Fleming Witherspoon Stuart

WitherspoonCoA
IrishGathering - The Fleming Clan Coat of Arms (Family Crest) and History. Irish Gathering 2013

Note the name Atholl that is a Stewart.

The Big Lying going on, fueled by billionaires paying for politicians, spells doom for our Democracy. The Stewarts aligned themselves with the two sisters that founded a religious schism. This came to America, and the Protestants prevailed. Mary’s loyal folks hid themselves, and were exiled to Canada as Tories. The crusade against WOKE and Pro-lifers, is a sham by the Church-State to destroy growing secularism that threatens the status quo new and old wealth who own most of the land.

With the discovery this morning of he Holinshed Chronicle reminds me I own a neglected theory as to who wrote Shakespeare. I am looking at a brother and sister who help author the King James Bible.

I am certain mostt of the Wiherspoons were proud and traditional Democrats – until seventy years ago.!

John Presco

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Fleming

Mary Fleming (/ˈflɛmɪŋ/) (1542–fl. 1581) was a Scottish noblewoman and childhood companion and cousin of Mary, Queen of Scots. She and three other ladies-in-waiting (Mary LivingstonMary Beaton and Mary Seton) were collectively known as “The Four Marys”.[1] A granddaughter of James IV of Scotland, she married the queen’s renowned secretary, Sir William Maitland of Lethington.

Malcolm Fleming, 3rd Lord Fleming (c. 1494 – 10 September 1547), was Lord Chamberlain of Scotland to King James V, from 1524.

Early life[edit]

He was the son and heir of John Fleming, 2nd Lord Fleming, who was killed in a feud with the Tweedie of Drumelzier family in 1524.

Prisoner[edit]

In November 1542, he was taken prisoner by the English at the Battle of Solway Moss, but released at a ransom of 1,000 marks, paid on 1 July 1548. During the Regency of the Earl of Arran he took messages from Mary of Guise to the English ambassador Ralph Sadler.[1] He was also happy to receive English messengers at his home at Cumbernauld Castle in 1544.[2]

Personal life[edit]

Fleming’s principal house was Boghall at Biggar, where he founded the collegiate church in 1545. The Tweedie family had already endowed a chaplain there in 1531 as part of the resolution of the feud.[3]

Malcolm married Janet Stewart, illegitimate daughter of King James IV of Scotland, after being granted a dispensation on 26 February 1524/5. Their children included:

He also had illegitimate sons called John and William.[7]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumbarton_Castle

“These original settlers in Williamsburg Township came from England, Ireland, Scotland, Germany, Holland, and from the New England States, Pennsylvania and Virginia. They were all about the same class of men. They were people who had been non-conformists as to State-Church religion, and nearly all of their families had lost their property in the religious conflicts of the seventeenth century. The greater number of them had lived in Ireland for many years before coming to America. They had migrated from England and from Scotland to Ireland on account of fair promises on the part of the English King. These failing them, they sought refuge in America.”

He was the great grandson of John Knox and his second wife, Margaret Stuart. From his Stuart great grandmother, he drew some of the blood of Robert Bruce as well as that of other Scotsmen of great strength and power-even from the Laird who became Shakespeare’s Banquo’s Ghost.

Witherspoon is an old Scottish name and is frequently mentioned in accounts of ancient battles. A description of the coat of arms may be found in Burke’s Armory. The cross and crescents thereon indicate crusader ancestry and the engrailed cross denotes possession of landed estates.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banquo

Shakespeare borrowed the character Banquo from Holinshed’s Chronicles, a history of Britain published by Raphael Holinshed in 1587. In Chronicles Banquo is an accomplice to Macbeth in the murder of the king, rather than a loyal subject of the king who is seen as an enemy by Macbeth. Shakespeare may have changed this aspect of his character to please King James, who was thought at the time to be a descendant of the real Banquo. Critics often interpret Banquo’s role in the play as being a foil to Macbeth, resisting evil whereas Macbeth embraces it. Sometimes, however, his motives are unclear, and some critics question his purity. He does nothing to accuse Macbeth of murdering the king, even though he has reason to believe Macbeth is responsible.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holinshed%27s_Chronicles

nfluence on Shakespeare[edit]

William Shakespeare is widely believed[5] to have used the revised second edition of the Chronicles (published in 1587) as the source for most of his history plays, the plot of Macbeth, and portions of King Lear and Cymbeline.

