No Place To Live

Meg Whitman was aware of this problem when she headed HP. How about ‘Love Prisons’?

John

SAN FRANCISCO—California’s economy is adding jobs far faster than affordable places to live, forcing some employers to leave the state as they expand.

Companies that move from California have historically left behind its diverse industries, renowned public universities and balmy climate for states with lower taxes and lighter regulation. But now home prices and rents, higher on average than anywhere else in the country, have surged to the top of concerns for businesses and workers.

For employers, “we’re at a crisis stage,” said Rob Lapsley, president of the California Business Roundtable, an association of executives. Companies are struggling to recruit or promote from within as people turn down offers to come to California, Mr. Lapsley said. And with the types of jobs being taken out of the state, he added, “we’re not growing the strong middle class that we used to.”

Karen Holian, 44 years old, joined the startup Lottery.com when it was founded here in 2015. Though a San Francisco native, Ms. Holian, a marketing manager, was excited when the company last year moved to Austin, Texas, because she could finally plan to buy a home.

“In San Francisco, that never seemed like a possibility,” she said. A mother of two, she is for now renting a four-bedroom house for $2,000 a month, a third of what a comparable place costs in her hometown.

Lottery.com CEO Tony DiMatteo said that as the company grew, he found it difficult to persuade current and prospective employees to move to the area. “We can give them a much better bang for their buck if we’re not in San Francisco,” he said.

The median home price in California in 2018 was $570,010, according to the California Association of Realtors, more than double the nationwide figure. The median price for a house in the Bay Area hovers around $1 million.

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In addition to tech startups like Lottery.com, employers that have moved out of California or stopped adding jobs in the state in the past five years come from such industries as finance, manufacturing, biotech, and food and beverage. They include brokerage firm Charles Schwab & Co., which has focused expansion outside its San Francisco headquarters, and smoothie-maker Jamba Juice, founded in San Luis Obispo, Ca.

Core-Mark Holding Co., which grew from a San Francisco tobacco shop in the 1800s to the second-largest distributor to convenience stores in the U.S., said last year it would relocate to a suburb of Fort Worth, Texas.

CEO Scott McPherson said recruiting new employees to the Bay Area became challenging given housing prices and long commutes.

McKesson Corp., the nation’s largest pharmaceutical distributor, in November said it would move its global headquarters from San Francisco to the Dallas suburb of Irving, Texas, bringing hundreds of jobs.

In the Bay Area, the tech industry’s historic home, even high-salaried engineers say they are looking to put down roots elsewhere because they can’t afford to rent or buy homes near their jobs.

Carl Guardino, chief executive of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, said CEOs tell him “that any new job that doesn’t absolutely need to be in the Bay Area is located outside of the Bay Area.” The public-policy advisory group counts some 360 companies, including Silicon Valley’s largest, as members.

There is no government data on how many companies and jobs have left California.

An average of 80,000 homes were built each year in the past decade, far below the 180,000 homes needed year to keep up with population growth through 2025, according to state estimates.

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s chief business and economic adviser, Lenny Mendonca, says he regularly hears from employers that they can’t recruit people because housing costs too much, but “in terms of the absolute scale of employment and the number [of companies] that move every year, that is very small.”

California’s unemployment rate in January was 4.2%, slightly higher than the national rate. But more than half its renters, and over a third of mortgage-holding homeowners, spend more than 30% of their income on housing, the maximum experts consider affordable, according to the state housing department.

Mr. Mendonca said California was still creating more companies and jobs than its undersupply of housing can handle. Since taking office in January, Mr. Newsom, a Democrat, has focused on trying to coax local communities to build more affordable homes more quickly.

Texas has drawn more companies leaving California over the past decade than any other state, according to research by Joe Vranich, a relocation consultant who encourages businesses to leave California.

Housing costs are “a major selling point for us,” said Mike Rosa, senior vice president of economic development for the Dallas Regional Chamber. “It’s a factor in just about every [relocation] search we see.”

Tech companies searching for talent in other states have taken note.

Duolingo, a language-learning startup based in Pittsburgh, put up a billboard last year along a San Francisco freeway reading: “Own a home. Work in tech. Move to Pittsburgh.”

Lowell Reade, formerly a user-experience researcher at Facebook, was among Duolingo’s recruits. He took a job at the company last year and swapped his $2,300 per-month, 350 square-foot apartment in the city of Palo Alto, Ca., for a three-bedroom in Pittsburgh that rents for $1,800.

“It was becoming difficult to imagine a future that was appealing to me” in Silicon Valley, said Mr. Reade.

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My Rose Castles

Rosamond Press

All night my angel wrestled with me. She told me to take what God wants me to own. Taking something for myself in this life, has been a real crisis. Why do I allow scum to walk over me and push me around. Why do I even mention their name. It has to do with the Founding of this Democracy, that put the Church in the hands of We the People. That Republican (evangelical) Senators of King Jesus are employing a woman prosecutor to question Ford, is such a slap in the face to women, who only earned the Right to Vote in 1920. The Protestant-Baptist- Catholic Church opposed this right – all the way! It is THE GREAT FLAW of our Founding Fathers. The Church in Democracy, was an EMPTY CHURCH. The Great Royal Families of Europe ALWAYS allowed their women to play a huge role in the Church…

View original post 2,685 more words

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The Restored Rose of Bohemia

I have been elected!

Thirty years ago I read the Bible for the first time. I was forty-two. What I saw, was John the Baptist, Jesus, and the Disciples had opened the Judaic Religion – to everyone! Saul-Paul closed The First Church, and shut out the Jews. Therefore, I declare the Catholic and Protestant Churches – dead! Only the Moravian Church – survives! This Church is open to everyone!

John Rose ‘The Hidden Seed of Bohemia’

https://quinnbradleesancestors.fandom.com/wiki/Royal_and_Imperial_House_of_Habsburg?venotify=created

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicolaus_Zinzendorf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Hus

Rose of Bohemia, style in Prague and roots in Vienna

Rose of Bohemia, by Chr. Vetter, 1668

Alles Erdreich Ist Österreich Untertan, Austriae Est Imperare Orbi Universo

(“All the world is subject to Austria” or “Austria is the Empire of the entire world”, usually abbreviated to A.E.I.O.U., the motto of Emperor Frederick III of Habsburg and of the Habsburg Empire after him)

Geography is the science which studies space and its construction, not only its physical construction but also its social/political one. In other terms geography can be the discipline in quest for meaning of space. And cartography is the science of interpretation of power relations and communicating it via maps. In the light of these tow definitions we exposed, on this site, the rapports  between the political centre, space and representation in some famous maps. First we worked on the maps of Heinrich Bunting: Jerusalem and Europe. Then we saw the Dutch Lion of Visscher.

Today our map is the BOHEMIAE ROSA, by Chr. Vetter, Vienna, 1668, a map representing Bohemia as a rose centred on Prague.

FIGURE 1. Rose of Bohemia, by Chr. Vetter, 1668

FIGURE 1. Rose of Bohemia, by Chr. Vetter, 1668

Bohemia, the heart of the Habsburg’s European system

1526, the catastrophic battle of Mohacs, and Louis II, king of Hungary and Bohemia, falls in the battle. The Turks occupy most of the Pannonian plains of Hungary. The rest of the country, still free from the Ottoman yoke, elected Ferdinand of Habsburg, brother of Emperor Charles V, as king of Hungary (Or king of the Regnum Marianum, a formal name of the country). Then and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown followed and elected him king of Bohemia and ex officio prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire. Thus in 1526 a four-century period of Habsburg rule in Hungary and Bohemia began.

Bohemia was already the “crossroads” in the heart of Europe and a cornerstone in the Habsburgs’ policy in the Holy Roman Empire, at the same time an important rear operating base against the advance of the Turks in the heart of Europe.

The Europa Prima of Bunting shows this Habsburger view of Europe and of the European international system of that time: while the “centre-head” is Spain the heart is Bohemia (See FIGURE 2). Keeping Bohemia was expensive for the Habsburgs: we can remember that the Thirty Years’ War began in and because of Bohemia. It was, also, an economic heart of the Habsburg Possessions in Europe: being rich in soil and silver mines, and even a birthplace of the Thaler, the silver coin ancestor of the Dollar.

Europa Prima Pars Terrae, 1581, Hanover, by Heinrich Bunting

FIGURE 2. Europa Prima Pars Terrae, 1581, Hanover, by Heinrich Bunting

ROSA BOHEMIAE and the blood

The map shows Bohemia as a rose centred on Prague which forms its style. The Bohemian counties are the petals (mapped in an accurate way) and the adjacent countries are the leaves. The “soil” from which the rose arises is Austria and Vienna is at the origin of the rose’s foot. The motto above reads IVSTITIA ET PIETATE (Justice and Piety), personal motto of Leopold I, then Holy Roman Emperor and head of the House of Habsburg.

Under the rose there is some explanation of the map. The writing in Latin translates:

“In the Hercynian Forest[*] a most graceful Rose grew, with a Lion standing guard next to her. This Rose is not of Venus but grows of the blood of Mars; here the Rosebush, here the Forest, of acknowledgement, this earth was.  Be not afraid, O Rose! The Austrians enter the Hercynian gardens; Under the Rose now silent, horrific wars were made. THE ROSE OF BOHEMIA, for centuries bloody, where more than 80 battles were fought, now for the first time drawn.”[1]

The Habsburg policy over Bohemia is clear: it is a rose, a most beautiful part, of the possessions, but this rose grows over the blood, shed by the Habsburgs and Austria, to protect it and to make peace. We can remember that the map was drawn in 1668, a time very “shaky” for the Habsburgs: Austria had signed the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 after the very bloody Thirty Years’ war, which had begun in and because of Bohemia in 1618. Then  by that time Austria had just survived a Turkish invasion in 1663-1664 while another one was being prepared (of what would come to be known as the Great Turkish War or the Holy War of 1683). The price was very high and the Habsburg army suffered from great human losses to stop Turkish advance into Europe. This map is an antithesis to the famous saying attributed to Emperor Maximilian I Habsburg: Bella gerant alii, tu felix Austria nube – ‘Let others wage war: thou, happy Austria, marry’.

Prague is depicted as centre of Bohemia: it has been its capital city and religious and economic centre since the Tenth Century (see FIGURE 3).

FIGURE 3: Prague, a detail from Rose of Bohemia

FIGURE 3. Prague, detail from Rose of Bohemia

Vienna, the centre-head and the residenzstadt of the Habsburgs

The interesting part of this map, the one related to the centre and centrality, is between Prague and Vienna: the first is the style of the rose, so its “apparent” centre. Yet the “real” one, the origine in the soil, is in Vienna (see FIGURE 4): the soil from which Bohemia grows is Austria, “watered” with blood and necessary to life and survival of the rose.

FIGURE 4: Vienna, detail of Rose of Bohemia

FIGURE 4. Vienna, detail from Rose of Bohemia

Figure 5: Emperor Leopold I of Habsburg

Figure 5. Emperor Leopold I of Habsburg

By that time the Habsburgs, archdukes of Austria, were kings of Bohemia. Thus their rank was higher in the latter, plus Bohemia was an Electorate of the Holy Roman Empire. But Vienna was the kaiserliche residenzstadt (Imperial residence) of the Habsburgs, thus the “head” of their possessions in Europe and the de facto Imperial city of the Holy Roman Empire. For these reasons Vienna was the seat of power and the origin of the rose. The Emperor, Leopold (see FIGURE 5), began the centralising processus on Vienna: that time the Habsburg Possessions had no cenral administration and every part was governed as a separate entity. Leopold I began to reinforce the position of Vienna as the Imperial residence and the city which hosts central powers to all the Possessions. Thus Bohemia is a rose centred on Prague, but which grows from Vienna, more discreet on the map but a much more powerful political centre, or “real centre” in this regard.

Fifure 6: A detailed map of Vienna by Suttinger, 1683

Fifure 6. A detailed map of Vienna by Suttinger, 1683

This “real centre” (or what we call a “head-centre” in this site) is thoroughly mapped since the XVIth Century (see FIGURE 6 for example) and was the seat of power of the Habsburgs between the XIVth and the XXth Centuries: but its centrality was discreet at the beginning. This discretion can be visible in our map: the apparent visible centre of Bohemia is clearly Prague. Vianna is more essential as it is the origin of the rose, yet it needs a more wandering eye to find it.

The centre-head and the “discreet” political centrality

In this site we have already seen and analysed he Europa Prima and demonstrated the difference between a centre-head (a seat of political power for example) and a centre-heart (a sea of economic power and production). In this map, Rose of Bohemia, Prague is depicted as an apparent centre of the map. But the most important point is Vienna: the city from which the rose grows. Modern examples can be quite numerous: many seats of power, centres-heads, prefer to be discreet and be not in the focus of a national image. We can find some parallels, mutatis mutandis, with Washington DC and New York, with Amsterdam and The Hague, with Sydney and Canberra etc. Of course these cases are different (plus some are formal and some are not), yet in all of them the political centre tends to be rather discreet, even on the maps, while a more “rosy” centre is the focus of attention even if its real power is much less important.

We tend, more and more, to represent centrality as an axis: in an axis it is clear that power cannot be equally distributed. Thus some points of the axis control all the movement and distribute power over the whole.

The centre, the Greek kentron, is originally the most eminent point of an axis and the attribute of power. In this regard we can say that the Rose of Bohemia is but a representation of power relation on this axis, the one of the Habsburg Possessions and where the focus of the map takes its power from a more discreet, yet the most powerful, point of the axis.

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[*] The Hercynian Forest (In Latin Hercynia Silva) is the old dense wood covering the central European mountain system.

