Genetic Keys to the Templar Kingdom of God

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florent-guillaumette_de_tilchatel_s116_r3077

florent-jean2In 1938 the ‘History of the Rosemond Family’ by Leland Eugene Rosemond, was published. Here is what Wikipedia has to say about Genealogy;

“The pursuit of family history tends to be shaped by several motivations, including the desire to carve out a place for one’s family in the larger historical picture, a sense of responsibility to preserve the past for future generations, and a sense of self-satisfaction in accurate storytelling.”

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/01/14/history-of-the-rosamond-family/

Sixteen years ago I took up this “accurate storytelling” after I became interested in the book ‘Holy Blood, Holy Grail’ wherein it is suggested the Merovingians were Nazarites, as was Jesus.

“On the whole the Merovingian attitude towards Judaism seems to have been without parallel in Western history prior to the Lutheran Reformation. The Merovingians themselves believed their miraculous power to be vested, in large part, in their hair, which they were forbidden to cut. Their position on this matter was identical to that of the Nazorites in the Old Testament, of whom Samson was a member. There is much evidence to suggest that Jesus was also a Nazarite. According to both early Church writers and modern scholars his brother, Saint James, indisputably was. In the Merovingian royal house, and in the families connected with it, there were a surprising number of specifically Judaic names. Thus, in 577, a brother of King Clotaire II was named Samson.”

In 1969 I discovered the Nazarene Artists of Germany, and let my hair grow long. In 1989 I began to author a book about the Nazarites who made up the first church that did not behold Jesus as a son of God, but a mortal being. I already entertained the possibility Jesus had a wife and children before I read HBHG. That the mortal offspring of Jesus would be Nazarites, made sence, because James, the brother of Jesus was a Nazarite, as was the cousin of Jesus, John the Baptist, who was seen as the Messiah by the Jews, even the second coming of Elijah who performed the same miracles as Jesus. John was a mere mortal.

Bagaint and Leigh made a name for themselves via their storytelling that created, or, discovered a (lost) genealogy for Jesus and his offspring. Dan Brown made the Sinclair family famous, and they now own “the desire to carve out a place for one’s family in the larger historical picture.”

When I read this in Leland’s book, I wondered if my kindred were involved in the narrative that was destined to make Dan Brown famous;

““The Huguenot tradition in the family, confirmed by such sources as O’Hart’s Irish Pedigrees and Agnew’s French Protestant Exiles, suggests a French origin also and this has been found in the name “Rougemont”, still perpetuated by the name of a village in southeastern France, near Switzerland, and another village in southwestern Germany.

These authors employ genealogies to give the impression their books are real and accurate. Most of their readers do not understand genealogies, and view them as some kind of scientific proof. There are many genealogies in the Bible, including two for Jesus in the New Testament. Why two genealogies – that are different?

“Genealogy is the study of families and the tracing of their lineages and history. Genealogists use oral traditions, historical records, genetic analysis, and other records to obtain information about a family and to demonstrate kinship and pedigrees of its members. The results are often displayed in charts or written as narratives.”

That my alleged ancestor was a French Huguenot who fought under William of Orange, was of great interest to me, for here was a real and very powerful rebellion against the Catholic church that was ruled a heresy. The Knight Templars were ruled heretics, but they never founded a new religion that would topple the Papal system that put, and kept, royal families on the throne. Surely the Ppapcy keot very accurate genealogies, if only to see how closely related those royals who wished to marry, were to one another.

“From 1568, La Rochelle became a centre for the Huguenots, and the city declared itself an independent Reformed Republic on the model of Geneva.[17] This led to numerous conflicts with the Catholic central government. The city supported the Protestant movement of William of Orange in the Netherlands, and from La Rochelle the Dutch under Louis of Nassau and the Sea Beggars were able to raid Spanish shipping.”

La Rochelle was a Templar port. Many authors have made a name, acquired many levels of fame in their genealogical storytelling because they claim the Knight Templars were formed to protect a Holy Grail Line that descends from Jesus and Mary Magdalene. How accurate these tales are does not matter in most cases, because most of these folks title themselves ‘Scholars’ and are not engaged in constructing a ‘Family genealogy’. Indeed, anyone who claims they are of the Holy Blood, are vilified, damned, titled “insane”. Why? It’s because fake scholars adhore proof! And, more often than not you will be accused of trying to emulate the divine god-like Jesus who is no longer a mere mortal – in your case! Being a Divine Scholar and Divine genealogist – is much safer!

