Warhol Rips McClure’s Beard Off

mcllyrl

mcllurew

mcclure_beardmelinda333Andy Warhol did a movie from Michael McClure’s play ‘The Beard’ without the Beat Poets permission. Michael got the famous SF attorney, Melvin Belli to slap a injunction on Andy, thus the world famous artist’s movie has not been released to the public.

I felt Michael Harkins was censoring me when I merely mentioned he knew McClure and Jim Morrison. Michael met my mother for the first time when we attended Christine’s funeral. In 1962, Rosemary told her eldest children she was making porno movies and prostituting herself for the mob. In tears she said she wanted to tell us before Mark and I came upon one of her movies. We had seen one porno that Randy Silver found in his father’s closet. Did my mother fear her sons would behold some masked man going down on her?

The Beard employs Jean Harlow and Billy the Kid against their will. Billy goes down on Jean. A beard can be a woman’s muff. Why is a famous actress and western outlaw being used to make a sexual uproar? Could it be these characters are found OUT WEST where there is a liberal and beat audience? Andy is BACK EAST with the Velvet Underground and perhaps is in coastal competition with McClure. This ARTIST and POET are having a heavyweight fight. It’s cultural warfare!

My kindred, Jessie Benton was the patron of the author, Bret Harte. My father used Jack London’s character ‘The Sea Wolf’ to raise his two sons. In 1964 I fled up north after my girlfriend’s father threatened to kill me. He had killed Melinda’s first boyfriend, a twenty year old Beat named Sky. Melinda was sixteen. Two men came into the New Balladeer, threw Sky against the wall, and told him to get out of town. He refused. A week later he was found dead with his face blow-torched off. He was tortured to death by members of the Purple Gang. Melinda’s father and two uncles owned about half of New Mexico where she went to Catholic school. A nun would put her under her desk and take kicks at her saying;

“This is how you treat a Jew!”

My friend, Bryan McClean of Love was a good friend of Sky and was ot happy when I began seeing Melinda.

“She’s a Black Widow. She is responsible for my friend’s death!”

At sixteen I had to conclude that men fight and die over a woman’s beard, her beaver……and, you don’t mess with a vagina owned by the Purple Gang. I watched an incredible drama unfold as Melinda fought against the idea that her father owned her beard, and thus it was his right to murder anyone that went after it without his permission.

As for these naughty bad boys fighting over ‘The Beard’ ……GROW UP! Let is see Andy’s movie. In the real West folks die for Love – and Art!

I got it wrong about McClure being disgusted with Jim about him being a Sex Pot. This is what attracted Michael to Morrison, he wanting him in his play. Jim got his sexiness from Arthur Lee of Love. Thus, what goes around, comes around. But – where is THE LOVE?

Above is the painting of Melinda Rosamond rendered. They were best friends. Bryan dated Liza Minelli who Andy did an image of. Andy did several images of our kindred, Liz. Melinda was a hostage of the Purple Gang. When Melinda’s father decided I would live, he offered me a job at one of his theatres that showed soft porn. Linda was disgusted – of course! Her father would allow me to see beaver on the silver screen, but, not his daughter’s beaver.

I was seventeen. I asked my lover if I took the job would I be part of Don’s family. Melinda gave me a dirty look.

“What do you think?”

Would I have beheld my mother the Porn Star at Don Frank’s movie theatre.

When I worked at Yale Trucking in Hell’s Kitchen, I was called ‘The California Kid’. I was still seventeen when I cam home and got a job at May Company. In 1965 Melinda came to my place of work with my friend Keith Purvis. She told me I should move back up north where she had fled from her father, because there was a movement. This was the Free Speech Movement that was fought to the streets by un-famous people.

It appears McClure wanted Jim Morrison to be in the film version of The Beard, thus, Michael was creating a male sex god, a rock porno star in order to get the Free Love and Free Speech Movement focussed in on HIM, the Sex Genius and Svengali of Hippieville. It appears Morrison was McClure’s
Sex Puppet, his Ken Doll, his Frankestein that goes down on Barbie. Arthur Lee was the real deal. Screw McClure. Amber tried to screw every dude at the College of Arts and Crafts as – her project!

This fight over a fake pussy is bullshit – and not art or poetry! Jim is a manufactured fake rock star, McClure’s art project, who is arrested for exposing his cock on stage.