[1] In Latin: Crevit in Hercÿnio Rosa formisissima Saltu; Stat penes armatus pro Statione Leo. Haec Rosa non veneris, Sed crevit Sanguine Martis; Hic Rhodus, hic saltus, faetaque, terra fuit. Nil Rosa pulcra time! Hercÿmos venit Auster in hortos; Sub tacita sileant horrida bella Rosâ. BOHEMIAE ROSA Omnibus saculis cruenta, in qua plura quam 80 magna pralia commissa sunt, nunc primum hac forma excusa.

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For further information on the Rose of Bohemia, you can read the Strange Map entry on this map. You can also see some acounts of the map and some other on the site of the National Technical Museum of the Czech Republic. Some informaion are also available on the European Library site. A zoomable version of the map is available here.

You can see the Habsburg site for the very good mapping of the Habsburg Monarchy during the centuries.

Equally, the same site offers a good account of Leopold I of Habsburg.

Some plans of Vienna are available on this site.

The notion of the residenzstadt is explained here on the site if the University of Munster.

The Suttinger’s map of Vienna is explained here.

A.E.I.O.U., the motto of the Habsburgs and of Austria.

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The Hidden Rose Seed

 

Over a year ago I was sent information on the unmarked burial ground of my great grandmother, Ida Rose. Her child, Dollie Rosamond, was buried with her mother. I assume they died in childbirth. Dollie is Royal Rosamond’s sister. What a loss for a young boy about nine. Ida married William Thomas Rosamond on February 16, 1888. Here lie a Hidden Rose.

The woman in charge of the graves went out and put a stick in the ground where the Rose mother and daughter were buried. I was reminded of a spliced rose. My kindred were too poor to purchase a marker.

Everything points to me being the Hidden Seed. I will go by the name JOHN ROSE. Ida’s father is John Wesley Rose who died in 1910, and is buried in the same cemetery. Edward Rose is Ida’s grandfather.

Sir Lewis Clifford, Kt. is William Thomas Rosamond’s 13th great uncle’s great grandfather.

John Rose

https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/edward-haney-rose_131956025

Relatives of Edward Haney Rose

Parents

Allen Rose

1770 – 1846

Elizabeth Haney

1775 – 1856

Spouse(s)

Marriage Martha Westbrook
Clark St Marriage

Children

J Wesley

1834 – Unknown

Bertha J
Marcus Clark Rose

1829 – 1876

J Wesley Rose

1834 – Unknown

Harriet Rose
Albert Rose

Jan Hus (1369-1415) prophesised many years before the birth of the Moravian Movement that the message of spiritual reform would be a ‘hidden seed’ that would fall into the ground and die, and then sprout again to bear much fruit. He was burned at the stake as a heretic for speaking out against the practices of the Roman Catholic Church.

http://divinityarchive.com/bitstream/handle/11258/8323/hiddenseedharves00davi.pdf?sequence=1

‘Fair Rosamund’

 

Rosamund’s early death was seen as a just punishment for her lascivious lifestyle. Rosamund ended her relationship with Henry in 1175/6 and withdrew to Godstow Abbey. It seems likely that she was already ill when she entered the priory and she died in 1176. Henry paid for a lavish tomb within the convent church, at which the nuns left floral tributes on a daily basis. In the years following Rosamund’s death, Henry endowed the convent with 2 churches at Wycombe and Bloxham, new buildings and substantial amounts of building materials. Rosamund’s father, Walter, granted the abbey mills and a meadow, for the souls of his wife and daughter.

Unfortunately, however, Rosamund was not allowed to rest in peace. In 1190 when  the saintly Bishop Hugh of Lincoln visited Godstow he was horrified that Rosamund’s tomb had a place of honour within the church and ordered her remains to be removed. The tomb was resited in the nun’s chapter house, with an accompanying inscription admonishing her lifestyle:

This tomb doth here enclose the world’s most beauteous Rose,

Rose passing sweet erewhile, now nought but odour vile.²

Sir Lewis Clifford, Kt. MP

Gender: Male
Birth: circa 1359
Bobbing, Kent, England, UK
Death: December 05, 1404 (41-49)
Bobbing, Kent, England, UK
Immediate Family: Son of Roger de Clifford, 5th Lord Clifford and Maud de Beauchamp
Husband of Eleanor de la Warre
Father of Lewis De Clifford; Elizabeth Vache; Richard De Clifford; Robert De Clifford and William de Clifford
Brother of Catherine de Greystoke, Baroness Greystoke; Maude de Hilton ( de Clifford); Thomas de Clifford, 6th Baron Clifford; Mary de Clifford; Margaret Melton and 4 others

Rosamond de Clifford MP

Gender: Female
Birth: 1136
Clifford Castle, Clifford, Herefordshire, England
Death: 1176 (40)
Woodstock Castle, Oxfordshire, England
Place of Burial: Godstow Nunnery, Wolvercote, Oxfordshire, England
Immediate Family: Daughter of Walter FitzRichard de Clifford, 1st Baron Clifford and Margaret de Toëny
Partner of Henry II “Curtmantle”, king of England
Mother of Rosamond FitzHenry
Sister of Henry Clifford; Amicia De Clifford; Lucia de Say (de Clifford); Walter de Clifford, 2nd Baron Clifford; Richard de Clifford, Sr., Lord Frampton Severn and 5

Edward Haney Rose

Deceased

Birth name:

Edward H. Rose

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1808

  Pennsylvania, United States

Residence:

1850

  Mason county, part of, Mason, Virginia

Residence:

1860

  T 15 N R 8, Douglas, Illinois, United States

Residence:

1865

  Tuscola, Douglas, Illinois

Residence:

1870

  Missouri, United States

Parents:

Allen RoseElizabeth Rose (born Haney)

Wife:

Martha Rose Rose (born Westbrook)

Children:

Charles W. RoseWesley RoseBertha Jane Meredith (born Rose)Marcus C RoseLaura RoseAlbert Edward RoseIda Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose),Sheldon Rose

Siblings:

Daniel Haney RoseMargaret Wigton (born Rose)Mary Polly Cristy (born Rose)Patrick RoseElizabeth Gorden (born Rose)Ellenor Rose Wooley (born Hoover)Rosanna Allen (born Rose)

Ida Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose)

Birth name:

Ida Louisiana Rose

Gender:

Female

Birth:

1860

  Louisiana, United States

Marriage:

Feb 16 1881

  Bates, Missouri, United States

Residence:

1870

  Missouri, United States

Death:

Sep 5 1891

  Helena, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Burial:

  Forest Vale Cemetery, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Parents:

Edward Haney RoseMartha Rose Rose (born Westbrook)

Husband:

William Thomas Rosamond

Children:

Frank Wesley RosamondIda C RosamondDollie Rosamond

Siblings:

Charles W. RoseWesley RoseBertha Jane Meredith (born Rose)Marcus C RoseLaura RoseAlbert Edward RoseSheldon Rose

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/03/18/the-rose-of-wallace/

https://rosamondpress.com/2013/01/10/born-of-two-roses/

https://rosamondpress.com/2014/10/04/born-on-yom-kippur/

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/03/05/born-under-falling-stars/

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/03/10/the-house-of-schwarzenberg-and-i/

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/02/13/dna-links/

THE ROSAMOND GENEALOGY
Plus Related Families of the Web Page Owner
AN UPCOMING TRIP TO SOUTH CAROLINA
Return to Home Page

FALL 2000, Final Weekend of September

We are planning a trip to Abbeville, South Carolina the last weekend of September and all Rosamond and related cousins are invited. We haven’t yet decided on where we will be staying, or the exact itenerary for the visit, so all suggestions are welcome. One of the definites for the trip will be a cleanup of the cemetery described in the email below from Gwen Rosamond Forrester. If you plan to come contact me at jrosamond@prodigy.net, or any of the Rosamond researchers listed on the OTHER RESEARCHERS page. I will be posting details online as they become available.
The following email was sent by one of the Rosamond cousins, Gwen Rosamond Forrester to the rest of the research cousins:
Hey Y’all,

Mark and I just got back from a trip to Halan Co., Ky., and Lee Co., Va., where his folks settled after leaving NC. We had a very successful trip with finding graves of his ancestors and meeting a relative. Since we were only about 200 miles from Abbeville, SC, we drove down there to look around, and guess what, we asked a couple of gentlemen, David Higgon’s and Mr. Richie (believe his name was Walter) in Ware Shoals, if they knew where the Walnut Grove Baptist Church was. (The church our Rosamond’s, Hill’s, Hodges, and Graham’s attended in the early 1800’s)

Sure enough, they both knew where it was. David lead us to it, and he lead us to the few graves on Mulberry Creek that mark the original site of the church that was organized in 1826. Talk about luck! This was so exciting!!! We were so lucky to have ran into these two gentleman.

These graves are right along a paved road in the woods (I mean, the stones are right along the road). This cemetery is in bad shape. No one is taking care of it. It is over grown in weeds, trees and with poison oak and ivy everywhere. David, Mark and I ventured out into the cemetery a little ways. Couldn’t go to each stone because the poison oak & ivy is soooo thick. There aren’t many stones. Some graves are marked with field stones and doesn’t have any writing on them, and some of the field stones looked as those they had been chiseled on but you couldn’t read it. There are Mays buried there and one stone was a Williams. Stones are in bad shape, you can hardly read them. They have black mildew, moss or what ever from the trees, all over them. There is one stone laying on the ground in perfect condition. No mildew or anything on it. You can read it clearly. It is the marker of Lucrete Mays born Dec 14, 1797 died Feb 14, 1845. Y’all, this is probably Sarah “Sally” Mays Rosamond’s mother. What do you think?

I couldn’t hardly leave there without looking at each stone, but the poison oak was to bad. Mark and I are highly allergic to these plants. I knew though, that we are all going to be there next year, or whenever and we can be better prepared to tackle this adventure. As soon as David left, Mark and I changed jeans, socks and shoes right there by the car on the side of the road. Pretty picture! That poison oak and ivy will go through your clothes if you give it time. We were very lucky, we were o’k the next morning. Only one car passed on that road the whole time we were at the cemetery, so it isn’t a busy one.

When we go there next year, or whenever, those of us allergic to these plants, will need to wear at least knee high rubber boots. We will also need to do some tombstone rubbings to be able to read the stones. Does anyone in this group know how to do tombstone rubbings? A lady in Lee Co., Va., showed me how by using paper and a pencil. She said you could also use colored chalk that children use at school. It wont hurt the stones at all. When it rains, it will wash the chalk off.

David told us the Walnut Grove Church has tried to put a book together about the History of the Church. He said this book is at the church. We were there on Monday, and no one was there. David said the original church (1826) on Mulberry Creek was a brush arbor, which was posts with brush on top to protect them from rain. They were having Church service when it stated to rain. Had a flash flood that swept the brush arbor away. Everyone was scramming to get to higher ground, scared the horses so bad they all ran away. That’s when they moved the Church to higher ground. It was built next to where the Walnut Grove Church stands today.

Ruth, do you know the History of Walnut Grove Church, and do you know who is buried in the original cemetery?

Abbeville is a beautiful Old Historic town. It takes you back in time. Has a lot of old beautiful two story homes. I have a pamphlet listing the motels in the Old 96 District when we get ready to make reservations. If we stay in Abbeville, there is a Belmont Inn on town square that would be perfect for us to stay in, if y’all like this sort of thing. The Belmont Inn was built 1902-03 as the Eureka Hotel to accommodate “drummers” of the textile trade, patrons of the Opera House, traveling salesmen of the day, and the railroad men who had layovers in Abbeville. It’s listed on the National Register of Historic places in Abbeville. It has 25 newly remodeled, decorated rooms. They let Mark and I walk through it. The rooms that didn’t have occupants in them, they leave the doors open so we were about to view them. They are furnished with old antique furniture, some rooms have large pieces of furniture. It has wooden floors and looks like bedrooms in antebellum homes, only a bit smaller. It is nice and very clean. Really takes you back in time. Prices are very reasonable. More on that later.

The Belmont Inn is next door to the Opera House and two doors from the court house. The Library is one block away. If yall had rather stay in a motel there are three motels around Abbeville, but the nicer ones are in Greenwood, which is only 15 miles away. Mr. Richie told me the Library in Greenwood was better than the one in Abbeville. I only got to spend a couple of hours at the Library in Greenwood. They have a lot of old books for research, made several copies, but don’t think I found too much of what we don’t already have. Haven’t had a chance to look it over.

Something else we might want to think about. This pamphlet I have says Edgefield County, (which we all know is part of Old 96 District) has D.A. Tompkins Memorial Library. It serves as a genealogical and historical research center focusing on the Old 96 District. It is the headquarters for the Courtesy Center and Archives. If we have time, we might want to check this out.

Your Cousin,
Gwen Rosamond Forrester
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Born Under a Shower of Stars

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I was born October 8, 1946 two minutes after the sun set. An amazing star-shower was suddenly visible. The nurses in the maternity ward bid my mother to come to the window and look, but, was too spent having just delivered me.

Rosemary said she had a vision while she was giving birth to me, she telling herself she must not forget it. She forgot.

Rosemary named me after John the Baptist because she believed I was born on the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur. I was born three days after Yom Kippur.

When my Astrologer began her five hour (recorded) reading of my chart, she began
with these words;

“Jon, I have never seen a chart like yours, never knew it was possible. It
begins where all charts in theory begin, on the exact cusp of Pisces and Aries..
For this reason I had to move up the time of your birth ten minutes, or in
theory, you were not born. As it is now, you barely escaped becoming a veritable
prisoner in this lifetime, that is, all the information you came here to share.”