Above are the gravestones of Jean and Guillaume Til-Chatel who were Knight Templars. Here are two images of real Templars, that are very rare! The Lords of Til-Chatel became the Lords of Rougemont. The bottom image is of Knight Templar, Étienne de Til-Châtel, who is buried at Fontenotte. He may being holding a dove with olive branch.

“Til-Châtel family members will follow one another until 1299, date to which the name blends into the family of Rougemont through Til-Châtel Jeanne, daughter of Guy III of Til-Châtel. At the end of the 15th century, the last of the Rougemont, absence descendants, ceded the seigniory to Antoine de Baissey, which immediately paid tribute to the Bishop of Langres.”

I have been looking at new genealogies of the Rougemont family in the last week that suggest they were the core family that allegedly became extinct. However, if you consider the history of Leland Rosemond, our Rougemonts kindred left France for Holland, and then moved to Basel.

” This James (or Jacob, for these names were once interchangeable) was the son of Hans Ulrich Rosemond, born 1623, a weaver; who was a son of Hans, a weaver, born
1581; who was a son of Fred Rosemond, born 1552, a weaver, member of town council and a local captain; who was the son of another Hans whose date of birth is not known, but he too, was a weaver and became a citizen of Basle in 1534. His father was Erhart de Rougemont who bought in 1495 “the house called Rebleuten-Zunft in Basle in the
Freistrasse.’ Peter Rosemond further reported information from the Records Office in Basle that “before Basle the family resided in Holland up to 1338, and it is said they descended from the estate Rosemont, near Belfort, in France, where also the village Rougemont is found.”

The Rosemond/Rougemont family were Swan Brethren and belonged to several guilds. Were they carrying on Templar traditions in a more covert manner due to the alleged persecution of the Templars, and the War of Religions? I believe I have discovered a more realistic and obvious motive, that I will reveal in my book.

What I now suggest is that a DNA test be made of the bones of these Templars that include Guillamette Til-Chatel. I will submit my DNA to this study. I know other revelant people who may be my kindred. Some of this material is in the chapell of Saint-Florent, that means “in flower”. What is in a name?

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

The pursuit of family history tends to be shaped by several motivations, including the desire to carve out a place for one’s family in the larger historical picture, a sense of responsibility to preserve the past for future generations, and a sense of self-satisfaction in accurate storytelling.[1]

Juliet.
‘Tis but thy name that is my enemy;–
Thou art thyself, though not a Montague.
What’s Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot,
Nor arm, nor face, nor any other part
Belonging to a man. O, be some other name!
What’s in a name? that which we call a rose
By any other name would smell as sweet;
So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call’d,
Retain that dear perfection which he owes
Without that title:–Romeo, doff thy name;
And for that name, which is no part of thee,
Take all myself.

https://rosamondpress.wordpress.com/2012/01/14/history-of-the-rosamond-family/The language of the coat of arms

http://www.lordredutemple.com/la-commanderie-de-fontenotte.html

According to Jean-Marc Roger and Marie Delphine, This is a simple house of the Temple dependent Bures, who becomes a commander after the devolution of the property of the Templars to Hospitallers. Elle a peu de dépendances, peu d’actes la concerne. It has few dependencies, few acts concerned. La première mention de la maison de Fontenotte est de 1178. The first mention of the house is Fontenotte 1178. Les seigneurs de Til-Châtel furent de généreux donateurs envers cette maison. Lords of Til-Châtel were generous donors to the house. Étienne de Til-Châtel fut chapelain dans cette maison. Etienne de Til-Châtel was chaplain in the house. Sa pierre tombale se trouve dans la chapelle. His tombstone is in the chapel.

The first task is to retrieve a golden key from the belly of a toad who lives at the bottom of a tree . In the second task she must use the golden key to retrieve a dagger, but in that room is an evil creature sitting at a table, and on the table is a feast of beautiful foods which she must not eat . The third and final task involves her taking her baby brother and delivering him to the center of the Labyrinth by midnight of the Full Moon that very same evening .

