Cogswell-London-Kerouac-Miller

The Dairy of God

by

John Presco

Copyright 2021

I just got off the phone with my old friend, Peter Shapiro. We talked about being roommates in a house in Oakland, across the street from ‘The Ghouls’ who did leathercraft out of their home. Peter paid me a quart of cheap beer to spend an hour grinding keys for his thumb pianos. It was part of the Bohemian rental agreement where I worked for – THE CAUSE!

https://www.kalimbamagic.com/shop/goshen-kalimbas

Pete recalled the time I soaked sheets and hung them in the window with a fan in front. Oakland was having a heatwave. I should be able to find the date on google. I jogged his memory about there being a piano that my father played when he came to visit. Vic made a loan for Jack London’s daughter, who descends from the Wellman-Cogswell family who have came over with the Puritans in the Great Migration.

The author, Joaquin Miller, and Jack London may share the same Cogswell linage. George Melvin Miller married Lischen Coggswell. Elizabeth Wellman testified in the Salem Witch Trials. I can find very little history on Ira and John Campbell who owned the Eugene Daily Guard that morphed into the Register Guard. Why? Juaquin Miller wrote for The Eugene City Democratic Register. Thomas Pynchon descends from the famous Puritan, William Pynchon. We are looking at a Literary Puritan Bohemian-Mafia that migrated West. Peter’s father was a professor at MIT, and my friend grew up in Boston.

Peter said he lived near the headquarters of the Hell’s Angel. He lived near Miller’s house on Redwood Road with members of the Tower of Power. When I lived with Sue Villiani in a houseboat (1968) we bought a 1939 Ford for a $100 dollars. Later I bought a boat and lived on board. I bought a typewriter at Goodwill, and had some ambition to be a writer. I began ‘Golden Girls of the Corncob’ at the same table I ground keys. The man who lived on a large boat at the end of the pier was into Edgar Cayse, and leant me that book. I worked on my Atlantis drawings, while watching a portable T.V. I had to sell my boat when they closed Sunrise Harbor down to built a new Port of Oakland. Jack London was a journalist and wrote for several papers. Being sober for thirty-four years counts for something. I have survived.

Peter mentioned Dogananda, our collective dog named after Yogananda, who I followed before I became a Baba Lover. Marilyn turned Jeff on to Yogananda.

THE HOLLYWOOD SURVIVOR – a musical by Jeff and Shannon Pasternak

https://reader.bookfusion.com/books/62326-the-acorn-planter-a-california-forest-play-1916

http://www.chickenonaunicycle.com/Loading%20Zone.htm

Archives West: Joaquin Miller papers, 1868-1960 (orbiscascade.org)

https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn84022679/1895-10-21/ed-1/seq-1/

Eugene Lost and Found: Cogswell-Miller House (lostandfoundeugene.blogspot.com)

The Miller Family | Bohemian Democratic Design (wordpress.com)

Kerouac’s heavy drinking over the previous decade had increased to such an extent that his closest friends wondered if he had a death wish. Ginsberg and Kerouac had grown distant—largely because Kerouac had become less and less available to Ginsberg, but also because Ginsberg no longer wished to be around his old friend, who, on any given night, could be a belligerent, unhappy, argumentative, and nasty drunk. Kerouac had remarried, bought a house for his wife and his invalid mother, and moved to Florida, where he lived a semi-reclusive life.

Jack London had racist ideas. It’s time to rename the square (sfchronicle.com)

One of Oakland’s Most Historic Figures Was Also Horribly Racist | East Bay Express | Oakland, Berkeley & Alameda

“Talking of Dead Jack” | The New Yorker

London accepted an assignment of the San Francisco Examiner to cover the Russo-Japanese War in early 1904, arriving in Yokohama on January 25, 1904. He was arrested by Japanese authorities in Shimonoseki, but released through the intervention of American ambassador Lloyd Griscom. After travelling to Korea, he was again arrested by Japanese authorities for straying too close to the border with Manchuria without official permission, and was sent back to Seoul. Released again, London was permitted to travel with the Imperial Japanese Army to the border, and to observe the Battle of the Yalu.

London asked William Randolph Hearst, the owner of the San Francisco Examiner, to be allowed to transfer to the Imperial Russian Army, where he felt that restrictions on his reporting and his movements would be less severe. However, before this could be arranged, he was arrested for a third time in four months, this time for assaulting his Japanese assistants, whom he accused of stealing the fodder for his horse. Released through the personal intervention of President Theodore Roosevelt, London departed the front in June 1904.[40]

Bohemian Club

London (right) at the Bohemian Grove with his friends Porter Garnett and George Sterling; a painting parodies his story The White Silence

On August 18, 1904, London went with his close friend, the poet George Sterling, to “Summer High Jinks” at the Bohemian Grove. London was elected to honorary membership in the Bohemian Club and took part in many activities. Other noted members of the Bohemian Club during this time included Ambrose BierceGelett BurgessAllan DunnJohn MuirFrank Norris,[citation needed] and Herman George Scheffauer.

Beginning in December 1914, London worked on The Acorn Planter, A California Forest Play, to be performed as one of the annual Grove Plays, but it was never selected. It was described as too difficult to set to music.[41] London published The Acorn Planter in 1916.[42]

Jack London – Wikipedia

Elizabeth Wellman gave testimony in the trial of Sarah Cole for allegedly bewitching Mary Browne, saying: “She saw Sarah Cole, the wife of John Cole the cooper living within the bounds of Lynn, going on in a plain woods in August last past; and she had cast the skirt of her garment over her neck; and she saw a black thing of a considerable bigness go by her side; and as soon as Sarah Cole came against a tree that lay upon the ground this black thing was gone and be seen no more, and Sarah Cole going a little further turned her face about to me. She clapped her hands together and swung them twice over her head was gone and I could see her no more; and when I came to the place where she took her flight I looked for her but could not see her.”[6]

Located at 252 Pearl Street adjacent to Skinner Butte, the Campbell House was originally built in 1892 by timber owner John Cogswell, for his daughter Idaho. Cogswell had another daughter, an older sister to Idaho, who passed away at four years of age, before Idaho was born. Idaho, after being widowed, remarried in 1897 to Ira Campbell, owner of the then Eugene Daily Guard Newspaper. Ira and Idaho Campbell had three children, Cogswell, Celeste and Jackson, before Ira passed away in 1904. Cogswell played football with Navy in a Rose Bowl team, was a business owner in Eugene, a naval submariner, and had two daughters with his wife Mary Ruth. Celeste was a University of Oregon graduate, assisted with nursing duties during World War 1 and 2 and never married. Jackson was 17 years old when he was killed in a hunting accident. It’s against this background that our ghost story takes off.

Society

GEORGE MELVIN MILLER. To George Melvin Miller more than to any other individual is due the development of Florence, the seaport of Lane county. His labors have directly and indirectly benefited this part of the state and the consensus of public opinion places him with the leading citizens of Eugene. He was born in Lane county, Oregon, May 22, 1857, and is a son of Hulings and Margaret B. (Witt) Miller. His paternal grandfather. Hulings Miller. Sr., laid down his life on the altar of his country while serving as a soldier in the War of 1812 under command of General William Henry Harrison. His son and namesake was born in Ohio, whence he removed to Liberty, Indiana. He was a well educated man for
his day and engaged in teaching school in Indiana, in which state he married and there four of the older children were born. After living for a time on the Indian Reserve in western Indiana, where he also engaged in teaching, he emigrated to Oregon in 1852, with his family, settling at Coburg in the foothills, where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1884. Unto him and his wife were born five children: John D., who was a dentist and practiced in Philadelphia but lost his health through his service in the Civil war; James, living at Creswell, Oregon; Joaquin, who is far famed as the poet, of the Sierras ; Ella, who became the wife of John Luckey but is deceased; and George Melvin.


The last named attended the public schools and afterward took up the profession of teaching. Desirous of advancing his own education, he later entered Monmouth (Oregon) College and also attended the University of Oregon in the year in which it was opened. He began reading law with Judge Walton and following his admission to the bar practiced at Eugene and at Independence but has given most of his time to real-estate dealings, in which connection he has become very widely known. On the 26th of May,


1887, he purchased the original town site of Florence, becoming owner of ninety acres, for which he paid ten dollars an acre. He had first visited this site in 1883, driving a wagon to a point twenty-five miles from Eugene and then walking the remainder of the distance, carrying his blankets. He was accompanied by D. P. Thompson, S. W. Condon and Professor Lee, who was superintendent of schools of Eugene. At Mapleton they found an Indian, who had a boat and took them down to what is now the site of Florence. At that time there was only a board house there and one white family—about a half dozen inhabitants in all. There was a small store in a shanty conducted by A. J. Moody. On that trip of two days Mr. Miller saw the possibilities for the building of an attractive seaport town there. Mr. Moody had obtained title to his holdings of ninety acres and when this was put on sale after his death nobody bid for it and the sale was continued until the following year. In the meantime a wagon road had been opened between Eugene and Mapleton and settlers began to move in and take up government land. Biggar Herman was attorney
for the administrator for the Moody estate and through him Mr. Miller learned that the property could be bought but only through public sale at auction. Mr. Herman also said that the land would not be put up for
sale again without a guarantee of at least one bid and Mr. Miller guaranteed the bid. He proved to be the only bidder and secured the title to the property. Later he secured a homestead claim adjoining the site and subsequently purchased a half interest in the Chicago addition and one hundred and fifty acres in another tract. He has since been selling lots and buying acreage, and has dealt extensively in that district. His sound judgment and keen prescience were manifest in his purchase of the land at Florence, for he recognized its possibilities and wisely used the opportunity that came to him. Operating extensively in real estate there through the intervening years, he has derived therefrom a handsome and well earned fortune.


