Bohemian Prophet of the ‘Hidden Seed’

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/07/15/sarah-wilson-rosamond-and-house-of-schwarzenberg/

On March 2, 2019 at high noon, I announce my candency for the President of the United States of America, as the embodiment of Jon Hus, the founder of the Moravian Church of Bohemia, that many scholars see as the True Seed of the Protestant Church. As Satan-Trump wails against the Government, and he People of the United State, as the Devils of CPAC shout “Lock her up!”….. I make void all that came from the racist seed that Martin Luther planted. I also make void all that came after John Fremont and Abraham Lincoln, in the Republican Abolitionist Party that was founded to make void ‘The Cure of Ham’.

Eleven years ago I registered as a Republican because my kindred, John Fremont and his wife, Jessie Benton co-founded the Republican Party that was extremely liberal. I am a Republican Candidate. I can not wait to get on a stage and shout down The Deceiver! I will drop him to his knees in total surrender and repentance!

I am the first Presidential Candidate that runs as a religious Prophet, with a religious agenda, which is to destroy the false Evangelical religion as founded by John Darby. With God’s help, I will destroy the ‘Great Deceiver’ they voted into office in order to get to God in the most round-a-bout sneakiness ever contrived. Would you go to a whore house to find God. A vote for me, is a vote for God. A vote for Trump, is a vote for Satan. My aim is to show you the way – directly to God!

In following my bloodline via a DNA test, I descend from the Rosenberg and Schwarzenburg Royal Bohemian Linages that came to America via the Wilson family of Puritans. John Heil was of the Moravian Church that had no intention of breaking from the Catholic Church, only reforming it. With the Heil union with the Wienke family, who gave sanctuary and seed to the Order of Saint Francis in Iowa – that fled Germany – I announce a divine reconciliation. My Rosemond ancestor defended the Great Erasmus from the Inquisition of Charles von Habsburg. Jon/Jan Huss was burned at the stake. The ‘Bohemian Brethren’ have risen from his ashes! The ‘Hidden Seed’ sought sanctuary in America and was taken into slavery in the wilderness. They were lost sheep – now found!

John ‘The Moravian Prophet of the Bohemian Brethren’

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/03/02/curse-of-ham-and-constitution/

Catherine was born around 1746 to Johann Nicholas Heil and Maria Marguerite Theisen. She had five siblings: Johann, Jonathan, Susannah, Mary Elizabeth and Mary Margaret. A Moravian Church Diary entry from 1/26/1756 stated that Catherine was abducted by Indians (Native Americans) at the age of ten and presumed killed. She was released after an unknown amount of time and went on to marry into the Silvius family, marrying Nicholas Silvius, who had also been captured by natives when he was 12, until the age of 18. They had over 10 children together: Barbara, Nicholas Jr, Johann Henrich, Maria Elizabeth, Jonas, Anna Maria, Catherine, Margaret, Susanna and Christina.”

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~marier/Catharine-Heil-Not-Best.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeffery_Amherst,_1st_Baron_Amherst

Moravian Church

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Protestant Christian denomination dating back to 15th century
Unity of the Brethren
Latin: Unitas Fratrum
AgnusDeiWindow.jpg

Church emblem featuring the Agnus Dei.
Stained glass at the Rights Chapel of Trinity Moravian Church, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
Classification Protestant
Orientation Hussite with Lutheran Pietist influences
Founder followers of Jan Hus and Petr Chelčický
Origin 1457
Bohemia
Congregations 1,000+[1]
Number of followers 1,112,120 (2016)[2]

The Moravian Church, formally named the Unitas Fratrum (Latin for “Unity of the Brethren”),[3][4][5] in German known as [Herrnhuter] Brüdergemeine[6] (meaning “Brethren’s Congregation from Herrnhut“, the place of the Church’s renewal in the 18th century), is one of the oldest Protestant denominations in the world, with its heritage dating back to the Bohemian Reformation in the 15th century and the Unity of the Brethren (Czech: Jednota bratrská) established in the Kingdom of Bohemia.

The name by which the denomination is commonly known comes from the original exiles who fled to Saxony in 1722 from Moravia to escape religious persecution, but its heritage began in 1457 in Bohemia and its crown lands (Moravia and Silesia), then forming an autonomous kingdom within the Holy Roman Empire. The modern Unitas Fratrum, with about one million members worldwide,[1] continues to draw on traditions established during the 18th century. The Moravians continue their tradition of missionary work, such as in the Caribbean, as is reflected in their broad global distribution. They place high value on ecumenism, personal piety, missions and music.

The Moravian Church’s emblem is the Lamb of God (Agnus Dei) with the flag of victory, surrounded by the Latin inscription: Vicit agnus noster, eum sequamur (English: “Our Lamb has conquered, let us follow Him”).