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100201171756.htm

Researchers excavating an ancient Roman cemetery made a surprising discovery when they extracted ancient mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from one of the skeletons buried at the site: the 2,000-year-old bones revealed a maternal East Asian ancestry.

http://www.exploratorium.edu/evidence/lowbandwidth/INT_ancient_dna.html

Heraldry, arms and Blazon – texts and images

http://lalanguedublason.blogspot.com/2012/08/la-seigneurie-de-til-chatel-ou-trichatel.html

Florent \f-lore-nt, fl(o)-rent\ as a boy’s name is of Old French origin, and the meaning of Florent is “in flower”. The feminine version is Florence. Florenz Ziegfeld.
Florent has 9 variant forms: Fiorentino, Florentin, Florentino, Florentz, Florenz, Florinio, Florino, Floris and Florus.

The lordship of Til-Châtel or Trichatel

The name of the lordship of Til-Châtel has existed under different spellings depending on the period: Tilicastro originally, then Tylicastrum, Tilchastel or Thilchastel, Trichastel or Triechastel, Trichateau or Trechateau or Trichatel, Mont-sur-Tille during the revolutionary period, and finally -Til-Châtel since 1860.
Another variant can still be found: Johanz, Lords of Tile Chastial for John of Til – Châtel in a deed dated September 1265 (see below).

“Golden at the clef gules”,
Guy III, Til-Châtel sgr (†1299), LBR 445 (© year)

N.B. The family of Til-Châtel is why I had the greatest difficulty in finding contemporary illustrations because the first known seal dates from 1248 and the last bearer of the name disappeared in 1299.
• History of the lordship of Til-Châtel (Burgundy)
The village, located on the way Agrippa between Langres (Andemantuno) and Chalon (Cabillione) is mentioned in 230 known Filena on River Tille.
He took the name of Tilae Castrum (castrum ad tillam) later before it is destroyed during an invasion from the North, after the year 400.
After the reconstruction, the village of Til-Châtel is found under the authority of the Bishop of Langres. From the year 801, the latter concedes the Church of Tilicastro and revenues at the Augustins de Saint-Etienne de Dijon.

The Lords of the place have their origins ofAudón I of Til-Châtel, son of Garnier, count of Troyes which found the signature in an act of Richard, Duke of Burgundy, dated 918. They pay tribute to the Dukes of Burgundy.

Til-Châtel family members will follow one another until 1299, date to which the name blends into the family of Rougemont through Til-Châtel Jeanne, daughter of Guy III of Til-Châtel. At the end of the 15th century, the last of the Rougemont, absence descendants, ceded the seigniory to Antoine de Baissey, which immediately paid tribute to the Bishop of Langres. In 1618, the last of the Baissey passes the Earth of Til-Châtel to half-brother Erard of the Châtelet, which makes it a marquisate. Implementation Decree [sold to repay the debt], it is acquired in 1663 by the baron of the Housset. It is again Decree and was then bought by the widow of the latter. Marie d’Aguesseau in fact gift in 1703 to his niece Catherine d’Aguesseau, married to Charles-Marie de Saulx, comte de Tavannes. The lordship remained the possession of this family until the French Revolution.

A hypothesis on the origin of the Til-Châtel key might be that they have inherited from the Clefmont in the 12th century, but inverting the colors. (cf. P. Palasi, Armorial of the Haute-Marne, record 267 on the family of Clefmont, off in the family of Choiseul in 1370). This raises the problem of the colors of the shield of the Clefmont, but this is another issue.

• coat of arms in relation to the holders of the name, sometimes identified
-1248- [Golden at the clef gules]: seal of Hugues de Til-Châtel, sgr of Conflans (~ 1220-1250), died on the seventh crusade (1248-1254)
An illustration for the seal is proposed on the site Early Blazon.
Excerpt from A page. Baudin on Jean de Joinville (1225-1317):

“Louis IX who vowed to cross if he healed from a serious illness (1244), the Seneschal of Champagne [Jean de Joinville] announced at Easter 1248 willingness to follow the King of France, with nine of his vassals to Hugues de Landricourt and Hugues de Trichatel, Lord of Conflans, all two Knights-standard-bearers, Gautier of Écurey, Gautier de Curel, Erard de Sivry-sur-Ante”Raoul de Vanault-le-Châtel, Frédéric de Louppy-le-Château, Renaud de Menoncourt and Hugh of Ecot-la-Combe.’

– 1265 – Johanz, Lords of Tile Chastial [no representation of seal]: Jean de Til-Châtel.
Cf. Act under seal seigneurial (Burgundy) dated September 1265 (to bring the seal cited by Mr. Prinet and dated 1266?;) cf. later, in the comments under the date of 1297).