He was the pioneer in cutting up the large donation claims into small tracts for higher tillage, beginning in 1887 with the Solomon Zumalt donation claim near Eugene. Mr. Miller spent the greater part of four years, from 1898 to 1902, in southeastern Alaska, following various occupations from practicing law to stampeding for mining claims in close proximity to the disputed boundary line between Alaska and Canada, and naturally, as an American citizen, took a deep interest in the settlement of the question pending between the British and American governments. He happened to be in Skagway on a morning in June, 1901, when the Canadian customs officials raised the British flag over their improvised customs house in that town. Mr. Miller, seeing the flag floating over what he knew to be American soil, promptly cut the halyards and lowering the British colors, carefully folded them and laid them aside. Asked by what authority he did this, he replied, “By the authority of an American citizen,” and added that the British flag could not be raised again in Skagway unless the flag of the United States floated above it. The incident very nearly led to international complications. The government sustained Mr. Miller in his action and the British government repudiated the act of its officials in Skagway. President Roosevelt sent out a body of soldiers and established a post at Haines Mission on the Chilcat peninsula. A commission was appointed and a boundary line established substantially as claimed by Mr. Miller, and Skagway remained in American territory.
Mr. Miller was one of the organizers of the Presbyterian church in Florence, and was for a time one of its elders.


In 1885 he married Lischen Coggswell, a daughter of John Coggswell, of Eugene. [The Centennial History of Oregon by Gaston Vol 4 p259-60]

Joaquin Miller (1837-1913) was the pen name of writer Cincinnatus Hiner Miller, born on September 8, 1837, to Quaker parents. In 1852, the family moved to Oregon, traveling overland on a three thousand mile trip that took over seven months. They settled near Eugene, Oregon where they established a home and farm. Miller later married the Oregon poet Therese Dyer.

“Miller attended Columbia College in (what was then) Eugene City from 1857 to 1858. He taught school, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1861. From 1861 to 1862 Miller rode pony express from Walla Walla to Idaho mines but he soon returned to Eugene City to become a newspaper editor. In his newspaper, The Eugene City Democratic Register, he pleaded for an end to the Civil War. The editorials were suppressed as pro-Southern in sympathy and Miller sold out, moving briefly to Port Orford on Oregon’s southern coast.”

“In 1864 he drove a herd of cattle across the Cascade Mountains to Canyon City where he planted the region’s first orchard and served as Grant County Judge until 1870.”

Elizabeth (Cogswell) Wellman (1648-1736) | WikiTree FREE Family Tree

Thomas Wellman was born in about 1615 in England and died at LynnMassachusetts on 10 October 1672. He was among the early settlers of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and progenitor of the Wellman family of New England. At age 21 he traveled from London to Barbados in 1634 or 1635 aboard Hopewell as part of a mass exodus of Puritans called the Great Migration.[1]

Elizabeth Cogswell Wellman (1648-1736) – Find A Grave Memorial

Daughter of John Cogswell and granddaughter of John Cogswell and Elizabeth Thompson Cogswell who came on the Angel Gabriel from Bristol and were shipwrecked off Pemaquid in 1635 but escaped death finally reaching Ipswich.

Married Abraham Wellman 1668

Children: Thomas 1669-1735, Elizabeth 1671-1673, Abraham 1673-1745, John 1676 , Elizabeth 1678-after 1734, Abigail 1702-about 1737, Martha 1736

Source The Descendents of Thomas Wellman of Lynn MA published in 1918 by Rev. Joshua Wyman Wellman

Thomas Wellman – Wikipedia

Flora Chaney-London (Wellman) (1843 – 1922) – Genealogy (geni.com)

Thomas Wellman, II (1620 – 1672) – Genealogy (geni.com)

John Cogswell was the son of James Cogswell and Mary (Stratton) Cogswell. He left his home in Michigan at the age of 16 and found work on the Erie Canal before later going to Missouri.

While in Missouri, John Cogswell decided to go “out west” and started out to cross the plains on foot. On his trip, he met another man who was driving a herd of horses. In exchange for John Cogwell’s help, the man would give him a horse. John Cogswell first arrived in California in 1845.

In the spring of 1846, Cogswell traveled to Oregon and worked sawing lumber for ship building at the mouth of the Columbia River. He returned to California to mine in 1849, but by 1850 he had found enough gold for his needs and he returned to Missouri. There he bought stock and then returned to Oregon, taking a claim on the north side of the McKenzie River, four miles east of where the Coburg Bridge is now located.

John Cogswell married Mary Frances Gay on October 28, 1852. Theirs was the first recorded marriage in Lane County, Oregon. They farmed in the Thurston, Oregon area. They had nine children, with just four living to adulthood. Inscription: We Come We Go That’s All We Know

 EditEdit profile photo

Idaho J Frazer Campbell (Cogswell)
Birthdate:January 26, 1864
Birthplace:Lane County, Oregon, United States
Death:August 12, 1932 (68)
Lane County, Oregon, United States
Place of Burial:Creswell, Lane County, Oregon, United States
Immediate Family:Daughter of John Cogswell and Mary Frances Cogswell
Wife of Ira Lane Campbell and Nicholas KIger Frazer
Mother of Cogswell Frazer CampbellJackson Frazer CampbellCatherine Celeste Campbell and Eva Johnson
Sister of De Etta CogswellClara B InghamLizzie M CogswellMary Anne CogswellFlorilla Cogswell and 4 others
Managed by:Katherine “Kate” Emily Hahn Moore
Last Updated:December 15, 2016

View Complete Profile

Historical records matching Idaho J Frazer Campbell

view all matches ›

Idaho J. Cogswell in FamilySearch Family Tree

Sarah Ida “idaho” Cogswell in MyHeritage family trees (merkel Web Site)

Idaho J. Cogswell in 1880 United States Federal Censusview all 17

Immediate Family

About Idaho J Frazer Campbell

Idaho Cogswell was the fifth child and fifth daughter of John Cogswell and Mary Frances (Gay) Cogswell. She was born on the McKenzie River donation claim, at the foot of the Coburg Hills, four miles east of the Coburg Bridge, near the mouth of the Mohawk River.