Born of Two Roses

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rosegraveYesterday I believe found my Rose kindred. I had recently located Royal Rosamond’s little book ‘At Matha Healey’s Grave’ that I published in 1998 under Royal Rosamond Press Co. I had got a copy of this book from a library, and took it to a printer. I gifted the University of Oregon with a copy of just twenty books. I was too poor to afford more. I intended this copy for my freind Edwin Corbin, but, realized I had no copy for myself, and kept it.

On the first page we have a ‘Pictorial Biography’ of my mother’s father, born Frank Wesely Rosamond. Royal is a pen name. Royal appears to be about one and half years of age. He and my grandson, Tyler Hunt, look like brothers. The caption reads’

“If my parents hada knowed it – that one so serious would turn out to be a humorist – they never would have growed it.”

This book of nine pages is part of Royal’s ‘Humor Of The States Series’. I think the reason Frank is looking glum, is, his folks put him in a dress!
On the inside back of the cover we find a ‘Thumbnail Biography Of Royal Rosamond’ that reads;

“John Rose, R.R.’s grandfather, a saw-mill man, settled with his daughter, Ida Lousisiana Rose, in Butler Missouri, right after the Civil War. Later, Mr. Rose bought a farm four miles west of Butler, on the Miami.

Mr’s Rosamond, a widow, migrated to Butler from Mississippi, with her four sons and a daughter. Her youngest son, William Thomas, met and fell in love with Ida. Married, they were provided with a cabin on a corner of the John Rose farm, where Royal, on December 18th. 11881, was born.”

Royal does not give the name of his grandmother, the widow of William Thomas, whose surname was Rosamond, but she is Frances Morrison. As for the name Ida Lousiana Rose, my Rosamond kindred might hold a record for odd names befitting backwoods folk, such as Fanny Lou Rosamond. But, when you ask what is in a name, you discover the name Fanny means “from France”. Does Lou stand for Louisiana?

We even have a Homer Rosamond which might make the Rosamond family the quintessential American Family, especially when my kindred were named after Francis Marion ‘The Swamp Fox’ who parents were Huguenots, as was the progenitor of the Rosamond family who may have come from Rougemont Switzerland, a city that was once a part of France. Frank Wesely Rosamond was named after Francis, and descends from James Rosamond, who allegedly fought alongside Samuel Rosamond, who served as a Captain in the Revolutionary War under Marion.

In his history of the Rosamond family family (1938) Leland Rosemond mentions, and then dismisses Fair Rosamond as being key to our family and our name. However, with my resent discovery about the true Rose Lineage, the Holy Grail has come to America. Rosamond had a graal cup entwined in vines on her tomb. She is the sleeping beauty that will soon awaken and behold her Family Tree that spring from my late sister, Christine Rosamond Benton.

Ed Corbin’s mother is kin to Francis Cavenaugh a Plymouth Brethren from which the evangelicals hail.

Here is the Rose Association

http://www.rosefamilyassociation.com/

Jon Presco

Sarah Wilson Rosamond and House of Schwarzenberg

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/07/16/robert-wilson-maried-jane-lee/

It is 7:25 in the morning. I have found my Bohemian People. Presco was originally spelled Braskewitz. My father’s ancestors came from Bohemia, and, so did my mother’s people via Sarah Wilson. She descends from the House of Schwarzenberg who were friends with Martin Luther. This is why William Wilson is buried in Saint George Cathedral. The House of Saxe-Coburg is in this tree. I am kin to much royalty. I am home. I am tired. I have been up all night.

John Gregory Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/07/10/rosamond-clifford-and-reverend-william-wilson/

http://www.almanachdegotha.org/id101.html

https://wikivividly.com/wiki/House_of_Schwarzenberg

Sarah Wilson Rosamond (Willson) MP

Gender:

Female

Birth:

1726
County Antrim, Ireland

Death:

1790 (64)
Abbeville County, South Carolina, United States

Immediate Family:

Daughter of Thomas Wilson and Elizabeth Willson
Wife of Pvt. John Roseman
Mother of Margaret Weems; James Rosamond; Jean Rosamond; Capt Samuel Rosamond and Sarah F Hodges
Sister of Capt Matthew Willson; Samuel Willson; Rebekah Willson; Elizabeth Musgrove; Nathaniel Willson and 2 others

Schwarzenberg is a Czech (Bohemian) and German (Franconian) aristocratic family, and it was one of the most prominent European noble houses. The Schwarzenbergs are members of the Czech nobility and German nobility and achieved the rank of Princes of the Holy Roman Empire. The family belongs to the high nobility and traces its roots to the Lords of Seinsheim during the Middle Ages.[1]

The current head of the family is Karel, the 12th Prince of Schwarzenberg, a Czech politician who served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic. The family owns properties and lands across Austria, Czech Republic, Germany and Switzerland.

Frank Wesley “Royal” Rosamond

Gender: Male
Birth: December 18, 1881
Missouri
Death: circa November 26, 1953 (67-75)
Prob Oklahoma
Place of Burial: Sunny Lane Sec. 13, lot S13-RN-7, Del City, Oklahoma
Immediate Family: Son of William Thomas Rosamond and Ida Rose
Husband of Mary Magdalene Weineke
Father of June E Rosamond; Bertha M Rosamond; Rosemary Rita Rosamond and Lillian J Rosamond
Half brother of <private> Rosamond and <private> Rosamond
DNA Markers:

details

Added by: Jimmy Dale Rosamond on March 21, 2009
Managed by: Jimmy Dale Rosamond

John Wilson MP

Gender: Male
Birth: 1425
Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Death: 1475 (50)
Cupar, Fife, Scotland
Immediate Family: Son of Thomas Wilson and Elizabeth Robinson
Husband of Antoinette Erasmus
Father of Sir John Wilson, Kt., Burgess of Fife
Added by: Dalest Wendy Bruce on March 29, 2013
Managed by: Dalest Wendy Bruce and 8 others
Curated by: Ben M. Angel, still catching up

Antoinette Erasmus MP

Gender: Female
Birth: 1425
England
Death: 1460 (35)
England
Immediate Family: Daughter of Erkinger von Seinsheim, I, 1st Baron of Schwarzenberg and Princess Barbara Von Abensberg, Baroness Of Schwarzenberg
Wife of John Wilson
Mother of Sir John Wilson, Kt., Burgess of Fife
Sister of Magdalene Baronesse zu Schwarzenberg; Sigmund I, Freiherr von Schwarzenberg; Kunigunde zu Schwarzenberg; Johann I d.Ä. Freiherr zu Schwarzenberg; Erkinger Freiherr von Schwarzenberg and 5 others
Half sister of Michael II von Seinsheim; Matern von Seinsheim; Heinrich von Seinsheim; Hermann “der Streitbare” zu Schwarzenberg; Agnes von Seinsheim and 1 other
Added by: Dalest Wendy Bruce on March 29, 2013
Managed by: Mary S Newton and 9 others
Curated by: Ben M. Angel, still catching up

Princess Barbara Von Abensberg, Baroness Of Schwarzenberg

German: Barbara von Abensberg, Baroness Of Schwarzenberg
Gender: Female
Birth: circa 1398
Abensberg, Niederbayern, Bavaria, Germany
Death: November 02, 1448 (46-54)
Asthem, Herzogtum Bayern, Heiliges Römisches Reich
Place of Burial: Astheim, Unterfranken, Bavaria, Germany
Immediate Family: Daughter of Jobst, Graf von Abensberg and Agnes Ursula von Abensberg
Wife of Erkinger von Seinsheim, I, 1st Baron of Schwarzenberg
Mother of Antoinette Erasmus; Magdalene Baronesse zu Schwarzenberg; Sigmund I, Freiherr von Schwarzenberg; Kunigunde zu Schwarzenberg; Johann I d.Ä. Freiherr zu Schwarzenberg and 6 others
Sister of Johann III von Abensberg, III; Margareta von Abensberg; Dietrich von Abensberg; Sigmund von Abensberg; Degenhard von Abensberg and 4 others
Half sister of Barbara Von Abensberg
Added by: Justin Swanstrom on May 10, 2009
Managed by: Severinfaxe and 8 others

https://www.geni.com/people/Elizabeth-Ingoldsby/6000000002808998459?through=6000000003263397662

Leland E. Rosemond

March, 1938

Scarsdale, N. Y.

THE NAME ROSEMOND

Some confusion seems to have resulted from the fact that more than
one origin for this name has existed. The oldest, perhaps, is the
Teutonic “Hrosmond”, conspicuous as far back as the 6th century in
the history of the Gepidae and the Lombards of northern Italy. “Mond”
in the Anglo-Saxon signified the protection given by a noble, or
chieftain, to this dependents of every kin, and the name signified
among them strong, or famous, protection. The form “Rosenmund”,
usually reckoned as German, has been interpreted as “rose of the
world,” form the Latin “mundus” for world. In Danish the name appears
as Rozamond; in French, as Rosemonde, in Italian, as Rosmonda, and in
Latin and Spanish, as Rosamunda.

“The Huguenot tradition in the family, confirmed by such sources as
O’Hart’s Irish Pedigrees and Agnew’s French Protestant Exiles,
suggests a French origin also and this has been found in the
name “Rougemont”, still perpetuated by the name of a village in
southeastern France, near Switzerland, and another village in
southwestern Germany. Why this source seems preferable for our origin
will be mentioned again.

Book shows end of PAGE 3 here

“Such a name, transported to other countries and dealt with in other
languages, was certain to be changed and even distorted. Our own
people have at times adopted the form “Roseman”, or “Rosman”,
or “Rossman”, or “Rosmond”, or “Rosmon”. The first three forms are
common in Germany although wholly unconnected with our family. Elders
in the family have held the view that the presence of the “d” is
significant and, since it is the equivalent of the “t”
in “Rougemont,” that seems reasonable. As many as thirty variations
are found, and yet the name in any form is not a common one in this
country if the German forms above are to be disregarded.

“In the Southern states among those identified with our line in
Ireland, the form “Rosamond” prevails as it does in England and
Canada, but the legends of “Fair Rosamond” Clifford which popularized
it there have no significance for us. It is, in one form or another,
the name of towns, but inquiry has developed that our family had
nothing to do with giving them.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/08/06/the-corbin-god-gene-and-evangelical-zionists/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/01/14/history-of-the-rosamond-family/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/01/13/fair-rosamond-a-literary-theme/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/10/17/humble-rosamond-roots/

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/08/15/christine-rosamond-benton/

Colonel John A Crawford, II

Gender: Male
Birth: circa 1687
Ayshire Scotland
Death: 1748 (57-65)
Chambersburg,Franklin Co.,Pa
Immediate Family: Son of John Crawford and Elizabeth Crawford
Husband of Mary Jameson Crawford
Father of Mary Jackson; Johanna Rose; James Crawford; John Crawford and Mary McBride

1~Thomas I Rose, I B: baptism by the Rev Edward Pele 12/19/1619 D: 1683 New London, CT

2~Robert Rose B: 1630 Holme, Cumbria, England M:

1~Sir Hill Rose B: 1650 Liverpool, England D: 1720 Liverpool, England M: Jane Hill 1680 England D:

1~William Rose B: 1680 Canterbury, England D: 1790 PA M: Jane Russell 1685 England D: PA

1~Robert Rose 1731-1784 Sleepy Creek,Frederick,WV M: Johanna Crawford 1729-1788. Daughter of Col John A Crawford I, born in Ayshire, Scotland 1687 & Mary Jameson McConnell, born in Ireland 1690

1~Major John David Rose B: 05/01/1761 VA D: 09/18/1843 Wolfe Cty, KY M: to Rebecca Bowen, daughter of David Bowen 1785-1871 & Hannah Davis. Was B: 1763 VA D: 1835 Wolfe Cty, KY   

 

http://chazzcreations.com/mize_genealogy/rose_family_history

Erkinger I. von Seinsheim and Peter Rosenberg

On this day, August 10, 2018, I claim all castles and lands that the Rosenberg, Seinsheim, and Schwarzenberg family acquired as rulers of Bohemia and Czechoslovakia . Erkinger Seinsheim is my 14th. great grandfather, and, Peter von Rosenberg, my 15th. This is approximate, and needs more study.

I was destined to save the land of my ancestors from Putin, the Ult-right, and Donald Trump who declared NATO an enemy of the United States. NATO was founded in order to save Czechoslovakia from the Soviet Union. There will be many posts on this Quest, that is a Dynastic as well as Political and National device to save NATO and all of Europe. Scroll down to see the property I might soon own.

God has blessed my endeavor and fills the sky with falling stars, as did fill the heavens when I was born on October 8, 1946

John Presco

Copyright 2018

President: Royal Rosamond Press

“The 1933[3][1] and 1946[1] Draconids had Zenithal Hourly Rates of thousands of meteors visible per hour, among the most impressive meteor storms of the 20th century.”

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Schwarzenberg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Vok_of_Rosenberg

Peter Vok was born in Český Krumlov, the son of Jošt III of Rosenberg, then head of the house of Rožmberk, and his wife Anna of Rogendorf. Fourteen days after Peter’s birth, his father died. Peter came under the guardianship of first his uncle Petr V of Rožmberk and later Albrecht of Gutnštejn, Oldřich Holický of Šternberk and Jeroným Šlik.

He received his early education at home in the castle at Český Krumlov. Even as he reached adulthood, Peter lived in the shadow of his older brother William. While William was a life-long Catholic, Peter sympathised with Utraquism and eventually joined the Unity of the Brethren. William died in 1592, and Peter inherited the Rosenberg holdings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Vok_of_Rosenberg

William Rose

rose-hill3 rose-hill4 rose-hill7 rose-hill5555royal-rosamond

Alas I have traced my grandfather’s mother, IDA LOUISIANA ROSE, to WILLIAM ROSE, who sailed for Cowes Isle of Wight, with William Penn. William and his wife, Jane Sarah Ridgway, landed in Philadelphia in December 3, 1699. They sailed on the Canterbury, perhaps the most important ship that sailed the waters of the Isle of Wight.