-1265-1270 -[d’Or in Chief gules], Armorial Wijnbergen 860: unnamed
-1265-1270 -[key in pale golden], Armorial Wijnbergen 1087: unnamed
-1265-1270 -[golden sand in the pal key], Armorial Wijnbergen 1088: unnamed
The illustrations were drawn by Brian Timms, but meanwhile its site has been vandalized.

-1274- [ecu to the key], gravestone of John, Lord of Tilchatel

Jean, Lord of Tilchatel (Tilchatel Church) (small, 1898)

Cf. dan Board 21 s E book. Small, history of the Dukes of Burgundy…, t. 6.

–1292-1295- s. of tchatel [Golden at the clef gules], Armorial Le Breton 445

Guy III, Til-Châtel sgr (†1299), LBR 445 (© YEAR)

Instructions for E. Boos:

“445 Sire ofriT chatel
gules key gold.
Guy III († 1299), Lord of Til-Châtel, gonfaloniere of the County of Burgundy. Son of John, Lord of Til-Châtel († 1275), guardian of Champagne and Brie, Marshal and gonfaloniere of the count of Burgundy, and of his second wife, Marie de Joinville, Lady of Marnay († 1263), married firstly in 1263, Mahaut of Courtenany (†1284), and then, in 1285, Isabelle de Rochefort(-sur-Brevon) [† ad 1309], daughter of Gaucher de Rochefort, Lord of le Puiset in Beauce, Viscount of Chartres, and of Marguerite de Plancy. In 1306, the married Humbert de Rougemont.

Wijnbergen 1087; Chifflet-Prinet 83
Europäische Stammtafeln, XV, 184-185 ”
— 1297 – Distance of Triechastel bears the Golden weapons [Chief / a key] of gheules, Armorial Chifflet-Prinet 93 or 94
This Blazon is problematic because, according to the editions of the manuscript, it meets the variations “in the head” or “a key”.
Found in the edition of the armorial by Mr. Prinet (p. 35 [= 31], online )) :

93 Distance of Triechastel bears the Golden weapons at the head of gheules (1).
(1) Gui, Lord of Thil-Châtel (Côte-d’Or, arr. of Dijon, Is-sur-Tille cant.) in 1275, 1276, 1280, 1291, 1293, gonfaloniere of the County of Burgundy (Arch. of the Doubs, B, 53, 69; Arch. of the Côte-d’Or, B 1336; Bibl. NAT., ms. French 31969, fol. 65 v, 66; Gollut, historical memories, ed. Duvernoy, col. (1744) His widow, Isabeau de Rochefort, was remarried, in 1311, Humbert, Lord of Rougemont; the eldest of his daughters, Isabeau of Thil – Châtel, married Rougemont Thibaud, son of Humbert (Arch. of the Côte-d’Or, B 10492, 10493; Peincede, t. XVII, p. 168). Through this marriage, the land of Thil-Châtel and the hereditary Office of gonfaloniere of the County of Burgundy passed to Rougemont House.

Seal Gui of Thil-Châtel (1276) is armorié with an ECU to a key and not a leader (seals of Burgundy, no. 448), as the seals of Jean de Thil-Châtel, in 1266 (Archives du Doubs, B 53) and of Isabeau de Thil-Châtel, dame de Grancey, in 1282 (seals of Burgundy, no. 489). The headstone of Jean, sire de Thil-Châtel, died in 1275, was also armoriée ECU to the key (Ernest Petit, history of the Dukes of Burgundy, t. VI, fig. 21).

In the edition proposed by G.J. Brault, latter reflects some of the P. Adam-Even notes about the armorial:

94 Distance of Triechastel bears the Golden weapons a gheules key (21).
(21) to the Chief.
Notes [on the edition of Prinet:]
[CP 94 – for the emendation Chief] a key, see Prinet, p. 31, n. 1.
S. Clemmensen assumed an error of mirroring the part of Max Prinet (record 114: “Prinet misread the legend as ‘head’ rather than ‘key’ gold key.”;) cf. scholarly publishing in pdf).
Jules Chifflet having the first copied the presumed original written in picard and dating back to the 13th century, “taking quite a lot of freedoms”, it may be rather that should have been suspect bad fill.