She started her education in the school house built by her father on his place. Her name is listed as attending the University of Oregon Prep. School and the University 1881-1882, 1882-1883, 1883-1884. Her schooling was interrupted by the illness of her sister, DeEtta, who she took to Santa Barbara, Calif. (by boat) to try to regain her health, the Winter of 1885-86.
The year after her sister passed away, her mother died of Typhoid fever, in 1887. The following year, June 17, 1888 Idaho Cogswell was married to Nicholas Kiger Frazer, at her home just east of Thurston, and she moved to Pendleton, Oregon. July 1, 1889, her daughter, Eva, was born.
Six months later, Jan. 28, 1890, her husband met a tragic death. (He was lost in the Blue Mountains and found frozen to death).
Mrs. Frazer and Eva returned to her father, who was then located on his ranch 25 miles east of Eugene. She remained there until she built her home at 252 Pearl St., Eugene, Oregon, in 1892.
Feb. 6, 1897, she married Ira L. Campbell who was editor, publisher and co-owner (with his brother John) of the Daily Eugene Guard newspaper. Three children were born: Cogswell Frazer Campbell, Feb. 19, 1898; Jackson Frazer Campbell, Jan. 21, 1900; and (Catherine) Celeste Campbell, Mar. 12, 1905.
Idaho had before this, become a charter member of the Eugene Fortnightly Club in 1893. She was also a member of the Eugene Shakespeare Club. She continued to take an active interest in local and national affairs.
In 1894, she and Eva spent several months in Chicago with her sister, Lischon Miller and a cousin Catherine Cogswell. She made a number of trips to visit her daughter, Eva, first in 1922 in Chicago and later in Madison, Wisconsin. She was proud of being the daughter of early Oregon pioneers and she never lost her love of Oregon's wonderful out-of-doors and nature.
The spirit of adventure stayed with her and perhaps the highlight of her life (not even climaxed by a trip to the Hawaiian Islands in 1931 with her daughter, Celeste, was on July 6, 1928, when she flew from San Francisco to Chicago in the regular Boeing Air Transport plane carrying U. S. Mail, with room for only two passengers. They flew in an open cockpit and took 24 hours for the trip. She was thrilled passing over the plains where her parents had crossed in covered wagons.
She died Aug. 12, 1932, and was laid to rest in the Mary Gay Cogswell Pioneer Cemetery.

~~~

The Eugene Register-Guard Lane County, Oregon, USA Saturday, August 13, 1932 Page One

MRS. I.F. CAMPBELL, PIONEER, IS DEAD

Mrs. Idaho Frazer Campbell, lifelong resident of Oregon, who spent the greater part of her life at the family home east of Skinner’s butte, died Friday following a brief illness at her home, 252 Pearl street.

Mrs. Campbell received her education at the University of Oregon and was active in social and club work of Eugene. She was a charter member of the Eugene Fortnightly club, the oldest women’s organization in the city.

The daughter of early pioneers, Mrs. Campbell was born January 26, 1864 on the donation land claim of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Cogswell, below the mouth of the McKenzie river.

The deceased is survived by two daughters and one son, Dr. Eva Frazer Johnson, Madison, Wis., Miss Celeste Campbell and Cogswell F. Campbell of Eugene; six grandchildren; a brother, B.E. Cogswell of Portland, and a sister, Dr. Clara Ingham of Portland.

Private services for the family only were held at the grave side in the Gay cemetery Saturday at 4 o’clock with the Veatch chapel in charge. ~~~

Campbell House 252 Pearl Street in Eugene, Oregon. Built in 1892, this large home is one of the early Queen Anne residences constructed. Surrounded by impressive landscaping, it was built for Idaho Cogswell Frazer before her marriage to Ira Lane Campbell, owner and editor of the Eugene Register Guard.

http://www.oip.net/oipabout.shtml?id=98

John Cogswell

John Cogswell (bef. 1592 – 1669)

JohnCogswell aka CoggswellBorn before  in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, EnglandANCESTORS ancestorsSon of Edward Cogswell and Alicia (Wilcoxe) CogswellBrother of Margaret (Cogswell) MerchanteElizabeth CogswellJohn CogswellAndrew CogswellRobert CogswellMargery CogswellAnthonius CogswellArthur CogswellGeoffrey CogswellElenor CogswellWalter Cogswell and Elizabeth (Cogswell) EmeleyHusband of Elizabeth (Thompson) Cogswell — married 10 Sep 1615 in Westbury Parish, Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, EnglandDESCENDANTS descendantsFather of Elizabeth (Cogswell) MastersonMary (Cogswell) ArmitageWilliam CogswellJohn Cogswell Jr.Phyllis (Cogswell) BroadhurstHannah (Cogswell) WaldoAbigail (Cogswell) ClarkeEsther CogswellEdward CogswellAlice CogswellRuth Cogswell and Sarah (Cogswell) TuttleDied  in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts Bay ColonyProfile managers: US Presidents Project WikiTree [send private message], Puritan Great Migration Project WikiTree [send private message], Jack Wise [send private message], Linda James [send private message], and John Putnam [send private message]Profile last modified 6 May 2021 | Created 27 Jun 2011This page has been accessed 6,887 times.

John Cogswell migrated to New England during the Puritan Great Migration (1620-1640).
Join: Puritan Great Migration Project
Discuss: PGM
John Cogswell is an ancestor of a US President/Vice President
Join: US Presidents Project
Discuss: PRESIDENTS
Contents[hide]1 Biography1.1 Birth and Early Life1.1.1 Siblings1.2 Marriage and Family1.2.1 Children of the Cogswell-Thompson Marriage1.3 Immigration1.4 Later Life1.5 Death and Burial1.6 Notable of Ipswich2 Sources

Biography

Notables Project

John Cogswell is Notable.

“John Cogswell” was the 3rd great grandfather of President John Adams And was the 4th Great Grandfather of President John Quincy Adams

Birth and Early Life

John Cogswell was born before his baptism date of 2 April 1592[1] in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. He was the son of Edward Cogswell and Alice maiden name unknown. It is known that his grandfather, Robert Cogswell (d. 1581), was a manufacturer of woolen cloth.[2]Baptism: 2 April 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England (11 is an erroneous reading of the register which says John Cogswell fillies Edward[ard]i Cogeswell baptized: fit ijth Aprilis 1592. ij should be read as 2 and not as 11.)

Siblings

All children born in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

  1. Margaret Cogswell born c. 1580. She married Thomas Merchante in 1599.
  2. Elizabeth Cogswell, 1st of this name in this family, born January 1581. She died early and was buried on 20 January 1582 in Westbury, Wiltshire, England.
  3. Robert 1 Cogswell who was baptized 28 May 1588 and probably died in infancy.
  4. Andrew Cogswell baptized 30 November 1590. Twin brother of Robert.
  5. Robert Cogswell baptized 30 November 1590. Twin brother of Andrew.
  6. John Cogswell born before 11 April 1592, when he was buried at All Saints Churchyard, Westbury, Wiltshire, England.
  7. Margery Cogswell married 3 September 1610 to John Wilkins.
  8. Anthony Cogswell, first of this name in the family, baptized 30 August 1595. Died before 28 June 1597 when he was buried at All Saints Churchyard, Westbury, Wiltshire, England.
  9. Anthony Cogswell baptized 19 January 1597. Married Margaret Unknown.
  10. Geoffrey Cogswell baptized 10 December 1598.
  11. Elenor Cogswell married Stephen Smythe.
  12. Walter Cogswell was born c. 1602.
  13. Elizabeth Cogswell born on 23 June 1615. She married Richard Erneley on 28 March 1609. Elizabeth died in April 1661 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. She was buried on 1 April 1661 according to the Parish Records, but FAG has date of 9 April 1661 as death date. No sourcing on FAG.

When James Coggswell was born on 10 March 1783, in Castleton, Rutland, Vermont, United States, his father, John Cogswell, was 35 and his mother, Hannah Gallup, was 35. He married Mary Stratton in 1810, in Whitehall, Whitehall, Washington, New York, United States. They were the parents of at least 7 sons and 5 daughters. He registered for military service in 1814. He died on 4 November 1873, in Dearborn, Wayne, Michigan, United States, at the age of 90, and was buried in Inkster, Wayne, Michigan, United States.

Newsletter August 2009.pdf (cogswellfamily.org)

Lord Humphrey Cogswell (1451 – d.) – Genealogy (geni.com)

Marriage and Family

John married Elizabeth Thompson (1594-1676) daughter of Rev. William Thompson, the Vicar of Westbury Parish, Wiltshire for 20 years (1603-1623) and Phyllis Unknown on 10 September 1615, according to the parish records.[3][4]His parents died soon after John married Elizabeth and he inherited: “The Mylls called Ripond, situate within the Parish of Frome Selwood”. [5] His occupation was manufacturing woolen fabric, broadcloths and kerseymeres. He had a very good reputation for a fine product. He is sometimes called a London merchant but that is because he probably had a commission house there, as it would have been the largest market for his product.

Children of the Cogswell-Thompson Marriage

All children except Sarah were born and baptized in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

  1. Elizabeth Cogswell was baptized on 15 September 1616. She married Nathaniel Masterson on 31 July 1657. Elizabeth died on 24 January 1692 at York, York, Maine as victims of King William’s War Candlemas Massacre.
  2. Mary Cogswell was baptized on 24 July 1618. She married Godfrey Armitage (c. 1617-1675) in about 1649. They lived in Boston, Massachusetts.
  3. William Cogswell baptized March 1620. He married Susanna Hawkes (1633-before 1696) in 1650. William died on 15 December 1700. 10 children.
  4. John Cogswell, Jr. was baptized on 25 July 1622. He married by about 1647 name unknown. He died on 27 September 1653 on the sea traveling between America and England.
  5. Phyllis Cogswell was baptized 2 July 1624. She is the mysterious unnamed daughter who stayed behind. She married John Broadhurst on 23 January 1645 in Chirton, Whitshire, England.
  6. Hannah Cogswell was baptized on 6 April 1626. She married before 2 January 1652 to Deacon Cornelius Waldo. Hannah died on 25 December 1704 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts.
  7. Esther Cogswell was baptized on 2 May 1628 in Westbury Leigh. She died on 7 June 1655 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts at the home of brother-in-law Godfrey Armitage.
