Did Captain Hull Have Three Daughters?

One of my grandfathers was Commodore Isaac Hull, who was close with the Hart sisters. It is alleged three never married and had a child. Did they become Nuns? I don’t buy it.  Some of the Hart sisters were involved in a strange Catholic burial, and I suspect were disowned. There was a curse on the Hart home. Joseph may be Isaac’s son, who may have fallen in love with his aunt Amelia. There was a huge family feud that needs more investigation.

John Presco

Amelia, sixth daughter, married Captain, afterward Commodore Joseph HULL, U. S. N., a nephew of Commodore Isaac HULL. Three of the (Hart) daughters died unmarried.”

Isaac Hull, (USN) MP

Gender: Male
Birth: March 09, 1773
Derby, CT, United States
Death: February 13, 1843 (69)
Philadelphia, PA, United States
Place of Burial: Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, United States
Immediate Family: Son of Capt Joseph Hull and Sarah “Sally” Hull
Half brother of Ira Hull

https://www.geni.com/people/Commodore-Isaac-Hull-USN/6000000010392017537

https://www.geni.com/people/Capt-Joseph-Hull/6000000010392074681?through=6000000010392017537

https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/joseph-bartine-hull_70950174

Ann Hart and Princess Diana

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Jeanette Hart, a heart-breaker to be sure...

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isaacspence

isaacwork

Virginia lived in a salt box house in Old Lyme across the river from Saybrook where the McCurdy and Hart family lived. This is the most desirable property in America, yet Ann Hart Hull could not give her father’s home away. I suspect it was because Jeanette McCurdy Hart aborted General Simon Bolivar’s baby after seeing him with his mistress. The baby was brought home in a wine casket and buried in Saybrook.

The Hart, Hull, and McCurdy families are kin to the mother of the late Princess Diana, and thus the Windsors. I descend from Isaac Hull and Ann Hart whose children abandoned their legacy that many felt was cursed.

When Virginia and I get married we will be the most illustrious family from this most historic place by the sea.

Jon Presco

After Captain HART’s remains were carried out of the front door of the house, the door and blind were closed and a bar nailed across it, which was not removed, nor the door opened till after it passed out of possession of the family-a period of about 40 years.

Following the auction the house was closed and deteriorated. School children called it the haunted house.

Of the seven sisters, Ann Hart Hull lived the longest and when she died in 1874 was buried alongside Isaac in Laurel Hill. She willed the house to the town with the stipulation that it be demolished and the land used for a town park.

Fearful of the expense of upkeep, the town declined the gift and the estate passed to the heirs who lived elsewhere and were not interested in keeping the place.

A descendant of Stephen HART is
Diana Spencer, the Princess of Wales.
Here is the way:
1.Stephen Hart 1602/3-1682/3
2.Mary Hart abt 1630-1710 +John Lee 1620-1690
3.Tabitha Lee 1677-1750 +Preserved Strong 1679/80-1765
4.Elizabeth Strong 1704-1792 +Joseph Strong Jr 1701-1773
5.Benajah Strong 1740-1809 +Lucy Bishop 1747-1783
6.Joseph Strong 1770-1812 +Rebecca Young 1779-1862
8.Ellen Wood 1831-1877 +Frank Work 1819-1911
9.Frances Ellen Work 1857-1947 +James Boothby Burke-Roche 1851-1920
10.Edmund Maurice Burke-Roche 1885-1955 +Ruth Sylvia Gill 1980-
11.Frances Ruth Burke-Roche 1936- +Edward John Spencer 1924-
12.Diana Spencer HRH The Princess of Wales 1961- + Charles HRH
The Prince of Wales 1948-

Source:Gen History of Deacon Stephen Hart and his descendants – Andrews and a book by Gary Boyd Roberts, through Nancy Bainter
on the net bainter@esdsdf.dnet.ge.com

ANNE LORD She married JOHN MCCURDY.
Children of ANNE LORD and JOHN MCCURDY are:
i. LYNDE6 MCCURDY, m. (1) URSULA GRISWOLD; b. 13 Apr 1754; m. (2) LYDIA LOCKWOOD.
ii. ELIZABETH MCCURDY, m. ALEXANDER STEWART.
iii. ANNA/NANCY MCCURDY, m. NATHAN STRONG.
iv. SARAH/SALLY MCCURDY, m. HENRY CHANNING.
v. JEANNETTE MCCURDY, m. ELISHA HART.
vi. JOHN MCCURDY.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/02/01/sleeping-beauty-heart/

http://rjohara.net/gen/notable/diana

http://freepages.family.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~odyssey/hart.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Saybrook,_Connecticut

http://www.katharinehepburntheater.org/blog/tag/1938-hurricane/

http://gohistoric.com/places/old-saybrook-south-green-new-milford

http://open.salon.com/blog/mean_mr_mustard/2009/06/30/a_ghost_story_or_love_story_elisha_benton_jemima_barrows

