Janke Park, Hall, And Stagecoach Line

belmontbot28belmontbot29belmontbot18 belmontbot20 belmontbot21 belmontbot22 belmontbot25 belmontbot26

belmontbot3 belmontbot4 belmontbot5 belmontbot6 belmontbot7 belmontbot8Very few families can say their kindred owned a Stagecoach Line, Theme Park, and a Turnverein Hall, or two. Carl Janke was half owner of the Belmont Accommodation Company that ran between Belmont ‘Beautiful Mountain’, and Halfmoon Bay. Mrs. Walter E. Janke was the President of the Cap and Bells Club that employed the cap of the Jester in its emblem. Consider the Merry Pranksters. Musicals, plays, and  “Jinks” were performed. Consider the Hi-jinks of the all male Bohemian Club. Is this a feminists answer?  It appears the Cap and Bells founded an art gallery. Was this the formation of the Outdoor Art League?

“CAP AND BELLS CLUB OPENS ART GALLERY

An event In the life of the Cap and Bells club took place yesterday afternoon with the opening of the permanent art gallery for women at the clubrooms 1509 Gough street. About 70 canvases are hung in the gallery at the rear of the building, which has a most excellent northern light. , The pictures shown are by women artists only. Paintings from this city, Piedmont and Monterey were shown. The president of the club, Mrs. F. H. Colburn. received the guests, assisted by several club presidents from around the bay. Mrs. Lyman Dickerson Foster was tea hostess and will continue to be at the receptions on the three opening days, with an able corps of assistants. Other club presidents will assist in receiving the guests today and tomorrow.

The Art League held a event in Mill Valley that looks like a Renaisance Fair.

OUTDOOR ART LEAGUE HAS YULETIDE FESTIVAL

Old Time Music and Costumes. Features of Jinks

Special Dispatch to The Call. MILL VALLEY. Jan. 9.— An old English yuletide festival was” given last night, with fifteenth century, music and costumes of the same period, by , the Outdoor Art. league. The jinks was under the direction of Mrs. F. ßostick and each member of the club brought one guest; so that there was a large” gathering of society folk.”

What we are beholding in the Genesis of the Hippie/Bohemian Movement. This is the heart and soul of San Francisco Culture. The Outdoor Art League played a big roll in rebuilding this world famous city after the Earthquake of 1907. This may be the first instance where a group of artists contribute to the redevelopment of a major city.

These are Magical Tree People. Janke built spiral stairs to take his guests into the embrace of the Giant California Oaks. Here are the Ents and the Hobbits celebrating life, art, poetry, dance, and music. I see young lovers in the tree tops beholding rainbow sunsets and the bright star in the West. This is the first Disneyland. Here come the Jester of the Jinks, with her Magic Wand. Do you hear the tinkling of the bells high in the tree amongst the stars of the Milky Way. Tinker Belle of Beautiful Mountain.

Disneyland is famous for its monorails.

“The same year the Belmont Soda Works opened, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.) hired 75 Southern Pacific railroad cars to transport 7,000 of its members from San Francisco to Belmont Park. There, 1,000 other members met them there, making the largest picnic ever held at Belmont Park.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2014

The Cap and Bells Club was organized for the development of wit and humor, and for the study of the drama, music, languages and kindred subjects.

The pointed cap, wand and bells of the Jester form its emblem, and unusual dramatic and musical talent characterizes the membership list, so that the programs during the sixteen years of the club’s existence have been of great excellence.

ARCHITECT ADDRESSES OUTDOOR ART LEAGUE

Willis Po-lfc Tells Women His Idea of Reconstruction of San Francisco

The outdoor art section of the California club, of which Mrs. Lovell White Is president, entertained its friends and members yesterday afternoon with what proved to be one of the most interesting programs of the season. The feature of the day was a short talk upon the reconstruction of San Francisco by Willis Polk, who interested his audience -very much. ‘ Mr. Polk’s views/although more those of an artist and [ dreamer than of a – practical businessman, were helpful in that they advised one step at a time, much waiting, and the making of deliberate rather than brilliant progress. He dwelt on the fact that if only the main ideal were kept to in rebuilding and re-planning, the finished city could not be otherwise: than beautiful, however long it was in reaching even comparative completion.

stuttm25 stuttm27 stuttm28 stuttm30

 

Here is the obituary of William in the San Francisco Call.

JANKE – in this city, Nov. 22, 1902 at his residence 320 Haight St. William August Janke, beloved husband of Cornelia L. Janke, and beloved father of Mrs. W.O. Stuttmeister and Carl and W.E. Janke, a native of Hamburg Germany aged 59 years. Internment, Laurel Hill

“According to Belmont Historical Society records, Dorothea and Carl August Janke sailed around Cape Horn from Hamburg, Germany, in 1848. After landing in San Francisco, they settled in Belmont in 1860″

I found Carl and Dorothea (also and Doretta) are buried at the Union Cemetery in Redwood City.