  8. Edward Cogswell was baptized on 16 April 1630. No other information at this time except that he was not mentioned in his father’s will.
  9. Alice Cogswell was baptized on 24 September 1631. No further record. (Not included with Jameson)
  10. Ruth Cogswell was baptized on 28 November 1633. No further record. (Not included with Jameson)
  11. Abigail Cogswell was born before 1635. Abigail married Thomas Clark by 1666.
  12. Sarah Cogswell was born about 1645 in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts. She married Simon Tuttle (1631-1692) in 1664 in Massachusetts.

Immigration

The Public Record Office in London has a conveyance deed for the sale of his Westbury Leigh property in 1635 to Anthony Selfe and Henry Allyn.[6]

John and Elizabeth and 8 of their living children, William, John, Jr., Edward, and 5 daughters (Elizabeth, Mary, Hannah, Esther, Abigail; leaving behind the one daughter, who is now known as Phyllis) sailed on the Angel Gabriel which was commanded by Capt. Andrews. It was the ship built for Sir Walter Raleigh and he probably made his last voyage on her to Guiana, South America in 1618 before he was executed. They boarded the ship on 23 May 1635, sailed on 4 June because it was becalmed. They landed finally on 15 August 1635[7][8] under the worst possible circumstances as a terrible storm wrecked the ship. On the same day, the “James” sailed with more emigrants fleeing religious intolerance. Among those passengers was the Rev. Richard Mather. The passengers on the Angel Gabriel, including John, lost a lot of valuable property and some lost their lives.[9] After they made it ashore at a place called Pemaquid in Maine, John left his family there with the tent he had brought along and went to Boston, Massachusetts. He arranged to have his wife, three sons and five daughters transported on about the last of August to Ipswich, Massachusetts. He was by 1636 granted 300 acres of land at Chebacco, part of Ipswich that was constituted on 5 May 1679, as Chebacco Parish. He also was granted a parcel of 8 acres to build a house and 5 more acres by the river. He built a log house in 1636 and lived in Chebacco for the rest of his life. He is said to have been the third original settler in those parts. He was always addressed as “Mr.” which was a mark of distinction in that time.

Later Life

John was made freeman on 3 March 1636 by an act of the Court, which meant that he could hold public office and vote, amongst other things. As soon as he was able, he built a frame house. Many of their original possessions, which were salvaged from the shipwreck, are still treasured by family members. One of those is an embroidered coat of arms. It was granted to Lord Humphrey Cogswell of England in 1447. On 25 September 1649, he was part of the Essex Grand Jury. As he and his wife grew older, they deeded land to their children, who settled very near and all around them, on farms of their own. On 2 January 1652, they deeded to their son-in-law Cornelius Waldo 49 acres and the dwelling house at Chebacco Falls. On 16 April 1657, they confirmed a grant to sons John and William which was the 300 acres called “Westbury Lee”.

Death and Burial

He died on November 29, 1669, in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts[10], at the age of 77. He died intestate and the administration of his estate was granted to his wife Elizabeth on 29 March 1670.[11] He was honored with a five mile long funeral procession and buried in the Old North Graveyard, also known as Highland, Cowles-Highland, Cowles Memorial, Highland-Cowles, Old Burying Hill, in Ipswich, Massachusetts. His wife is there beside him, but the graves are now unmarked. Find A Grave: Memorial #21536932 created by Cynthia on 13 September 2007. (Some information here in error including the middle name that has been added.)

Notable of Ipswich

Sources

  1.  Anderson, RC says 2 April 1592 and that E.O. Jameson made an error in reading the parish entry. He also mentions that both the Mary Walton Ferris and the Donald Lines Jacobus book use E.O. Jameson as a source.
  2.  Jameson, EO: p. xii
  3.  Jameson, EO: p. xii
  4.  Jameson, EO: p. xv
  5.  Jameson, EO: p. 1
  6.  Paine, SC, p. 128.
  7.  Jameson, EO: p. xvi
  8.  Paine, SC, p. 129.
  9.  Jameson, EO: p. 2, This was called the worst storm known by white man or Indian for many years. There’s a poem by Whittier about it “There was wailing in the shallop; woman’s wail and man’s despair; A crash of breaking timbers on the rocks so sharp and bare; And through it all the murmur of Father Avery’s prayer. The ear of God was open to his servant’s last request. As the strong wave swept him downward the sweet hymn upward pressed, And the soul of Father Avery went singing to its rest.”
  10.  The Essex Institute, Vital Records of Ipswich, Massachusetts to the End of the Year 1849 Volume II. – Marriages and Deaths (Salem, Mass. 1910)(Free e-book)(Records are also available at ma-vitalrecords.org) p. 527
  11.  Anderson, RC: On 12 April 1670 the inventory came to court and Simon Tuttle and Thomas Clark, Jr. swore that “our father Cogswell did promise upon marriage that he would give all he had and what he should more get unto his daughters Abigail and Sarah, and they should have it when he and his wife died’; Thomas Clarke Sr. supported their claim.
  • Jameson, Ephraim Orcutt. The Cogswells in America, Boston: A. Mudge & Sons, 1884, x-xv for parents of John Cogswell and history before immigration of the family to the new world. John the immigrant pages 1-7. Family follows.The
  • Norton, James E.b.. Norton-Lathrop-Tolles-Doty American ancestry of Ralph Tolles Norton, James Edward Norton, Arden Lathrop Norton, Frank Porter Norton; their children; & the Wright-Briggs-Cogswell-Dudley American ancestry of Ellen Cogswell-Wright-Norton & Frances Cogswell-Wright-Norton. Warsaw, NY: Unknown, 1935. Page 146-147.
  • Cogswell Family Association web site http://www.cogswell.org
  • Cogswell, Donald J. Descendants of John Cogswell. Unknown, Unknown, 1998.
  • Anderson, Robert Charles. New England, The Great Migration and The Great Migration Begins, 1620-1635. Vol. 2, C-F, record for John Cogswell, page 137.
  • England and Wales Marriages, 1538-1940 about Johannes Cogswell.
  • Hurd, Dwayne Hamilton. History of Essex County, Massachusetts, with Biographical Sketches of Many of its Pioneers and Prominent Men (J.W. Lewis & Co., Philadelphia, 1888) page 570.
  • Ferris, Mary. Dawes-Gates Ancestral Lines (Privately Printed, 1943) Whose work is discussed in Anderson.
  • Paine, Sarah Cushing, compiler. Paine Ancestry The family of Robert Treat Paine, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, including maternal lines. Boston, MA: Printed for the family, 1912.
  • Find A Grave: Memorial #21536932
  • Savage, James. A Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers of New England (Little, Brown and Company, Boston, 1862); Vol.1,p.422
  • Greenlees, Priscilla Colstad. Identification of The Unnamed Daughter of John1 and Elizabeth (Thomson) Cogswell Who Remained In EnglandThe New England Historical & Genealogical Register (NEHGS, Boston, Mass., 2008) Vol. 162, WN 645, Page 5.

THE COGSWELLS IN ENGLAND. 1580-1635.

It is not the object of this work to give any extended account of the Cogswells in England, but merely as introductory to their record in America to mention the birthplace and the more immediate ancestors of John Cogs- well, who with his family were the first immigrants of the name to this country. Tradition and probability identify the name Cogswell with the old English town of Coggeshall, which is located forty-four miles from London, in the County of Essex. Coggeshall was the ancient Canonium of the Romans, and held by them as a military trading post for several centuries, being surren- dered only on their departure from Britain. Roman bricks, tiles, broken urns, and coins, relics of Roman possession, have often been found in Coggeshall. In the time of the Saxons it was called Coed Garr's Hall. When Canute, the Dane, ruled Britain, Godwin, one of his favorites, who lived also under Edward the Confessor, came into possession of Coggashael, whose daughter Edward the Confessor married, and whose son was King Harold, the last of the Saxon kings. In 1046 Coggeshall was given to the Church of Christ for the support of the Benedictine monks of Canterbury. In 1139 the Abbey of Coggeshall was founded by King Stephen and Queen Matilda, the monks being of the Cister- cian Order. The first Abbot of Coggeshall was William. In the reign of Edward III., A. D. 1337, Johanus Coggeskale was M. P. from Gloucester, England For further history of Coggeshall, vid. The Annals of Cogges- hall, by Bryan Dale^ M. Z?., and The Chronicles of Ralph De Cogges- hall, /;/ Latin. It is the family tradition of the Cogswells now holding the ancient Cogswell possessions in Westbury, County of Wilts, England, that their ancestors came from the County of Essex, and were there known as Coggeshall, with the vari- ous spellings which appear, viz. : Cogshall, Coggeshall, Hoggeshale, CogeshoU, Cogeshole, Coggashael, Cogshol, Coxhall, Cockshall, and Coggshale. Beside Vlll the family tradition tlie experts in such matters say that Cogswell and Cogges- hall in England have the same origin. The ancient Family Arms, which appear on the cover of this volume, are recorded in England : Argent, a cross belween four escallops sable. Crest, a stag lodged sable attired or. Motto : "^cc s:pernc> xxcc ttntco." The Coggeshalls lost their head in the reign of Henry VI., and became a widely distributed race, the branches remaining in several counties ; and "between Henry VI., 1422, and Charles I., 1625, there was plenty of time for the name to change among bad spellers." But while Coggeshall and Cogswell have the same origin in England, they are two distinct names in America although sometimes confounded. The Coggeshalls of this country have mostly descended from John Cogges- hall, the First Governor of Rhode Island, while the Cogswells, with the exception of a few recent immigrants, have sprung from John Cogswell, who came from Westbury Leigh, County of Wilts, England, and settled, in 1635, in Ipswich, Mass.


Edward Cogswell (Coggswell)
Also Known As:“Edward /Coggswell/”, “Edward /Cogswell/”
Birthdate:1562
Birthplace:Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England
Death:January 12, 1616 (52-53)
Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England, United Kingdom 