After her death, some 40 years after meeting Bolivar, the contents of the old Hart house were auctioned by James Tread way of Saybrook. Among the items sold from her room was a miniature painting on ivory of General Simon Bolivar. Scratched onto the back were the words: “Mr. Bolivar liberator, S.A. 1824.” There being no bidders, Mr. Treadway purchased the item and later presented it to members of the Hart family. Its whereabouts today is unknown.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2013/01/31/stephen-hart-princess-diana/

Jeannette was torn between her feelings and her family. She traveled to Chile to be with her sister Elizabeth and her husband Heman Allen. While there, a premature baby was born to Elizabeth and Heman. The birth seriously endangered Elizabeth’s health. Local physicians refused to treat the foreigner and she was saved only by the care and skill provided by her beloved slave, Leah.

Strong anti-American feelings were also expressed by destroying the graves of foreigners. Fearful of burying her baby there Elizabeth wanted to send the body back to Connecticut. To do this she placed the fetus in a cask of brandy to preserve it.
Jeannette took the cask back to Peru where she planned to put it aboard Commodore Hull’s ship and have it returned home for proper interment.

When the story reached Bolivar he believed that it was a baby born to Jeannette and he accused her of being immoral and unfit to be his wife.

He later found out what happened. “I know too much to expect forgiveness,” he wrote to Jeannette. “But I do plead with you to try to understand that the depth of my rage and bitterness was the measure of my passion for you. Had I loved you less madly, I had not been so insane with jealousy, so blinded by it was to believe for a moment what seemed at the time incontrovertible evidence of clay feet on the idol I had set up in my heart.…”
Eventually, the baby was sent to Saybrook and buried in the Hart family plot at Cypress Cemetery. Leah is also buried there in the Hart family plot, against the wishes of many local residents.
Eventually, Jeannette left Chile to return to the American Consulate in Lima, Peru. Soon after arriving, Bolivar and his army rode through the streets in triumph. Bells rang out, people threw flowers and kneeled before them. Following the Liberator was an attractive young woman in white trousers with thick black hair, pulled back in a bun. It was Bolivar’s mistress, Manuela Saenz.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frances_Shand_Kydd

Frances Shand Kydd (20 January 1936 – 3 June 2004) was the mother of Diana, Princess of Wales.

Shand Kydd was born Frances Ruth Roche in Park House, on the royal estate at Sandringham, Norfolk, on 20 January 1936.[2][3] Her father was Edmund Roche, 4th Baron Fermoy, a friend of King George VI and the elder son of the American heiress Frances Work and her first husband, the 3rd Baron Fermoy.[3] Her mother, Ruth Roche, Baroness Fermoy, DCVO, was a confidante and lady-in-waiting to Queen Elizabeth (later the Queen Mother).[4] In her own right since birth she held the style of The Honourable as the daughter of a baron.

Shand Kydd was of Scottish, English and American ancestry, her paternal grandmother being Frances Ellen Work, an heiress and socialite from New York City. Besides this she also had very distant and partial Indian ancestry, as her great-great-great-grandmother was the half-Indian Eliza Kewark, who married Theodore Forbes and had a daughter in 1812.[5]

Shand Kydd’s aristocratic and royal roots are related to a Prince, who was Donal MacCarthy Reagh, 9th Prince of Carbery, but also to James de Barry, 4th Viscount Buttevant, to Murrough O’Brien, 1st Earl of Thomond, to Gerald FitzGerald, 8th Earl of Kildare through Donal IV O’Donovan who is descended from all these. It also happens that O’Donovan was Edmond Roche, 1st Baron Fermoy’s maternal great-great grandfather.[6]

Major Richard William HART, the only child of Gen. William and Esther BUCKINGHAM, was born at Saybrook, January 15th 1768, and married Miss Elizabeth BULL, of Newport, Rhode Island. Major HART inherited from his father a large fortune, which increased by the rise in value of the land purchased by Gen. HART in the Western Reserve, so that at his death he left an estate valued at half a million dollars, which was divided between his widow and two daughters. He was much esteemed and respected in his native State, and used his means liberally for the good of those about him. He built a large house on the west side of Main street, near the corner of the road leading to New Haven, where he resided till his death. He was for many years a merchant, his store standing for a long time on the corner near his house, but he afterward moved it across Main street, nearly opposite, where it still stands. Major HART died of apoplexy in 1837. He was a man of unusually fine personal appearance and handsome features. His only son died in early youth, but he left two daughters, the oldest of whom, Elizabeth M., married at Saybrook, in 1825, the Rev. William JARVIS, son of Hezekiah JARVIS, of Norwalk, and for a time resided in Saybrook. The second daughter of Major HART, Miss Hetty B. HART, died in Hartford unmarried, aged 76.