Carl_August_Janke
Names Listed on the Marker:
Janke, Carl August
Janke, Dorette Catherine
Janke, Mutter Heinrich
Inscription:
— From the 1937 headstone survey –
Carl August Janke, born in Dresden, Germany Oct. 1806, died Belmont, Calif. Sept. 2, 1881
Dorette Catherine, wife of Carl August Janke, born in Hamburg, Germany, July 21, 1813, died in Belmont, California, Feb 16, 1877
Mutter Heinrich, mother of Dorette Catherine Janke, born in Island of Heligoland, Germany, 1781 died in Belmont, California 1876
NOTE: In 1937 the Daughters of the American Revolution recorded all the headstones.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF UNION CEMETERY
By: John G. Edmonds
Before Union Cemetery
The first entry that mentioned a cemetery in the Times and Gazette (which was the only newspaper in San Mateo County at that time) was in early January 1859. William Cary Jones had allowed 13 burials on his property, the site of today’s Sequoia High School. Now that Horace Hawes had taken over the property, he informed the county that he no longer wanted the dead to be buried on his property and he wanted all 13 bodies exhumed and moved elsewhere. This caused great anxiety in Redwood City.

1864-1910, page 133).
Records from Tombstones in Laurel Hill Cemetery, 1853-1927 – Janke
– Stuttmeister
Mina Maria Janke, daughter of William A, & Cornelia Janke, born
February 2, 1869, died March 1902.
William August Janke, native of Hamburg, Germany, born Dec. 25,
1842, died Nov. 22, 1902, son of Carl August & Dorette Catherine Janke. Frederick William R. Stuttmeister, native of Berlin, Germany, born
1812, died January 29, 1877.
Mrs. Matilda Stuttmeister, wife of Frederick W.R. Stuttmeister, born
1829, died March 17, 1875, native of New York.
Victor Rudolph Stuttmeister, son of Frederick W.R. & Matilda
Stuttmeister, born May 29, 1846, died Jan. 19, 1893, native of New
York.

https://rosamondpress.com/2011/09/09/stuttmeister-janke-wedding-at-ralston-hall/

The most popular daytime excursion destination on the Peninsula during the late 19th century once occupied the area in Belmont now known as Twin Pines Park. The Belmont Picnic Grounds proved so popular, in fact, that scores of picnickers would travel regularly from San Jose and San Francisco for sun, fresh air and libations.
The size of the crowds and the fondness for libation, however, eventually led to the attraction’s demise.
According to Belmont Historical Society records, Dorothea and Carl August Janke sailed around Cape Horn from Hamburg, Germany, in 1848. After landing in San Francisco, they settled in Belmont in 1860. Industrious and entrepreneurial, Carl Janke purchased land in the vicinity of 6th and Ralston. Janke set out to create a site for leisure activities, modeled after the biergarten in his native Hamburg. His creation became Belmont Park.

Janke’s park offered all the necessary provisions for an outdoor holiday, which included a dance pavilion to accommodate 300 large glassless windows, a conical roof and a dance floor situated around a large spreading tree. The pavilion was also equipped with a bar, an ice cream parlor and a restaurant.
Outside the pavilion, the park provided a carousel for children, footpath bridges crossing the meandering of creeks, and a shooting gallery, with picnic benches and lathe houses situated about the shady grounds. Brass bands performing from bandstands could be heard all around the woodland.
In 1876, Janke opened Belmont Soda Works, located north of Ralston along Old County Road. Janke’s sons, Gus and Charlie, operated the soda works, which offered a variety of sarsaparillas. Within two years, the Soda Works produced more than 1,000 bottles a month — a large percentage of which would be sold at Belmont Park. Between the Soda Works and the several bars situated in and around the park, the liquid refreshment flowed abundantly.
Belmont Park became so popular that Southern Pacific Railroad began reserving exclusive trains for the sojourn to Belmont. Several local organizations and fraternities used the grounds for the celebrations, such as the Germania Rifles, the Apollo Verein, the Blue Bells, the Bunker Hill Association, the Ignatian Literary Society, the Hibernians and the Purple Violets. Races – foot, three-legged, and pony cart – as well as other amusements became commonplace at the gatherings.

The same year the Belmont Soda Works opened, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (I.O.O.F.) hired 75 Southern Pacific railroad cars to transport 7,000 of its members from San Francisco to Belmont Park. There, 1,000 other members met them there, making the largest picnic ever held at Belmont Park.
With all the alcohol, dancing and overheated bodies gathered in a relatively small place, trouble seemed destined to follow.

In 1880, rival gangs started a small riot at Belmont Park, leaving one person dead and several injured. On another occasion, a young girl named Anne Mooney mysteriously disappeared. Authorities assumed she had been kidnaped, but a suspect was never identified. The fate of Anne Mooney remains a mystery.

By the turn of the century, the weekly treks to Belmont had become something of a nuisance. The drunken tussling would often begin at the on-board bars, continuing and intensifying by the time the passengers reached Belmont. The small communities through which the trains rumbled complained about the outsiders cavorting and otherwise disturbing their peaceful Peninsula neighborhoods. Southern Pacific, tired of the rowdies and the damage inflicted to the railroad cars, finally stopped operating the excursions in 1900.

