O’Hart Red Hand

The Hart name is associated with the Red Hand of Ulster and the O’Neill Kings of Ireland. In authoring the history of the Rosemond family, Leland Rosemond consulted O’Hart’s Irish Pedigrees compiled by John O’Hart. The Hart family is there in the name Thomas Hart Benton.

“To complete his genealogies he used the writings of Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, Duald Mac Firbis and O’Farrell, along with the Annals of the Four Masters, for the medieval pedigrees. He used the works of Bernard Burke, John Collins and others to extend his genealogies past the 17th century.”

Above we see a flag with a Red Hand within a Star of David. John O’Hart was the Dan Brown of his day.

“In his Irish Pedigrees, O’Hart presents the legendary origins of the Irish people, from the Biblical Adam and Eve through the kings of ancient Ireland. Irish tradition holds that every Irish person is descended from the king Milesius who emigrated from Spain in 500 BC, so O’Hart started each of his genealogies with Adam recording Milesius as his 36th descendant.”

I am authoring a great genealogical story that will sweep over my enemies like a tsunami, and leave their history wallowing in pools of mud!

Jon Presco

Copyright 2011

O’Harte is a native English name, numerous in that country but in Ireland the Harts (usually spelt Harte in Connacht) are nearly all of the Sept O’Hart [4]. Some families have always retained, others have recently retained preserved the prefix O. In Irish the name is O’hArt, i.e. descendant of Art who was son of King Conn of the Hundred Battles. The O’Harts were the Southern Ui Neill and were one of the Four Tribes of Tara (Co. Meath) in early times. Tbut after the Anglo-Norman invasion they were pushed westward and settled in the territory now known as the barony of Carbury, Co Sligo. O’Hart is included in the Composition Book of Connacht.

Leland E. Rosemond
March, 1938
Scarsdale, N. Y.
THE NAME ROSEMOND

John O’Hart

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This article relies largely or entirely upon a single source. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. Discussion about the problems with the sole source used may be found on the talk page. (March 2011)
John O’Hart (1824 – 1902) was an Irish genealogist. He was born in Crossmolina, Co. Mayo, Ireland. A committed Roman Catholic, O’Hart originally planned to become Catholic priest but instead spent 2 years as a police officer. He was an Associate in Arts at the Queen’s University of Belfast. He worked at the Commissioners of National Education during the years of the Great Irish Famine. He worked as a genealogist and took an interest in Irish history. He was an Irish nationalist. He died in 1902 in Clontarf near Dublin, at the age of 78.
O’Hart’s 800-page The Irish and Anglo-Irish landed gentry (Dublin 1884) was reprinted in 1969, with an introduction by Edward MacLysaght, the first Chief Herald of Ireland. Another work, Irish pedigrees; or, The origin and stem of the Irish nation, first published in 1876, has come out in several subsequent editions.
To complete his genealogies he used the writings of Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, Duald Mac Firbis and O’Farrell, along with the Annals of the Four Masters, for the medieval pedigrees. He used the works of Bernard Burke, John Collins and others to extend his genealogies past the 17th century.
[edit] Stem of the Irish nation
In his Irish Pedigrees, O’Hart presents the legendary origins of the Irish people, from the Biblical Adam and Eve through the kings of ancient Ireland. Irish tradition holds that every Irish person is descended from the king Milesius who emigrated from Spain in 500 BC, so O’Hart started each of his genealogies with Adam recording Milesius as his 36th descendant.
From (1) Adam, his son (2) Seth, his son (3) Enos, his son (4) Cainan, his son (5) Mahalaleel, his son (6) Jared, his son (7) Enoch, his son (8) Methuselah, his son (9) Lamech, his son (10) Noah, his son (11) Japhet, his son (12) Magog, his son (13) Baoth “to whom Scythia came has his lot,” his son (14) Phoeniusa Farsaidh (Fenius Farsa) King of Scythia, his son (15) Gaodhal (Gathelus), his son (16) Asruth, his son (17) Sruth (who fled Egypt to Creta), his son (18) Heber Scut (returned to Scythia), his son (19) Beouman, King of Scythia, his son (20) Ogaman King of Scythia, his son (21) Tait King of Scythia, his son (22) Agnon (who fled Scythia by sea with the majority of his people), his son (23) Lamhfionn (who led his people to Gothia or Getulia, where Carthage was afterwards built), his son (24) Heber Glunfionn King of Gothia, his son (25) Agnan Fionn King of Gothia, his son (26) Febric Glas King of Gothia, his son (27) Nenuall King of Gothia, his son (28) Nuadhad King of Gothia, his son (29) Alladh King of Gothia, his son (30) Arcadh King of Gothia, his son (31) Deag King of Gothia, his son (32) Brath King of Gothia (who left Gothia with a large band of his people and settled in Galicia, Spain), his son (33) Breoghan King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal, his son (34) Bile King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal, and his son (35) Galamh (also known as Milesius of Spain) King of Galicia, Andalusia, Murcia, Castile, and Portugal.
According to O’Hart’s account, Milesius had four sons, Heber, Ir, Heremon, and Amergin, who were involved, along with their uncle Ithe, in the invasion of ancient Ireland; Milesius, himself, had died during the planning. Because Amergin died during the invasion, he died without issue. It is from the four other invaders–Heber, Ir, Heremon, and Ithe–that the Irish are alleged to descend. These. according to O’Hart, are the four lines from which all true Irish descend.