Elisha HART, fifth son of Rev. William HART, born in 1758, married Jeannette MCCURDY, of Lyme, and had seven daughters but no sons. They were distinguished for their beauty and accomplishments, and moved in the highest circles of wealth and honor. The eldest daughter, Sarah MCCURDY, married Rev. Dr. Samuel F. JARVIS, of Middletown, from whom she was divorced. Her remains lie in the burial ground on Saybrook Point. The second daughter, Ann MCCURDY, married Commodore Isaac HULL, U. S. N., who distinguished himself in the war of 1812 while in command of the frigate Constitution by capturing the British frigate Guerriere. After the war Commodore HULL was a frequent visitor at Saybrook, and with his wife spent a few weeks at the old mansion nearly every summer for several years till his death in Philadelphia, in 1843. Elizabeth, the fifth daughter, married Hon. Heman ALLEN, formerly member of Congress from Vermont, and minister plenipotentiary to Columbia, South America. He died in 1844, at Burlington, Vermont, where his wife also died. Amelia, sixth daughter, married Captain, afterward Commodore Joseph HULL, U. S. N., a nephew of Commodore Isaac HULL. Three of the daughters died unmarried. One of them, Jeannette M. McCurdy HART, in 1860, gave a handsome iron fence for the front of the ancient cemetery on Saybrook Point.* (*It is said that in the latter part of her life she embraced the Catholic faith. It was by her direction, and at her expense, that one of the inscriptions on the tomb of Lady Fenwick was cut. A simple inscription was well enough, but when she added a huge cross, an offense against good taste was committed, which the descendants of the Saybrook Puritans are not likely to forget or forgive.) Capt. Elisha HART died in May 28th 1842, aged 84. He was also a merchant in Saybrook. His store is still standing on the east side of Main street, and is owned and occupied by T. C. ACTON jr., as a grocery. The post office is also kept in it. Captain HART lived in a large old-fashioned mansion, on the west side of Main street, a little north of his store, which is still standing, though it has recently passed out of the possession of the family. It is surrounded by large shade trees, and is one of the finest locations on the street. After Captain HART’s remains were carried out of the front door of the house, the door and blind were closed and a bar nailed across it, which was not removed, nor the door opened till after it passed out of possession of the family-a period of about 40 years. Rev. William HART’s house stood very near the spot where this was built, and was moved to the corner opposite the ACTON Library, on what are now the grounds of Mr. T. C. ACTON, and was used for many years by Captain William CLARK as a paint shop. The house of Rev. William HART’s son-in-law, Rev. F. W. HOTCHKISS, is still standing, and is nearly opposite Captain Elisha HART’s, and is owned and occupied by Mr. Charles W. MORSE, a son of Prof. S. F. B. MORSE, the inventor of the telegraph. Gen William HART built and lived in the house north of the present Congregational church, now owned and occupied by Misses Hetty B. and Nancy WOOD. Captain John HART, another of Rev. William HART’s sons, resided in Massachusetts for several years, and then returned to Saybrook, where he lived in the Captain Samuel SHIPMAN house which stood a few rods south of the Congregational parsonage. He died in 1828, aged 78.

By Tedd Levy
Special to the Times

“Mrs. Isaac Hull in her Wedding Veil,” unknown artist, c. 1833, Wadsworth Atheneum; photo courtesy Tedd Levy

When Capt. Elisha Hart (1758-1844), the wealthy Saybrook merchant and trader, married Janet McCurdy (1765-1815), of the well-known and well-off Lyme family, he looked forward to having sons to carry on his thriving businesses but fate, and “x” chromosomes, provided one daughter after another:

First there was Sarah born in 1787, then Ann in 1790, then Mary Ann in 1792, then Jeanette in 1794, Elizabeth in 1796, Amelia in 1799, and finally Harriet Augusta in 1804 – the seven beautiful Hart sisters.

The girls enjoyed the pleasant and pampered life of their prominent family. They were sent to “finishing schools,” including the highly respected Miss Pierce’s School in Litchfield, and their exposure to the ways of the world expanded beyond small town Saybrook. Lively, attractive, charming and sophisticated, they attracted many suitors.