In her book “Heritage of the Wooded Hills,” Ria Elena MacCrisken writes, “… if the railroad looked down its nose at the San Francisco picnickers, the little town of Belmont welcomed them with open arms. These early-day tourists brought lively times to Belmont and revenue to its stores…” Unfortunately for the Jankes , when the train stopped bringing carloads of revelers, much of Belmont Park’s clientele disappeared.

By 1910, the property had sold to George Center, the director of the Bank of California, who built a home on the property. Later Dr. Norbert Gottbrath opened a sanitarium called “Twin Pines,” which operated until March of 1972. The City of Belmont took over the property, dedicating Twin Pines Park in June of 1973.

 

http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=SFC19021124.2.75.3#

http://www.sfgenealogy.com/sanfranciscodirectory/1916/1916_928.pdf

http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=SFC19091115.2.40.9#

http://www.historicunioncemetery.com/Person.php?person=Janke%2C+Carl+August

http://www.historicunioncemetery.com/Person.php?person=Janke%2C+Lilly

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_Cemetery_(Redwood_City,_California)

http://patch.com/california/redwoodcity-woodside/union-cementery-tells-story-of-redwood-citys-civil-war-history

https://rosamondpress.com/2014/11/26/the-turns/

 

The social day of the Cap and Bells club will be held Thursday afternoon, Mrs Walter E. Janke being. the chairman of the day. An elaborate program will be given, opening with numbers by the Cap and Bells mandolin orchestra. after which Arthur Moore will sing. A farce. “The Silent System,” will be presented by Miss Mac Sullivan and Reginald Travers, and Miss Elizabeth Ruddle Price will sing. In closing, a comedy In one act. “The Mere Man,” will be played with the following cast: Mrs. L. R. Ellert.^Jklrs. E. P. Heald. Mrs. F* S. Samuels, Miss Kate Van Duier. Miss Vina Elsenmann, Mrs. Walter E. Janke. Mrs. Will S. Pardy and Mrs. Glenn C. Barnhart. • • •

City and County Federation of Women’s Clubs
San Francisco 1918 – 1920
Cap and Bells Club
Transcribed by Elaine Sturdevant

Cap and Bells Club
Mrs. Ella M. SEXTON, President


Organized 1904
Federated 1918
First and third Thursdays

The Cap and Bells Club was organized for the development of wit and humor, and for the study of the drama, music, languages and kindred subjects.

The pointed cap, wand and bells of the Jester form its emblem, and unusual dramatic and musical talent characterizes the membership list, so that the programs during the sixteen years of the club’s existence have been of great excellence.

Section work, always an indication of progress, has received much earnest attention, and has proved a marked success during 1918-1920.

The study of Art, under Mrs. J. H. CRABBE, of Household Economics, under Mrs. J. A. KUYKENDALL, of Literature, including California authors, with Mrs. Jesse WHITED, of French with Mrs. J. K. PLENCZ, bridge with Mrs.Marshall HARRIS, and modern dancing with Mrs. A. J. ROSSI as chairman, added knowledge and variety, broadening, also, the outlook and self-expression of the members. Mrs. M. H. HEYNEMANN was chairman of an excellent Red Cross Section during 1918.

The Cap and Bells Orchestra, with Mrs. B. Frank HOWARD as leader, preceded by Mrs. Charles KER, furnishes delightful numbers for programs, and is of much advantage to the members composing it.

The dramatic work has been in charge of Miss Mae F. O’KEEFE, during 1918-1920.

Willis Po-lfc Tells Women His Idea of Reconstruction of San Francisco

The outdoor art section of tha Call-, fornia club, of which Mrs. Lovell White Is president, entertained its friends and members yesterday afternoon with what proved to be one of the most interesting programs of the season. The feature of > the day was a short talk upon the reconstruction of San Francisco by Willis Polk, who interested his audience -very much. ‘ Mr. Polk’s views/although more those of an artist and [ dreamer than of a – practical businessman, were helpful in that they advlaed one step at a time, much waitIng, and the making of deliberate rather than brilliant progress. He dwelt on the fact that if only the main ideal were kept to in rebuilding and replanning, the finished city .could not be otherwise: than beautiful, however long it was -In reaching even comparative completion.

; As yesterday was the anniversary of Whlttler’s birth the remainder of the program was devoted to the Quaker poet and his work.’ Mrs. Orr presided, and among those who read clever papers on this subjeot were Mrs. Truesdale and’ Mrs., White. A cup of tea and , an informal chat about the ; tea table finished the ; afternoon, which was: enjoyed by about sixty of the club’s prominent members.

 

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1 Response to Janke Park, Hall, And Stagecoach Line

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    Every word in this blog is copyrighted. I have given no one permission to act as my agent. If any one has contacted and claimed they are my representative, let me know. braskewitz@yahoo.com https://rosamondpress.com/2014/11/26/the-turns/

    https://rosamondpress.com/2014/11/27/turn-verein-cottages/

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