Place of Burial:Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England
Immediate Family:Son of Robert Cogswell, l and Alicia (Alice) Cogswell
Husband of Alice Cogswell
Father of Margaret MerchanteElizabeth CogswellAndrew CogswellRobert Cogswell, d. infancy?John Cogswell and 7 others
Brother of Robert Cogswell, llRichard CogswellStephen CogswellMargery WhatelyEdith Cogswell and 7 others
Occupation:clothier, Woolen Manufacturer, Clother, textiles
Managed by:Private User
Last Updated:March 12, 2021

View Complete Profileview all 27

Immediate Family

About Edward Cogswell

http://kristinhall.org/fambly/Cogswell/EdwardCogswell.html

RESIDENCE

Edward lived his entire life in his family’s ancestral town of of Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. His estates were designated Ludborne, Horningsham and Ripond Mills. Ripnd Mills (or Mylls) was in Frome Selwood, near the Selwood Forest, a few miles from Westbury Leigh.

EDWARD’S ESTATE

His will reads as follows:

“In the name of God, Amen. The 23d of June, 1615, I Edward Cogswell, clothier of Westburie Leighe in the countie of Wilts…do bequeath, My soul to God and my bodie to be buried in the Church or Churchyard of Westburie. To Margaret Marchante, the wife of Thomas Marchante £20. To Elizabeth Ernly, the wife of Richard Ernle, £30. To Margery Wilkins, the wife of John Wilkins, £10. To Elizabeth Marchante, the dau. of Thomas Marchante 20 marks at her marriage. To the other children of my three who shall be born and living at the time of my decease, £4 each. To Elinor Smythe, the wife of Stephen Smythe, 40 shillings. To Joane Freestone, widow, to Margaret Francklene, widow, to Margery Whatley, the wife of John Whatley, to Edith Stevens, the wife of Thomas Stevens, to every of these four my sisters, £2. To Henry Freestone, 10 shillings. To Edward Franklene, 10 shillings. To Robert Cogswell the son of Stephen Cogswell, ten shillings. To Margery Stevens, the dau. of Thomas Stevens, ten shillings. To Edward Cogswell, the son of Robert Cogswell, deceased, ten shillings. To George Cogswell, his brother, twenty shillings. To every of my godchildren besides these aforesaid, 12 pence. To John Cogswell, my son, £240, bed, bedding, and other household stuff &c. To my son Anthony, the whole estate, right and interest and term of years which I have in and to Ludborne, with the appurtenances, together with the Lease of the same for the term of his life to be delivered to him at the age of 23. After his death my son John Cogswell to have and enjoy the said Ludborne, &c., for his life only” remainder to Jeffrey, my son. To Anthony, the sum of £80, and four of my best kyne at 23. To my son Jeffrey Cogswell, all my estate, right and term of years which I have in little Horningsham, &c., with the Lease of the same for his life only. After his deahth the said little Horningsham to the party next mentioned in the said Lease to him and his assigns. To my son Jeffrey, £80 and four oxen, now in the hands of Robert Northen of little Horningsham, all to be delivered to him at the age of 23. To my son, John Cogswell, all the right and term of years which I have to the Mylls called Ripond, place situate within the parish of Froome, Selwood for his life. After his death, to the party next mentioned in the Lease thereof to enjoy the remainder of the term. I owe John Boutcher, my sercant, £60 10s. to be paid at any time on his demamd. To Alice, my wife, my dwellling house, &c., so long as she keepeth herself widow and in my name. After her death, to my son John, and his heirs forever. To Alice my wife, yearly out of Ludborne, £8, after the delivering up of the same; and from Horningsham £12 yearly, after the delivery of the Lease thereof to Jeffrey; so long as she keepeth herself widow and no longer. The residue of goods and chattels unbequeathed, to Alice my wife, my sole executrix.

My well beloved Jeffrey Whitaker and Anthonye Selfe, overseers”

Signed: Edward Cogswell

Witnessed: Robert Foster, Clerk & Richard Painter.

Proved 12 January 1615/1616


GENEALOGY: Cogswell

Edward(2) COGSWELL was born circa 1554 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. He was buried on January 12, 1616 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. His occupation was Clothier.

In 1591 he built the ancient home at what is now known as 145 Westbury Leigh. Restoration work uncovered three irregular lumps above the hearth, and further inspection revealed three shields carved in relief. One in inscribed “ECA (Edward Cogswell and Alicia), another reads “1591” and the third bears the Cogswell cloth logo, the use of which became compulsory for clothiers. The house was privately restored during the 1980s by Peter and Mary Jones. “His estates were designated Ludboune, Horningsham, and Ripond Mylls… were located in Frome Selwood, a few miles from Westbury.” “He appears to have been one of the most successful and prosperous clothiers of the region.”

About the year 1578, he married Alice who was born circa 1559 in Westbury Leigh, England. She was buried on May 11, 1616 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. They had the following Children:-

Margaret(3); b. circa 1580 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; m. Nov. 1599, Thomas MERCHANTE; child:

Elizabeth MERCHANTE

Elizabeth(3); b. circa 1582 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. buried Jan. 20, 1582 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Elizabeth(3); b. circa 1584 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; m. ERNELEY; buried April 1, 1661.

John(3); b. circa 1586 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; buried April 11, 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Robert(3); baptized May 28, 1588 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; probably died in infancy.

Andrew(3); (twin); baptized Nov. 20, 1590 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.died in infancy.

Robert(3); (twin); baptized Nov. 20, 1590 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.died in infancy.

John(3); in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Margery(3); b. circa 1593 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; buried 1626; m. John Wilkins on Sept. 3, 1610.

Anthonius(3); baptized Aug. 30, 1595 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; buried June 28, 1597 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Anthoney\\\\Arthur(3); baptized January 19, 1596/97 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. d. before 1651. m. Margery PHIPPS circa 1617. She died a widow in 1651 at Ludbourne.

Geoffrey(3); baptized Dec. 10, 1598 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; m. Mary YONGE in 1617;

Elenor(3); b. circa 1600 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; m. Stephen SMYTHE circa 1620 in Westbury.

Walter(3); b. circa 1602 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Margerie(3); buried June 4, 1597

John(3) Cogswell was the immigrant ancestor in this Cogswell line. He was born in 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. He was baptized on April 7, 1592. He died on Nov. 29, 1669 at Ipswich, Mass. He is buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Mass. On Sept. 10, 1615 in Westbury Leigh, Wilts, John married Elizabeth THOMPSON. She was born circa 1594 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. She died on June 2, 1676 at Ipswich, Mass. She is also buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Mass.

At age 23, he succeeded to his fathers’ business and settled down in the old homestead. His parents died soon after his marriage, and he received his inheritance, “The Mylls called Ripond, situate within the Parish of Frome Selwood,” together with the home place and certain personal property. Like his father, he was a manufacturer of wollen fabrics, largely broadcloths and kerseymeres. The superior quality of these manufacturers gave his “mylls” a favorable reputation, which appears to have been retained to the present day. There are factories occupying much the same locations and still owned by the Cogswells, which continue to put on the market wollen cloths that in Vienna and elsewhere have commanded the first premium in the world exhibitions of our times (1880s?).

John Cogswell doubtless found, in London, a market for his manufactures. He may have had a commission house in that city, which would account for his being called, as he sometimes has been, a London merchant.

Mrs. Cogswells’ mother was Phillis— and her father was the Rev. William Thompson, vicar of Westbury from 1603 to his death in 1623. About twenty years after their marriage, with a family of nine children about them, and having the accumulations of a prosperous business, Mr. and Mrs. Cogswell determined to emigrate to America. The particular reasons which led them to leave England may have been much the same that influenced others in their times. It appears that early in 1635, Mr. Cogswell made sale of his “mylls” and other real estate, and soon after, with his wife, eight children, and all their personal effects, embarked at Bristol, May 23, 1635, for New England. Their passage was long and disastrous. Their arrival in America was after a most unexpected fashion. Having reached the shores of New England, they were landed unceremoniously at a place called Pemaquid, in Maine, being washed ashore from the broken decks of their ship “Angel Gabriel ” which went to pieces in the frightful gale of August 15, 1635, when such a “sudden dismal storm of wind and rain came as had never been known before by white man or Indian.” Traces of this storm remained for years.

John Cogswell and his wife Elizabeth settled at Ipswich, and had lands granted him there as appears from the records; under the date of 1635, is this entry:

“Granted to Mr. John Cogswell three hundred acres of land at the further Chebacco, Having the river on the southeast, the land of Will White on ye Northwest & a Creek Coming out of the river towards Will Whites farme on the Northeast. Bounded also on the west with a creek & a little brooke. Also there was granted to him a percell of ground containing eight acres, upon part whereof the said John Coggswell hath Built an house, it being in ye corner lott in Bridge Streete and has goodman Bradstreet houselott on ye s.e. The was also granted to him six acres of Ground late mr. John Spencers. Butting upon the river on the southeast having a lott of Edmund Gardners’ on the Northeast & a lott of Edmund Saywords on the Southwest wch six acres of ground teh sd John Coggswell hath sold to John Perkins teh younger his heirs and assigns.”