When Ann attended school in Philadelphia she and her classmates visited the ship commanded by Isaac Hull. He showed them about and Ann had many questions and displayed an unusual knowledge in seafaring life which she gained from her father.

She commented on the neatly coiled rolls of tarred ropes and how she enjoyed the odor of tar. A few days later she received a delicate chain made from tarred rope that was sent by Hull. She wrote thanking him for the gift and so began a correspondence that led to their marriage in 1813.

Hull was born in Derby, the second of seven sons, and grew up along the shores of the Housatonic River. He developed a flair for the sea and signed on to a coastal schooner when he was 14. He studied navigation and by 20 was a master in the merchant service. In 1798 he entered the U.S. Navy.

When the War of 1812 began, 39-year-old Hull was placed in command of the frigate U.S. Constitution. Receiving orders to seek and destroy British warships between Nantucket and Halifax, he set sail. Spotting the English frigate Guerriere, he ordered all hands to prepare for action. When he was almost alongside the Guerriere, Hull gave the order: “Now boys! Pour it into them.”

In less than an hour, the British ship was badly damaged and began to sink and British Captain James Richard Dacres was forced to surrender. When the U.S. Constitution returned to Boston with the captured British crew, the country went wild with pride.

Hull was a national hero, showered with gifts, given a large sum of money for the capture, and promoted to commodore. A year later he married Ann Hart of Saybrook, 17 years younger.

In 1824 he was appointed commander of the Pacific squadron. At about the same time President James Madison appointed Heman Allen of Vermont to be America’s first minister to the new republic of Chile. Continued…

Allen called upon Commodore Hull to make arrangements for his passage to South America. While doing so he met Mrs. Hull’ sister, Elizabeth and in two weeks they were married.

Soon thereafter, Commodore Hull and his wife Ann, Heman Allen and his wife Elizabeth, and Jeanette Hart left on the frigate United States bound South America. Throughout their marriage, Ann traveled with Isaac when he went to sea. They had no children and were almost constantly accompanied by members of his or her family.

In Peru, Commodore Hull hosted a gala reception to which the Liberator of South America, Simon Bolivar was invited. Bolivar was captivated by Jeanette Hart who was also strongly attracted to him. Their relationship grew closer and Bolivar asked Jeanette to marry him which she agreed to do. But this never happened as they became entangled in misunderstandings, different religions, Bolivar’s involvement with his mistress, and objections by Jeanette’s family.

After completing the South American assignment, Hall was given the honor of overseeing the restoration of his old ship now referred to as “Old Ironsides.” At about this time Ann injured her foot and spent most of the next two years confined to her room. Hull resigned his command and took her to Europe to recuperate.

At about this time, Isaac’s nephew Joseph Hull, and Ann’s sister Amelia, became engaged and eventually married.

In 1838 Isaac rejoined the Navy but suffered strokes in 1840 and 1841 and after completing his mission returned with Ann to settle in Philadelphia.

Knowing his end was near, Isaac made arrangements for his burial and funeral. His last words were: “I strike my flag.” He died in Feb. 13, 1843 and is buried in the Laurel Hill Cemetery in Philadelphia.

After his death, Ann and Jeanette continued to live in Philadelphia but returned each summer for a few weeks in Saybrook. They did not live in the old house but stayed with Capt. James Rankin, a former lighthouse keeper, at his house at Saybrook Point.

Of the seven sisters, Ann Hart Hull lived the longest and when she died in 1874 was buried alongside Isaac in Laurel Hill. She willed the house to the town with the stipulation that it be demolished and the land used for a town park.

Fearful of the expense of upkeep, the town declined the gift and the estate passed to the heirs who lived elsewhere and were not interested in keeping the place.

The heirs returned to place the remaining contents up for auction. The auction lasted several days and disbursed antiques, a large library, silk dresses, bonnets, china and furniture.

Following the auction the house was closed and deteriorated. School children called it the haunted house.

The old Elisha Hart house was located next to St. John’s Church on Main Street and was shaded by three giant elms known as Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob… there must have been times when Elisha must have looked at those trees and thought they would be fine names for sons.

Col. Lemuel Benton and Capt. Samuel Rosamond

Swamp%20Fox,%20Francis%20Marion

benton-blackcreek

benton-lemuelMy kindred, Samuel Rosamond, Lemuel Benton, and Gavin Witherspoon, fought under the Francis Marion ‘The Swamp Fox’ in the War of Independence. John Witherspoon is a Signer and is kin to the Preston family, as are the three Patriots above. These four men are kindred to the Stewart family, and thus William and Harry Windsor. Add to this roster, the Hart and Hull family, then here is America’s most illustrious and Patriotic Family.

