Baba Bruce

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bababruce44We used to call Bruce Perlowin ‘Baba Bruce’ because he had a painting of a famous Sikh on the wall down in Wanda’s Mystery Basement. BB was busted on his way to see his guru. He was taken off the Jetliner in handcuffs.

Once again we find Bruce working both sides of the street in regards to Singh’s mission to end drug addiction. “No drugs” he says. But does the founder of Marijuana Inc, listen as he lets the hipster world now know from where their Cosmic Buzz came, and, where their Cosmic Cash Flow, go. Bruce took the mystery out of it. We can now see to the top of Jacob’s Ladder made up of a billion little match boxes containing our miniscule and meaningless high, we but little fleas in Perlowin’s drawers, he not the little Jew that wrote the Bible, but, the Basement Jew that smoked the Bible, he rolling the mystery pages into blunts, and blowing smoke up our ass. Where is the Honest Man with the Honest Game? Bruce reminds me of Mel Brooks as an Indian Chief in Blazing Saddles.

What interests me is his mention of Vladimir Megre and the Ringing Cedars” movement. Has anyone connected it to the Roza Mira Prophecy?

“One New Age writer relates the Ringing Cedar books to the “great change” Edgar Cayce prophesied for Russia.”

“In large part, Roza Mira is a spiritual cosmography, a description of the domains human souls occupy after death or between incarnations—domains resembling, to greater or lesser degrees, the heavens, hells, purgatories, and netherworlds of various religions and mythological systems. As such, it can be compared to works like the Bardo Thodol or Tibetan Book of the Dead, and the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri ”
“Late in 1968, Singh went to visit a friend in Los Angeles, but ended up staying to share the teachings of Kundalini Yoga with members of the hippie counterculture of California and New Mexico.[5]:32-”

Did Singh connect with the Brotherhood of Eternal Love?

Jon Presco

Siri Singh Sahib Harbhajan Singh Khalsa Yogiji (born as Harbhajan Singh Puri)[1] (August 26, 1929–October 6, 2004), also known as Yogi Bhajan and Siri Singh Sahib, was a spiritual leader and entrepreneur who introduced Kundalini Yoga to the United States.[2] He was the spiritual director of the 3HO (Healthy, Happy, Holy Organization) Foundation, with over 300 centers in 35 countries,[3] and the founder of Sikh Dharma, a Sikh sect based in the United States.[4]

Singh emigrated to Canada in 1968. According to his own account, he left India under pressure to participate in Soviet psychic experiments at their designated research center in Tashkent.[12]
Although a promised position as director of a new yogic studies department at the University of Toronto did not materialize because of the death of his sponsor, Singh made a considerable impact in the predominantly Anglo-Saxon metropolis. In three months, he established classes at several YMCAs, co-founded a yoga centre, was interviewed for national press and television, and helped set in motion the creation of eastern Canada’s first Sikh temple in time for Guru Nanak’s five hundredth birthday the following year.[13][14]
Late in 1968, Singh went to visit a friend in Los Angeles, but ended up staying to share the teachings of Kundalini Yoga with members of the hippie counterculture of California and New Mexico.[5]:32-

Some of Singh’s earliest students in Los Angeles had spent time in New Mexico influenced by Native American, especially Hopi teachings. To fulfill their wishes, he accompanied them in June 1969 to their summer solstice celebration at the Tesuque Indian reservation outside of Santa Fe.[23]
At the next year’s celebration, a delegation of Hopi Indian elders arrived. They spoke of their ancient legend that before the end of the present age of darkness, a white-clad warrior would come from the East and create an army of warriors in white who would rise up and protect the “Unified Supreme Spirit.” A sweat lodge ceremony was held and a sacred arrow given in trust to him. The elders explained that they had determined he was the white-clad warrior of their legend.[24]
Seven years later, he purchased a large parcel of land in the Jemez Mountains where the Hopis had indicated sacred gatherings had taken place for thousands of years. The elders had said this land needed to be prepared so “the Unified Supreme Spirit can once again be experienced by the great tribes and spread through all the people of the world.” The land was named “Ram Das Puri” and annual solstice prayers and festivities have been celebrated there every summer since. Since 1990, these have included a Hopi sacred prayer walk.[25]