There is a castle mentioned. Is this where the group Love lived, and where Morrison hung out, being a pest?

Bryan auditioned to be a member of The Monkeys a simulated rock band. Oliver Stone’s people contacted Michael Harkins and wanted his Morrisson stories. My old friend told them to go to hell, that they would not do Jim justice. That was bullshit. Jim made it to Hollywood and was a big porno star in Stone’s simulation. Harkins played his HARD TO GET crap on me in order to be in – some simulated limelight.
Jon Presco

Michael McClure:

“… Warhol has caused me a lot of grief. He wrote via his apprentice Malanga asking permission to do The Beard as a seventy-minute sound film. We exchanged several letters. At first it sounded good and then finally I said NO! Then I got a card from LA with no return address saying they had gone ahead and done Beard anyway. Then there were telephone calls. And Warhol surrogates showed up in town making rumors about the film being shown in L.A. I jumped on a plane and few to LA and picked up four beautiful girls and nailed Andy at the Trip Club where he was doing his Velvet Underground shot. He showed us the film in a castle in the Hollywood HIlls and the girls and I walked out afterwards without saying a word. It was bad! Next day I phoned and told him never to show the film. Then I had three more meetings with Andy here and gave a showing of the film for Jo Anna and a few mutual friends. It looked even worse than the first time. Warhol has promised to neither show the film nor sell the prints and I have a print of it. Though God knows I don’t want it.” (FL101-2)


By May 1966 there had not been any performances of McClure’s play in Los Angeles or New York and, as noted on page one, Warhol had not seen the December 1965 production of it. Yet, during an interview first published in 1971, one of Warhol’s superstars, Ultra Violet, recalled seeing the play with Warhol but did not give a date:

Ultra Violet (The Autobiography and Sex Life of Andy Warhol, 2010, p. 202):

“One thing really surprised me. We saw the play The Beard – I think it was in San Francisco, earlier, I can’t remember – and when we came out of it, Andy said, ‘God, it is beautiful,’ and he really was sincere, and I was very surprised that he really liked the play. I couldn’t quite understand it. I loved the play, personally, and he said ‘That’s how all my movies should be. My movies should be as beautiful as that play, ‘ and that really didn’t shock me. It was hard to really understand what he meant.”

The interviewer John Wilcock then says to Ultra, “McClure was not very pleased, I heard, because Andy had actually filmed his play without asking him a couple of years before.” A couple of years before what? Before Ultra and Andy saw the production of the play? Warhol and Ultra Violet visited Los Angeles and San Francisco the following year and there was a production of the play in San Francisco around the same time they were there.

THE STORY: Examining the nature of seduction—and attraction—the play brings into explosive confrontation two legends of America’s recent past: the sultry, platinum blonde movie star, Jean Harlow; and the baby-faced, quick-temperated outlaw, Billy The Kid. Drawn to each other, but constrained from yielding by their towering egos, the two probe each other’s weaknesses and uncertainties with cruel precision—she mocking his vaunted masculinity, and he accusing her of envying his beauty. In time, as their obstinacy fades with the knowledge that there is no one watching them—that they are free to slip out from behind the larger-than-life facades with that they have been burdened—the two give way to their true feelings in a rush of unbridled passion, leading to a final scene which is one of the most celebrated and widely discussed of the modern theatre.
One of the most famous and controversial plays of the modern theater. Detailing an imagined meeting between two legendary figures—Jean Harlow and Billy The Kid—the frank, outspoken language of the play brought a police action that closed its initial production in San Francisco, and resulted in legal charges against the actors. The eventual dismissal of these charges marked an important step in establishing the limits of censorship in the theatre. “Michael McClure’s THE BEARD is a mysterious piece of work…almost as if ghosts from two periods of the American past were speaking across decades to each other…” —Norman Mailer

Moscowitz yells out “Saracen pig! Spartan dog!” whenever he pounds his enemies, a femme fatale drops her towel and says, “Quick — name three presidents!”

“Lincoln?”