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/patriot_military_sc_captains.htm

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/patriot-samuel-rosamond/

He sent Lt. Col. Lemuel Benton with sixteen men to seize the pass over Horse Creek. Horry’s men stumbled over a sentry who fired a shot, and they quickly rushed Sumter’s home with Col. Marion’s remaining 134 men closely behind them. In a brief fight, they killed or captured 22 British Regulars and two Loyalists. One of the Continental prisoners, Capt. Perry Benson of the 5th MD Regiment, was wounded as well.

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/revolution_battle_of_great_savannah.html

Rosamond, Samuel
Ninety-Six District Regiment
1777
1782
A Captain under Col. Robert Anderson at Siege of Ninety-Six (1781) (Upper Ninety-Six District Regiment).  A Lieutenant under Capt. Adam Crain Jones during 1782.  Also at battle of Kettle Creek (GA). Aka Samuel Roseman.

Benton, Lemuel
Cheraws District Regiment
1775
1777
Promoted to Major in 1777.  Promoted to Lt. Col. In 1780, then Colonel in 1781.

Witherspoon, Gavin
Berkeley County Regiment
1780
1782
From Williamsburg District.  A Captain under Col. Richard Richardson, Jr. (aka Richardson’s Regiment)
Pee Dee Swamp w/4 men, Tearcoat Swamp, Halfway Swamp #1, Georgetown #6, Wiboo Swamp, Witherspoon’s Ferry, Fort Motte, Quinby’s Bridge, Shubrick’s Plantation, Eutaw Springs, Videau’s Bridge, Wadboo Swamp

Witherspoon, James
SC Light Dragoons
1779
1782
1779-1780, a Captain under Maj. Hezekiah Maham, Col. Daniel Horry.  1781-1782, a Captain under Lt. Col./Col. Peter Horry (Kingstree Regiment, Horry’s Light Dragoons, and SC 4th Regiment of State Dragoons).  From Williamsburg District.
Georgetown #6, Eutaw Springs

Witherspoon, John
Lower Craven County Regiment
1777

From Williamsburg District.  Earlier, a Lieutenant.  A Captain under Col. Hugh Giles.

http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/revolution_wambaw_bridge.html

http://www.pierces.org/gen/5530.htm

http://wardepartmentpapers.org/searchresults.php?searchClass=fulltextSearch&fulltextQuery=Lemuel+Benton

Terry Lipscomb, “South Carolina Revolutionary Battles – Part Ten (MS H-2-2)”, unpublished, p.29:

Benton personally led his troops in a second skirmish higher up on Black Creek, which is believed to be the Battle of Williamson’s Bridge mentioned in local tradition; this corresponds to the present bridge on state secondary road 35 in Darlington County, four miles southeast of Darlington.
Alexander Gregg, D.D., History of the Old Cheraws, Richardson And Company, 1867, pp.387,
Another skirmish took place about this time, higher up on Black Creek, Colonel Benton commanding. The Tories were routed and fled, but being overtaken and surrounded, were forced to make a hand to hand fight, suffering very severely. Colonel Benton had no fire arms except his pistols. One man, pressed by the colonel, turned about, and was in the act of firing his musket, but, before he could do so, Benton discharged his pistol at him, missing him, however, then threw it at him and knocked him from his horse to the ground.
JP:
Black Creek Skirmishes 1 & 2 seem to have taken place in the last half 1781 or early 1782

Samuel BENTON “the Immigrant”
ABT 1720 – 1770
ID Number: I99600

RESIDENCE: England and Granville Co. NC
BIRTH: ABT 1720, Worcester, England
DEATH: 1770, Granville Co, North Carolina
RESOURCES: See: [S3615]

Family 1 : Francis KIMBROUGH
MARRIAGE: Craven County, (now Johnston Co.) North Carolina
1. +Lemurel BENTON
2. +Jesse BENTON Sr.
Notes

Native of England (probably Worcester County). Was appointed Justice of Granville County Court in 1746. Sheriff in 1764. Member of House of Commons from 1760 to 1768. Registrar of the County from 1761 until his death in 1770. Clerk of Court of Common pleas and Quarter Sessions from 1764 to 1770. Lt. Col. of militia under Gov. Wm. Tyron in 1768 during some of the Regulator troubles. Gave land for new courthouse at Oxford Plantation – part of 1,000 acres he owned. Before 1763, was responsible for erecting St. George’s Chapel in Granville, South Carolina. Buried in family cemetary on plantation, Oxford Granville Co SC.