Several other playwrights, such as Christopher Marlowe, used the Chronicles as a source.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atholl_Fleming

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Stewart,_4th_Earl_of_Atholl

https://www.geni.com/people/John-Stewart-4th-Earl-of-Atholl/4235130604110046555

John Stewart, 4th Earl of Atholl (died 25 April 1579) was a Scottish noble…

…He was the son of John Stewart, 3rd Earl of Atholl and Grizel Rattray…

…He married:

  1. Elizabeth, daughter of George Gordon, 4th Earl of Huntly and Elizabeth Keith, by whom he had two daughters, one of them Elizabeth Stewart, wife of Hugh Fraser, 5th Baron Lovat (this union led to descent of James Monroe, 5th President of the U.S.A.), Robert Stewart, 6th Earl of Lennox and James Stewart, Earl of Arran; and
  2. The Hon. Margaret Fleming, widow of Robert Graham, Baron Graham, and Thomas Erskine, Master of Erskine. With Margaret, James had three daughters, Jean Stewart, wife of Sir Duncan Campbell, 1st Baronet, Grizel Stewart, wife of David Lindsay, 11th Earl of Crawford and Mary Stewart, wife of Francis Hay, 9th Earl of Erroll, and one son, John Stewart, 5th Earl of Atholl, at whose death in 1595 left the earldom in default of male heirs and reverted to the crown.”

https://www.geni.com/people/Margaret-Fleming/6000000008630789607

About Janet ‘Jennet’ Fleming

Janet married John Fleming in Ireland. “She had a large family of children in Ireland and brought seven of them to this place, Williamsburg…” -Robert Witherspoon, 1780, quoted in Ensworth, Sarah I. B. The Bradleys and Allied Families of South Carolina. Medina, Ohio: Ensworth Print. Co., 1969. Print. p. 129. K1

https://www.singletonfamily.org/familygroup.php?familyID=F4638

STUART OF ATHOLE

 Reverend John FLEMING / Janet WITHERSPOON (F4638)

John PRESSLEY 
GenderMale 
_UID889308D6F0D9487DA0DE53B4DC549C2C048B 
Person IDI13507 Singleton and other families
Last Modified18 Apr 2022 
FamilyIsabella FLEMING

https://www.geni.com/people/James-Fleming/6000000129563440834#:~:text=About%20James%20Fleming%20Son%20of%20William%20Fleming%2C%20who,Henry%2C%20George%2C%20Peter%2C%20Mary%20%28wife%20of%20David%20Cowan%29.

About James Fleming

Son of William Fleming, who emigrated from Scotland and died before 1733. Siblings of James Fleming include John, William, Henry, George, Peter, Mary (wife of David Cowan).

Biography

Children of James and Ann Fleming:
  • William Fleming
  • John Fleming (1722 – 1761)
  • Henry Fleming (abt. 1736 – 1767)
  • Joseph Fleming (abt. 1738 – 1799)
  • Susanna (Fleming) Robb (1739 – 1816)
  • James Fleming
  • Sarah (Fleming) Davinson
  • Mary (Fleming) Hart
  • Ann Fleming
  • Margaret Fleming

Estate

Decedent

Estate of William Fleming, of Caln Township, was granting to Mary Fleming on May 5, 1726. His sureties were John and James Fleming.[1] Will Abstract

James Fleming of East Caln Township signed his will on April 17, 1767, and his will proved May 27, 1767 in Chester County courthouse. Provides for wife Ann. To son Joseph plantation in East Caln containing 100 acres, he paying £388 in annual payments. To son William £25. To son Henry £20. To son Joseph £20. To daughter Sarah Davinson £25. To daughter Susanna Robb £25. To daughter Mary Hart [not given]. To daughter Ann Fleming £25. To daughter Margaret Fleming £100. To grandson James Fleming, son of John deceased £20. To Ann McBeth £5. To Susanna, widow of son James. Fleming deceased £5. Plantation I now live on to sons Henry and Joseph at wife’s decease, they paying to their sister Mary Hart £40. Executors: Sons Henry and Joseph.[2] Burial