When U.S. President Nixon called drugs America’s “Number one domestic problem,” Singh launched a pilot program with two longtime heroin addicts in Washington, D.C. in 1972.[67] The next year, a full-blown drug treatment center known as “3HO SuperHealth” was launched in Tucson, Arizona. The program used Kundalini Yoga, diet and massage therapy to cure the addicts. According to the 3HO website, the center distinguished itself in 1978 as being among the top 10% of all treatment programs throughout the United States, with a recovery rate of 91%.[68][not in citation given]
Early on, when the term “stress” was still practically unheard of, Singh warned his students a tidal wave of insanity would soon engulf modern industrialized societies.[69] As a remedy, Singh taught hundreds of techniques of yogic exericise and meditation. Many have been catalogued by their traditionally known effects in calming and healing the mind and body. Some of those techniques have been scientifically studied and applied in clinical practice with favorable results.[70]
One of the most noteworthy successes has been achieved by Dharma Singh Khalsa, M.D., whose holistic treatment of Alzheimers disease using yoga with other therapeutic modalities has been lauded by the U.S. Surgeon General.

Singh received significant coverage in the North American media, particularly in the early 1970s when yoga was still a matter of general curiosity.

Singh’s message of no drugs, family values and healthy living was widely popular, and many of the media stories were positive, serving not only to educate the public, but also to publicize the work of the 3HO Foundation. Some focused on the lifestyle, others on the inspiration behind the organization.[75][76][77] Others focused on Singh’s holistic approach to drug addiction.

When U.S. President Nixon called drugs America’s “Number one domestic problem,” Singh launched a pilot program with two longtime heroin addicts in Washington, D.C. in 1972.[67] The next year, a full-blown drug treatment center known as “3HO SuperHealth” was launched in Tucson, Arizona. The program used Kundalini Yoga, diet and massage therapy to cure the addicts. According to the 3HO website, the center distinguished itself in 1978 as being among the top 10% of all treatment programs throughout the United States, with a recovery rate of 91%.[68][not in citation given]
Early on, when the term “stress” was still practically unheard of, Singh warned his students a tidal wave of insanity would soon engulf modern industrialized societies.[69] As a remedy, Singh taught hundreds of techniques of yogic exercise and meditation. Many have been catalogued by their traditionally known effects in calming and healing the mind and body. Some of those techniques have been scientifically studied and applied in clinical practice with favorable results.[70]
One of the most noteworthy successes has been achieved by Dharma Singh Khalsa, M.D., whose holistic treatment of Alzheimers disease using yoga with other therapeutic modalities has been lauded by the U.S. Surgeon General.

Some of Singh’s earliest students in Los Angeles had spent time in New Mexico influenced by Native American, especially Hopi teachings. To fulfill their wishes, he accompanied them in June 1969 to their summer solstice celebration at the Tesuque Indian reservation outside of Santa Fe.[23]
At the next year’s celebration, a delegation of Hopi Indian elders arrived. They spoke of their ancient legend that before the end of the present age of darkness, a white-clad warrior would come from the East and create an army of warriors in white who would rise up and protect the “Unified Supreme Spirit.” A sweat lodge ceremony was held and a sacred arrow given in trust to him. The elders explained that they had determined he was the white-clad warrior of their legend.[24]
Seven years later, he purchased a large parcel of land in the Jemez Mountains where the Hopis had indicated sacred gatherings had taken place for thousands of years. The elders had said this land needed to be prepared so “the Unified Supreme Spirit can once again be experienced by the great tribes and spread through all the people of the world.” The land was named “Ram Das Puri” and annual solstice prayers and festivities have been celebrated there every summer since. Since 1990, these have included a Hopi sacred prayer walk.[25]