Children:
2 Samuel BENTON , Jr. b: ABT 1740 + UNKNOWN b: ABT 1740
2 Lemuel BENTON b: 23 Oct 1754 d: 18 May 1818 + Elizabeth KIMBROUGH b: ABT 1774 d: ABT 1855
2 Jesse BENTON , Sr. b: 1747 d: Aug 1791 + Ann (Nancy) GOOCH b: 1758 d: 3 Jan 1838
2 Joseph BENTON b: ABT 1740

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0062/g0000031.html#I45174

Jesse BENTON Sr.
1747 – Aug 1791
ID Number: I99602

RESIDENCE: Granville and Orange Cos. NC
BIRTH: 1747, Granville Co. North Carolina
DEATH: Aug 1791, Orange Co. North Carolina
RESOURCES: See: [S3615]
Father: Samuel BENTON “the Immigrant”
Mother: Francis KIMBROUGH

Family 1 : Ann (Nancy) GOOCH
1. +Thomas Hart BENTON
Notes

Member of the Assembly 1781. Owned a plantation on Eno River (Hartford) which was purchased from Thomas Hart III. See info. in Patriot Index, Vol. I (DAR Papers p. 55).
Children:
2 Mary BENTON b: 1780 d: 1817
2 Thomas Hart BENTON b: 14 Mar 1782 d: 10 Apr 1858 + Elizabeth MCDOWELL b: 1794 d: Sep 1854
2 Jesse BENTON , Jr. b: 1783 d: Sep 1843 + Mary CHILDRESS b: ABT 1783 + Barnissa BENSON b: ABT 1783
2 Samuel BENTON b: 1785 + Mary HUNTER b: ABT 1785
2 Nathaniel BENTON b: 1786 + Unknown BRANCH b: ABT 1786
2 Margaret BENTON b: 1788 d: 1806
2 Ann “Nancy” BENTON b: 1788 d: 1807
2 Susannah BENTON b: 1791 d: 1811

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0075/g0000066.html#I99602

Col. Lemurel BENTON
23 Oct 1754 – 18 May 1818
ID Number: I45174

TITLE: Col.
OCCUPATION: Rev War Marion’s Brigade
RESIDENCE: NC and Cheraw Dist. Darlington Co. SC
BIRTH: 23 Oct 1754, Granville Co. North Carolina
DEATH: 18 May 1818, Stoney Hill Estate, Darlington Co. South Carolina
RESOURCES: See: [S1631] [S3615]
Father: Samuel BENTON “the Immigrant”
Mother: Francis KIMBROUGH

Family 1 : Elizabeth KIMBROUGH
1. +Penelope BENTON
2. +Gilly Hinton BENTON
Notes

Lemuel Benton, (1754-1818), served in Marion’s Brigade until the close of the war. In 1783 he was a delegate from St. David’s Parish to the Legislature. He was born in Granville Co., N. C.; died in Darlington District, S. C.
Children:
2 John BENTON b: ABT 1794
2 Lemuel BENTON , Jr. b: ABT 1794
2 Buckleigh (Buckley) K. BENTON b: abt 1794 d: 1836 + UNKNOWN b: abt 1794
2 Alfred BENTON b: ABT 1794
2 Clarissa BENTON b: ABT 1794 + William Little THOMAS b: ABT 1794
2 Gillie Hinton BENTON b: ABT 1794 + Isaiah DUBOSE b: ABT 1794
2 Charlotte BENTON b: ABT 1794 + Laurence PRINCE b: ABT 1794
2 Elizabeth BENTON b: ABT 1794 + George BRUCE b: ABT 1794
2 Penelope BENTON b: ABT 1794 + William BROCKINTON b: ABT 1794

“Married his first cousin on his mother’s side. He and his brother, Jesse, signed the “Redressor Papers” in protest of the Regulator movement in NC before emigrating to SC. Then he moved to SC and settled in section of Cheraw District that is now Darlington Co SC. There he became a planter and acquired extensive landholding. During the Revolution, he attained the rank of Colonel and served under General Francis Marion as commander of the PeeDee force, retaining his commission until he resigned in 1794. He was a member of the legislature in 1781-84 and 1787.