– 1454-1457 – Trichatel sr [empty ecu], Armorial Le Bouvier 700.
Instructions for E. Boos:

“700 sr d Trichatel
vacuum
Thil-Châtel: gold at the clef gules ; House off at the end of the 13th century in Rougemont (J.B.. of Vraivre, “Seven mounds slabs of Til-Châtel House”, in Heraldry Books No. IV, pp. 137-146;) (Prinet XXIV). ”
– 1560 – Tricastel, gate of gold at wrench gules, in Palliot p. 175.

Tricastel (Palliot, p. 176)

– 1770 – Tricastel door gold key in Pale gules, rather than gules to the silver key, in Ménestrier p. 216.

Tricastel (Ménestrier, windsurfing XXXI, fig. 1)

N.B. The illustration is incorrect, what the text says but few explicitly.

– 1884 – Trichatel – Ile-de-France, Picardie – gold at wrench gules in pal, in Rietstap.

Til-Châtel (Rolland from Rietstap)

• To go further – variants in the family name and in representation of the ecu
If the graphic change ‘castel/chastel/Châtel/Castle’ is relatively well known in French, metathesis is less (inversion of vowels and consonants within a Word). It is recognisable in the Til-Chastel pair / Tri-Chastel. If you know that the consonants “l” and “r” are two close achievements at the phonetic level, and that metathesis is a specificity of the picard talk, one might wonder if the variants “Tri-…” would be not specific time where the Lords of Til-Châtel settled in Picardy (cf. Rietstap reference)

At the level of the representation of the coat of arms, the confusion between “head” and “key” has been very punctual and inconsequential subsequently.

History of the Rosemond Family

_________________________________________

Compiled and Written by

Leland Eugene Rosemond

_________________________________________

New York, New York

Printed by the Waterman Press, 1938

End of Title Page here

FOREWORD

The writer has for many years been interested in knowing more of the
Family History and about the name Rosemond and its variations. He
has, therefore, collected material form different sources and is now
putting it into book form, so that it will not become lost; also to
the end that others who desire it, may have it.

The writer learned that the members of the Rosemond family as a whole
have not had any great interest in preserving records of the family
but have permitted them to become lost or misplaced. The interest on
the part of many has not been great, and it has been hard work trying
to get authentic information. It has been secured only after many
years, and the fact that it is so complete even now is due almost
entirely to the efforts of Fred L. Rosemond of 40 West Long Street,
Columbus, Ohio. He has spent years in trcing the ancestory of the
family and has collected the details concerning “Philip the Elder”
and much about “Edward the Elder” in this country. (The
designation, “elder,” is simply for the purpose of distinguishing the
first members of the family to have the names Philip and Edward from
later members of the family who had the same given names.)

This booklet would not have been possible were it not for Fred L.
Rosemond’s most help cooperation and the information turned over to
the writer which was secured entirely by the formers efforts. Much of
this is printed exactly as written by him. He gives credit, where
due, for the assistance he received so it need not be repeated here.

The writer’s side of the family for years spelled their name Roseman
and this was the real cause of this History being printed. For years,
in fact since childhood, the writer remembers his father, Edward
Monroe, telling about the family in Ireland and of his saying that
the name had been changed in

Book shows end of PAGE 1 here

spelling as compared to the original. His father told of many members
of their family having died in Guernsey County, Ohio, of a
disease “Milk Sickness.” He, himself, almost succumbed. His father
and other relatives died from this disease. This left him (Edward
Monroe), who was the eldest of twelve children, head of the family at
the age of twenty-one. They suffered many hardships over the period
fo the next few years. The mother died six years later and the family
split up, moving to different sections. They lost race of each other
to a great extent. Some members of the family continued spelling the
name Roseman while others used the original spelling of Rosemond.

THe change occurred with this branch, which did not retain the
spelling as Rosemond about this time. Edward Monroe’s father, who was
Joseph Rosemond, born December 13th, 1802, and who was the son of
Edward, the elder, signed his name both as Rosemond and as Roseman,
also at times as Rosman. Edward, the elder, did likewise. However,
when they took or passed title to land it was always as Rosemond. It
will be noticed later in this book that Edward, the elder, signed his
name as Rosman at the time he was naturalized. However, he used the
correct spelling of Rosemond when taking title to land, in marriage,
and was buried with the spelling on his tombstone as Edward Rosemond.

Naturally, many omissions will be found in this History of the
Rosemond Family. There has been no attempt

to make it a complete history. It is printed to give information on
the name, the derivation, and mainly concerning the ancestry of
Edward, the elder, and Philip, the elder, and some of their
descendants. It will enable those, who have the desire, to preserve
the information for their descendants.