Niall Noígíallach (Irish pronunciation: [ˈniːəl noɪˈɣiːələx], Old Irish “having nine hostages”),[1] or in English, Niall of the Nine Hostages, son of Eochaid Mugmedón, was an Irish king, the eponymous ancestor of the Uí Néill kindred who dominated Ireland from the 6th century to the 10th century. The rise of the Uí Néill dynasties and their conquests in Ulster and Leinster are not reliably recorded but have been the subject of considerable study and attempts to reconstruct them.
Although generally supposed to be a historical personage, very little can confidently be said of Niall’s life. The sources for the details of Niall’s life are genealogies of historical kings, the “Roll of Kings” section of the Lebor Gabála Érenn, Irish annals such as the Annals of the Four Masters, chronicles such as Geoffrey Keating’s Foras Feasa ar Éirinn, and legendary tales like “The Adventure of the Sons of Eochaid Mugmedon” and “The Death of Niall of the Nine Hostages”. These sources date from long after Niall’s time and their value as history is limited at best.
Niall is placed in the traditional list of High Kings of Ireland. His reign dated to the late 4th and early 5th centuries. The Annals of the Four Masters dates his accession to 378 and death to 405.[2] The chronology of Keating’s Foras Feasa ar Éirinn broadly agrees, dating his reign from 368-395, and associating his raiding activities in Britain with the kidnapping of Saint Patrick (ca. 390-461).[3] However, the traditional roll of kings and its chronology is now recognised as artificial. The High Kingship did not become a reality until the 9th century, and Niall’s legendary status has been inflated in line with the political importance of the dynasty he founded. Based on Uí Néill genealogies and the dates given for his supposed sons and grandsons, modern historians believe he is likely to have lived some 50 years later than the traditional dates, dying circa 450.[4]

The coat of arms of the Uí Néill (plural of Ó Néill) of Ulster were white with a red left hand cut off below the wrist, and it is because of this prominence that the red hand (though a right hand is often found used mistakenly, rather than the left used originally) has also become a symbol of Ireland, Ulster, Tyrone and other places associated with the ruling family of Uí Néills. The red hand by itself has become a symbol of the O’Neill name, such that when other O’Neill family branches were granted or assumed a heraldic achievement, this red hand was often incorporated into the new coat of arms to the point of being a cliché.[5]In his Irish Pedigrees, O’Hart presents the legendary origins of the Irish people, from the Biblical Adam and Eve through the kings of ancient Ireland.heir chiefs were lords of Tiffia (Co Meath) Irish tradition holds that every Irish person is descended from the king Milesius who emigrated from Spain in 500 BC, so O’Hart started each of his genealogies with Adam recording Milesius as his 36th descendant.

According to O’Hart’s account, Milesius had four sons, Heber, Ir, Heremon, and Amergin, who were involved, along with their uncle Ithe, in the invasion of ancient Ireland; Milesius, himself, had died during the planning. Because Amergin died during the invasion, he died without issue. It is from the four other invaders–Heber, Ir, Heremon, and Ithe–that the Irish are alleged to descend. These. according to O’Hart, are the four lines from which all true Irish descend.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to O’Hart Red Hand

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    Some people are destined to be Immortal. The work Keith and I performed in our lifetime, was to awaken the Red Hand of Ulster and the Kings of Melisia where there was a Labyrinth Belle Erin means ‘Beautiful Ireland’.

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