The fact that he was designated “Mr.” at that date, and the considerable amount of land granted him indicate that he was a man of good social standing in society. The records of about that date further show that Cornelius Waldo was Mr. Coggswell’s farmer.

The Cogswells were also involved in an attempt to prevent the execution of Goodwife Proctor in the Salem witch trials. According to Ipswich In The Massachusetts Bay Colony, 290-291, by Thomas Franklin Waters, The Ipswich Historical Society, 1905: “Five members of the Cogswell family were among the twenty prominent people who signed the petition drawn up by the Rev. John Wise on behalf of Goodwife Proctor, who stood accused of witchcraft. Mary Warren alleged that she had been threatened and abused by Goodwife proctor, and that she had seen apparitions of people who had long since been murdered by the wife of John Proctor. This evidence prevailed and the good woman was sentenced to death.”

Mrs. Cogswell survived her husband but a few years. She was a woman of sterling qualities and dearly loved by all who knew her. Side by side in the old churchyard in Ipswich have slept for more than three hundred years, the mortal remains of this godly pair, whose childhood was passed near the banks of the river Avon; who leaving behind the tender associations of the Old World, came with their children to aid in rearing on these shores a pure Christian state. They did greater work than they knew, died in the faith of the Gospel, and while their graves are unmarked by monument of stone, their souls are safe in heaven, their memory blessed, and their names honored by a posterity in numbers second only to that of Abraham.

John and Elizabeth Cogswell had the following children:-

daughter(4); she married, lived in London, and was the only child of John Cogswell who did not come to America

Mary(4); b. circa 1617 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England; d. in Boston Mass.

William(4); b. 1619

John(4); b. 1622

Phyllis(4); Baptized July 1624; probably died young.

Hannah(4); b. circa 1624

Abigail(4); b. circa 1626

Edward(4); b. 1629, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.

Alice(4); baptized 1632; she probably died young

Ruth(4); baptized 1633; she probably died young

Sarah Cogswell(4)b. circa 1632.

Elizabeth(4); b. 1635

3.William(4); b. 1619, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, 1619 in Westbury Parish Church. died Dec. 15, 1700

4. John(4); b. 1622, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, July 25, 1622 in Westbury Parish Church.

6. Hannah(4) b. circa 1624, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, April 26, 1626 in Westbury Parish Church. died Dec. 25, 1704 in Charleston, Mass. Buried in Phipps Street burying ground, Charlestown, Mass.

7. Abigail(4) b. circa 1626, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptized, 1627. Died in Ipswich, Mass. m. Thomas CLARKE circa 1646. Child:-

11. Sarah Cogswell(4)b. circa 1632; married Simon Tuttle in 1663.

12. Elizabeth(4); b. 1635, in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England.


Clothier, largely broadcloths & kerseymeres. Coggswell’s still own factories almost in the same location (the reputation that Edward started remained for over 300 years). In 1591 he built the ancient home at what is now known as 145 Westbury Leigh. Restoration work uncovered 3 irregular lumps above the hearth, & further inspection revealed 3 shelds carved in relief. One is inscribed ‘ECA’ (Edward Cogswell & Alicia), another reads ‘1591’ & the third bears the Coggswell cloth logo, the use of which became compulsory for clothiers. The house was privately restored during the 1980’s by Peter & Mary Jones. ‘His estates were designated Ludboune, Horningsham & Ripond Mylls…were located in Frome Selwood, a few miles from Westbury.’ He appears to have been one of the most successful & prosperous clothiers of the region.


From The Cogswell Family in America, pp xiii-xiv:

“Edward Cogswell, son of Robert and Alice Cogswell, was a clothier, pursuing the business of his father and ancestors for generations. His estates were designated Ludborne, Horningsham, and Ripond Mylls. Ripond Mylls were located in Frome Selwood, a few miles from Westbury. Frome Selwood was so named because near the famous Selwood Forest. Mr. Cogswell died early in 1616, and was buried in the churchyard of Westbury. Mrs. Cogswell survived him but a few weeks.”

His will was dated 23 June 1615 and was proved 12 Jan 1616. The will of Alice Cogswell was dated 25 June 1615 and was proved May 11, 1616

Excerpts from the "Descendants of John Cogswell"
by Donald J. Cogswell

One otherwise quiet evening, several years ago, my telephone rang and I was greeted by the plaintive voice of an unknown woman, who identified herself as Bernice Sonna, from Wyoming. As I gathered my wits to present a vigorous defense against unwanted magazine subscriptions, life insurance, or credit cards, she added: "...from the Cogswell Family Association - I just wanted too know why you didn't renew your membership this year." Now totally off guard, I innocently allowed the conversation to proceed. Bernice told me that my complaint was not uncommon, and that the Association was working hard to overcome its shortcomings, and the problem that I had identified, the useless database, was the most urgent of her problems.
Being a man of strict and proper upbringing, I was powerless to ignore the suffering of a damsel in distress, and asked if, perhaps, I might be of some service. The trap was thus sprung. She said, "Yes, we have only about a hundred members, and someone should copy their family records into some kind of an accessible database." I agreed to tackle this little project, as had the Rev. Jameson, in my spare time. About two weeks later, a large cardboard box arrived by United Parcel Service, and I became the keeper of a pile of assorted papers, and the victim of the most ridiculous, frustrating, irritating excuse for a computer program I had ever encountered.
Six months later, having had very little success in learning to use the so-called "program," and having managed to extract a total of eleven names from it, I ordered a new program, and began writing the Cogswell descendants for additional information, or for interpretation of illegible information. (In one case, I had an oil-stained, well used grocery bag, upon which someone had written his family history, in pencil.) After about a year had passed I had accumulated a certain body of information, and, during a not infrequent call from Bernice, the comment was made: "Oh, by the way, did I mention that we intend to publish a book?" How difficult could it be, I asked myself, to update the information on a few hundred people? (Those who fail to understand Rev. Jameson's Preface are doomed to repeat it.)
Two more years, a heart attack, an angioplasty, and many hundreds of cartons of cigarettes and barrels of coffee later, my original goal of locating my own great-great-grandfather Cogswell remains somewhere over the genealogical horizon, but you are holding the Cogswell Family Association's latest "Little Pamphlet Update," which became this volume.
Obviously, this book would not have been possible without the invaluable assistance and labors of many dozens of cooperative people, whose names would fill many, many pages, and cannot all be listed here. The Cogswell Family Association is deeply in debt, and I hope this volume will provide some small measure of repayment. In addition to the three people mentioned in the introduction, a few of the many, many descendants who were particularly helpful and most dedicated to the success of this volume were: Charles Atwood, Rev. A. Charles Cannon, Marion Cavin, Edward Everett Cogswell, Edward Russell Cogswell, Jr., Horatio Adams Cogswell, Howard J. Cogswell, Dr. Howard L. Cogswell, John Heyland Cogswell, Keith & June Cogswell, Lawrence H. Cogswell, Rev. Malcolm Cogswell, Ralph E. Cogswell, Lt. Col. William C. Cogswell, Claire Cogswell Daigle, Alexine Dempster, Tanis Diedrichs, Betty M. Dodge, Etta Faulkner, Edith Hall, Lucia Heins, Phyllis Leverton, Caroline Lutz, Karen Prickett, Peg Simons, William Wood, and Janice Yates.
The Author


First Generation
1. John [1] COGSWELL. Son of Edward COGSWELL & Alice. Born 1592 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptism 7 Apr 1592. Died 29 Nov 1669 in Ipswich, Mass. Buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Mass. 
At the age of twenty-three years he married the daughter of the parish vicar, succeeded to his father's business, and settled down in the old homestead. His parents died soon after his marriage, and he received his inheritance, "The Mylls called Ripond, situate within the Parish of Frome Selwood," together with the home place and certain personal property. Like his father, he was a manufacturer of woolen fabrics, largely broadcloths and kerseymeres. The superior quality of these manufactures gave to his "mylls" a favorable reputation, which appears to have been retained to the present (1884) day. There are factories occupying much the same locations and still owned by Cogswells, which continue to put upon the market woolen cloths that in Vienna and elsewhere have commanded the first premium in the world exhibitions of our times.
John Cogswell doubtless found in London a market for his manufactures. He may have had a commission house in that city, which would account for his being called, as he sometimes has been, a London merchant.
Mrs. Cogswell's father was the Rev. William Thompson, vicar of Westbury from 1603 to his death in 1623. About twenty years after their marriage, with a family of nine children about them, and having the accumulations of a prosperous business, Mr. and Mrs. Cogswell determined to emigrate to America. The particular reasons which led them to leave England may have been much the same that influenced others in their times. It appears that early in 1635 Mr. Cogswell made sale of his "mylls" and other real estate, and soon after, with his wife, eight children, and all their personal effects, embarked at Bristol, May 23, 1635, for New England. Their passage was long and disastrous. Their arrival in America was after a most unexpected fashion. Having reached the shores of New England, they were landed very unceremoniously at a place called Pemaquid, in Maine, being washed ashore from the broken decks of their ship "Angel Gabriel," which went to pieces in the frightful gale of August 15, 1635, when such a "sudden, dismal storm of wind and rain came as had never been known before by white man or Indian." Traces of this storm remained for years.