Botnick at Sunset Sound in May 1967… Poet Michael McClure, deeply impressed by the visionary poetics of the Doors’ album, visited during the sessions and exchanged phone numbers with Jim. The Doors then went back on the road, only returning to the studio later in the summer after it had upgraded to eight tracks from four. Jim and Pamela went to see the L.A. production of McClure’s play The Beard, in which Dennis Hopper, as Billy the Kid, tore off Jean Harlow’s panties and pretended to pleasure her with his mouth… Unlike in San Francisco, the local vice squad didn’t intervene.”
According to McClure,however, the cast of the L.A. production were arrested fourteen nights in a row. In a letter to Stan Brakhage c. September 7, 1968, McClure complains, “I’ll have to return to L.A. for the opening of the trial of Beard, which starts September 16.”
(FL141/http://www.michael-mcclure.com/bio.html)
Michael McClure:
“… we went to Los Angeles, where we lost Billie Dixon from the cast and worked with a young woman named Alexandra Hay, as Harlow. We had Dennis Hopper in it but there was a lot of hassle keeping Dennis because of his confrontations with the producer. At last, we got Richie Bright again as The Kid, and had Alexandra Hay, a young starlet, as Harlow. But in the meantime The Beard had been done without my permission in [Fullerton] Orange County.
There must have been twenty newspapers in Orange County at that time, all extremely right wing, [which] ran banner headlines against the ‘filthy’ play that had been produced at Fullerton State College. The students had done an unauthorized production without my permission or knowledge.
Then the LA Times took it up, running two editorials against the play, while it was in rehearsal, while we were preparing for opening – two editorials against the play and other actions and threats from the FLO, the Forces of Law and Order. We knew we were going to have major trouble, and when the play opened it was arrested 14 performances in a row. The police would come in at the end of the play, walk backstage, arrest Jean Harlow and Billy the Kid, after they’d had a standing ovation from the audience, lead them out back onstage to the police car again, and the audience gave them a second standing ovation before they went off overnight to the jail, where we were being bailed out by a liberal, moneyed person. Then the theater was burned down by vandalism and we went to another theater. Eventually the play was found not guilty of obscenity…” (FL211n.4)
Although Jim Morrison did attend the L.A. production as noted by Stephen Davis, McClure had actually met Morrison in New York originally. At one point during their friendship, a film version of the play starring Morrison was considered.
Michael McClure :
“The way I got to know Jim was this. I had read a magazine piece about him that interested me. He was discussing the concept of evil in a way that made me feel we shared some insights. So Mitchell Hamilburg, the literary agent, got us together while my play The Beard was playing in New York. Jim was, of course, interested in the theater, and Mitchell knew Jim because he knew Pam, so he introduced us at some bar in the Village and we started talking…
Later, we met in L.A. pretty often to talk and drink together… Jim and I talked poetry and drank in L.A. while The Beard was running there. He was interested in writing a play himself, and he liked mine. Then, a while later, I got a call from Elliott Kastner, a film producer based in London. His idea, which turned out to be unworkable, was to film The Beard with Jim playing the part of Billy the Kid. Jim was already in London, so I flew over. On the plane, I imagined that I saw Blake and Shelley floating through the air above the airport, and never having been to London before, it seemed only natural that they float in the air above the airport, so I landed and told Jim about that and we went out and started going to the Soho clubs, and it was quite a night. The bobbies busted us a couple of times for being drunk and disorderly…”
(http://archives.waiting-forthe-sun.net/Pages/Players/Personal/mcclure_recalls.html)
The film of The Beard with Jim Morrison never got made. The Warhol film version, starring Gerard Malanga and Mary Woronov, never got released. McClure recalls, “Attorney Melvin Belli sent an injunctive letter to Warhol warning him never to show his film of The Beard or toy with my property again.” (FL125)

http://www.warholstars.org/mcclure_beard_fullerton_los_angeles.html

More than six months after the initial production of the play, it was presented by Bill Graham at his rock venue, the Fillmore Auditorium, on July 24, 1966. Although the poster only has a single performance date, a second planned performance was cancelled after a warning from the police according to McClure.
Michael McClure:
…and then Bill Graham at the Fillmore Auditorium said he’d like to do it… Then Graham cancelled the second performance and the guy playing Billy the Kid went to Graham and said why and Graham had had a warning from the police who said if it was done a second time they were going to bust him and take the Fillmore license away… so anyway we took it over to the Committee Theater which was an avant garde theater…” (MC)
According to McClure,however, the cast of the L.A. production were arrested fourteen nights in a row. In a letter to Stan Brakhage c. September 7, 1968, McClure complains, “I’ll have to return to L.A. for the opening of the trial of Beard, which starts September 16.”
(FL141/http://www.michael-mcclure.com/bio.html)

Michael McClure:

“… we went to Los Angeles, where we lost Billie Dixon from the cast and worked with a young woman named Alexandra Hay, as Harlow. We had Dennis Hopper in it but there was a lot of hassle keeping Dennis because of his confrontations with the producer. At last, we got Richie Bright again as The Kid, and had Alexandra Hay, a young starlet, as Harlow. But in the meantime The Beard had been done without my permission in [Fullerton] Orange County.