History[edit]

Jan Hus and the Bohemian Reformation[edit]

Jan Hus

The Hussite movement that was to become the Moravian Church was started by Jan Hus (English: John Huss) in early 15th century Bohemia, in what is today the Czech Republic.[3] Hus objected to some of the practices and doctrines of the Catholic Church; specifically, he wanted the liturgy to be celebrated in Czech, lay people to receive communion in both kinds (bread and wine – that is, in Latin, communio sub utraque specie), married priests, and eliminating indulgences and the idea of Purgatory. Since these actions predate the Protestant Reformation by a century, some historians claim the Moravian Church was the first Protestant church.[7][8]

Jan Hus Preaching at Bethlehem Chapel in Prague by Alfons Mucha (1916)

Jan Hus-Council of Constance by Václav Brožík

The movement gained support in the Crown of Bohemia. However, Hus was summoned to attend the Council of Constance, which decided that he was a heretic and had him burned at the stake on 6 July 1415. From 1419 to 1437 were a series of Hussite Wars initially between various Catholic rulers and the Hussites, and then the political situation continued into a Hussite civil war between the more compromising Utraquists and the radical Taborites. In 1434, an army of Utraquists and Catholics defeated the Taborites at the Battle of Lipany. The Utraquists signed the Compacts of Basel on 5 July 1436.

Within fifty years of Hus’ death, a contingent of his followers had become independently organised as the “Bohemian Brethren” (Čeští bratři) or Unity of the Brethren (Jednota bratrská), which was founded in Kunvald, Bohemia, in 1457. A brother known as Gregory the Patriarch was very influential in forming the group, as well as the teachings of Peter Chelcicky. This group held to a strict obedience to the Sermon on the Mount, which included non-swearing of oaths, non-resistance, and not accumulating wealth. Because of this, they considered themselves separate from the majority Hussites that did not hold those teachings. They received episcopal ordination through the Waldensians in 1467.[7]:36 ff[8]:107 ff These were some of the earliest Protestants, rebelling against Rome some fifty years before Martin Luther.[7][8] By the middle of the 16th century as many as 90 per cent of the inhabitants of the Bohemian Crown were Protestant.[9] The majority of the nobility was Protestant, and the schools and printing-shops established by the Moravian Church were flourishing.

Protestantism had a strong influence in the education of the population. Even in the middle of the 16th century there was not a single town without a Protestant school in the Bohemian crown lands, and many had more than one, mostly with two to six teachers each. In Jihlava, a principal Protestant center in Moravia, there were five major schools: two German, one Czech, one for girls and one teaching in Latin, which was at the level of a high/grammar school, lecturing on Latin, Greek and Hebrew, Rhetorics, Dialectics, fundamentals of Philosophy and fine arts, as well as religion according to the Lutheran Augustana.[10]

Counter-Reformation[edit]

With the University of Prague also firmly in hands of Protestants, the local Catholic church was unable to compete in the field of education. Therefore, the Jesuits were invited, with the backing of the Catholic Habsburg rulers, to come to the Bohemian Crown and establish a number of Catholic educational institutions. One of these is the university in the Moravian capital of Olomouc. In 1582 they forced closure of local Protestant schools.

In 1617, Emperor Matthias had his fiercely Catholic brother Ferdinand of Styria elected King of Bohemia, but in 1618 Protestant Bohemian noblemen, who feared losing their religious freedom,[11] started the Bohemian Revolt. The Revolt started by the unplanned second Defenestrations of Prague and was defeated in 1620 in the Battle of White Mountain near Prague. As consequence the local Protestant noblemen were either executed or expelled from the country while the Habsburgs placed Catholic (and mostly German speaking) nobility in their place. The war, plague, and subsequent disruption led to a decline in the population from over 3 million to some 800,000 people. By 1622 the entire education system was in the hands of Jesuits and all Protestant schools were closed.

The Brethren were forced to operate underground and eventually dispersed across Northern Europe as far as the Low Countries, where their Bishop John Amos Comenius attempted to direct a resurgence. The largest remaining communities of the Brethren were located in Leszno (German: Lissa) in Poland, which had historically strong ties with the Czechs, and small, isolated groups in Moravia. These latter are referred to as “the Hidden Seed” which John Amos Comenius had prayed would preserve the evangelical faith in the land of the fathers.

In addition to the Renewed Unitas Fratrum or Moravian Church, which preserves the Unitas Fratrum’s three orders of episcopal ordination, The Evangelical Church of Czech Brethren and the Czechoslovak Hussite Church also continue the Hussite tradition in the Czech and Slovak Republics today, although they only account for 0.8% of the Czech population (which is 79.4% non-religious, and 10.4% Catholic).

