Rosamundu and Trojumanna

Hromund

A Great Story for the Silver screen.

By

John Presco

Copyright 2019

Hromund will be about the Trojans coming to the aid of the Nordic Tribes that are under attack by the legions of Paul of Cypress who suffers from mental illness. He had two personalities. The one the Followers of The Way feared the most, was Bar-Jesus. Argotta had met Bar-Jesus in Corinth. He took a queer like to her. This freakish looking troll called her his Helen. When he found out the name her beloved teacher had given her, he began to send her strange letters in the Brabant.

“Rosamunde, must I send my army to fetch you to Cypress?”

“Fuck you, you little worm! Come get me, and I will personally pull out your unibrow with plyers!?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elymas

https://gw.geneanet.org/hpichot?lang=en&n=de+toxandrie&oc=0&p=priarios

https://www.geni.com/people/Argotta-of-the-Franks/5412414922360067363

Argotta “la Mère de tout les Roys” des Francs

French: Argote des Cimbres, Swedish: Argotta av Westphalia (av Östfrankerna)
Also Known As: “Argotta Rosamunde “Mother of All the Kings” of France”
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Frankish Territory [North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany]
Death: circa 438 (54-70)
North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Immediate Family: Daughter of Genebald II, duke of the East Franks and Blesinde of the Suevi
Wife of Pharamond, king of the Franks (Fictitious) and Théodémir, King of the Franks at Thérouanne
Mother of Fredemundus; Clodius de Cologne, VI; Adalbertus de Cologne; Chararic (Guerric) de Tongres; Sigebert De Soissons, King de Cologne and 7 others
Sister of Amalaberge of the Franks
Occupation: Queen of the Franks, ABT 0376, Koningin van de Franken, Princesse, des Cimbres, Princess France/Sicambrian Heiress, , Princess of the Salic Franks, Queen of the Salic Franks, Queen of Franks, Queen of the Salian Franks, MSD2-MQM

Trójumanna saga

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to navigation Jump to search

Trójumanna saga (The Saga of the Men of Troy) is a saga in Old Norse which tells the story of the matter of Troy. It is the Icelandic translation of the Daretis Phrygii De Excidio Troiae Historia (Dares Phrygius’ History of the Destruction of Troy). The saga expands on the basic framework provided by Dares to create a story with many particularly Norse elements and values.

Composition and sources[edit]

Trójumanna saga was most likely composed by an Icelander in the mid-thirteenth century. Today there exist three separate and different redactions of Trójumanna saga, themselves dating from probably the thirteenth and fourteenth century.[1] These are known as the Hauksbók, Beta, and the Alpha redactions. Trójumanna saga Alpha, though the last to be discovered by modern scholars, is the closest to Dares’ Historia in that it uses fewer supplementary sources than the other two versions. As such, it was published as Trójumanna saga: The Dares Phrygius Version, by Jonna Louis-Jensen.[2] Randi Claire Eldevik states that although Trójumanna saga Alpha has only a few sources other than De Excidio Troiae Historia, “its treatment of [De Excidio Troiae Historia] is elaborately embellished in comparison with the other two redactions.”[3] These other sources are the Ilias Latina attributed to Publius Baebius Italicus, and Heroides by Ovid.

Synopsis of the Alpha Redaction[edit]

The saga begins with the journey of Jason and his Argonauts. On the way to find the Golden Fleece they stop at Troy. Laomedon, King of Troy, forces Jason to leave his lands for fear of a Greek invasion. This is the start of a feud between the Trojans and the Greeks. After Jason acquires the Golden Fleece, he remains in Phrygia with Medea.

Hercules, however, gathers a Greek army and returns to Troy. After a brief war, Troy falls and Telamon takes Laomedon’s daughter and Priam‘s sister, Hesione, back to Greece. Priam, after rebuilding Troy, summons his five sons: Hector, Alexander (Paris), Deiphobus, Helenus, and Troilus, and they decide to avenge their grandfather, Laomedon.