The writer, Leland Eugene Rosemond, at present living at Scarsdale,
New York, married Emma Janet Ray in Syracuse, New York, at the home
of her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Earle Knox Ray. The service
was making it a complete history. It is printed to give information
on the name, the derivation, and mainly concerning the performed by
Rev. Dr. Rock-

Book shows end of Page 2 here

wood Ferris, September 24, 1927. There are tow children, Leland Ray
Rosemond, born September 19th 19__ (year was blacked out), and Janet
Rosemond, born September 13th, 19__ (year was blacked out). Both were
born in Boston, Mass.

Throughout the following pages will be found many paragraphs in
quotation marks. These are

exactly as written by Fred L. Rosemond. Much of the information
secured by the writer is a

duplication of this, so the quotations are taken direct from Fred L.
Rosemond’s record.

Leland E. Rosemond

March, 1938

Scarsdale, N. Y.

THE NAME ROSEMOND

Some confusion seems to have resulted from the fact that more than
one origin for this name has existed. The oldest, perhaps, is the
Teutonic “Hrosmond”, conspicuous as far back as the 6th century in
the history of the Gepidae and the Lombards of northern Italy. “Mond”
in the Anglo-Saxon signified the protection given by a noble, or
chieftain, to this dependents of every kin, and the name signified
among them strong, or famous, protection. The form “Rosenmund”,
usually reckoned as German, has been interpreted as “rose of the
world,” form the Latin “mundus” for world. In Danish the name appears
as Rozamond; in French, as Rosemonde, in Italian, as Rosmonda, and in
Latin and Spanish, as Rosamunda.

“The Huguenot tradition in the family, confirmed by such sources as
O’Hart’s Irish Pedigrees and Agnew’s French Protestant Exiles,
suggests a French origin also and this has been found in the
name “Rougemont”, still perpetuated by the name of a village in
southeastern France, near Switzerland, and another village in
southwestern Germany. Why this source seems preferable for our origin
will be mentioned again.

Book shows end of PAGE 3 here

“Such a name, transported to other countries and dealt with in other
languages, was certain to be changed and even distorted. Our own
people have at times adopted the form “Roseman”, or “Rosman”,
or “Rossman”, or “Rosmond”, or “Rosmon”. The first three forms are
common in Germany although wholly unconnected with our family. Elders
in the family have held the view that the presence of the “d” is
significant and, since it is the equivalent of the “t”
in “Rougemont,” that seems reasonable. As many as thirty variations
are found, and yet the name in any form is not a common one in this
country if the German forms above are to be disregarded.

“In the Southern states among those identified with our line in
Ireland, the form “Rosamond” prevails as it does in England and
Canada, but the legends of “Fair Rosamond” Clifford which popularized
it there have no significance for us. It is, in one form or another,
the name of towns, but inquiry has developed that our family had
nothing to do with giving them.

“It is not to be thought surprising, therefore, if persons bearing
the name be found whose ancestry traces back along a line quite
different from the Huguenot line.”

THE “ROUGEMONT” ORIGIN

The gracious and intelligent aid of Peter Rosemond of Flushing,
Holland, who lived for some years in Basle, Switzerland, was a large
contribution to the writer’s* investigation of the Huguenot
tradition. His family went from Basle to Holland in 1754. Researches
he made over many years, including 1911 to 1917 in Basle, furnished
him with material which he regarded as identifying us with a James
(or Jacob) Rosemond, born in Basle, January 1st, 1654 (which date is
not far from our traditional date of `about 1655′) who left home and
who did not reappear there even for the reading of