Alas, the TWO ROSES are joined in my ROSY FAMILY TREE. This makes my family one of the foremost PATRIOTIC AMERICAN FAMILIES  in history. We fought off pirates to arrive here, so we could practice RELIGIOUS FREEDOM.

In my mother’s name ROSEMARY ROSAMOND, the FAMILY ROSES are united. Here is a TRUE ROSELINE that I will design a cote of arms for, and get registered. This English Rose were Quakers. ROYAL ROSAMOND married MARY MAGDALENE. whose kindred fled religious persecution in Germany.

Jon Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press Co.

Copyright 2016

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/06/08/briarcliff-rose-2/

 

rosenmund-1crest

royalrosa33

http://www.kellscraft.com/OldPhiladelphia/OldPhiladelphiaCh01.html

Descendants of Sir Hill Rose

Sir Hill Rose was born 1650, and died 1720.  He married ? (Rose).

Child of Sir Rose and ? (Rose) is:

——————————————

William Rose was born December 3, 1699 in Immigrant on the ship Canterbury England, and died in Bedford Co, Pa.  He married Jane ? (Rose).  She was born in England.

Child of William Rose and Jane (Rose) is:

——————————————

Robert Rose was born Abt. 1731 in Bedford Co, Pa, and died 1784 in Westmoreland Co, Pa.  He married Johanna Crawford Abt. 1755, daughter of John Crawford and Mary Campbell.  She was born Abt. 1735, and died 1788 in Va.

Child of Robert Rose and Johanna Crawford is:

The Canterbury, or Canterbury Merchant, is the ship that transported William Penn and James Logan from England toPhiladelphia in 1699.[1][2][3] The Canterbury set sail from the Isle of Wight on September 3, 1699, reaching Philadelphia on December 3, 1699.[1][4] The captain of the Canterbury is recorded as either “Henry Tregeny” or “Hen. Weagene”.[5][6] During the voyage the Canterbury reportedly survived an attack by pirates.[7]

http://www.hallvworthington.com/Penn/PennBiography-4.html

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~millersomers/1715.html

https://journals.psu.edu/wph/article/viewFile/3747/3565

Ezekiel Rose was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, a surveyor, and a farmer. He was apparently from a town of Milford, for his son named New Milford, Ohio in honor of his father, Captain Ezekiel Rose.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crawford%27s_Defeat_by_the_Indians

 

  • Name: William Rose 1 2

  • Sex: M

  • Birth: 1680

  • Birth: in Source: Tesha Tredwell Rose, GenCircles 2

  • Birth: 3 DEC 1680 in England 2

  • Death: in Bedford County, Pennsylvania 2

  • Note:

[2670654.ged]

Immigrant on the ship Canterbury:
Source: Lee Kreider <lkreider@earthlink.net> taken from David Rose <SBWN43A@prodigy.net>
Name: William ROSE 1
Sex: M
Change Date: 05 APR 2001
Note:
William Rose and his wife Jane boarded the ship, Canterbury,
under the command of Captain Fryers, to sail with William Penn
on his second voyage to America. They landed in Philadelphia 3
Dec 1699, taking lodging with Edward Shippen. 1
Birth: ABT 1680 in England 1
Burial: Philadelphia, Montgomery Co, Pennsylvania 1
Immigration: 03 DEC 1699 Philadelphia, Montgomery Co, Pennsylvania 1

Father: Sir Hill ROSE b: 1650

Marriage 1 Jane
Married:
Children
William ROSE
Susanna ROSE
Peter ROSE b: BEF 1725
Robert ROSE b: ABT 1731

Mary Magdalene Rosamond (born Wieneke)

Frank Wesley Rosamond
Gender: Male
Birth: Dec 18 1881

 Montana, United States

Marriage: Spouse: Mary Magdalene Wieneke

Dec 27 1911

 Los Angeles County, California
Residence: 1930

 Ventura, California
Death: Nov 23 1953
Burial:
 Sunny Lane Cemetery Del City Oklahoma County Oklahoma, USA
Parents: William Thomas Rosamond, Ida Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose)
Wife: Mary Magdalene Rosamond (born Wieneke)
Daughter: June E Rice (born Rosamond)
Siblings: Dollie Rosamond, Ida C Rosamond

Dollie Rosamond

Gender:

Female

Birth:

1891

  Helena, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Death:

Sep 25 1891

  Helena, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Burial:

  Forest Vale Cemetery, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Parents:

William Thomas RosamondIda Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose)

William Thomas Rosamond

Deceased

Birth name:

William Thomas Rosamond

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1860

  Mississippi, United States

Marriage:

Spouse: Ida Louisiana Rose

Feb 16 1881

  Bates, Missouri, United States

Father:

Samuel Rosamond

Wife:

Ida Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose)

Children:

Dollie RosamondFrank Wesley RosamondIda C Rosamond

Siblings:

Benjamin F. RosamondNonimus Nathaniel Rosamond,Nonimus Nathaniel RosamondLaura Rosamond,Frances J. RosamondJohn J. RosamondWilliam Thomas Rosamond

Samuel Rosamond

Deceased

Birth name:

Samuel Rosamond

Gender:

Male

Birth:

Circa 1815

  Abbeville District, South Carolina, United States

Marriage:

Spouse: Frances C. Morrison

Mar 31 1842

  Lowndes,Mississippi

Parents:

Benjamin Franklin RosamondSusannah Rosamond (born Hill)

Wife:

Frances C. Rosamond (born Morrison)

Children:

Benjamin F. RosamondNonimus Nathaniel Rosamond,Nonimus Nathaniel RosamondLaura Rosamond,Frances J. RosamondJohn J. RosamondWilliam Thomas RosamondWilliam Thomas Rosamond

Siblings:

John R. RosamondMarion Francis RosamondWilliam Addison RosamondJoseph RosamondMr. Rosamond,Lucretia RosamondNancy Narcissus Bowie (born Rosamond)Thomas Henry RosamondJames RosamondJantha RosamondBenjamin Rosamond,Daniel RosamondTillman Jasper Rosamond

Benjamin Franklin Rosamond

Birth names:

Benjamin Rosamond
Benjamin Franklin Rosamond

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1790

  Abbeville, South Carolina, United States

Marriage:

Spouse: Susannah Hill

Circa 1810

  Abbeville, South Carolina, United States

Marriage:

Spouse: Jane Rogers

1843

  Edgefield, South Carolina

Residence:

1850

  Attala, Mississippi, United States

Death:

To May 16 1859

  Attala, Mississippi, United States

Parents:

James RosamondLettice Rosamond (born Tillman)

Spouses:

Susannah Rosamond (born Hill)Jane Rogers

Children:

John R. RosamondSamuel RosamondMarion Francis RosamondWilliam Addison RosamondJoseph RosamondMr. RosamondLucretia RosamondNancy Narcissus Bowie (born Rosamond)Thomas Henry RosamondJames RosamondJantha Rosamond,Benjamin RosamondDaniel RosamondTillman Jasper Rosamond

Siblings:

Mary Elizabeth Pyles (born Rosamond)Samuel E RosamondThomas A RosamondNathaniel Jones RosamondJames Doharty Rosamond

James Rosamond

Birth names:

James
James Roseman
James Rosemond
James Rosamond

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1754

  Augusta, Virginia, United States

Marriage:

Spouse: Lettice Tillman

1778

  of Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina

Marriage:

Spouse: Mary Doharty

1795

  Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina, United States

Death:

July 10 1806

  Abbeville, Abbeville, South Carolina, United States

Parents:

John RosamondSarah Rosamond (born Wilson)

Spouses:

Mary Rosamond (born Doharty)Lettice Rosamond (born Tillman)

Children:

Mary Elizabeth Pyles (born Rosamond)Benjamin Franklin RosamondSamuel E RosamondThomas A RosamondNathaniel Jones RosamondJames Doharty Rosamond

John Rosamond

Birth names:

John “The Highway Man” Rosamond
John Rosemond
Mr. Rosemond

Gender:

Male

Birth:

Between 1709 and 1711

  Leitrim, Ireland

Christening:

Sep 11 1715

  London St Botolph without Aldgate, London, England

Marriage:

Spouse: Sarah Wilson

May 10 1748

  Augusta, Virginia, United States

Death:

1790

  Abbeville, South Carolina, United States

Parents:

James RosamondAnn Rosamond (born D’Orr)

Wife:

Sarah Rosamond (born Wilson)

James Rosamond

Birth names:

James Or Jacob
James Or Jacob Rosemond
John Rosamond
James Jacob Rosamond

Gender:

Male

Birth:

Jan 1 1654

  Basel, Switzerland

Marriage:

Spouse: Ann D’Orr

1678

  Of,Ire

Death:

  County Leitrim, Ireland

Title of Nobility:

Sergeant James Rosemond

1690

  “Battle of the Boyne” (1690)

Father:

Hans Ulrich Rosemond

Wife:

Ann Rosamond (born D’Orr)

Children:

James Washer RosamondNathaniel RosemondJohn Rosamond

Hans Ulrich Rosemond

Deceased

Birth name:

Hans Ulrich Rosemond

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1623

  Basel,Basel,Switzerland

Marriage:

Between 1652 and 1653

Parents:

Hans RosemondMrs Hans Rosemond (born Rosamond)

Son:

James Rosamond

Hans Rosemond

Deceased

Birth name:

Hans Rosemond

Gender:

Male

Birth:

Between Jan 11 1581 and Jan 10 1582

  Basel, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland

Occupation:

Weaver

Father:

Fred Rosamond

Wife:

Mrs Hans Rosemond (born Rosamond)

Son:

Hans Ulrich Rosemond

Fred Rosamond

Deceased

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1552

  Basel, Basel-Stadt, Switzerland

Parents:

Hans RosamondMrs. Hans Rosamond

Son:

Hans Rosemond

Hans Rosamond

Deceased

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1531

Marriage:

Spouse: Mrs. Hans ROSAMOND

1553

Father:

Erhart DeRougemont

Wife:

Mrs. Hans Rosamond

Son:

Fred Rosamond

Erhart DeRougemont

Deceased

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1495

  Basle in the Freiestrasse

Son:

Hans Rosamond

Frank Wesley Rosamond

Gender:

Male

Birth:

Dec 18 1881

  Montana, United States

Marriage:

Spouse: Mary Magdalene Wieneke

Dec 27 1911

  Los Angeles County, California

Residence:

1930

  Ventura, California

Death:

Nov 23 1953

Burial:

  Sunny Lane Cemetery Del City Oklahoma County Oklahoma, USA

Parents:

William Thomas RosamondIda Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose)

Wife:

Mary Magdalene Rosamond (born Wieneke)

Daughter:

June E Rice (born Rosamond)

Siblings:

Dollie RosamondIda C Rosamond

Source:

Click here to view record on FamilySearch

Ida C Rosamond

Gender:

Female

Birth:

Jan 1886

  Helena, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Death:

June 18 1887

  Helena, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Burial:

  Benton Avenue Cemetery, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Parents:

William Thomas RosamondIda Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose)

Siblings:

Dollie RosamondFrank Wesley Rosamond

Source:

Click here to view record on FamilySearch

Additional information

LifeSketch:

Birth: Jan., 1886 Helena Lewis and Clark County Montana, USA Death: Jun. 18, 1887 Helena Lewis and Clark County Montana, USA Ida C. Rosamond was born in January 1886 and lived in the Sixth Ward, Helena. On June 18, 1887, Ida died from measles at age 17 months. The attending physician was Kellogg. Herrmann & Co. provided the following: child’s gloss white case and outside box $15.00, digging of grave by Schmidt $3.00, carriage of McComas $6.00, total $24.00.

https://www.geni.com/people/Ida-Appleton/6000000035634008730

Ida Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose)

Birth name:

Ida Louisiana Rose

Gender:

Female

Birth:

1860

  Louisiana, United States

Marriage:

Feb 16 1881

  Bates, Missouri, United States

Residence:

1870

  Missouri, United States

Death:

Sep 5 1891

  Helena, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Burial:

  Forest Vale Cemetery, Lewis and Clark, Montana, United States

Parents:

Edward Haney RoseMartha Rose Rose (born Westbrook)

Husband:

William Thomas Rosamond

Children:

Frank Wesley RosamondIda C RosamondDollie Rosamond

Siblings:

Charles W. RoseWesley RoseBertha Jane Meredith (born Rose)Marcus C RoseLaura RoseAlbert Edward RoseSheldon Rose

Edward Haney Rose

Deceased

Birth name:

Edward H. Rose

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1808

  Pennsylvania, United States

Residence:

1850

  Mason county, part of, Mason, Virginia

Residence:

1860

  T 15 N R 8, Douglas, Illinois, United States

Residence:

1865

  Tuscola, Douglas, Illinois

Residence:

1870

  Missouri, United States

Parents:

Allen RoseElizabeth Rose (born Haney)

Wife:

Martha Rose Rose (born Westbrook)

Children:

Charles W. RoseWesley RoseBertha Jane Meredith (born Rose)Marcus C RoseLaura RoseAlbert Edward RoseIda Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose),Sheldon Rose

Siblings:

Daniel Haney RoseMargaret Wigton (born Rose)Mary Polly Cristy (born Rose)Patrick RoseElizabeth Gorden (born Rose)Ellenor Rose Wooley (born Hoover)Rosanna Allen (born Rose)

Source:

Click here to view record on FamilySearch

Martha Rose Rose (born Westbrook)

Birth name:

Martha Rose Westbrook

Gender:

Female

Birth:

May 10 1811

  London, Middlesex, Ontario, Canada

Residence:

1850

  Mason county, part of, Mason, Virginia

Residence:

1860

  T 15 N R 8, Douglas, Illinois, United States

Residence:

1870

  Missouri, United States

Death:

Apr 15 1895

  Missouri, United States

Burial:

  Hazelwood Cemetery, Springfield Township, Greene, Missouri, United States

Parents:

Andrew WestbrookSally Westbrook (born Hull)

Husband:

Edward Haney Rose

Children:

Sheldon RoseIda Louisiana Rosamond (born Rose),Wesley RoseBertha Jane Meredith (born Rose),Marcus C RoseAlbert Edward RoseCharles W. Rose,Laura Rose

Siblings:

Nancy Kimball (born Westbrook)Martha Or Henrietta WestbrookJohn Hull WestbrookHenrietta Westbrook,Euphemia Peer (born Westbrook)Ebeneser Wesbrook,Oliver WestbrookHannah Jane Comstock (born Westbrook)William Thorn WestbrookAndrew Hull Westbrook

Source:

Click here to view record on FamilySearch

 

Allen Rose

Birth name:

Allen Rose

Gender:

Male

Birth:

Nov 1770

  Bedford, Bedford, Pennsylvania, United States

Marriage:

Spouse: Elizabeth Haney

Circa 1804

  Pennsylvania

Death:

1846

  Gallia, Ohio, United States

Parents:

Edward RoseDrucilla Rose (born Pierpont)

Wife:

Elizabeth Rose (born Haney)

Children:

Daniel Haney RoseEdward Haney RoseMargaret Wigton (born Rose)Mary Polly Cristy (born Rose),Patrick RoseElizabeth Gorden (born Rose)Ellenor Rose Wooley (born Hoover)Rosanna Allen (born Rose)

Siblings:

Drucilla Gardner (born Rose)Edward RoseRosane RoseNancy Mullick (born Rose)Elizabeth RoseJohn RoseSarah Simpson (born Rose)Samuel Rose,Roseanne Cumings (born Rose)

 

Edward Rose

Birth names:

Edward
Edward Rose

Gender:

Male

Birth:

May 17 1743

  Bedford, Bedford, Pennsylvania, United States

Marriage license:

1771

  Pennsylvania, United States

Marriage:

Spouse: Drucilla Pierpont

1762

  Pennsylvania

Death:

Feb 23 1834

  Somerset, Perry County, Ohio

Burial:

  Somerset, Perry, Ohio

Parents:

William RoseJane Sarah Rose (born Ridgway)

Wife:

Drucilla Rose (born Pierpont)

Children:

Drucilla Gardner (born Rose)Allen RoseEdward RoseRosane RoseNancy Mullick (born Rose),Elizabeth RoseJohn RoseSarah Simpson (born Rose)Samuel RoseRoseanne Cumings (born Rose)

Siblings:

Nancy RoseRachel RoseRobert RoseAllen Rose,Sarah Rose CessnaLouise Lesiria Twin) (born Rose (),Susanna RosePeter Rose

Source:

Click here to view record on FamilySearch

 

William Rose

Birth names:

William ROSE
Father Rose
Willaim Rose

Gender:

Male

Birth:

1696

  Tyrone, England

Marriage:

Spouse: Jane Sarah Ridgway

1723

  United States

Marriage:

Spouse: Sarah Ridgeway

Feb 12 1745

  Talbot, Maryland, United States

Immigration:

  Ship Canterbury With William Penn

Death:

1790

  Philadelphia, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States

Source:

Click here to view record on FamilySearch

 

  • ID: I055305
  • Name: Captain Ezekiel Rose 1 2 3
  • Sex: M
  • Title: Senior
  • Birth: in Hampshire County, (West) Virginia or Pennsylvania 1 3
  • Death: BEF 25 MAY 1818 in Newton Twp, Muskingum County, Ohio 1 3
  • Burial: South of flagpole in Roseville Cemetery, Roseville, Ohio 3
  • Note:

    [2670654.ged]

    The now proven erroneous DAR records suggested Ezekiel Rose was born 23 October 1745 in Pennsylvania. The records state his first wife was Harriet Colson born 1747 also in Pennsylvania and died in Washington County, Pennslyvania about 1800. This record of the DAR is apparently not my Ezekiel Rose and subsequent investigation has shown this Ezekiel Rose and/or Harriet Colson to have been born actually after the Revolutionary War:
    Ezekiel Rose
    Birth: 11 September 1800– Salem, Pittsgrove, NJ
    Death:
    12 May 1884 —
    Spouse: Harriet Colson
    Parents: Uriah Rose, Rachel Dubois

    My Ezekiel Rose was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, a surveyor, and a farmer. He was apparently from a town of Milford, for his son named New Milford, Ohio in honor of his father, Captain Ezekiel Rose.

    My Ezekiel Rose may have been married at least twice; separated from his wife who left him. In the Potowmac Guardian and Berkeley Advertiser of Martinsburg, West Virginia on April 14, 1794 page 4 column 1 appears the following:

    Whereas Mary Rose, the wife of me the subscriber, has left my bed and board, without any just cause, I therefore caution all persons trusting in or in any manner dealing with her on my account, as I will not be answerable for any debt she may contract, or any dealing she may make, after this date. Ezekiel Rose. Hampshire County, March 15, 1794.

    Probably the first wife was named Mary Hynes or Hinds. This Mary who “left my bed” was his second wife, the widow Mary Mcconnell Milliken. Probably the third wife was named Mary Higgins or Higkins as her name is spelled on the deed for sale of land in Washington County, Pennsylvania. NOTE: Washington County absorbed Cuberland County after the Revolutionary War.

    Note the problem this separation causes for determining the mother of William Rose born in 1794 who became a minister and married Margaret “Peggy” Lowery 10 April 1817. It would have been difficult for this first wife to have left her sole means of support with an infant child. Likewise my Ezekiel does not have additional children after the birth of William Rose in 1794, so the event may be of another Ezekiel Rose and wife Mary, or it may be my own.

    Ezekiel Rose served as captain in the 5th Bn Washington County, Pennsylvania. He fought in battles including the Battle of Sandusky in the Ohio region where he eventually moved and died.

    The will of my Ezekiel reads as follows:
    Will of Ezekiel Rose of Muskingum County, Ohio

    In the name of God Amen I Ezekiel Rose of Newton Township Muskingum County Ohio being weak in body but sound and perfect in mind and memory blessed be almithy God for the same do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following that is to say

    First I give and bequeath unto my daughter Rachel Prior 84 cents I do also give and bequeth unto my daughter Sarah Williams 84 cts I aso give and bequeth unto my son Ezkiel Rose jur 84 cts I also gie and bequeth unto my daughter Nancy Smith 84 cts I also give and bequeth unto my son William Rose 84 cts I will and order to be paid within six months after my decase–
    (and?) lastly to all the rest residue and remainder of my personal estate goods and chattles of what kind nature soever I give and bequeth the same to my daughter Hannah Rose whom I appoint my sole executrix of this my last will and testament in witness whereof ? I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 23rd day of march in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen
    Ezekiel (his mark) Rose (seal)
    signed and sealed and published and declared by the above named Ezekiel Rose to be his last will and testament in preance of us have hereunto subscribed our names asa witnesses in the presence of the testator
    Benjamine McClain Chauncey Ford
    John Weylie
    Joseph Weylie
    The will was proved 25 May 1818. The settlement is cited as #445,
    Muskingum County, Ohio.

    In 1812 he, or his son, platted the town of New Milford, Ohio which was renamed for him after his death to Roseville, Ohio. He is buried in the center of the Roseville Cemetery just south of the flag pole.
    information from a Muskingum Co book of wills. Book
    > A 1804-0814.
    > Microfilm # 1847941.
    >
    > I will try to forward the info to both the Rose and
    > Pryor/Prior lists.
    >
    > Third from the last given is:
    >
    > P 228 May term 1818 Ezekiel Rose of Newton Twp.-will
    > Wit: Chauncey Ford & Joseph Wiley
    > Dau: Rachel Prior-84 cents
    > Dau: Sarah Williams-84 cents
    > Son: Ezekiel Rose Jr.-84 cents
    > Dau: Nancy Smith-84 cents
    > Son William Rose-84 cents
    > Residue of estate to Hannah Rose & she is executrix
    >

    RLee found an alternate birthyear of 1735 for Ezekiel.

    Both Captain Ezekiel Rose and Major John Rose fought in the Battle of Sandusky which took place in what would become the family home area in Muskingum County, Ohio. The Battle of Sandusky was in May, 1782; the Roses moved to this Ohio region shortly thereafter, following along the Zane Trace which was named after one of the soldiers in Captain Ezekiel Rose’s militia troop. The Zane Trace follows along each of the battles of the Revolutionary War that Ezekiel Rose fought in!

    Captain Ezekiel Rose is in Washington County, Pennsylvania for the 1790 census, and in Greene County, Pennsylvania for the 1800 and 1810 census.

    Note: Greene County, Pennsylvania was part of Washington County, Pennsylvania before 1796. Likewise, Washington County, Pennsylvania was part of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania before 1781.
    Captain Ezekiel Rose moved from his birthplace of Pennsylvania to Ohio in 1812 according to RLee

    My Ezekiel was a wealthy man as anyone in the 1700’s who owned a horse was considered well off. My Ezekiel according to the tax record of 1787 owned 5 horses, 2 cows, and 12 sheep which he raised for wool. This was before cotton became a common clothing material.

    DAR has come up with four Ezekiel Roses in the Revolutionary War:

    1. Ezekiel Rose b June 9 1745 NJ m 1. Elizabeth More 2. Elizabeth Newkirk
    d.5 Dec. 1824 in Indiana. He was a private.

    2. Ezekiel Rose b 1746 NJ private m Mary Field and died 28 June 1811 in NJ

    3. Ezekiel Rose b 1745 PA Captain m Harriet Colson d NJ

    4. and ours b 1745 m Mary Hines Capt. died in Ohio.

    More twists to the Ezekiel’s in the war. Only two of these Ezekiel Roses could read and
    write, and they were both captains. None of these Ezekiel Roses laid claim to a war pension. The son of our Ezekiel, however, laid claim to land in Ohio for his father’s service.

    My Ezekiel Rose was severely wounded at the Battle of Sandusky. The following history is taken from the Fort Laurens site:

    http://www.friendsoffortlaurens.org/about.html

    In early 1778, General George Washington prepared a military plan to attack the British. The plan was to attack Fort Detroit because the British were encouraging their Indian allies in the area north of the Ohio River to attack American settlements in the frontier region.

    Due to political pressure from the states of Pennsylvania and Virginia, and the inability to secure the necessary numbers of men and supplies, the expedition’s original purpose was changed by the Continental Congress to simply attacking Indian towns and villages along the southwestern edge of Lake Erie.

    Following a well-established Indian trail known today as the Great Trail, an American army of 1,200 men and their Delaware Indian guides marched west into the Ohio territory from Fort Pitt in the fall of 1778 under the command of Georgia native General Lachlan McIntosh. Twenty miles down river from Fort Pitt near present-day Beaver, Pennsylvania, Fort McIntosh was constructed to store provisions and supplies. On November 4, 1778, McIntosh departed from there to head west toward the Sandusky towns.

    As they neared the end of the year and the weather worsened, McIntosh arrived in the Tuscarawas Valley. He decided to forego the attacks on the Indian towns and to build a fort near the crossing of the Great Trail and the Tuscarawas River.

    He would then leave a small garrison of 172 men and women at the fort and return to the area the following spring to continue his march toward Detroit or the Sandusky Towns.

    Fort Laurens was built in late November, 1778, on the banks of the Tuscarawas River near what is now Bolivar, Ohio. General McIntosh named the fort in honor of the President of the Continental Congress, Henry Laurens. The wooden stockade was approximately one acre in size. It was a quadrangular-shaped fort with four bastions approximately 240 feet from the top of one angle of a bastion to another. Barracks and storehouse buildings were located inside the walls.

    A Significant Link to Ohio’s Past
    Fort Laurens remained an active American military post from November of 1778 through August of 1779. During that time, the fort was clearly perceived by the British and their Indian allies in the northwest as a very serious threat. This was evident from the numerous attacks on the fort by Indians, Loyalists and British soldiers. These attacks resulted in the death of more than 20 American soldiers, who were later buried a short distance from the fort, near the fort hospital.

    Just outside the Fort Laurens Museum, which houses many artifacts from the fort site, is The Tomb of the Unknown Patriot of the American Revolution. It pays lasting homage to at least one of the unknown defenders of the fort. The young man was laid to rest with full military honors from the Ohio National Guard in 1976.

    Fort Laurens is, in reality, a military cemetery of the American Revolution. Rebuilding this memorial is fitting tribute to the men and women who gave their lives for America’s freedom.

    Father: Robert Rose b: 1731 in Long Island, Suffolk County, New York
    Mother: Hanna \ Johanna Crawford b: ABT 1735

    Sources:

    1. Title: 6-2-00.ftw
      Repository:
      Media: Other
      Text: Date of Import: Jun 6, 2000
    2. Title: William Rose
      Note: 1325 White Oak Drive, Colfax, CA, USA, 95713, wdr_yah@yahoo.com. Please contact me if you find any errors or if you can further my knowledge; Thanks.
    3. Title: 2670654.ged
      Repository:
      Media: Other
      Text: Date of Import: Dec 22, 2003

 

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The Hidden Seed of Roseville

The city of Roseville, founded by my kindred, Ezekiel Rose, is in dire trouble. It is dying! I am still working on my letter to Ed Ray. I am going to challenge him and his university to do a study on how to save  Roseville. Here is the Crawford-Wallace legacy.

http://www.clanwallace.org/wallace-crawford-connections.pdf

Here is the remarkable diary of David Zeisberger a Moravian minister that tried to save America. He failed! However, there is a Hidden Seed born in Bohemia.