Alexander tricks Helen into vowing to marry him by tossing a golden apple into her lap. On the apple is inscribed, “I swear by the god that I shall be wed to Alexander and be his queen henceforward,”[4] which Helen unwittingly reads aloud, thus binding herself by oath to Alexander, who takes her back to Greece, inciting the Trojan War.

The course of the war is described in detail from the first landing of the Greeks to the taking of the city. Hector is Troy’s greatest protector until he is slain by Achilles in an even fight. After this Troilus and the rest of the sons of Priam fill the role. Achilles is a less central character to the story than in Homer‘s Iliad, though he is still most often responsible for the deaths of prominent Trojans. He falls in love with Polyxena, Priam’s daughter, is drawn into an ambush for her sake, and is assassinated by Alexander after a heroic last stand.

Antenor and Aeneas, along with many townsmen, betray the city by letting the Greeks in during the night. Neoptolemus Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, kills Priam at the altar of Thor. In the days following the sack of the city Neoptolemus searches for and finds Polyxena (who had been under Aeneas’ protection). Blaming her for his father’s death, Neoptolemus insists on her execution. After she defends herself in a passionate, but futile speech, he cuts off her head.

The saga closes with a very brief summary of the Greeks’ return home and the casualty counts of the war.[5]

Pharamond and Rosamond

merlinchild

Yesterday, I heard Brussels called the Capitol of Europe in regards to the terrorist attacks by radical Islam. It is said all of Europe is having a crucial identity crisis due to the large number of Muslims who are not being assimilated into society, and thus are potential terrorists who threaten to turn Europe into a vast Wasteland.

Here is an old post from my blog that is no more. I discuss Pharamond, who came to King Author’s court, and his wife, Rosamond.

Since 1996 I have been writing about, and having discussions with numerous Grail scholars who have an interest in the Knight Templars. I have taken a keen interest in Denis de Rougemont who is a father of the European Union, and a Grail Scholar. With the Grail paper of Elzbieta, there is a joining of hands across the water.

Jon Presco

“Pharamond

In the Arthurian romances, a Knight of the Round Table, said to have
been the first king of France and have reigned in the early 5th
century. Pharamond was the son of Marcomir and father of Clodion.”

Pharamond’s father, Marcomir, appears to have been a Bohemian, and
Queen Rosamond the ruler of the Bohemians, the Boii. Pharamond was
removed as a Knight of the Round Table for many reasons. One of them
might be because he was a dead-givaway as to whom the Grail served,
and where the Round Table was located. I suspect in Jutland in the
Provence of Chersonese. Here is what Gauthier de Costes has to say;

“Cimbrian Chersonese, a Provence famous for being the seat of the
ancient Cimbrians: who in the time of Marius made war upon the
Romans, and after that foresaking the country from whence they drew
their origin, made themselves Masters of Bohemia, and there founded
the famous Monarchy, orer which, Madam, said Gismond to Queen
Rosamond, your majesty rules at the present. By the departure of the
Cimbirans, that Province by little and little, lost its ancient name,
for that at this day it is called Jutia or Jutland.”

http://www.blaisdell.com/papers/

 

In The Hague, free men and women will forcefully assert that, as de
Rougemont said so well fifty years ago in a “Message to Europeans” on
the union of the continent, a message that has lost none of its
timeliness: “Europe is playing out its destiny and that of peace in
the world.”

Gauthier de Costes ends his Grail Romance with “Predictions
concerning the Monarchy of the Franks”. Here he attempts to foretell
the future of the Merovingians – in 1677 – thus he might be the first
author of these Grail studies. His claim to employing a “science”
sugggests he is a Rosicrucian and Alchemist.

“Ether the rules of Sicence, which has never failed me hitherto, are
false and uncertain, or Cologne shall be taken in a few days after,
the King of the Franks shall be happy with the Queen of the Cimbrians.

Their felictiy shall be too great to be of a short continuance; they
shall enjoy it as long as they live: and it shall descend to a
numerous Train of Illustrious Sucessors: And shall be in a manner
Hereditary to the flourishing Monarch which they founded.”

Gauthier speaks of a coming Frankish King as great as Pharamond,
who “Shall make a Voyage no less magnificent then the Triumphs of
Ancient Romans.”