_______

*Fred L. Rosemond

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his father’s will in 1679 nor thereafter. This James (or Jacob, for
these names were once interchangeable) was the son of Hans Ulrich
Rosemond, born 1623, a weaver; who was a son of Hans, a weaver, born
1581; who was a son of Fred Rosemond, born 1552, a weaver, member of
town council and a local captain; who was the son of another Hans
whose date of birth is not known, but he too, was a weaver and became
a citizen of Basle in 1534. His father was Erhart de Rougemont who
bought in 1495 “the house called Rebleuten-Zunft in Basle in the
Freistrasse.’ Peter Rosemond further reported information from the
Records Office in Basle that “before Basle the family resided in
Holland up to 1338, and it is said they descended from the estate
Rosemont, near Belfort, in France, where also the village Rougemont
is found.” A family coat-of-arms was registered in Basle about 1537
when the first Hans became a resident there. A reproduction of this
coat-of-arms in the writer’s possession shows a weaver’s crook
conspicuously, and it will be remembered that in Ireland our people
were linen weavers and farmers, and that Edward, the elder, was a
weaver in this country. Peter Rosemond had seen in print the letters
from Erasmus to Gotschalk Rosemondt. He noticed that a seal used by a
Rosemont in Holland, bearing a jumping fox, was like an emblem he had
noticed in a wall of the house Rebleuten-Zunft in Basle. This seal
dated back to 1430, whereas the coat-of-arms above mentioned dates
from 1534, it seems. Peter Rosemond died September 22, 1930. This is
but a sketch of what he wrote.”

http://www.knightstemplar-uk.co.uk/holygrail.html

The Holy Grail & the Keepers of the Faith
Who were the keepers of the wisdom and sacred secrets all these years? Was it the Knights Templars, guardians of the truth and keepers of the faith? Do they have the Ark of the Covenant that Moses had? Is the Holy Grail really the bloodline of Jesus Christ? Are the Knights Templars the guardians of that bloodline? Why did the church hunt them down to destroy them? Was it because of the knowledge they have, even to this day? Is there a direct descendant of Jesus alive today, if so who is he/she? Would such a bloodline be powerful? Or is the real Holy Grail and secrets the truth about our planet, Humans & secret enemies within. Our we all living an illusion of freedom? Our the Templars the real Gedi Knights. Is there a secret WAR OF THE WORLDS going on today?

http://lib.znate.ru/docs/index-291941.html?page=39

http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/sociopolitica/esp_sociopol_dragoncourt06.htm

http://www.oocities.org/vampiricstudies/knights.html

http://www.lordredutemple.com/la-commanderie-de-fontenotte.html

According to Jean-Marc Roger and Marie Delphine, This is a simple house of the Temple dependent Bures, who becomes a commander after the devolution of the property of the Templars to Hospitallers. Elle a peu de dépendances, peu d’actes la concerne. It has few dependencies, few acts concerned. La première mention de la maison de Fontenotte est de 1178. The first mention of the house is Fontenotte 1178. Les seigneurs de Til-Châtel furent de généreux donateurs envers cette maison. Lords of Til-Châtel were generous donors to the house. Étienne de Til-Châtel fut chapelain dans cette maison. Etienne de Til-Châtel was chaplain in the house. Sa pierre tombale se trouve dans la chapelle. His tombstone is in the chapel.

The first task is to retrieve a golden key from the belly of a toad who lives at the bottom of a tree . In the second task she must use the golden key to retrieve a dagger, but in that room is an evil creature sitting at a table, and on the table is a feast of beautiful foods which she must not eat . The third and final task involves her taking her baby brother and delivering him to the center of the Labyrinth by midnight of the Full Moon that very same evening .

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100201171756.htm

Researchers excavating an ancient Roman cemetery made a surprising discovery when they extracted ancient mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from one of the skeletons buried at the site: the 2,000-year-old bones revealed a maternal East Asian ancestry.

http://www.exploratorium.edu/evidence/lowbandwidth/INT_ancient_dna.html

Because of the claims by Corbu, Rennes-le-Château became the centre of conspiracy theories about Saunière’s mysterious wealth. The story grew in the telling, from the initial rumours that perhaps he had uncovered hidden treasure, to speculation that he had discovered secrets about the history of the Church, which could threaten the foundations of the Catholic Church. The entire area around Rennes-le-Chateau has become the focus of increasingly sensational claims involving the Knights Templar, the Priory of Sion, the Rex Deus, the Holy Grail, the Knights Templar and the treasures of the Temple of Solomon, the Ark of the Covenant, ley lines, Cathars, Montségur (another Cathar Castle), Druids, Jesus, Mary Magdelene, space aliens and sacred geometry.

http://www.castlesandmanorhouses.com/renneslechateau.htm

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Genetic Keys to the Templar Kingdom of God

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    ISIS is destroying the Art of the World and committing atrocities in hope our President will send a Crusader Army to defeat them. I will go – alone! I will raise my Knights Templar from the dead. I will lay them low with the Hand of God. https://rosamondpress.com/2013/02/17/knights-templar-arise/
    https://rosamondpress.com/2013/03/23/sister-knights-of-saint-george-de-rougemont/

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