Little is known about Vladimir Megre’s early life, apart from a few experiences he describes in his writings. One of these occurred in the 1960s when as a teenager he made periodic visits to a monk called Father Feodorit at the Trinity-Sergiev Monastery, in Sergiev Posad (then known as Zagorsk), just east of Moscow.[1]
In the mid-1980s Megre was married, having a daughter (Polina) and living in Novosibirsk, where, like many other new Russian capitalists, he took advantage of Perestroika and the subsequent collapse of the communist system to launch into an entrepreneurial career. He formed a number of commercial co-operatives and by the late 1980s had leased a fleet of river steamers which plied the waters of the Ob River north of Novosibirsk.[2]
[edit] Anastasia and the “Ringing Cedars” books
Megre claims to have met a mysterious young woman named Anastasia on the bank of the River Ob in 1994. She reportedly led him deep into the Siberian taiga, where she revealed her philosophy on Man’s relationship to Nature, the Universe and God, as well as lifestyle, education, nutrition, spirituality, love, family, sexual relations and other plants. These teachings became the basis for a series of best-selling books, The Ringing Cedars of Russia, first published in 1996. In ten years they sold over 10 million copies and have been translated into twenty languages.
[edit] Back to the Land movement
The Ringing Cedars series offers material about living close to the Earth in a village of Kin’s domains by creating a ‘Space of Love’.[3] The books have become the basis for a Russian and increasingly worldwide Back to the Land movement based on the Russian tradition of self-reliant simple living on the land, providing physical subsistence and spiritual fulfillment.[4] It is one of a number of such projects in Russia.[5] The books and communities combine deep ecology with traditional, even conservative family values, quite unlike the conventional hippie alternative lifestyle.[6] This is based on the idea of “kin estates” or self-sufficient family homesteads.[7] Before the publication of the first book in the series, there were virtually no eco-villages in Russia. By June 5, 2004, eight years later, a conference of the Ringing Cedars Movement in Vladimir, attracted delegates from over 150 eco-villages from across 48 of the 89 regions of Russia[8]
Megré’s ideas are similar to those of Russia’s agricultural economist Alexander Chayanov eighty years earlier,[9] referring to harmonious relationship with nature based on sustainable rural settlements consisting of individual family-owned homesteads.[10] Also like Chayanov, Megré presents his ideas in a novel-like format. He admits using this strategy to minimize initial resistance to his writings.[11]
In addition to Russia, Anastasia centers can be found in Australia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Ireland, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Netherlands,[12] New Zealand, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and the United States.[13]
One New Age writer relates the Ringing Cedar books to the “great change” Edgar Cayce prophesied for Russia.[14]

In large part, Roza Mira is a spiritual cosmography, a description of the domains human souls occupy after death or between incarnations—domains resembling, to greater or lesser degrees, the heavens, hells, purgatories, and netherworlds of various religions and mythological systems. As such, it can be compared to works like the Bardo Thodol or Tibetan Book of the Dead, and the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri (as well as modern expressions of the same visionary tradition, like The Urantia Book). As a 20th-century entrant in this sub-genre, Roza Mira extends its purview far beyond the terrestrial Earth, to other planets, solar systems, and galaxies. Andreev peoples these visionary domains with types of beings recognizable from world religions and mythologies—angels, archangels, demons, daemons, titans, nature spirits or “elementals”—and also with creatures unique to Andreev’s vision, called igvas, raruggs, and witzraors, among others. The venues include familiar names like Atlantis and Gondwana, plus unique Andreevian coinages, Olirna and Digm, Mudgabr and Fongaranda and many more. All of this is expressed in a distinctive and remarkable volcabulary—and this vocabulary is one of the most noteworthy aspects of the text. So, the Earth (Enrof) is the center of a complex structure (bramfatura) of 242 “variomaterial planes.” Similar structures abound in the known universe, so that Andreev’s cosmos comes to resemble the “niutas of kotis of Buddha countries” (i.e. tens of millions of millions of alternative realms) described in the sutras of the Buddhist religious canon. This makes Roza Mira a highly distinctive and notable entry in the Western esoteric spiritual literature.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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