Mr. Cogswell and his family escaped with their lives, but well drenched by the sea and despoiled of valuables to the amount of five thousand pounds sterling. They were more fortunate than some who sailed with them, whom the angry waves gathered to a watery grave. On leaving England Mr. Cogswell had taken along with him a large tent, which now came into good service. This they pitched, and into it they gathered themselves and such stores as they could rescue from the waves. The darkness of that first night of the Cogswells in America found them housed beneath a tent on the beach. The next day they picked up what more of their goods they could, which had come ashore during the night or lay floating about upon the water. As soon as possible Mr. Cogswell, leaving his family, took passage for Boston. He there made a contract with a certain Capt. Gallup, who commanded a small barque, to sail for Pemaquid and transport his family to Ipswich, Mass. This was a newly settled town to the eastward from Boston, and was called by the Indians, "Aggawam." Two years earlier, March, 1633, Mr. John Winthrop, son of Gov. John Winthrop, with ten others, had commenced a settlement in Aggawam. An act of incorporation was secured August 4, 1634, under the name of Ipswich. The name Ipswich is Saxon, in honor of the Saxon queen Eba, called "Eba's wych," i.e., Eba's house; hence Yppyswich or Ipswich. Some derive it from Gippewich, meaning "little city." In the early records are found the following enactments of the General Court:
"April 1st, 1633. It is ordered that no person whatsover shall go to plant or inhabit at Aggawam, without leave from the Court, except those already gone, Mr. John Winthrop, Jun'r, Mr. Clerke, Robert Coles, Thomas Howlett, John Biggs, John Gage, Thomas Hardy, Wil1am Perkins, M. Thornedicke, William Srieant.
"June 11, 1633. There is leave granted to Thomas Sellen to plant at Aggawam.
"August 5, 1634. It is ordered that Aggawam shall be called Ipswich.
"At Ipsidge a plantation made up this year. Mr. Ward P___, Mr. Parker T____. James Cudworth, 1634.
It was probably near the last of August, 1635, when Capt. Gallup sailed up the Aggawam River, having on board Mr. and Mrs. Cogswell, their three sons and five daughters, and whatever of household goods his bags would carry, the rest of their effects being taken by another ship. The settlers of Ipswich at once manifested an appreciation of these new-comers. They made John Cogswell liberal grants of land, as appears from the following municipal records:
"1636. Granted to Mr. John Cogswell Three Hundred acres of land at the further Chebokoe, having the River on the South east, the land of Willm White on the North west, and A Creeke romminge out of the River towards William White's farm on the North east. Bounded also on the West with a Creek and a little creek.
"Also there was granted to him a parsel of ground containing eight acres, upon part whereof ye said John Cogswell hath built an house, it being the corner lot in Bridge street and hath Goodman Bradstreet's house-Lott on the South East.
"There was granted to him five acres of ground, which is thus described: Mr. John Spencer's buttinge upon the River on the South, having a lot of Edmond Gardiner's on the South East, and a lot of Edmond Sayward's on the south west; with six acres of ground, the said John Cogswell hath sold to John Perkins, the younger, his heirs and assigns."
The grant of three hundred acres of land at the further Chebokoe was some five miles to the eastward, in a part of Ipswich that was constituted, May 5, 1679, Chebacco Parish; and February 5, 1819, incorporated the town of Essex. A settlement had been commenced in the Indian Chebokoe, in 1635, by William White and Goodman Bradstreet.
It appears that John Cogswell was the third original settler in that part of Ipswich which is now Essex, Mass. On the records of Ipswich his name often appears. It is uniformly distinguished by the appellation of Mr., which in those days was an honorary title given to but few, who were gentlemen of some distinction. There were only about thirty of the three hundred and thirty-five original settlers of Ipswich who received this honor. Very soon after his arrival, March 3, 1636, by an act of the Court, John Cogswell was admitted freeman, to which privileges none were admitted prior to 1664 except respectable members of some Christian church. To freemen alone were given the civil rights to vote for rulers and to hold public office.
Ipswich In The Massachusetts Bay Colony, pp. 290-291, by Thomas Franklin Waters, The Ipswich Historical Society, 1905: "Five members of the Cogswell family were among the twenty prominent people who signed the petition drawn up by the Rev. John Wise on behalf of Goodwife Proctor, who stood accused of witchcraft. Mary Warren alleged that she had been threatened and abused by Goodwife Proctor, and that she had seen apparitions of people who had long since been murdered by the wife of John Proctor. This evidence prevailed and the good woman was sentenced to death."
For several years Mr. Cogswell and family lived in the log-house with its thatched roof, while many of their goods remained stored in boxes, awaiting some better accommodations. It is said there were pieces of carved furniture, embroidered curtains, damask table linen, much silver plate; and that there was a Turkey carpet is well attested. As soon as practicable Mr. Cogswell put up a framed house. This stood a little back from the highway, and was approached by walks through grounds of shrubbery and flowers. There is an English shrub still, 1884, enjoying a thrifty life, which stands not far from the site of the old Cogswell manor. This shrub, tradition says, John Cogswell brought with him from England.
Not long since, Mrs. Aaron Cogswell, of Ipswich, had in her possession, it is said, the famous coat of arms which has been widely copied in the family. This is described as "wrought most exquisitely with silk on heavy satin." A few years ago, a stranger borrowed the curious relic of this too obliging lady, and, like the jewels of the Egyptians, borrowed by the Israelites, it was never returned.
For some years after the completion of their new dwelling-house Mr. and Mrs. Cogswell lived to enjoy their pleasant home, surrounded by their children, well settled, some of them on farms near by, made of lands deeded to them by their now aged parents. The time came at length, after a life of change, adventure, and hardship, and Mr. Cogswell died at the age of seventy-seven years. The funeral service for John Cogswell was conducted by the Rev. William Hubbard, pastor in Ipswich and since known as 'the Historian of New England'. The funeral procession traversed a distance of five miles to the place of burial, the Old North graveyard of the First Church. They moved under an escort of armed men, as a protection against the possible attack of Indians.
Mrs. Cogswell survived her husband but a few years. She was a woman of sterling qualities and dearly loved by all who knew her. Side by side in the old churchyard in Ipswich have slept for more than two hundred (now more than 300) years the mortal remains of this godly pair, whose childhood was passed near the banks of the river Avon; who, leaving behind the tender associations of the Old World, came with their children to aid in rearing on these shores a pure Christian state. They did greater work than they knew, died in the faith of the Gospel, and while their graves are unmarked by monument of stone, their souls are safe in heaven, their memory blessed, and their names honored by a posterity in numbers hardly second to that of Abraham.
John married Elizabeth THOMPSON, daughter of William THOMPSON Rev. & Phillis _____, 10 Sep 1615 in Westbury, Leigh, Wilts, England. Born circa 1594 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Died 2 Jun 1676 in Ipswich, Mass. 
Buried in Old North Graveyard, Ipswich, Mass. They had the following children:
2 i. Daughter [2] COGSWELL
3 ii. Mary [3] COGSWELL
4 iii. William [4] COGSWELL
5 iv. John [5] COGSWELL
6 v. Phyllis [6] COGSWELL. Baptism Jul 
1624. She probably died young. 
7 vi. Hannah [7] COGSWELL
8 vii. Abigail [8] COGSWELL
9 viii. Edward [9] COGSWELL
10 ix. Alice [10] COGSWELL. Baptism 1632.
She probably died young. 
11 x. Ruth [11] COGSWELL. Baptism 1633. She probably died young. 
12 xi. Sarah [12] COGSWELL
13 xii. Elizabeth [13] COGSWELL

Second Generation
2. Daughter [2] COGSWELL. Daughter of John [1] COGSWELL & Elizabeth THOMPSON. 
She married, lived in London, and was the only child of John Cogswell who did not come to America.
3. Mary [3] COGSWELL. Daughter of John [1] COGSWELL & Elizabeth THOMPSON. Born circa 1617 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Died in Boston, Mass. Mrs. Mary (Cogswell) Armitage may have been the Mary Cogswell who was in the family of Gov. Bellingham, and joined the Boston Church, Aug. 29, 1647. The date of her death is unknown. 
She married Godfrey ARMITAGE, 1649. They resided in Boston, Mass. He was a tailor, and afterwards a merchant. 
Mary Cogswell was his second wife. He was either the son or brother of Thomas Armitage, who came to America aboard the "James" in 1635. He was made a freeman March 14, 1639, in Boston. Mr. Armitage appears a man of ample means. 
He was one of the executors named in John [5] Cogswell's will. Geoffrey and Mary (Cogswell) Armitage had the following child:
14 i. Samuel [14] ARMITAGE b. Apr 1651. 
4. William [4] COGSWELL. Son of John [1] COGSWELL & Elizabeth THOMPSON. Born 1619 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptism Mar 1619 in Westbury Parish Church. Died 15 Dec 1700 in Chebacco, Ipswich, Mass. Buried 17 Dec 1700. He was sixteen years of age at the time he came with his parents to America in 1635, and about thirty when he was married. He settled on the home place, and lived in a house that then stood a little to the north of the site now occupied by the ancient Cogswell house. He possessed many of the traits of his father. He was a man of Christian character, and one of the most influential citizens in that part of Ipswich. It was largely by his efforts that the Gospel ministry was established in Chebacco. After two years of opposition, and several appeals to the General Court, at last, May 5, 1679, the Parish of Chebacco was established. Mr. Cogswell gave the land on which to erect a meeting-house, a lot thirteen rods by three. This first meeting-house in Chebacco stood on what was long known as Meeting-house Hill. Mr. Cogswell entertained at his house the Ecclesiastical Council that met Aug. 12, 1683, to organize the church and to obtain Mr. John Wise, their first pastor.