Herrnhuter Brüdergemeine, 18th-century renewal[edit]

Zinzendorf preaching to people from many nations

In 1722, a small group of Bohemian Brethren (the “Hidden Seed”) who had been living in northern Moravia as an illegal underground remnant surviving in Catholic setting of the Habsburg Empire for nearly 100 years, arrived at the Berthelsdorf estate of Nikolaus Ludwig von Zinzendorf, a nobleman who had been brought up in the traditions of Lutheran Pietism. Out of a personal commitment to helping the poor and needy, he agreed to a request from their leader (Christian David, an itinerant carpenter) that they be allowed to settle on his lands in Upper Lusatia, which is in present-day Saxony in the eastern part of modern-day Germany. The Margraviates of Upper and Lower Lusatia were governed in personal union by the Saxon rulers and enjoyed great autonomy, especially in religious questions.

The refugees established a new village called Herrnhut, about 2 miles (3 km) from Berthelsdorf. The town initially grew steadily, but major religious disagreements emerged and by 1727 the community was divided into factions. Count Zinzendorf worked to bring about unity in the town and the Brotherly Agreement was adopted by the community on 12 May 1727. This is considered the beginning of the renewal. Then, on 13 August 1727 the community underwent a dramatic transformation when the inhabitants of Herrnhut “learned to love one another”, following an experience that they attributed to a visitation of the Holy Spirit, similar to that recorded in the Bible on the day of Pentecost.

Herrnhut grew rapidly following this transforming revival and became the centre of a major movement for Christian renewal and mission during the 18th century. The episcopal ordination of the Ancient Unitas Fratrum was transferred in 1735 to the Renewed Unitas Fratrum by the Unity’s two surviving bishops, Daniel Ernst Jablonski and Christian Sitkovius. The carpenter David Nitschmann and, later, Count von Zinzendorf, were the first two bishops of the Renewed Unity. Moravian historians identify the main achievements of this period as:

  1. Setting up a watch of continuous prayer that ran uninterrupted, 24 hours a day, for 100 years.
  2. Originating the Daily Watchwords.
  3. Establishing more than 30 settlements internationally on the Herrnhut model, which emphasized prayer and worship, and a form of communal living in which simplicity of lifestyle and generosity with wealth were held to be important spiritual attributes. The purpose of these communities was to assist the members resident there in the sanctification of their lives, to provide a meeting place for Christians from different confessional backgrounds, to provide Christian training for their own children and the children of their friends and supporters and to provide support for the Moravian Mission work throughout the world. As a result, although personal property was held, divisions between social groups and extremes of wealth and poverty were largely eliminated.
  4. Being the first Protestant church body to begin missionary work; and
  5. Forming many hundreds of small renewal groups operating within the existing churches of Europe, known as “diaspora societies”. These groups encouraged personal prayer and worship, Bible study, confession of sins and mutual accountability.

Missions[edit]

Portrait of a group of Moravian Church members with King George II of Great Britain, attributed to Johann Valentin Haidt, circa 1752–1754

Along with the Royal Danish Mission College, the Moravian missionaries were the first large-scale Protestant missionary movement. They sent out the first missionaries when there were only 300 inhabitants in Herrnhut. Within 30 years, the church sent hundreds of Christian missionaries to many parts of the world, including the Caribbean, North and South America (see Christian Munsee), the Arctic, Africa, and the Far East. They were the first to send lay people (rather than clergy) as missionaries, the first Protestant denomination to minister to slaves, and the first Protestant presence in many countries.

Owing to Zinzendorf’s personal contacts with their royalty, the first Moravian missions were directed to the Dano-Norwegian Empire. While attending the coronation of Christian VI of Denmark, Zinzendorf was profoundly struck by two Inuit converts of Hans Egede‘s mission in Greenland and also by an African from the West Indies.[12] The first Moravian mission was established on the Caribbean island of St Thomas in 1732 by a potter named Johann Leonhard Dober and a carpenter named David Nitschmann,[13]:7 who later became the first bishop of the Renewed Unity in 1735. Matthaeus Stach and two others founded the first Moravian mission in Greenland in 1733 at Neu-Herrnhut on Baal’s River, which became the nucleus of the modern capital Nuuk.

In 1772, John Ettwein and his group of some 200 Lenape and Mohican Christians traveled west along The Great Shamokin Path from their village of Friedenshütten (Cabins of Peace) near modern Wyalusing on the North Branch Susquehanna River to their new village of Friedensstadt (City of Peace) on the Beaver River in southwestern Pennsylvania.

