was a goat that was designated (Hebrew לַעֲזָאזֵֽל ) la-aza’zeyl; either “for absolute removal” (Brown-Driver-Briggs Lexicon) or possibly “for Azazel” (some modern versions taking the term as a name) and outcast in the desert as part of the ceremonies of the Day of Atonement, that began during the Exodus with the original Tabernacle and continued through the times of the temples in Jerusalem.
Throughout the year and on the Day of Atonement, the record of all the sins of the Israelites was transferred to the Tabernacle by the blood of the sacrifices. On the Day of Atonement, the tabernacle was cleansed of all the accumulated sins by the ritual described in Leviticus 16. At that time the high priest confesses the accumulated sins of the Children of Israel to the scapegoat which is then sent into the desert wilderness. The Tabernacle and the Children of Israel were thus cleansed of sin.[14]
This has been interpreted to be a prefigure of the final judgment by which sin is removed forever from the universe. Through the sacrifice of Jesus, the sins of the believers are forgiven them, but the fact that sins were committed still exist on record in the “Books” of heaven (see Revelation 20:12). After the final judgment, the responsibility for all those forgiven sins are accredited to the originator of sin, Satan. After which, Satan is destroyed in the Lake of Fire. Sin no longer will exist anywhere.[15]
Since this goat is sent away to perish,[16] the word “scapegoat” has come to mean a person who is blamed and punished for the sins, crimes or sufferings of others, generally as a way of distracting attention from the real causes. The story of the scapegoat in Leviticus has also been interpreted as a symbolic prefigure of the self-sacrifice of Jesus, who takes the sins of humanity on his own head, having been crucified on a cross outside the city by order of the Roman prefect Pontius Pilate, after pressure from the Jewish leaders.

Locust & Wild Honey

According to Matt 3:4 and Mark 1:6 John the Bapist ate locusts [Gr. akrides, plural of Akris] and wild honey.

Mt 3:4 And the same John had his raiment of camel’s hair, and a leathern girdle about his loins; and his meat was locusts [Gr. akrides] and wild honey.
Mr 1:6 And John was clothed with camel’s hair, and with a girdle of a skin about his loins; and he did eat locusts [Gr. akrides] and wild honey;

Whether this was all John ate we do not know.
It is possible that the diet of locusts & honey were considered to be the distinguishing diet of a prophet, even as “raiment of camel’s hair, and a lethern girdle” marked him a successor of the ancient prophets. (See DA 102).
“Locusts and honey” may have been representative of various articles of food in the wilderness emphasising a lonely abstemious diet.

In English the word “locust” properly denotes both an insect and certain kinds of trees. However in Greek literature Akris always denotes the insect. This has led virtually all commentators to teach that John ate the insects, which were permitted by according to the law (Lev 11:22).

However, from very early Christian times there is a tradition, persistent, widespread and emphatic that in Matthew & Luke akris meant something other than the insect. Of all the suggestions the Carob pod is the most likely because of linguistic & anthropological considerations as will be shown.

The Carob tree (Ceratonia seliquis) is cultivated extensively in the Mediterranean Sea, and is common in Palestine from Hebron northward. It fruit which matures in late spring is a flat pod shaped somewhat like a Lima bean, and from six to ten inches in length. The pods are eaten raw, cooked or ground into flour. They can be dried and keep indefinitely. Though not particularly palatable the carob has substantial nutritive value, and has long been a staple diet for the poorer classes in the Near East. The Tosephta (Ma’aseroth 2. 19 [84]) lists carob pods as a kind of food and the Mishnah (Ma’aseroth 1. 3, Soncino ed. of the Talmud, p256) specifies that, as a food, they are to be tithed.

The “husks” fed by the prodigal son to the swine were carob pods
(See Luke 15:16). Incidentally, in English, the carob is commonly known as “St. John’s bread.” English grain dealers are said to supply carob pods as feed for cattle under the name “locusts.”
Evidence tending to favour the fruit of the carob tree as the “locusts” that John the Baptist ate is as follows:

1. Available information indicates that the locust is a very poor form of food and that it would be incapable, in itself, of sustaining human life. According to Hastings Encyclopaedia of Religion and Ethics (art. Locust), “the nutritious value of locusts is extremely small, and insufficient, [even] with honey, to support life.” The fact that the “locusts” John ate seem to have constituted a major element of his diet is against the insect locust and tends to favour the fruit of the carob tree.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to The Thorny Crown of the Scapegoat

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    Trumpputin want more moral solutions for millions of citizens. Is this a good idea. Moral Solution For Abortion
    Posted on February 24, 2012
    by Royal Rosamond Press

    What I suggest, is, that Mormons willingly baptise dead fetuses. Jesus’ mission was to save souls for a eternal life – and not prevent folks from sinning. Christians have paid too much attention to politics, and have forgotten about the souls of the unborn. If they believe a fetus is a being with a soul, why then have they not set aside a cemetery on church property for victims of the abortion holocaust?
    Christian Republicans want to do away with intrusive big government, but want to make many laws in many states that will make getting an abortion difficult. Jesus and Paul understood you can’t legislate moral laws. Paul bid his followers to ignore Old Testament Laws. If the Morons and Christians can set aside their religious differences, then the innocent aborted unborn can enjoy a blessed eternal life – tommorow! Why are Christians and Mormons denying these innocents eternal life? How selfish!
    Jews are complaining about how their dead are being brought to a eternal life by a special Mormon baptism. Anne Frank – the most famous holocaust victim – has been baptized five times by Mormons! My gosh, there is an endless supply of dead persons waiting to enter the kingdom pf God at abortion clinics all over America – and the world!
    Just to be clear on this, Christian churches have never recognized folks being folks while in their mother’s womb, because on tombstones inside church grounds, the day you are born, and the day you die is etched. This is your church recognized life, your stay on earth before you moved on to everlasting life!
    I’m talking about Everlasting Life for the Unborn!
    Here’s how it works. The city where the abortion took place becomes the last name of the fetus. A computer chooses boy or girl. Since sex does not matter to these unborn angels, it is a random choice;
    Brody Bronx
    Brook Bronx
    Brody and Brook are now in the Bronx family tree! The only hitch to this solution, is, do you tell the mothers their aborted babies are being baptized and blessed – then sent to live with Jesus in heaven? This might make it more O.K. for these mothers to go ahead with an abortion. It might be best to let them believe their babies are going to to hell. So, I might keep this solution a Holy Secret.
    Jon the Nazarite

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