He was Darlington Co Court Justice 1785-1791. He was Escheator of Cheraw District 1789-91. He was delegate to State Constitutional Convention in1790 and the 1788 Convention in Charleston that ratified the federal Constitution. He was elected the first congressional representative from the PeeDee District. He served as a Democrat in the 3rd, 4th and 5th Congresses 1793-99. He opposed the administration of John Adams and was defeated for re-election. He was buried on his estate, Stoney Hill. He and Elizabeth had 4 sons and 4 daughters. Only 1 son survived to reach manhood.”

http://ncpedia.org/biography/benton-lemuel

http://ncpedia.org/history/colonial/regulator-movement

Lemuel Benton (1754 – May 18, 1818) was an American planter and politician from Darlington County, South Carolina. He represented South Carolina in the United States House of Representatives from 1793 until 1799. Colonel Benton resided on Stoney Hill Farm, located in Darlington County near Mechanicsville. Stoney Hill is currently owned by the Burns family.

http://gaz.jrshelby.com/blackcreek2.htm

Other names: Williamson’s Bridge
What:
Skirmish, *Lt. Col. Lemuel Benton vs. unknown British (or allied) commandeer. Unknown date, 1780 (last half 1781?).
Where:
34.2707096 -79.7867283 Black Creek 2, Williamson’s Bridge
Maps: [map notes]
34.2707096 -79.7867283 Black Creek 2, Williamson’s Bridge
ACME Mapper.
National Map
Google
GNIS record for Williamsons Bridge. Note mapping options.
Confidence: 5
Sources:

Terry Lipscomb, “South Carolina Revolutionary Battles – Part Ten (MS H-2-2)”, unpublished, p.29:
Benton personally led his troops in a second skirmish higher up on Black Creek, which is believed to be the Battle of Williamson’s Bridge mentioned in local tradition; this corresponds to the present bridge on state secondary road 35 in Darlington County, four miles southeast of Darlington.
Alexander Gregg, D.D., History of the Old Cheraws, Richardson And Company, 1867, pp.387,
Another skirmish took place about this time, higher up on Black Creek, Colonel Benton commanding. The Tories were routed and fled, but being overtaken and surrounded, were forced to make a hand to hand fight, suffering very severely. Colonel Benton had no fire arms except his pistols. One man, pressed by the colonel, turned about, and was in the act of firing his musket, but, before he could do so, Benton discharged his pistol at him, missing him, however, then threw it at him and knocked him from his horse to the ground.
JP:
Black Creek Skirmishes 1 & 2 seem to have taken place in the last half 1781 or early 1782

http://wardepartmentpapers.org/searchresults.php?searchClass=fulltextSearch&fulltextQuery=Lemuel+Benton

of Granville County, North Carolina As a young man he moved to the Pee Dee section of Cheraw District, South Carolina. In 1789, he was granted 1,940 acres in Cheraw where he established his plantation, Stony Hill. Later he received grants for 659 acres at the fork of Saltketcher River in Colleton county and 89 acres on the Great Pee Dee River in Darlington District, South Carolina.  [2, 6]

MILI
He was commander of Pee Dee Reg’t., Francis Marion Brigade His first public service was in the militia during the American Revolution. He was commissioned a lieutenant (1775-1776), served as a captain (1776) and a major (1777), and was promoted to lieutenant colonel in command of the Cheraw militia (1781-1782). His regiment was allied with Francis Marion’s Brigade from 1781 until the end of the war, and his unit often confronted Tories in Black Creek skirmishes. After Yorktown, he continued to serve as colonel of the Cheraw Regiment until 1794 when he resigned his commission due to the appointment of Tristram Thomas as brigadier general of the Cheraw Brigade.  [2, 6]
Occupation
1st member of Congress (1790’s) elected from Upper Pee Dee; planter; sheriff of Cheraw District (1789, 1791); Darlington County court judge (1785, 1791), and commissioner, to superintend the opening of navigation of the Great Pee Dee River (1805)  [2, 7]
http://www.singletonfamily.org/getperson.php?personID=I11821&tree=1

Lemuel Benton

Note for:   Lemuel Benton,   23 OCT 1754 – 18 MAY 1818         Index

Residence:
Place:   Cheraw Dist. (Darlington County, SC)

Individual Note:   Married his first cousin on his mother’s side. He and his brother, Jesse, signed the “Redressor Papers” in protest of the Regulator movement in NC before emigrating to SC. Then he moved to SC and settled in section of Cheraw District that is now Darlington Co SC. There he became a planter and acquired extensive landholding. During the Revolution, he attained the rank of Colonel and served under General Francis Marion as commander of the PeDee force, retaining his commission until he resigned in 1794. He was a member of the legislature in 1781-84 and 1787. He was Darlington Co Court Justice 1785-1791. He was Escheator of Cheraw District 1789-91. He was delegate to State Constitutional Convention in1790 and the the 1788 Convention in Charleston that ratified the federal Constitution. He was elected the first congressional representative from the PeDee District. He served as a Democrat in the 3rd, 4th and 5th Congresses 1793-99. He opposed the administration of John Adams and was defeated for reelection. He was buried on his estate, Stoney Hill. He and Elizabeth had 4 sons and 4 daughters. Only 1 son survived to reach manhood.