The Moravian Church – a Hidden Seed

https://archive.org/details/diaryofdavid01zeisrich/page/n8

This official says says Rosevillites want a laundry-mat. Those who want to go back to these simpler times, must read David’s diary. The Moravian system depends on there being no increase in the population. Here is the account of the recovery of the Heil children. My great great grandfather, John Heil, was a member of the Moravian church in Pennsylvania,

Catherine was born around 1746 to Johann Nicholas Heil and Maria Marguerite Theisen. She had five siblings: Johann, Jonathan, Susannah, Mary Elizabeth and Mary Margaret. A Moravian Church Diary entry from 1/26/1756 stated that Catherine was abducted by Indians (Native Americans) at the age of ten and presumed killed. She was released after an unknown amount of time and went on to marry into the Silvius family, marrying Nicholas Silvius, who had also been captured by natives when he was 12, until the age of 18. They had over 10 children together: Barbara, Nicholas Jr, Johann Henrich, Maria Elizabeth, Jonas, Anna Maria, Catherine, Margaret, Susanna and Christina.”

John ‘Born Again Prophet of the Hidden Seed’

“The fight with the English took a severe toll on the Wallaces and Crawfords. William’s father and both brothers were killed by the English. Most his maternal uncles and cousins likewise lost their lives. The heritable position of Sheriff of Ayr and the title and lands of Loudoun passed on to the Campbells with the marriage of the heiress and last survivor of the line, Susanna Crawford, daughter of Sir Reginald, the Fifth Sheriff of Ayr, to Duncan Campbell. Hugh, an uncle of Susanna, does appear to have survived, or at least one of his offspring did, and it is into this line that the Crawford Chieftainship passed. Hugh Crawford also was the progenitor of the Crosbie line. For his valor at Bannockburn he was rewarded by Robert the Bruce with a heritable grant, being given the estate at Auchenames, which became the residence of the Crawford Chiefly line and gave its name to that cadet.

The principal legacy of William Wallace for us Crawfords is his kinship to our House. His mother was a Crawford and thus the Wallaces recognize us as kin, as we do them. We also, through the centuries, have shared with him his love of liberty learned from bitter life lessons and at his uncle’s knee. Sir Reginald is said to have inspired his at the time very young nephew William with the statement:

Dico tibi verum, libertas optima rerum:  Nunquam Sanville sub nexu vivito, fili.

Freedom is best, I tell you true, of all things to be won:  Then never live within the bond of slavery, my son.

As a leader of his country and people, William Wallace is said to have oft repeated this phrase to inspire them in their resistance to the English. William Wallace is Scotland’s greatest hero, a man of integrity, but also a man of his day — violent and vengeful. His determination to free his country from a foreign yoke left a legacy manifest in many prominent historical documents related to the struggle for independence, among them the Scottish Declaration of Arbroath and the American Declaration of Independence.”

https://archive.org/details/diaryofdavid01zeisrich/page/n15

https://www.zanesvilletimesrecorder.com/story/news/2018/07/13/roseville-revitalization-ohio-jobs-economic-development/755857002/

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/03/18/the-rose-of-wallace/

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/03/03/the-moravian-native-converts/

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/03/02/bohemian-prophet-of-the-hidden-seed/

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/07/15/sarah-wilson-rosamond-and-house-of-schwarzenberg/

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/07/16/robert-wilson-maried-jane-lee/

Stanza Fourteen also contains a typo. “Captain Rase” is actually a reference to Captain Ezekiel Rose. It’s not entirely unlikely that the author may have been referring to Gustavus Heinrich de Rosenthal, who served under the name “John Rose.” However, Rosenthal was elected adjutant with the rank of Major, not Captain. Ironically, Cowan’s “Southwestern Pennsylvania in Song and Story” contains yet another typo. It incorrectly lists a “Captain Ross” instead of Captain Rose.

David Zeisberger (April 11, 1721 – November 17, 1808) was a Moravian clergyman and missionary among the Native Americans in the Thirteen Colonies. He established communities of Munsee (Lenape) converts to Christianity in the valley of the Muskingum River in Ohio; and for a time, near modern-day Amherstburg, Ontario.

Biography[edit]

Zeisberger was born in Zauchtenthal, Moravia (present day Suchdol nad Odrou in the Czech Republic) and moved with his family to the newly established Moravian Christian community of Herrnhut, on the estate of Count Nicolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf in the German Electorate of Saxony in 1727. However, when his family migrated to the newly established English colony in Georgia, Zeisberger remained in Europe to complete his education. In 1738, he came to Georgia in the United States, with the assistance of governor James Edward Oglethorpe. He later rejoined his family in the Moravian community at Savannah, Georgia. At the time, the United Brethren had begun a settlement, merely for the purpose of preaching the gospel to the Creek nation. From there he moved to Pennsylvania, and assisted at the commencement of the settlements of Nazareth and Bethlehem.

In 1739, Zeisberger was influential in the development of a Moravian community in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and was there at its dedication on Christmas Eve 1741. Four years later, at the invitation of Hendrick Theyanoguin, he came to live among the Mohawk. He became fluent in the Onondaga language and assisted Conrad Weiser in negotiating an alliance between the English and the Iroquois in Onondaga (near present-day Syracuse, New York). Zeisberger also produced dictionaries and religious works in Iroquoian and Algonquian.

Zeisberger began as a missionary to Native American peoples following his ordination as a Moravian minister in 1749. He worked among the Lenape (Delaware) of Pennsylvania, coming into conflict with British authorities over his advocacy of Natives’ rights and his ongoing efforts to establish white and native Moravian communities in eastern Ohio. He was the senior missionary of the United Brethren (as the Moravians sometimes referred to themselves) among the Indians. His relations with British authorities worsened during the American Revolutionary War and in 1781 he was arrested and held at Fort Detroit. While he was imprisoned, ninety-six of his Native converts in Gnadenhutten, Ohio were brutally murdered by Pennsylvania militiamen, an event known as the Gnadenhutten Massacre.

After Zeisberger was released, violent conflicts with other Native tribes and the expansion of white settlement forced many Moravian Christian settlements to relocate to present-day Michigan and Ontario. A large group of Munsee moved there in 1782, but Zeisberger later returned to live the rest of his life among the Native converts remaining near the village of Goshen (in present Goshen Township, Tuscarawas County, Ohio). Zeisberger spent a period of 62 years, excepting a few short intervals, as a missionary among the Indians. He died on November 17, 1808 at Goshen, Ohio, on the river Tuscarawas, at the age of 87 years. Zeisberger is buried in Goshen.

William Crawford (2 September 1722 – 11 June 1782) was an American soldier and surveyor who worked as a western land agent for George Washington. Crawford fought in the French and Indian War and the American Revolutionary War. He was tortured and burned at the stake by American Indians in retaliation for the Gnadenhutten massacre, a notorious incident near the end of the American Revolution.

Early career[edit]

In 1722, Crawford was born in Spotsylvania County, Colony of Virginia, at a location which is now in Berkeley County, West Virginia.[1] He was a son of William Crawford and his wife Honora Grimes,[2] who were Scots-Irish farmers. After his father’s death in 1736, his mother married Richard Stephenson. Crawford had a younger brother, Valentine Crawford, plus five half-brothers and one half-sister from his mother’s second marriage.[3]

In 1742 Crawford married one Ann Stewart and she bore him one child, a daughter also named Ann, born in 1743. Apparently she died in childbirth or soon after, and on 5 January 1744 he married Hannah Vance, said to have been born in Pennsylvania in 1723. She bore him a son named John (20 April 1744 – 22 September 1816; he married one Effie Grimes) and at least two daughters, Ophelia “Effie” (2 September 1747 – 1825, who married Captain William McCormick who was born Feb 2, 1738, and died August 15, 1816[4]), and Sarah (1752–10 Nov 1838, who married 1)Major William Harrison [c 1740–13 June 1782], and 2) Lt. Col Uriah Springer [18 Nov 1754–21 Sep 1826]}. There may also have been another daughter, Nancy, born in 1767, who had apparently died when he wrote his will in 1782.[5]

In 1749, Col. William Crawford became acquainted with George Washington, then a young surveyor somewhat younger than Crawford. He accompanied Washington on surveying trips and learned the trade. In 1755, Crawford served in the Braddock expedition with the rank of ensign. Like Washington, he survived the disastrous Battle of the Monongahela. During the French and Indian War, he served in Washington’s Virginia Regiment, guarding the Virginia frontier against Native American raiding parties. In 1758, Crawford was a member of General John Forbes’s army which captured Fort Duquesne, where Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania now stands. He continued to serve in the military, taking part in Pontiac’s War in 1763.

In 1765 Crawford built a cabin on the Braddock Road along the Youghiogheny River in what is now Connellsville, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. His wife and three children joined him there the following year. Crawford supported himself as a farmer and fur trader. When the 1768 Treaty of Fort Stanwix with the Iroquois opened up additional land for settlement, Crawford worked again as a surveyor, locating lands for settlers and speculators. Governor Robert Dinwiddie had promised bounty land to the men of the Washington’s Virginia Regiment for their service in the French and Indian War. In 1770 Crawford and Washington travelled down the Ohio River to choose the land to be given to the regiment’s veterans. The area selected was near what is now Point Pleasant, West Virginia. Crawford also made a western scouting trip in 1773 with Lord Dunmore, Governor of Virginia. Washington could not accompany them because of the sudden death of his stepdaughter.[6]

At the outbreak of Dunmore’s War in 1774, Crawford received a major’s commission from Lord Dunmore. He built Fort Fincastle at present Wheeling, West Virginia.[7] He also led an expedition which destroyed two Mingo villages (near present Steubenville, Ohio) in retaliation for Chief Logan‘s raids into Virginia.[8] During the expedition, Crawford’s men rescued two captives held by American Indians, killing six and capturing 14 Indians.[2]

Crawford’s service to Virginia in Dunmore’s War was controversial in Pennsylvania, since the colonies were engaged in a bitter dispute over their borders near Fort Pitt. Crawford had been a justice of the peace in Pennsylvania since 1771, first for Bedford County, then for Westmoreland County when it was established in 1773. Arthur St. Clair, another Pennsylvania official, called for Crawford to be removed from his office, which was done in January 1775. Beginning in 1776, Crawford served as a surveyor and justice for Virginia’s short-lived Yohogania County.[9]

American Revolution[edit]

When the American Revolutionary War began, Crawford recruited a regiment for the Virginia Line of the Continental Army. On 11 October 1776, the Continental Congress appointed him colonel of the 7th Virginia Regiment. Crawford led his regiment in the Battle of Long Island and the retreat across New Jersey. He crossed the Delaware with Washington and fought at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. During the Philadelphia campaign, he commanded a scouting detachment for Washington’s army.[10]

After the war on the western frontier intensified in 1777, Crawford was transferred to the Western Department of the Continental Army. He served at Fort Pitt under Generals Edward Hand and Lachlan McIntosh. Crawford was present at the Treaty of Fort Pitt in 1778, and helped to build Fort Laurens and Fort McIntosh that year. Resources were scarce on the frontier, however, and Fort Laurens was abandoned in 1779. In 1780, Crawford visited Congress to appeal for more funds for the western frontier. In 1781, he retired from military service.

The Ohio Historical Society‘s marker near the Colonel Crawford Burn Site Monument in Wyandot County, Ohio.

Crawford expedition[edit]

In 1782, General William Irvine persuaded Crawford to come out of retirement and lead an expedition against enemy Indian villages along the Sandusky River. Before leaving, on 16 May he made out his will and testament.[11] His son John Crawford, his son-in-law William Harrison, and his nephew and namesake William Crawford also joined the expedition.

Execution of Crawford

After his election as commander of the expedition, Crawford led about 500 volunteers deep into American Indian territory with the hope of surprising them. However, the Indians and their British allies at Detroit had learned about the expedition in advance, and brought about 440 men to the Sandusky to oppose the Americans. After a day of indecisive fighting, the Americans found themselves surrounded. During a confused retreat, Crawford and dozens of his men were captured. The Indians executed many of them in retaliation for the Gnadenhutten massacre earlier in the year, in which 96 peaceful Christian Indian men, women, and children had been murdered by Pennsylvanian militiamen. Crawford’s execution was brutal; he was tortured for at least two hours before he was burned at the stake. His nephew and son-in-law were also captured and executed. The war ended shortly thereafter, but Crawford’s horrific execution was widely publicized in the United States, worsening the already strained relationship between Native Americans and European Americans.

Crawford’s torture and execution by the Indians is described in graphic detail by Allan W. Eckert in That Dark and Bloody River [12]

In 1982, the site of Colonel Crawford’s execution was added to the National Register of Historic Places. In 1994, the Wyandot County Patriotic Citizens erected an 8.5 ft (2.6 m) Berea sandstone monument near the site. The Ohio Historical Society also has an historical marker nearby.

Crawford County, Ohio, Crawford County, Pennsylvania, Crawford County, Michigan and Crawford County, Indiana are named for William Crawford. So too is Colonel Crawford High School in North Robinson, Ohio.

There is a replica of Crawford’s cabin in Connellsville, Pennsylvania.

Colonel William Crawford captured by Indians burned at the stake

Colonel William Crawford (1722-1782) was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, raised near Winchester, Virginia, and lived in western Pennsylvania. He was a farmer, surveyor, soldier and friend of George Washington. Colonel Crawford distinguished himself during the Revolutionary War and in the Indian wars along the frontier. As a partisan he was very active and successful. He took several Indian towns, and did great service in scouting, patrolling and defending the frontiers. He was captured and burned at the stake just north of Upper Sandusky, Ohio, on June 11, 1782.