There must have been twenty newspapers in Orange County at that time, all extremely right wing, [which] ran banner headlines against the ‘filthy’ play that had been produced at Fullerton State College. The students had done an unauthorized production without my permission or knowledge.

Then the LA Times took it up, running two editorials against the play, while it was in rehearsal, while we were preparing for opening – two editorials against the play and other actions and threats from the FLO, the Forces of Law and Order. We knew we were going to have major trouble, and when the play opened it was arrested 14 performances in a row. The police would come in at the end of the play, walk backstage, arrest Jean Harlow and Billy the Kid, after they’d had a standing ovation from the audience, lead them out back onstage to the police car again, and the audience gave them a second standing ovation before they went off overnight to the jail, where we were being bailed out by a liberal, moneyed person. Then the theater was burned down by vandalism and we went to another theater. Eventually the play was found not guilty of obscenity…” (FL211n.4)

Although Jim Morrison did attend the L.A. production as noted by Stephen Davis, McClure had actually met Morrison in New York originally. At one point during their friendship, a film version of the play starring Morrison was considered.

A Detroit Mob War was soon ensued between the Italian, Irish, and Jewish bootleggers over territory. The Purples fought a vicious turf war with the Licavoli Squad led by the vicious brothers, Tommy and Pete Licavoli.[1][3] In March 1927, three men were killed. They had been brought into Detroit as hired assassins for the Purple Gang and the motive for the murder was believed to be retaliation for a “double cross”. The homicides took place in an apartment leased by Purple Gang members, Eddie Fletcher and Abe Axler (and reportedly Fred Burke[9]), which made them prime suspects in the slaying. The three suspects (Fletcher, Axler, and Burke) were questioned, as were the other Purples and associates.[18] However, no one was ever convicted of the murder.[5] This was reportedly the first use of a machine gun in a Detroit underworld slaying.[19]

[edit] St. Valentine’s Day MassacreMain article: Saint Valentine’s Day Massacre
The Purple Gang was reputedly suspected of taking part in the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.[8] On February 13, 1929, Abe Bernstein had allegedly called Bugs Moran and told him that a hijacked load of booze was on its way to Chicago. Moran, who was in the middle of a turf war with Capone, had only recently begun to trust Bernstein, who had previously been Capone’s chief supplier of Canadian liquor.[17] The next day, instead of delivering a load of liquor, five men dressed as cops went to S.M.C. Cartage on North Clark Street (Moran’s North Side hangout) and opened fire with machine guns, killing seven men in what has become known as the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.[17]

Murder, Inc. (or Murder Incorporated or the Brownsville Boys; known in syndicate circles as The Combination) was the name given by the press to organized crime groups in the 1930s through the 1940s that acted as the “enforcement arm” of the American Mafia and Jewish Mafia, the early organized crime groups in New York and elsewhere.[1] Originally headed by Louis “Lepke” Buchalter, and later by Albert “The Mad Hatter” Anastasia, Murder, Inc. was responsible for between 400 and 1,000 contract killings,[2] until the group was exposed in the early 1940s by informer and group member Abe “Kid Twist” Reles. In the trials that followed, many members were convicted and executed, and Abe Reles himself died mysteriously after falling out of a window.

Based in part out of Midnight Rose candy store in Brooklyn, Murder Inc. hit men used a wide variety of weapons, including ice picks, to murder their victims.[3] Though the group had a number of members, Harry “Pittsburgh Phil” Strauss was the most prolific killer, committing over 100 murders (some historians put the number as high as 500).[1]
The killers were paid a regular salary as retainer as well as an average fee of $1,000 to $5,000 per killing. Their families also received monetary benefits. If the killers were caught, the mob would hire the best lawyers for their defense.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Warhol Rips McClure’s Beard Off

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.