James Fleming died on May 3, 1767 and was buried at Upper Octorara Church Cemetery in Parkesburg, Pennsylvania.[3]

Sources

https://www.yahoo.com/news/ian-fleming-estate-backs-controversial-091657420.html

https://www.williamsburgcounty.sc.gov/399/History

One of the first impressions that Williamsburg County offers to people entering the area is the beauty of live oak trees. The trees, many of which line the streets of Kingstree, are an important part of the local heritage and Southern charm. While Kingstree’s history is most often associated with the white pine that gave the town its name, today the emphasis is turning to the many live oak trees that are part of the town’s beauty and charm.

Explore Williamsburg County and discover one of the most beautiful areas of South Carolina, where history echoes in the fine architecture and new memories are waiting to happen.

Beginnings

Williamsburg County, located in the southern tip of the Pee Dee, holds treasures of historical interest dating back to the early 1700’s. In 1730, Governor Robert Johnson proposed a “Township Plan,” marking the beginning of Williamsburg County. This plan was proposed to stimulate the economy of the province to provide protection for coastal settlers. The township, which was laid out on the bank of the Black River, was named Williamsburg in honor of the Protestant King, William of Orange.

Williamsburg Township’s success was largely attributable to the raising and processing of indigo. From indigo, came wealth and prosperity to the area. Hemp, flax, and Holland were other fine quality products introduced in the 1730’s. 

Meeting House

A settlement, existing on Black Mingo (later referred to as Willtown), had a “Meeting House” for dissenters in what later became Williamsburg County. In 1736, the first Williamsburg Presbyterian Meeting House was built. This “Meeting House” was the mother church for a wide area embracing several states.

Early Battles

In 1780, after the fall of Charles Town, the nucleus of “Marion’s Brigade” was formed in this area. On August 27, 1780, the “Battle of King’s Tree” took place and it was at this time that Major John James turned his group over to Francis Marion, the Swamp Fox. The fighting consisted of rear-action skirmishing, but heavy losses were sustained. British Major James Wemyss, under orders from Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton, burned the Indiantown Presbyterian Church down.

The battles of Black Mingo (September 28-29, 1780), Mount Hope Swamp (March 1781) and Lower Bridge (March 1781) were all fought in Williamsburg County.

Kingstree

Williamsburg, the first settlement, later was named King’s Tree because the King reserved for his own use all white pines. In 1886, King’s Tree became known as Kingstree. Kingstree became the county seat of Williamsburg County. Years following the Revolution, Williamsburg County quickly prospered. Since then, Williamsburg County has become famous for its wildlife and hunting preserves. It has truly become a “Sportsman’s Paradise.”

Thorntree Plantation

Thorntree, the plantation home of James Witherspoon (who lived from 1700 to 1768), was built in 1749. After the death of James Witherspoon, Thorntree became the home of Gavin Witherspoon, the son of James and Elizabeth Witherspoon. 

During the Revolution, Tarleton with one hundred British dragoons, and a large number of Tories under Colonel Elias Ball, encamped at the plantation of Gavin Witherspoon, south of the lower bridge, on Black River, early in August 1780. 

As a restoration project, Williamsburg Historical Society relocated Thorntree to the city limits of Kingstree in order to provide police and fire prevention. For future generations, as well as for the present, the Historical Society desires to preserve and restore this early architectural structure.

Old Muster Ground & Courthouse

Old Muster Ground and Courthouse Historical PlaqueBack in 1737, the Courthouse grounds, located on Main Street in Kingstree, was designated the parade ground in the original survey of the town of Kingstree. The grounds served as the muster ground for the local militia during colonial and Revolutionary Times. 

Courthouse Dates

  • The Williamsburg County Courthouse, designed by South Carolina native and nationally known architect Robert Mills, was built in 1823.
  • In 1883, a fire gutted the second story, but the massive brick barrel arches protected the public records in the first story, and realizing that the 30 inch walls were fireproof the building was soon repaired. 
  • The Courthouse was enlarged in 1901 with an addition of a substantial fence to give a good park to the town and to keep horses and cattle out of the square. 
  • Due to efforts of Judge Phillip H. Stoll, the Courthouse was remodeled in 1954. The Courthouse had been enlarged by adding a 3 story wing at the back, giving the building its present T-shape.

