Habsburg-Merovingien-Rougemont

800px-clotilde_partageant_le_royaume_entre_ses_fils

Here is where the Habsburg-Ferrette-Rougemont linage merge, and descend from Merovingiens, who some claim descend from Mary Magdalene. This may not be the modern claim that Dad Brown made famous, but one assigned to Saint Clotilde who converted her husband from Arianism. This link would make the Habsburgs ‘Keepers of the Catholic Faith as many nobles wanted blood ties to Clotilde who gave birth to three King of the Franks, if not more. If Dame Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor descends from Clotilde, then the grouping of people in her sphere are immortalized beyond the fact many of then were Hollywood Stars. I do not have to subscribe to the claims many authors have made, especially in regards to the Sinclair family. The Franks took more than one wife in order to empower their BLOODLINE. Forget about this bloodline coming from Jesus and Mary Magdalene – for now!

http://magdalhnh.blogspot.com/2009/01/mary-magdalen-and-kings-of-france.html

Liz may be called a Secular Saint. For the reason I suspect Trump is going to be crowned a Evangelical King of America, and created a Holy Alliance with Putin, the Russian Christian, I am going to revive Arianism. I am going to found a new religion that beholds all human beings as Divinely Created from……

THE ROSE OF THE WORLD

Jon Presco

Pharamond Lord of the West FRANKS:
Date born 2: ABT 370 in Westphalia, Germany.

Children of Pharamond Lord of the West FRANKS and Argotta (Rosamunde) Queen of FRANKS are:
+Clodius* “the Long Hair” King of the FRANKS, b. 395, Westphallia, Germany335, d. Bet. 447 – 449335.

https://rosamondpress.com/2013/04/05/gendolfus-faramund-rosemunde/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clotilde

Frankish customs of the day allowed for the practice polygamy, especially among royalty. So it was not uncommon for a king to have multiple wives and several competing heirs upon his death. This was a major deviation from the monogamy of late Roman customs, influenced by the Church. Frankish rulers followed this practice mainly to increase their influence across larger areas of land in the wake of the Roman empire’s collapse. The aim was to maintain peace and ensure the preservation of the kingdom by appeasing local leaders.[2] In the Germanic tradition succession fell, not to sons, but to younger brothers, uncles, and cousins. But under Salic law, Clovis I instituted the custom of sons being the primary heirs in all respects. However, it was not a system of primogeniture, with the eldest son receiving the vast majority of an inheritance, rather the inheritance was split evenly between all the sons. Therefore, the greater Frankish Kingdom was often splintered into smaller sub-kingdoms.[2]

Clotilde was born at the Burgundian court of Lyon, the daughter of King Chilperic II of Burgundy. Upon the death of Chilperic’s father King Gondioc in 473, his brothers Gundobad and Godegisel and him had divided their inheritance; Chilperic II apparently reigning at Lyon, Gundobad at Vienne and Godegesil at Geneva.[1]

From the sixth century on, the marriage of Clovis and Clotilda was made the theme of epic narratives, in which the original facts were materially altered and the various versions found their way into the works of different Frankish chroniclers.[1] According to Gregory of Tours (538–594), Chilperic II was slain by his brother Gundobad in 493, and his wife drowned with a stone hung around her neck, while of his two daughters, Chrona took the veil and Clotilde was exiled – it is, however, assumed that this tale is apocryphal.[2] Butler’s account follows Gregory.[3]

After the death of Chilperic, her mother seems to have made her home with Godegisil at Geneva, where her other daughter, Chrona, founded the church of Saint-Victor. Soon after the death of Chilperic, Clovis asked and obtained the hand of Clotilda.[1] They were married in the same year.

