The Templar Brotherhood of the Holy Shroud

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kingdom-of-heaven-2005-40-gHugh de Rougemont appears to be the missing Grand Master of the Knight Templars mentioned before Bernard Tramelay which is also Dramelay, who is then followed by Andre de Montbard, a name that is Montbéliard and Bar combined. The Rougemonts are listed as a Templar family. It is my discovery that they are the Shroud of Turin family. Here is the only evidence the Templars were a hereditary order. I may descend from the Rougemont Templars on my mother’s side. With the recent attention given to the shroud by the new Pope, Francis, I hereby found a new order and adopt the original name of the Templars the ‘Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon’.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2013

http://www.cambridge.org/aus/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9781139227612&ss=ind

Rougemont (Côte-d’Or, cant. Montbard), lords of 196, ,
See also Hugh
Rougemont (Côte-d’Or, cant. Montbard), monastery 95
Hugh of Rougemont (T), provincial master of Burgundy 196

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodoric_I,_Count_of_Montb%C3%A9liard

Theodoric I (French: Thierry) (ca. 1045 – 2 January 1105) was a Count of Montbéliard, Count of Bar and lord of Mousson (as Theodoric II) and Count of Verdun. He was the son of Louis de Scarpone, Count of Montbéliard, and Sophie, Countess of Bar and Lady of Mousson.

http://books.google.com/books?id=ZcCOs1AYOFAC&pg=PA72&lpg=PA72&dq=roscelin+de+rougemont&source=bl&ots=mn70HSqf04&sig=TO9Wz-nonThzL3IRHSarUpUzaWc&hl=en&sa=X&ei=LBhYUeXsGojRigKl3oCoDQ&sqi=2&ved=0CDoQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=roscelin%20de%20rougemont&f=false

http://www.shroud.com/pdfs/n66part3.pdf

http://www.acheiropoietos.info/proceedings/PianaunknownhidewayWeb.pdf

http://www.acheiropoietos.info/proceedings/PianaMYHSWeb.pdf

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/shroud-of-turin-displayed-pope-delivers-message/2013/03/31/0bc1d9af-674c-458c-a03f-ee0770309811_video.html

http://www.cambridge.org/aus/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9781139227612&ss=ind

Rougemont (Côte-d’Or, cant. Montbard), lords of 196, ,
See also Hugh
Rougemont (Côte-d’Or, cant. Montbard), monastery 95

Hugh of Rougemont (T), provincial master of Burgundy 196

Bernard de Tramelay (died August 16, 1153) was the fourth Grand Master of the Knights Templar.
He was born in the castle of Tramelay near Saint-Claude in the Jura. According to Du Cange, he succeeded a certain Hugues as Master of the Temple, although this Hugues is otherwise unknown. He was elected Grand Master in June 1151, after the abdication of Everard des Barres, who had returned to France following the Second Crusade. King Baldwin III of Jerusalem granted him the ruined city of Gaza, which Bernard rebuilt for the Templars.
In 1153 the Templars participated in the Battle of Ascalon, a fortress at that time controlled by Egypt. The Templars constructed a siege tower, which was burned down by the Egyptian soldiers inside Ascalon. The wind caught the flames and part of the walls of Ascalon burned down as well.
According to William of Tyre, knights of the Order rushed through the breach without Baldwin’s knowledge while Bernard prevented other crusaders from following, as he did not want to share the spoils of the city with the king. Bernard and about forty of his Templars were killed by the larger Egyptian garrison. Their bodies were displayed on the ramparts and their heads were sent to the sultan. Other more modern accounts say that William of Tyre’s version may have been distorted, since it may have been based on the defensive accounts given by the army’s commanders as to why they did not follow the Templars into the breach.[1]
In yet another differing account by a Damascene chronicler in the city, the breach of the wall is mentioned as a pre-cursor to the fall of the city; he makes no mention of the incident with the Templars.
Regardless of which account is believed, Bernard was killed and beheaded during the fighting.
A few days later, Baldwin captured the fortress; shortly thereafter, the Templars elected André de Montbard as their Grand Master.

André de Montbard (5. November c. 1097 – 17 January 1156) was the fifth Grand Master of the Knights Templar and also one of the founders of the Order.
The Montbard family came from Hochadel in Burgundy, and André was an uncle of St. Bernard of Clairvaux, being a half-brother of Bernard’s mother Aleth de Montbard.[1] He entered the Order in 1129 and went to Palestine, where he quickly rose to the rank of seneschal, deputy and second-in-command to the Grand Master. After the Siege of Ascalon on 22 August 1153, André was elected Grand Master to replace Bernard de Tremelay, who had been killed during an assault on the city on 16 August.
He died on 17 January 1156, in Jerusalem and was succeeded by Bertrand de Blanchefort.

The dynasty of the Dramelay[Edit]
The first known Lord of Dramelay is Amedeo of Dramelay, 1044. His grandson, Humphrey, Lord of Dramelay to 1090 is in relation to the Cluniac Priory of Romainmôtier.
Bernard of Dramelay, Grand Master of the Temple in 1152, died at the siege of Ascalon in Palestine on August 16, 1153.
Hugues de Dramelay is Constable of the County of Burgundy in 1173. He is the father of Hugues II, Lord of Dramelay from 1189 to 1217. In 1240, son is driven from the Castle, for acts of war [Who?] [What?]. The castle became possession of the County of Chalon.
Another branch of the family, from Guy of Dramelay, who fought in the war of the Peloponnese in 1209, will feature a dozen castles in Greece and not less than 34 castles in Franche-Comté (for example Présilly). One of his descendants, Amédée, Archbishop of Besançon, will build the chapel found below the tower.
The time of the Chalon[Edit]
In 1240, the fief of Dramelay passes under the possession of Jean de Chalon. In 1248, he is subservient to Rodolphe de Courtenay, brother-in-law of John of Chalon. The Tower (or what is left), dates from this time.
In 1260, Jean de Chalon gives his eldest son Hugues his fiefs and castles. Jean II of Chalon-Auxerre is Lord of Dramelay from 1292 to 1361, and site passes to a cadet branch, the Lords, Châtel-Belin, and the Chalon-Arlay finally princes of Orange.
The castle was destroyed by the French troops of Louis XI, during the war between Franche-Comté in France, after the death of Charles the bold.

http://records.ancestry.com/Thiébaut_I_de_Neufchâtel_records.ashx?pid=211995321

http://fabpedigree.com/s044/f102765.htm

http://dcodriscoll.pbworks.com/w/page/9956531/Neufchatel

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodoric_I,_Count_of_Montb%C3%A9liard

Theodoric I (French: Thierry) (ca. 1045 – 2 January 1105) was a Count of Montbéliard, Count of Bar and lord of Mousson (as Theodoric II) and Count of Verdun. He was the son of Louis de Scarpone, Count of Montbéliard, and Sophie, Countess of Bar and Lady of Mousson.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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