FROM: http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=B000396
BENTON, Lemuel, (great-grandfather of George William Dargan), a Representative from South Carolina; born in Granville County, N.C., in 1754; as a young man moved to that section of Cheraw District which is now Darlington County, S.C.; engaged as a planter and subsequently became an extensive landowner; elected major of the Cheraw Regiment in 1777 and served throughout the Revolutionary War, being promoted to the rank of colonel in 1781; resigned his commission in 1794; member of the State house of representatives 1782-1788; county court justice of Darlington County in 1785 and 1791; escheator of Cheraw District (composed of what is now Chesterfield, Darlington, and Marlboro Counties) in 1787; delegate to the State convention at Charleston that ratified the Federal Constitution in 1788; sheriff of Cheraw District in 1789 and 1791; delegate to the State constitutional convention at Columbia in 1790; elected to the Third Congress and reelected as a Republican to the Fourth and Fifth Congresses (March 4, 1793-March 3, 1799); unsuccessful candidate for reelection in 1798 to the Sixth Congress; resumed agricultural pursuits; died in Darlington, Darlington County, S.C., May 18, 1818; interment on his estate, “Stony Hill,” near Darlington, S.C.

http://www.e-neva.com/ghtout/np12.html

Even though he was a Continental officer Marion had been elected
to the South Carolina General Assembly as the senator for the Parish
of St. John Berkeley. He left Horry in charge of his brigade while he
was at the general assembly in Jacksonboro. Hezekiah Maham still
considered his unit totally independent and would only take orders
from General Greene, not Peter Horry.
On the advice of Marion, Horry moved the brigade to Wambaw
Creek near the Santee River. The forage was more available there
and it had better protection from the British troops.
Colonel Benjamin Thompson, a Loyalist from Massachusetts,
learned that Marion was at the general assembly and that there was a
breakdown in communications between Marion’s two colonels.
Thompson decided to attack the partisans while their guard was
down.
Thompson had put together a cavalry force that consisted of all the
mounted units in Charlestown. He wrote that “the principal objects of
the expedition were to practice the Cavalry in marching in Regular
order in the Enemy’s Country, and to accustom them to act with the
mounted militia, who will be very useful in covering our flanks.
They are all armed with rifles as well as Swords, and are perhaps the
best marksmen in the world for shooting on horse back.”
Horry was on the other side of the Santee River visiting his
plantation and had left Colonel Archibald McDonald in command
while he was gone. Marion had told Horry that if he had to absent
himself for any reason the command should go to Maham, however
Maham was with Marion at the assembly.
On the morning of February 24th Colonel Thompson set out from
Daniel’s Island and rode towards Marion’s camp. Colonel Lemuel
Benton held a position at Durant’s Plantation. Benton’s men
33
Patrick O’Kelley
consisted of two regiments of “six month’s men” and were made up
of “reformed Tories.” These men had come in under Governor
Rutledge’s amnesty proposal.
Major William Benison commanded the scouts in St. Thomas’s
and told Benton that the British were approaching his position.
Benison proceeded to Colonel McDonald’s headquarters and also told
him of the approaching enemy. Many of the officers there were
eating dinner and most of the Patriot officers did not believe that the
British were going to attack.
Colonel Benton was one of the few who did believe the reports
and rode to Durant’s plantation only to encounter the advance of
Thompson’s army. Major John Doyle did not wait for the rest of the
cavalry force to arrive and charged Marion’s men at Wambaw Bridge.
Major William Young wounded Benton as he was about to cut down
Lieutenant Simon Jones, Thompson’s adjutant. Benton’s dragoons
fled and raced across the Wambaw Bridge.
The stress was too much for the old bridge and it broke under the
weight of men and horses. Many of Benton’s men tried swimming
across and a few drowned. The men who had not fled across the
bridge hid themselves in thickets. This saved them from capture and
death because the British were giving no quarter. Major James had
two British dragoons try to cut him down, but he kept them at a
distance with his pistols. He leapt the twenty foot chasm in the bridge
and rode to safety.
The rest of Marion’s Brigade fell back to Mrs. Tydiman’s
Plantation in between Echaw and Wambaw. Thompson continued to
raid the countryside and was able to capture and parole Charles
Cotesworth Pinckney.25
Beaufort, South Carolina Skirmish
24 February 1782
Colonel Robert Barnwell and his St. Helena Volunteer Militia
Company attempted to cross the Savannah River at Beaufort to burn
the British stores in Georgia. He was attacked by the Beaufort
Loyalist militia under the command of Major Andrew Deveaux and
34

About Royal Rosamond Press

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