“He shall be just. He shall make those laws, which he shall exactly
observe himself. He shall suppress Luxery, establish Commerce. He
shall cherish Arts and Sciences and Liberty. And in a word, he shall
be endued with all the virtues of a great Prince, and all the
Qualities of a real honsest man.”

If the dishonest neo-Confederates who have taken over this Democracy
can make dishonest and secret deals with the Thatcher Deregulators of
Britain who wants out of the European Union – and declare war on the
Arts – then we Liberty loving people can extend our friendship to the
Congress of the Hague, and found a Branch of Peace in America that
will honor the true Prince of Peace in all lands.

Jon Presco

THE HAGUE CONGRESS
MAY 1948 – MAY 1998

Why has the International European Movement taken the initiative,
along with other Europe–wide organisations, of convening a Congress
of Europe in The Hague next May? Very simply because it considers it
crucial to contribute to Europe’s new spring. How? By going back to
the source of the undertaking of peace, destined for the entire
continent and unprecedented worldwide, that was initiated at the
Congress of Europe in The Hague in May 1948. Why? Because the ideal
and the values that inspired participants at the time have lost none
of their strength: they alone will make it possible to build a Europe
of the 21st century capable of taking up in solidarity, thus in
peace, the challenges to be met in today’s world. A Europe that can
remain, now more than ever, an example of integration for the entire
world. This is what the representatives of European society will
assert, with the words and sensibilities of this end–of–century, when
they meet in The Hague from 8 to 10 May. They will say that Europe is
still a combat to be fought. They will maintain that the Europe of
their dreams is not the unfinished Europe in which they live. Like
their predecessors, they will demand another Europe, more Europe.

THE BIRTH OF THE DREAM
For Jacques Delors, the first congress in The Hague “was one of
enthusiasm, of the birth of a dream” (1). Indeed, it was in The
Hague, with Winston Churchill chairing and some 800 delegates in
attendance, that the utopia took wing. And all the European
achievements of the past 50 years are its offspring, from the Council
of Europe to the Treaty of Amsterdam, from the European Convention on
Human Rights to the European Parliament elected every five years,
from the common market to the single currency…
But these names and concrete advances no longer inspire European
citizens in day-to-day life. Wrongly so, because these achievements
constitute the edifice, built stone by stone, housing the dream of
the delegates to the 1948 Congress, which was to break, at last, the
infernal cycle of conflicts which regularly, like an inescapable
fate, plunged our continent into mourning. A dream of peace which
materialized on the basis of a few fundamental principles, the
essence of which is not in the least outdated:

* reconciliation between the enemies of yesteryear and, with the fall
of the Berlin Wall, between even more recent enemies;

* confidence and solidarity between States agreeing voluntarily to
exercise their sovereignties jointly so as to serve the higher cause
of the common good. In President Santer’s words, “the essence of
Community construction is nurtured by the qualitative ethical leap”
(2) taken in The Hague;

* the equality of States having agreed to participate in the common
adventure. The Community method is not perceived sufficiently from
the historical standpoint for what it is: a revolutionary instrument
making it possible to work towards unity, in peace and with respect
for all.

All these elements started taking root at the 1948 Congress in The
Hague. At the time, the New York Times perceptively observed: “We are
witnessing today a phenomenon of the greatest importance, we are
witnessing the renewal of the European spirit…”.

From a distance, Jacques Delors also paid a ringing tribute to these
precursors, measuring the debt our contemporaries owe them, without
even realising it: “We can never sufficiently express our gratitude
to all those who decided to make a radical break with types of
behaviour that were suicidal to all Europeans. It was not easy, as
some hungered for revenge while others demonstrated an innate
mistrust of others. And above all, because of fear, the fear of
others, that can still be seen surfacing today in the minds of
some”… (3).