William Cogswell was the defendant in the "historic" suit, Cogswell vs. Cogswell, brought by his nephew, John [26] Cogswell, son of John [5] Cogswell, who had appointed William guardian of his children, and who died at sea. After two years of trials and appeals, William was found innocent, and John was ordered to pay the court's costs, £13 4s.
William married Susanna HAWKES, daughter of Adam HAWKES & Anne (Brown) HUTCHINSON Mrs., 1649/1650 in Lynn, Essex, Mass. Born 13 Aug 1633 in Charlestown, Middlesex, Mass. Died circa 1696 in Ipswich, Essex, Mass. 
They had the following children:
15 i. Elizabeth [15] COGSWELL
16 ii. Hester [16] COGSWELL
17 iii. Susanna [17] COGSWELL (Twin)
18 iv. Ann [18] COGSWELL (Twin) 
b. 5 Jan 1657 in Ipswich, Mass. 
d. before 5 Aug 1696. 
19 v. William [19] COGSWELL
20 vi. Jonathan [20] COGSWELL, Capt.
21 vii. Edmund [21] COGSWELL 
d. 15 May 1680. 
22 viii. John [22] COGSWELL, Lt.
23 ix. Adam [23] COGSWELL, Capt.
24 x. Sarah [24] COGSWELL
5. John [5] COGSWELL. Son of John [1] COGSWELL & Elizabeth THOMPSON. Born 1622 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptism 25 Jul 1622 in Westbury Parish Church. Died 27 Sep 1653, at sea. In 1652, John's wife died, "leaving three children, the youngest a year old. Mr. Cogswell was much broken by the affliction, and his health being poor, he arranged with his sister, Mrs. Waldo, to care for his little ones, constituted his father and his older brother, William, their legal guardians, made his will, and sailed for England in the fall of 1652. He arrived in London, visited his sister and other friends, attended to matters of business, and when about to embark for home he wrote a touching and affectionate letter to his parents, which was dated London, March 30, 1653. Early in the autumn of 1653 Mr. Cogswell started on his return to America, but died on the passage, Sept. 27, 1653, at the age of thirty years. His orphaned children were brought up among his friends, their uncle William acting as their guardian."
The name of John's wife remains a mystery, but Helen Riesterer, of Anaheim, California, submitted to the OCCGS Quarterly, March 1981, information to the effect that the wife's name was "Miss Rogers."
The had the following children:
25 i. Elizabeth [25] COGSWELL
26 ii. John [26] COGSWELL
27 iii. Samuel [27] COGSWELL
7. Hannah [7] COGSWELL. Daughter of John [1] COGSWELL & Elizabeth THOMPSON. Born circa 1624 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptism 6 Apr 1626. Died 25 Dec 1704 in Charlestown, Mass. Buried in Phipps Street burying ground, Charlestown, Mass. (1902) "Her gravestone is still [1884] standing, inscribed as follows:
Memento Mori Fugit Horah
Here Lyes Ye Body of 
Mrs Hannah Waldo
Wife To Mr Cornelius
Waldo Aged 80
Years Died Ye 25 Of
December 1704
Ye Memory Of Ye Just
Is Blessed"
She married Cornelius WALDO, Dea., before 2 Jan 1651 in Ipswich, Mass. Born 1624 in England. Died 3 Jun 1701 in Chelmsford, Mass. Cornelius Waldo said that the "city" of Boston was seven huts when he located there. He and John Cogswell appear in the town records as being farmers. Cornelius and Hannah (Cogswell) Waldo had the following children:
28 i. Elizabeth [28] WALDO
29 ii. Daniel [29] WALDO
30 iii. Martha [30] WALDO b. 27 Feb 1658. 
31 iv. Cornelius [31] WALDO (Twin)
32 v. John [32] WALDO (Twin)
33 vi. Deborah [33] WALDO
34 vii. Rebecca [34] WALDO
35 viii. Judith [35] WALDO b. 12 Jul 1664. 
36 ix. Mary [36] WALDO b. 9 Sep 1665. 
d. 23 Nov 1665. 
8. Abigail [8] COGSWELL. Daughter of John [1] COGSWELL & Elizabeth THOMPSON. Born circa 1626 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Baptism 1627. Died in Ipswich, Mass. She married Thomas CLARK, circa 1646. 
They had the following child:
37 i. John [37] CLARK b. 13 Nov 1666. 
9. Edward [9] COGSWELL. Son of John [1] COGSWELL & Elizabeth THOMPSON. Born 1629 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. "Of whom little is known.". The names of the three children were provided by Mrs. Margaret Simons, from World Family Tree. Original source unknown. Edward is not named in his father's will. It was thought by some that Edward died early in life, while others say there is mention of him made in 1670 and in 1676. He had the following children:
38 i. William [38] COGSWELL
39 ii. Jonathon [39] COGSWELL
40 iii. Adam [40] COGSWELL
12. Sarah [12] COGSWELL. Daughter of John [1] COGSWELL & Elizabeth THOMPSON. Born circa 1632 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. Died 25 Jan 1732 at age 100. She married Simon TUTTLE, son of John TUTTLE & Joanna (Antrobus) LAWRENCE, Mrs., 1662/1663. Born 1637 in Ipswich, Mass. Died Jan 1692 in Ipswich, Mass. 
The Tuttle Family Genealogy states that John Tuttle was the son of Simon Tuttle and Sarah Cogswell. 
The Burnham Family Genealogy states that John Tuttle was the son of Simon Tuttle and his first wife, Martha Ward.
Simon and Ruth (Cogswell) Tuttle had the following children:
41 i. John [41] TUTTLE
42 ii. Joanna [42] TUTTLE
43 iii. Simon [43] TUTTLE Jr.
44 iv. Elizabeth [44] TUTTLE
45 v. Sarah [45] TUTTLE
46 vi. Abigail [46] TUTTLE
47 vii. Susanna [47] TUTTLE b. 7 May 1675. 
48 viii. William [48] TUTTLE b. 7 May 1677.
49 ix. Charles [49] TUTTLE
50 x. Mary [50] TUTTLE b. 12 Jun 1680.
She died young. 
51 xi. Jonathan [51] TUTTLE b. 11 Jun 1682. He died young.
52 xii. Ruth [52] TUTTLE
13. Elizabeth [13] COGSWELL. Daughter of John [1] COGSWELL & Elizabeth THOMPSON. Born circa 1635 in Westbury Leigh, Wiltshire, England. She married Nathaniel MASTERSON, 31 Jul 1657. 

About Thomas Wellman, II

Thomas Wellman was born about 1620, probably in Ilminster, Somerset, England, and immigrated to Lynn, Massachusetts sometime between 1640 and 1644. There have been some claims that Thomas Wellman arrived in 1640 on the ship Hopewell, though there are no records to substantiate this. In my opinion this claim is very questionable, as the Hopewell “brought passengers this year destined for Connecticut”, and Thomas settled in Lynn, Massachusetts. It is more likely that Thomas came in 1643 or very early in 1644. A list of names of Englishmen who sided with Parliament in the English Civil War in the parish of Cerne Abbas, Dorset County (1641-1642), contained both a Thomas Wellman and John Knight. Dorset County adjoins the south side of Somerset County, and the parish of Cerne Abbas is about fifteen miles southeast from Crewkerne in Somerset. It appears that Thomas was in England, fighting at the side of his future brother-in-law during this conflict. However, Thomas was among a list of twenty-seven families that appeared in Lynn in 1644.

He married Elizabeth, whose family surname is unknown, no later than 1642, as their first child, Abraham, was born in 1643. It seems likely that their marriage took place in England, and perhaps that is also where Abraham was born.

The earliest record of Thomas Wellman in Lynn, Massachusetts is a land deed dated Dec 12, 1653 in which Thomas and John Knights purchased two sixty acre tracts jointly. This was virgin land which bounded on the north by land already owned by Thomas, They cleared and farmed this newly purchased land togeather until Thomas bought out John’s interest on June 10, 1662. Thomas and his Elizabeth built their home on this land, on the east side of the 1659 road that linked Salem to Reading near Gerry’s mill.

One account, written in the twentieth century says: “Leaving the Lynnfield Center Rail Station by the way of Summer Street, about a mile distant, near the junction of Summer and Walnut Street stood the ancient Wellman House … built @ 1653 … on the western slope of the hill near the elms. The bounds of the ancient structure can be plainly seen, and it appears as if additions to the house had been made at different times. The stairs leading to the cellars, whech were separately constructed, were of stone; and at the front lies the doorstone … Not far from the house was the old well and the ancient flower garden. Still farther away is an excellent spring of water, which was named for Robert Bates … One of the relics of this family is a cup which belonged to the first Thomas. There is also a razor hone of sea wood; a panelled chest brought over in 1640; and a child’s chair, an elaborate piece of work made from the native hard wood.”

There is a tradition that Thomas had a sister, Emma, who married one John Knight about 1644/45, who after immigrated with his family to Lynn, Massachusetts, taking his new bride with him. John’s father, William Knight, had immigrated with his family to Lynn, Massachusetts, ca. 1634/36, and John had returned to England to fight in the Civil war there about 1642.

Thomas and his wife Elizabeth were religious people who were members of the First Congregational Church in Reading (Wakefield), Massachusetts. The church records od December 25, 1662 record that “Goodman Wellman and his wife” were admitted to the membership at that time.

Elizabeth died after March 22, 1672/73, the day that the heirs of Thomas signed their agreement. Thomas died at Lynn End (Lynnfield, Massachusetts) on October 10, 1672.

The dissolution of Thomas’ estate and its inventory agreed to by his heirs was dated 2 May 1673. Son Abraham received half the land and the house after his mother’s death or remarriage; son Isaac received half the land to be shared with his mother (the widow) until her death or remarriage; the widow got the barn; the three daughters got 30 pounds each, payable in cattle and household goods. Items of interest from the inventory are the absence of any cash as well as highly valued bibles and books.

Links

  1. Descendants of Thomas Wellman of Lynn, Massachusetts. By Joshua Wyman Wellman, George Walter Chamberlain, Arthur Holbrook Wellman. Page 22.
  • Religion: Puritan – Sterling Puritan
  • Immigration: 1640 – The Good Ship Hopewell to Massachusetts
  • Immigration: Arrived in Lynn End, Massachusetts – 1650 – Lynn End, Massachusetts

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.