He was a brother of Valentine Crawford, Jr. (1724-1777); the CRAWFORD brother some southern CRAWFORD families’ claim links with. Both CRAWFORD brothers are the subjects of Allen W. Scholl’s book, “The Brothers Crawford”.

Most of the following material comes from “The Frontiersmen” by Allan W. Eckert published in 1970. Eckert used “hidden dialog” as a means of writing history. This technique has been termed “documentary fiction”; Alex Haley called it “faction” and he used it in “Roots”. “The Frontiersmen” is comparable to “Son of the Morning Star” and to “Roots”. A great balance between academic and popular writing. Really illustrates the dark side of humanity.

On June 10, 1782 Colonel William Crawford was captured with several of his command by hostile Indians and marched to a large village about eight miles above the Sandusky River. Soon the prisoners, all except Crawford and army surgeon Dr. Edward Knight, were murdered and scalped. Dr. Knight was held captive but Colonel Crawford was taken by the Indians, stripped of all clothing and led to a thick post projecting fifteen feet from the ground. Bound at the wrists he was tethered with a rawhide cord to the post. In this way he was able to walk around the pole, stand, sit, even lie down, but was unable to move more than four feet in any direction from the pole.

Soon a crowd of Indians rushed up with sticks and switches and beat Crawford unmercifully, withdrawing only when his body was badly welted and bloodstained and he appeared on the verge of unconsciousness. The Indians then raced over to where Dr. Knight was tied and subjected him to the same punishment.

Colonel Crawford was then informed that his captors planned to burn him. A foot-high circle of kindling was placed all the way around Crawford’s stake, at a distance of about five yards. About a hundred dry hickory poles, each an inch or so thick and upwards of twenty feet in length, were placed so that they lay with one end atop the kindling and the other stretching outward, away from the circle.

Crawford was surrounded by a milling mass of Indian warriors and squaws, all of whom carried flintlock rifles. Into the barrels they poured extra-large quantities of gunpowder but no balls, and shot at Colonel Crawford pointblank. The grains of powder and saltpeter still burning peppered his body; and imbedded just beneath his skin. Crawford screamed until he was hoarse and whimpering. More than seventy powder charges had struck him everywhere from feet to neck, but the greater majority had been aimed at his groin, and when, they were finished the end of his penis was black and shredded and still smoking.

As Dr. Knight watched in horror one of the Indian leaders stepped up to Colonel Crawford and sliced off his ears. From where he sat watching Dr. Knight could see blood flowing down both sides of Crawford’s head, bathing his shoulders, back and chest.

Now came the squaws with burning brands and they lighted the kindling all the way around the circle, igniting the material every foot or so until the entire circle was ablaze. The poles quickly caught fire on their tips and the heat became intense, causing the closest spectators to fall back. Crawford made a peculiar cry and ran around the post in a frenzy trying to escape the flames, finally falling to the ground and wrapping his body around the stake. After the better part of an hour the fire died down, leaving behind a fanned-out ring of long poles, each with one end a glowing spike.

Crawford’s back, buttocks and the skin on the back of his thighs had blistered and burst and then curled up into little charred crisps. The sounds he made were fainter. The torture continued as Indians selected poles and jabbed the glowing ends onto Colonel Crawford’s skin where they thought it would give most pain. Dr. Knight thought Crawford near death by this time, but was amazed to see the colonel scramble to his feet and begin stumbling about the stake, attempting to avoid the glowing ends, that hissed and smoked whenever they touched him. One of the glowing points was thrust at his face and as he jerked to avoid it he ran into another which contacted his open eye, causing him to shriek loudly.

When the poles had all been used and tossed on a pile to one side, some of the squaws came up with wooden boards and scooped up piles of glowing embers to throw at him until soon he had nothing to walk upon but coals of fire and hot ashes. As Colonel Crawford circled the stake he began to plead coherently for someone to shoot him, to kill him. Most of the Indians did not understand what Crawford was saying, but the beseeching tone of the colonel’s voice pleased them and they clapped their hands and shouted aloud in triumph at having forced the white chief into this outburst.

When there was no answer to his pleads; Crawford began a shuffling walk round and round the stake as if in a trance, scarcely flinching as he stepped on the hot coals. Finally he stopped and slowly raised his head and loudly and clearly prayed for God to end his suffering.

Once more he began the same shuffling walk until at last, two full hours after having been prodded with the glowing poles, he fell on his stomach and lay silent. At once an Indian chief stepped over the ring of ashes and cut a deep circle on the top of Colonel Crawford’s head with his knife, wrapped the long dark hair around his hand and yanked hard. The pop as the scalp pulled off was clearly audible to Dr. Knight.

The chief now stepped clear of the circle and advanced on the captive doctor. He held the dripping scalp in front of Dr. Knight’s eyes and taunted him. With rapid strokes he whipped the fleshy portion of the scalp back and forth across Knight’s face, stopping only when there came a deep murmur from the crowd behind him.

A squaw had entered the circle of ashes with a board heaped full of glowing coals, and these she scattered on Crawford’s back and held them with the board against the officer’s bare skull. The murmur that had arisen was occasioned by what seemed wholly unbelievable; Colonel Crawford groaned faintly and rolled over and then slowly drew up his knees and raised himself to a kneeling position. For perhaps two minutes he stayed like this and then he placed one foot on the ground and stood erect again, beginning anew a shuffling walk around the stake. A few squaws touched burning sticks to him but he seemed insensitive to them, no longer even attempting to pull away. It was the most appalling sight Dr. Knight had ever witnessed and, unable to control himself any longer, he suddenly vomited and then screamed at his captors, cursing them and calling them murderers and fiends and devils.

Squaws now heaped armloads of fresh kindling in a pile near the stake and lighted it. When the fire reached its peak, two warriors cut the rawhide cord that bound the still shuffling Crawford and, one on each side let him shuffle toward the fire. When the heat became too intense for them to advance closer, they thrust him from them and he sprawled into the blaze. His legs jerked a few times and one arm flailed out but then, as skin and flesh blackened, living motion stopped and all that remained was a gradual drawing of arms and legs close to the body in the pugilistic posture characteristic in persons burned to death.

So ended the life of Colonel William Crawford. Dr. Knight, who had witnessed Crawford’s sufferings was later turned over by the Delaware to the Shawnees, from whom he later escaped. Dr. Knight eventually reached safety in a white settlement and gave a report of the events. Later he published his famous narrative, which described the sad end of Colonel Crawford.

Because of the obvious errors in the published rolls, there is a need for locating more reliable sources on the Sandusky expedition. One source unknown to Butterfield and Egle is the journal of John Rose. 21 Like Lafayette and von Steuben, this Russian nobleman of Baltic German extraction — whose true name was Gustavus Heinrich de Rosenthal — came to the aid of the American colonies in their revolt against England. Following a series of land and sea adventures including imprisonment at New York for a time, John Rose found himself at Fort Pitt in 1782 as an aide to General William Irvine,the fort’s commander. When Colonel Crawford asked for help, Irvine sent Rose on the campaign as Crawford’s aide-de-camp. Welleducated, Rose wrote daily journal entries throughout the campaign. Afterwards he added endnotes in which he evaluated the expedition’s officers and made recommendations as to how to improve acomparable force in the future. Rose took the journal withits endnotes withhim when he returned to his homeland in 1784. Today his journal and notes would be unknown on this side of the Atlantic except for a great-grandson who sent a copy to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in 1893 for publication. 22 The original journal and notes are evidently now in an official archival institution in the Estonian S.S.R. in the Soviet Union.23 The military pension applications at the National Archives in Washington are a rich source ofinformation. In1823 Congress passed the first comprehensive pension act which provided an annual grant to soldiers who served six months or more during the Revolution. Widows married at the time of the war were also eligible. As of this writing, eighty pensions of expedition volunteers or their widows have been identified. The pension files reveal a different picture of Crawford’s army than is commonly supposed. The typical picture

https://journals.psu.edu/wph/article/viewFile/3747/3565

https://journals.psu.edu/wph/article/viewFile/3764/3582

https://journals.psu.edu/wph/article/viewFile/3795/3613

Ezekiel Rose

Birth
Death unknown

Muskingum County, Ohio, USA
Burial

Roseville, Muskingum County, Ohio, USA

Memorial ID 40450770 · View Source

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Ezekiel Rose was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, a surveyor, and a farmer. He was apparently from the town of Milford, for his son named New Milford, Ohio (later to be renamed Roseville) in honor of his father. Ezekiel Rose served as captain in the 5th Bn Washington County, Pennsylvania. He fought in the Battle of Sandusky and is listed as a soldier of Fort Laurens http://www.friendsoffortlaurens.org . The statue of Ezekiel in Roseville Cemetery was erected by the Womens Relief Corps on May 30, 1896. from Terry Baulch: Ezekiel Rose is my ancestor. He was the worst of the wounded at the Battle of Upper Sandusky. Upon returning to safety after the campaign, his wound was cleaned by wrapping a ramrod with gauze and pushing in through his upper torso to stimulate bleeding to cleanse the wound. He credited his survival to repeatedly reciting the Lord’s prayer after being wounded as the battle raged. See Alan Eckert’s book THAT DARK AND BLOODY RIVER.


Family Members

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    Ezekiel Rose

    17761844

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Is Trump Insane?

Sincerely straight people are asking if Trump is insane. What is clear, he has a deep resentment and loathing for all Democrats for dare running against him, and is taking it real personal. The President of the United States of America goes after Republicans who do not hate Democrats like he does.

I suspect Trump is being pressured by Christian leaders to show empathy for the Muslim victims, which is causing a moral and mental crisis in our President. Trump is not getting their full attention – and full favorable treatment! This is a real crisis for a full-blown Narcissist. One can say God is a Narcissist.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thou_shalt_have_no_other_gods_before_me

I just have to laugh because the Kimites and Bellites labeled me insane, and went after me. My daughter is a Ignorant Trumpite!

John

Cornyn was asked about Trump’s tweets from over the weekend in which he criticized “Saturday Night Live” after the sketch comedy show aired a rerun featuring a skit depicting a world in which he had never become president.

“I don’t take that seriously, honestly,” Cornyn said.

Trump, in a pair of tweets on Sunday morning, complained that “SNL” and other late-night comedy shows “can spend all of their time knocking the same person (me), over & over, without so much of a mention of ‘the other side.’ Like an advertisement without consequences.”

In a separate tweet, Trump asked, “Should Federal Election Commission and/or FCC look into this?” 

https://www.politico.com/story/2019/03/18/kellyanne-conway-trump-mental-state-1224795

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-time-cure/201709/the-dangerous-case-donald-trump

“in praying for peace and safety in our nation and for these precious families who have lost so much in this senseless tragedy.”

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to those fighting for their lives and the families of the victims of the senseless violence that took place last night in Thousand Oaks,” said Franklin.

“There aren’t laws that can stop a person committed to hurting other people, but it does add a sense of urgency for reaching all people with the message of hope and life change found in Jesus Christ.”

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America Bishop Guy Erwin, who is based in the Los Angeles area, took to social media to express his condolences.

“Devastated by the mass shooting in Thousand Oaks last night. Heartrending & sad,” tweeted Erwin on Thursday morning.

“God is with those who mourn; we surround them with our care as well. Then we must address the parts of our culture that have made this so common in our land.”

The reported shooter, 28-year-old Ian Long, was a retired Marine Corps veteran. Authorities have not yet determined a motive for the massacre.

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William Crawford On Warpath

Allan, William; Blind Harry, Reciting the Deeds of Wallace; Paisley Art Institute Collection, held by Paisley Museum and Art Galleries; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/blind-harry-reciting-the-deeds-of-wallace-189838

Colonel William Crawford’s ancestors, are my ancestors.  Did he know Captain Ezekiel Rose was his kin? These warriors would lead 489 armed men against the Indians. Most of them were Scot-Irish. It was at the end of the Revolutionary War that was won by these immigrants from Ireland and Scotland, who had been on the warpath with the English for hundreds of years. The English had allied themselves with several tribes to go to war with their old foes.

American politics has entered a more open Cowboy verses the Indians, phase. President Bush just gave a speech, and pleaded for tolerance of Immigrants. President Trump has taken a stand against immigration and sees the whole Democratic Party as Hostiles who are all for the Foreign Invaders and crimes against White People. It is quite clear the Whites are the Immigrant-Invaders, that all but a handful of Native Americans, were determined to repel, and, exterminate.

I am now promoting a movie about Crawford’s defeat. I would like Spielberg to direct this movie that can become a series by Ken Burnes. This is The War for America.

John Presco

https://journals.psu.edu/wph/article/viewFile/3795/3613

“In contrast to the Wyandots and Delawares, the Shawnees burned a number of captives following the Battle of Sandusky with little or no regard for military rank. Not all the captives, of course, were from Crawford’s army; twelve Americans caught in Kentucky about the same time were reported to have arrived at Wapatomica where they were parceled out to other towns for burning.20 In this bicentennial report I will also include part of a letter received from Helen York Rose of Seminole, Oklahoma, a registered Delaware and the only Indian member of the “First Families of Ohio” genealogical organization. In response to my request for information concerning Indian archives under tribal control, she replied that Indian history has to be “dug out” little by little…. itis very difficult to get an Indian to tell our legends to white people. It so happens I was the one in our family to listen to the Older Delawares. …My own great grandmother, Sally Olivia Journey Cake Smith, always spent the time mourning for our people on the dates of slaughter [Gnadenhiitten massacre]. … The way to the battle of Sandusky is spattered with blood. What makes it so personal to me, Capt. Pipe’s band was my own ancestors band. … I am not only an Indian but collateral kin to the Crawford family, a brother of my captive grandmother, Mary Castleman, was married to Ann Crawford, related to Col. Crawford. I try to keep an open mind about the old, harsh times when my white ancestors were killing my Indians and my Indians burning white kin — with mixed blood that isn’t very easy sometimes. The battle at Sandusky had its start with the slaughter of the Christian Delawares by Williamson and his Pa. troops. Although Col. Crawford didn’t take part in the murder of the Christian Delawares, Williamson and his troops were under him….Keeping in mind it was the belief of the Indians ifone was murdered the family had the right to murder the offender if not, a member of the family paid the price and was put to death. … Ithink one has to be of Indian descent to fully realize the close kinship of Indians….21 From all accounts, white and Indian, Colonel Crawford died bravely. He was sixty years old. Heavy-set, he stood about five feet, ten inches tall. His eyes were blue, his skin fair, and his hair irongray.22″

Ezekiel Rose served as captain in the 5th Bn Washington County, Pennsylvania. He fought in battles including the Battle of Sandusky in the Ohio region where he eventually moved and died.