Moravians founded missions with Algonquian-speaking Mohican in the British colony of New York in British North America. For instance, they founded one in 1740 at the Mohican village of Shekomeko in present-day Dutchess County, New York. The converted Mohican people formed the first native Christian congregation in the present-day United States of America. Because of local hostility to the Mohican, the Moravian support of the Mohican led to rumors of their being secret Jesuits, trying to ally the Mohican with France in the ongoing French and Indian Wars.

Although supporters defended their work, at the end of 1744, the colonial government based at Poughkeepsie expelled the Moravians from New York.[14]

In 1741, David Nitschmann and Count Zinzendorf led a small community to found a mission in the colony of Pennsylvania. The mission was established on Christmas Eve, and was named Bethlehem, after the Biblical town in Judea. There, they ministered to the Algonquian Lenape. Bethlehem, Pennsylvania is today the seventh largest city in Pennsylvania. Later, colonies were also founded in North Carolina, where Moravians led by Bishop August Gottlieb Spangenberg purchased 98,985 acres (400.58 km2) from John Carteret, 2nd Earl Granville. This large tract of land was named die Wachau, or Wachovia, after one of Zinzendorf’s ancestral estates on the Danube River in Lower Austria. Other early settlements included Bethabara (1753), Bethania (1759) and Salem (now referred to as Old Salem in Winston-Salem North Carolina) (1766).

In 1801 the Moravians established Springplace mission to the Cherokee Nation in what is now Murray County, Georgia. Coinciding with the forced removal of the Cherokees to Oklahoma, this mission was replaced in 1842 by New Springplace in Oaks, Oklahoma. Due to Civil War-related violence, New Springplace closed in 1862, and resumed during the 1870s. Finally, in 1898, the Moravian Church discontinued their missionary engagement with the Cherokees, and New Springplace, now the Oaks Indian Mission, was transferred to the Danish Evangelical Lutheran Church.[15]

The start of far-flung missionary work necessitated the establishment of independently administered provinces. So, from about 1732,[13]:7 the history of the church becomes the history of its provinces.

Eventually, the Moravian missions in Australia and Greenland were transferred to the local Presbyterian and Lutheran Churches respectively.

Present[edit]

Mary Greenwoord was buried in Gracehill in 1752. Her gravestone is identical in style to hundreds of others irrespective of their gender or former status

The modern Moravian Church, with about 750,000 members worldwide,[1] continues to draw on traditions established during the 18th-century renewal. In many places it observes the convention of the lovefeast, originally started in 1727. It uses older and traditional music in worship. Brass music, congregational singing and choral music continue to be very important in Moravian congregations. In addition, in some older congregations, Moravians are buried in a traditional God’s Acre, a graveyard with only flat gravestones, signifying the equality of the dead before God and organized by sex, age and marital status rather than family.

Friedensthal Moravian Church Christiansted, St Croix, USVI founded in 1755

The Moravians continue their long tradition of missionary work, for example in the Caribbean, where the Jamaican Moravian Church has begun work in Cuba and in Africa where the Moravian Church in Tanzania has missions in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda. This is reflected in their broad global distribution. The Moravians in Germany, whose central settlement remains at Herrnhut, are highly active in education and social work. The American Moravian Church sponsors the Moravian College and Seminary. The largest concentration of Moravians today is in Tanzania.

The motto of the Moravian Church is: “In essentials, unity; in nonessentials, liberty; and in all things, love”.[16]

Some Moravian scholars point to a different formula as a guide to constructive debate about faith. This formula was first advanced by Luke of Prague (1460–1528), one of the bishops of the ancient Unitas Fratrum. Luke taught that one must distinguish between things that are essential, ministerial or incidental to salvation. The essentials are God’s work of creation, redemption and sanctification, as well as the response of the believer through faith, hope and love. Things ministerial are such items as the Bible, church, sacraments, doctrine and priesthood. These mediate the sacred and should thus be treated with respect, but they are not considered essential. Finally, incidentals include things such as vestments or names of services that may reasonably vary from place to place

Organization[edit]

Provinces[edit]

For its global work, the Church is organised into Unity Provinces, Mission Provinces and Mission Areas and four regions of Africa, Caribbean and Latin America, Northern America, and Europe. The categorisation is based on the level of independence of the Province. Unity Province implies a total level of independence, Mission Province implies a partial level of supervision from a Unity Province, and Mission Area implies full supervision by a Unity Province. (The links below connect to articles about the history of the Church in specific provinces after 1732, where written.)

In the Czech Republic and Honduras occurred splits within the churches after charismatic revivals; non-charismatic minorities formed own bodies but both sides remained connected to the international church. The minority communities are listed as “mission provinces”.[17]

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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