The marriage produced the following children:

Clotilde was brought up in the Catholic faith and did not rest until her husband had abjured Arianism (the version of Christianity named after its founder Arius) and embraced the Roman Catholic version of the Christian faith. According to Gregory of Tours’ Historia Francorum (History of the Franks), when Clotilde had their first child baptised, he died soon after. Clovis upbraided her; but when Chlodomer was born, she insisted on baptising him also. Although Chlodomer did indeed fall ill, he soon after recovered. More healthy children followed.[4]

Clotilde’s victory came in 496, when Clovis converted to Catholicism, baptised by Bishop Remigius of Reims on Christmas Day of that year. According to tradition, on the eve of the Battle of Tolbiac against the Alamanni, Clovis prayed to God, swearing to be baptised if he emerged victorious on the battlefield. When he did indeed triumph, Clovis readily took the faith. With him Clotilde built at Paris the Church of the Holy Apostles, afterwards known as the Abbey of St Genevieve.[2] After Clovis’ death in 511, she retired to the Abbey of St. Martin at Tours.

http://gw.geneanet.org/jbarthodmalat1?lang=en&pz=jacques+marc+gilbert&nz=barthod+malat&ocz=0&p=liutfrid+ier&n=d+alsace

http://gw.geneanet.org/jbarthodmalat1?lang=en&pz=jacques+marc+gilbert&nz=barthod+malat&ocz=0&p=egino+v&n=von+urach

Although victorious, Chlodomer had Sigismund and his sons Gisald and Gondebaud assassinated on 1 May 524. He then led a second expedition against the Burgundians. He was killed on this expedition, in the spring or summer of the same year, at the Battle of Vézeronce. His three sons were entrusted to his mother until his widow married Clotaire I. Clotaire, however, had Chlodomer’s children killed, although Clodoald managed to escape. Better known as Saint Cloud, he later became abbot of Nogent, having given up his hair, the symbol of the Frankish royalty, rather than giving up his life.gregj4

gra

Clothilde de NEUSTRIE

  • Born about 553 Julian
  • Deceased in 618 Julian , age at death: possibly 65 years old

 Parents

  • sosa Chilpéric Ier Mérovingien de NEUSTRIE, born in 535 Julian, Deceased in September 584 Julian – Chelles, 77500, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, FRANCE age at death: 49 years old , buried – Saint-Germain des Prés – Basilique Saint-Vincent – Paris, 75000, Paris, Île-de-France, FRANCE, (Hilperik) – Roi de Neustrie (561-584) – Roi de Soissons (539-584)
    Married about 549 Julian to
  • sosa Audovère DES FRANCS MÉROVINGIENS, born about 535 Julian, Deceased about 580 Julian – Le Mans, 72000, Sarthe, Pays de la Loire, FRANCE age at death: possibly 45 years old, Princesse Franque
    divorced about 560 Julian

 Spouses, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren

 Half-siblings

On ‘s side sosa Chilpéric Ier Mérovingien de NEUSTRIE, born in 535 Julian, Deceased in September 584 Julian – Chelles, 77500, Seine-et-Marne, Île-de-France, FRANCE age at death: 49 years old , buried – Saint-Germain des Prés – Basilique Saint-Vincent – Paris, 75000, Paris, Île-de-France, FRANCE, (Hilperik) – Roi de Neustrie (561-584) – Roi de Soissons (539-584)
sosa Egino II von ACHALM ca 1015-1077 sosa Berthe von CALW ca 1022- sosa Rudolf von RHEINFELDEN ca 1025-1080 sosa Thetberge N ca 1015- sosa Werner Ier le Pieux von HABSBURG 1013-1096 sosa Regilinde von NELLENBURG ca 1027-1090 sosa Thierry II de MOUSSON ca 1045-1105 sosa Ermentrude de BOURGOGNE-COMTÉ 1055-1105/
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sosa Egino III (Egon) von URACH ca 1045-1112 sosa Cunégonde (Kunigunde) von RHEINFELDEN ca 1050- sosa Otto II “le Docte” von HABSBURG 1057-1111 sosa Ida de FERRETTE 1076-1104/
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sosa Egino IV le Jeune von URACH ca 1085- sosa Hadewich von HABSBURG ca 1095-
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sosa Egino V von URACH ca 1125-1180

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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