The will of my Ezekiel reads as follows:
Will of Ezekiel Rose of Muskingum County, Ohio

In the name of God Amen I Ezekiel Rose of Newton Township Muskingum County Ohio being weak in body but sound and perfect in mind and memory blessed be almithy God for the same do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following that is to say

First I give and bequeath unto my daughter Rachel Prior 84 cents I do also give and bequeth unto my daughter Sarah Williams 84 cts I aso give and bequeth unto my son Ezkiel Rose jur 84 cts I also gie and bequeth unto my daughter Nancy Smith 84 cts I also give and bequeth unto my son William Rose 84 cts I will and order to be paid within six months after my decase–
(and?) lastly to all the rest residue and remainder of my personal estate goods and chattles of what kind nature soever I give and bequeth the same to my daughter Hannah Rose whom I appoint my sole executrix of this my last will and testament in witness whereof ? I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 23rd day of march in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighteen
Ezekiel (his mark) Rose (seal)
signed and sealed and published and declared by the above named Ezekiel Rose to be his last will and testament in preance of us have hereunto subscribed our names asa witnesses in the presence of the testator
Benjamine McClain Chauncey Ford
John Weylie
Joseph Weylie
The will was proved 25 May 1818. The settlement is cited as #445,
Muskingum County, Ohio.

In 1812 he, or his son, platted the town of New Milford, Ohio which was renamed for him after his death to Roseville, Ohio. He is buried in the center of the Roseville Cemetery just south of the flag pole.
information from a Muskingum Co book of wills. Book

Roseville was laid out in 1812 by Ezekiel Rose. It was initially named New Milford, but the name had been changed to Roseville by the time a post office was applied for in 1830.[7] By 1833, Roseville had a gristmill and saw mill.[8] Roseville was incorporated in 1840, with Dr. James Little elected as the first mayor.

The Roseville area was noted for its pottery production. The Roseville Pottery Company operated from around 1890 to 1954, and was a premiere producer of art pottery in the early 20th century.

https://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=arc150&id=I055305

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Crawford-502

William Crawford

William Crawford (1722 – 1782)

Col. William Crawford
Born in , Spotsylvania County, Virginiamap

Ancestors ancestors

Husband of Ann Stewart — married (to ) [location unknown]
Husband of Hannah Vance — married (to ) in , Frederick County, Virginiamap

Descendants descendants

Died in Tymochtee Creek, North of the Upper Sandusky River, Connecticut Western Reserve, (later Wyandot County, Ohio)map

Malcolm Crawfurd of Kilbirnie MP

Gender: Male
Birth: circa 1551
Kilbirnie, North Ayrshire, Scotland
Death: between 1592 and 1595 (36-47)
Kilbirnie, North Ayrshire, Scotland
Immediate Family: Son of Hugh Crawfurd of Kilbirnie and Margaret Colquhoun, of Luss
Husband of Margaret Cunningham, of Glengarnock
Father of John Crawfurd of Kilbirnie; Alexander Crawford; Anne Crawfurd, of Kilbirnie and Margaret Crawford
Half brother of Margaret Crawford, of Kilbirnie; Marion Crawford, of Kilbirnie; Elizabeth Crawford, of Kilbirnie; William Crawford of Knightswood; John de Crawford and 1 other; and Catherine Crawford « less
Added by: Terry L Wahl on May 27, 2007
Managed by: Michael Bishop Ebersol and 35 others
Curated by: Erica Howton

Malcolm Crawfurd of Kilbirnie

  • From the peerage.com
  • M, #183794, b. circa 1551, d. 1595
  • Last Edited=29 Mar 2011

Malcolm Crawfurd of Kilbirnie was born circa 1551.2 He was the son of Hugh Crawfurd and Margaret Colquhoun.1 He died in 1595.2 He died in 1592.1 He lived at Crawford Castle, Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland.3 He was also known as Malcolm Crawford.3

family

Married

  1. Margaret Cunningham, daughter of John Cunningham of Glengarnock.1

Children of Malcolm Crawfurd of Kilbirnie and Margaret Cunningham

  1. John Crawfurd of Kilbirnie+1 d. 1622. Married Margaret Blair.
  2. Alexander Crawford+3 b. c 1582, d. 1650. No descendants (sic: should read: “known to me.”. In fact there were descendants)
  3. a daughter, [Sic: Anne] married to William Cunningham, ancestor of Sir William Cunningham, baronet

Biographical notes

“He [Hugh Crawfurd] deceased in the year 1576, and had for his successor Malcolm, his son and heir, who wedded Margaret, daughter of John Cunningham of Glengarnock, by whom he had a son, John, who became his heir, and was a man of most extraordinary merit and refined accomplishments, having made a great figure, according to his rank and fortune.” (1)

Citations

  1. [S400] Sir Bernard Burke, A Genealogical and Heraldic Dictionary of the Peerage and Baronetage of the British Empire, 28th edition (London, U.K.: Harrison and Sons, 1866), page 891. Hereinafter cited as The Peerage and Baronetage, 28th ed.
  2. [S443] Rootsweb, online unknown url.
  3. [S73] William Fowle Crawford, A Crawford Family History (San Diego, California, U.S.A.: self-published, 1997), page 6. Hereinafter cited as Crawford Family History.

Sources

  1. The Crawfurd Peerage: With Other Original Genealogical, Historical, and Biographical Particulars Relating to the Illustrious Houses of Crawfurd and Kilbirnie (Google eBook) Andrew Jack & Company, 1829 – 484 pages. Page 39
  2. The Crawfords of the county Donegal updated 2000 edition
  3. The early ancestors of the Crawfords in America : an introduction to genealogies of American families of the name. Fred E. Crawford.  1940.

Links

notes

Malcolm Crawford was born in Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland.

Malcolm Crawford married Margaret Cunningham.

Malcolm Crawford had 5 children. Their names are Agnes Crawford, Alexander Crawford, Andrew Crawford, Janet Crawford, and John Crawford.

Malcolm Crawford passed away in 1659 in Kilbirnie, Ayrshire, Scotland

Descendants of Malcolm Crawford

[The following is from the Crawford family webpage at: http://www.geocities.com/elaineclow/surname/crawford.html#2]

Malcolm Crawford of Kilbirnie, m Margaret Cunningham

  • John Crawford, b 1600 Ayshire, Scotland d 1676 James City, VA
  • * David Crawford, b ca 1623 Kilbernie, Ayshire, Scotland d VA m Jane —-
  • * * Elizabeth Crawford, b ca 1671 New Kent Co, VA m Nicholas Meriwether II, son of Nicholas Meriwether and Elizabeth Woodhouse

A Little Bit of History, Bacon’s Rebellion

Ann Meriwether, b 1694 Goochland, VA d ca 1780 Louisa Co, VA m (1) Thomas Johnson Semiramis Johnson, b —- m Thomas Paulett

Ann Paulett, b m John Clark, son of Francis Clark and Cordella Lankford

Francis Clark, b 1748 m Nancy Walker

Robert Clark, Sr., b 1770 m Judith Weaver, dau of James Weaver and Tabitha —-

Robert Clark, Jr., b 1830 m Rebecca Harris, dau of Capt. Benjamin Harris and Elizabeth Weaver

Martha Jane Clark, b 1850 m Eli Brewer, son of Oliver Brewer and Elizabeth Louisa Drinnon

Andrew Martin Brewer, b 1877 m Etta Mae Hale, dau of George Henry Hale and Sarah Ellen Rose

Jesse Brewer, b 1916 m Isabelle C. Anderson, dau of James N. Anderson and Martha Arabelle Thompson

Elaine Brewer (me)


Malcolm Crawford


MALCOLM CRAWFORD was born in Kilbirnie, Scotlamd married Margaret Cunningham.

Children of Malcolm Crawford and Margaret Cunningham 1. Alexander Crawford m Mary Crichton 2. JOHN CRAWFORD, b 1600 Ayshire, Scotland d 1676 James City, VA

John Crawford JOHN CRAWFORD (Crafford) was born 1600 in Ayshire, Scotland, and died in 1676 in James City, Virginia. He married ca 1597 in Ayrshire, Scotland, wife’s name unknown. John migrated to Jamestown in 1643 and was killed during Bacon’s Rebellion in 1676.

Reference: “Magna Charta” Part VIII by John S. Wurts p 2915, and “The Meriwethers and Their Connections” by Nelson Heath.

Child of John Crawford and —- unknown —- 1. DAVID CRAWFORD, b 1623/25 Kilbernie, Ayrshire, Scotland d 13 Dec 1689 New Kent, New Kent Co, VA

David Crawford DAVID CRAWFORD was born 1623/25 in Kilbernie, Ayrshire, Scotland, and died 13 Dec 1689 in New Kent, New Kent County, Virginia. He married in 1654/56 to Jane —- born 1633 in Virginia. Various spellings in legal documents have the Crawford name as Craford or Crafford. In 1667, David had 86 acres of land located in the parish of Martyn’s Hundred in James City County granted by Sir William Berkeley, the Governor of the Colony of Virginia. The second grant of land to David was in 1672 for 1000 acres of land as “lying in ye branches of Mattadegun Creeke, in New Kent County” for having brought into the colony twenty persons. He acquired other lands: 1,350, 375, 1,300, 277, and 196 acres, most in St. Paul’s Parish and St Peter’s Parish in New Kent County or Hanover County.

“David Crawford belonged to the slave-holding aristocacy of the Old Dominion which so closely resembled the feudal nobility of earlier times.” He certaintly had Indian servants whom he said he had purchased. The way of life in Virginia at this period became very gracious for those who could afford it. Almost from one generation to the next, this class went from primitive shelters to homes built of brick. Mostly constructed of two stories, these homes had large rooms and high ceilings, large windows with glass to take care of the heat in summer. The kitchen and any other areas which were considered other than living areas were separated. So was born the southern tradition of the ‘main’ house surrounded by smaller buildings for cooking, washing, and dairy products.

Reference: “The Meriwethers and Their Connections” by Nelson Heath Meriweather, Chapter III Nicholas Meriwether II (1667-1744) p 55, This Crawford History is taken from Mrs. Frank Armstrong (Crawford) Vanderbilt’s “Laurus Crawfordiana: Memorials of that branch of the Crawford family which comprises the descendants of John Crawford, of Virginia, 1660-1883” (New York, privately printed, 1883), “Statutes at Large; A Collection of all the Laws of Virginia” Volume V, by William Waller Hening p. 257 September 1744 18th George II Chap. XXIV.

Children of David Crawford and Jane —- 1. Judith Crawford, b 1658 New Kent Co, VA m Robert Lewis 2. Angeline Crawford, b Apr 1660 New Kent Co, VA d Apr 1766 m William McGuire 3. David Crawford II, b 1662 New Kent Co, VA d Sep 1762 Amherst, VA m Nov 1695 Jamestown, VA Elizabeth Smith. 4. John Crawford, b Oct 1664 New Kent Co, VA d 13 Dec 1689 St. Peter Parish, New Kent Co, VA 5. Sarah Crawford, b 1666 New Kent Co, VA d 1752 Louisa Co, VA m 1696 Thomas Poindexter 6. ELIZABETH CRAWFORD, b 1671/72 New Kent Co, VA d 1753/62 Louisa Co, VA Elizabeth Crawford ELIZABETH CRAWFORD was born in 1671 or 1672 in New Kent County, Virginia, and died sometime between 1753 and 1762 in Louisa County, Virginia. She married in 1688 or 1689 in New Kent County to Nicholas Meriwether II, son of Nicholas Meriwether and Elizabeth Woodhouse.

Children of Elizabeth Crawford and Nicholas Meriwether 1. Jane Meriwether, b 1680-1705, Goochland Co, VA d 1753-57 m 1724-1725, Glouester, VA Col. Robert Lewis 2. Thomas Meriwether, b 1682-91 Goochland, VA 3. William Meriwether, b 1683-92, New Kent, VA d 1756 m 1713 Elizabeth Bushrod 4. Nicholas Meriwether, b 04 Jul 1684 Goochland, VA d 1739 m Mildred Thornton 5. David Meriwether, b 1689-90 Goochland, Virginia d 25 Dec 1744 Louisaco, VA m 1711-13 New Kent, VA, Anne Holmes 6. Elizabeth Meriwether, b 20 Jun 1690 Goochland, VA d 01 Jan 1724-25 m Thomas Bray 7. ANN (Anne) MERIWETHER, b 15 Jul 1694 Goochland, VA d 1780-85 Louisa Co, VA m (1) in VA, Thomas Johnson (2) in 1750-52 John Cosby 8. Sarah Meriwether, b 07 Dec 1697 Goochland, VA d 02 Jul 1733 m William Littlepage 9. Mary Meriwether, b 1698-1707 New Kent, Albemarle, VA d 1745 m. John Aylett


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