WHEN THE DREAM BECOMES CONTINENTAL
The dream of the first Congress in The Hague has thus materialized.
And this dream still holds its appeal for those not yet sharing it,
as attested to in President Vaclav Havel’s remarks to the European
Parliament, on May 8 1994, explaining why the Czech Republic wished
to join the European Union: “Yes, we are capable of voluntarily
surrendering to the European Union part of our national sovereignty,
to be managed jointly, aware as we are -like all Europeans- that the
stakes are worth it. The part of the world where it is our lot to
live still has hopes of seeing the gradual transformation of this
arena of sovereigns eternally on bad terms, of powers, of nations, of
social classes or religious doctrines fighting for influence or
supremacy, into a forum of concrete dialogue and active cooperation
by all citizens, into an area of co-existence and shared solidarity,
managed and cultivated in common.”
It could not have been said better in so few words that the utopia
being built since the Congress in The Hague 50 years ago is still as
valid as ever. The membership applications submitted by ten Central
and Eastern European countries -along with Cyprus, not to mention
Malta, Switzerland and Turkey- have since attested to the fact that
the dream has become a continental one. This is no surprise,
according to Jacques Delors who, in his comment on the “velvet
revolutions” that took place East of the Wall observed: “These non-
violent revolutions which gave back to Europe the full wealth of its
origins did not arise solely from the hope of attaining prosperity
and well-being. They were borne by an ethical assertion, confidence
in human integrity, which lies at the source of all democratic
progress. And was it not the will to act in pluralism and
cooperation, the desire to bring together all democracies, that was
the very basis of the European Community?” (4)

The Congress in The Hague from 8 to 10 May will be the congress of
the recomposed Europe. This at a time when, as Jacques Delors so
rightly observes, the fear of others is resurfacing…

EUROPE’S NEED FOR A RENAISSANCE
Fear is resurfacing because all our European countries are battling
against difficulties leading them insidiously to give in to the
temptation of withdrawal, to forget that solidarity is the basis of
the unprecedented peace Europe enjoys today. Several contemporary
political leaders are succumbing to hesitation where their
predecessors, to use the expression of Paul-Henri Spaak, were “not
lacking in redeeming boldness”.

In spite of its positive aspects, the Amsterdam Treaty bears the
marks of this hesitancy: it lacks a clear vision of the goals being
sought and of the institutional tools the European Union must be
given to attain them. The federal goals of the undertaking launched
at the 1948 Congress still alienate certain governments of present
Member States. Overwhelmed by their own problems, the others hardly
fought a valiant battle in this domain. Budgetary concerns did the
rest. The result: an ambiguous Treaty that is not the compass
Europeans need to venture into the 21st century with an understanding
of the profound meaning of their common march.

Where European leaders should have agreed on a mobilizing undertaking
synonymous with hope for citizens, only a faint lantern was lit…

The Hague Congress next May will summon them to show themselves equal
to the heritage for which they are responsible. It will express the
expectations and demands of a European family, reunited at last,
which has not lost sight of the fundamental passage of the “Message
to Europeans” read by Denis de Rougemont at the first Congress of
Europe: “The supreme conquest of Europe is called human dignity and
its true form is freedom. These are the ultimate stakes of our
struggle. It is in order to safeguard our acquired freedoms and to
enlarge their benefits to all men that we seek to unite our
continent.”

Man is at the heart of the European undertaking, but the citizen no
longer perceives this as being so. He is afraid because Europe is in
turmoil and no longer provides him with references. He is afraid
because he is out of a job, because he is living through the
emergence of a dual society that is synonymous for many with
precarity and thus the loss of freedom. He is also afraid because he
no longer recognises himself in policies which, developed on his
behalf at national, regional and European level, offer no answers to
his search for meaning in a profoundly changing world… Hence the
fear of others which resurges and revives the temptation to withdraw
into himself.

Against this backdrop, the warning issued by Vaclav Havel in his
speech to the European Parliament in 1994 takes on new meaning.
President Havel asserted that the extension of the thinking and the
values that underpin the European Union constitutes a “vital
interest” for the entire continent: “The demons are still on the look-
out. The void, the disintegration of values, the fear of freedom,
suffering and misery, chaos – this is their favourite ground. I
believe they must not be given the slightest chance. If the future
order does not emanate from the European Union, which is based on the
best European values, which is prepared to defend them, to spread
them, then it might be introduced by madmen, populists and demagogues
of all kinds who are awaiting their turn, determined to establish the
worst European traditions, which unfortunately are also many in
number.”

This warning does not apply to the Central and Eastern European
countries alone. The Member States of the present European Union have
no reason to show the slightest tendency to arrogance. Jacques Delors
said so with brilliant lucidity: “The man of the supermarket, like
the man of the gulag, aspires to discover the references that give
meaning to his freedom. And it is our shared task as Europeans to
create the framework within which these references will once again
become perceptible.” (5) A point of view confirmed and made stronger
by Father Josef Tischner, a Polish priest who directs the
International Institute for Human Studies in Vienna: “To the man
emerging from the gulag, we must not hold out the prospect of the
economic Europe alone, marvelously rich and politically united, but
also Europe as a spiritual value. (…) A Europe that represents a
value in itself. This man must be convinced that, in rediscovering
Europe, he is not entering another gulag that does not exist today,
but that could emerge in fifteen or twenty years…” (6)

At the next Congress in The Hague, men and women from the entire
continent will consequently consider how to transpose the founding
values of integration, formulated 50 years ago, into the changes
Europe is experiencing as this century draws to a close.

In May in The Hague, free men and women will endeavour to state that
Europe’s vocation at this time is to transpose its constituent values
of solidarity and freedom into today’s post-industrial society and
that Europe, as unsatisfactory as it may still be, is in a better
position than the other continents to rethink its initial
undertaking, so generous and visionary, on the values of social
justice, equality and tolerance. They will be nurtured by the
conviction that it is on the basis of the European experience that we
must work to invent together the human and social dimension of the
society of creativity, no longer in competition, but in dialogue with
our partners throughout the world.

In The Hague, free men and women will forcefully assert that, as de
Rougemont said so well fifty years ago in a “Message to Europeans” on
the union of the continent, a message that has lost none of its
timeliness: “Europe is playing out its destiny and that of peace in
the world.”

 

Cambrians.

“Pharamond

In the Arthurian romances, a Knight of the Round Table, said to have
been the first king of France and have reigned in the early 5th
century. Pharamond was the son of Marcomir and father of Clodion.”

Pharamond’s father, Marcomir, appears to have been a Bohemian, and
Queen Rosamond the ruler of the Bohemians, the Boii. Pharamond was
removed as a Knight of the Round Table for many reasons. One of them
might be because he was a dead-givaway as to whom the Grail served,
and where the Round Table was located. I suspect in Jutland in the
Provence of Chersonese. Here is what Gauthier de Costes has to say;

“Cimbrian Chersonese, a Provence famous for being the seat of the
ancient Cimbrians: who in the time of Marius made war upon the
Romans, and after that foresaking the country from whence they drew
their origin, made themselves Masters of Bohemia, and there founded
the famous Monarchy, orer which, Madam, said Gismond to Queen
Rosamond, your majesty rules at the present. By the departure of the
Cimbirans, that Province by little and little, lost its ancient name,
for that at this day it is called Jutia or Jutland.”

The Merovingians claimed they were descended from Noah. The Cimri
were descended from Gomer, the son of Noah. The Cimri are said to be
the Galteans who converted to Judaism, and were given the Message of
the Messiah, thus, they would worship the Grail.

Frederick Wittlesbach, and Elizabeth Stuart (daughter of Scotish
King, James), were the Winter King and Queen of Bohemia. Their son
was defeated by Catholic forces at the battle of White Mountain,
causing 3 million French Hugenots to flee to Britain and America,
where they founded ‘Freedom of Religon’ so to put an end to the
Catholic tyranny of Saintan Paul. They were the founders of the
Protestant religion that the fundamentalist Christians claim they are
tied to. They are wrong, and are severed from the kingdom, and are no
more! The Catholic Habsburg, of who I am kin, hold the title King and
Queen of Bohemia…..until today.

The Rose of the World has overcome the World.

Jon Presco

http://www.pantheon.org/articles/p/pharamond.html
http://alignment2012.com/pharamond.html
http://reference.allrefer.com/encyclopedia/F/FredWK.html

http://97.1911encyclopedia.org/C/CE/CELT.htm

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.