Ann Witherspoon was born before 1771. She was the daughter of John Witherspoon.1 She married Reverend Samuel Stanhope Smith.
Her married name became Smith.1

Child of Ann Witherspoon and Reverend Samuel Stanhope Smith
1.Mary Stanhope Clay Smith+1 b. 30 Aug 1787

History of Williamsburg

By

William Willis Bodie

p. 10-20 on Witherspoon Family

“In 1734, John Witherspoon and his seven children, six of whom were married and brought children of their own, came up Black River as far as Potato Ferry; and, from this point, settled in various parts of the Township. Robert Witherspoon, grandson of John, in 1780, wrote the following account of the Witherspoon Colony, the original manuscript, of which this is a true copy, is in the possession of the descendants of the late Dr. J. R. Witherspoon, of Alabama.

‘John Witherspoon and Janet Witherspoon were born in Scotland about the year 1670. They lived in their younger years near Glasgow, at a place called Begardie, and were married in 1693. In 1695, they left Scotland and settled at Knockbracken, in the Parish of Drumbo, County of Down, Ireland, where they lived in comfortable circumstances and good credit until the year 1734. He then removed with his family to South Carolina.

We went of board the ship called ‘The Good Intent’ on the 14th of September, and were detained by headwinds fourteen days in the Lough at Belfast. On the second day after we set sail, my grandmother, Janet, died and was interred in the boisterous ocean, which was affecting sight to her offspring.

We were sorely tossed at sea with storms, which caused our ship to spring a leak; our pumps were kept incessantly at work day and night for many days together and our mariners seemed many times at their wits’ end. But it please God to bring us all safe to land, except my grandmother, about the first of December.

But to return,–my grandfather and grandmother had seven children. Their names

were as follows, viz: Janet [or Jennet], David, James, Elizabeth, Robert, Mary, and Gavin. Their daughter Janet was born in Scotland and was married to John Fleming in Ireland. They had a large family of children born in Ireland and brought seven of them to this place, Williamsburg, viz: Isabella, John, Elizabeth, James, Janet, Penelope, and William. My uncle, Jon Fleming, died in 1750, in a good old age; my aunt Janet died in 1761 in the sixty-sixth year of her age. My uncle David was born in 1697, married to Ann Pressley and brought with him to this place two children, viz:

Sarah and Janet. He died in the year 1772 in the sixty-seventh year of his age.

In the fall of the year 1737, my grandfather, John Witherspoon, took a disease called Rose-in-the-leg, which occasioned a fever from which he died. He was the first person buried at the Williamsburg Meeting House, which he had assisted to erect. About the same time, 1737, my father had a daughter, Elizabeth that died, aged three years, born at the place called the Bluff, where we lived.

My grandfather was a man of middling or common stature, of a fine, healthy constitution, of fair complexion, and somewhat bow-legged. He was well acquainted with the Scriptures, had volubility in prayer, and was a zealous adherent to the principles of what was called in his day the Reformed Protestant Church of Scotland. He had also a great aversion to Episcopacy, and whoever will impartially read the history of the times of his younger years in Scotland will see that his prejudices were not without cause. It was his lot to live in a time of great distress to the persecuted Church, during the reign of James the Seventh of Scotland and Second of England. Being one who followed field-meetings, e and some others of his kindred were much harassed by the Papists. Yet, notwithstanding, if his younger years were attended with some trouble, he still enjoyed great peace and tranquility in his after life and had the comfort and happiness of living to see his seven children all creditably married and settled for themselves; and, except the death of my grandmother, his beloved wife, he never knew what it was to part by dealt with one of his own immediate family, a blessing which few persons have granted to them, especially at his advanced age.

My father’s name was James, the third child and second son of my grandparents. He was born at the beginning of the present century, lived with his parents at Drumbo, County of Down, until he was twenty-five years old, when he married my mother, whose name was Elizabeth McQuoid, in the twentieth year of her age.

p. 21

“From 1735 to 1737, a great many settlers came to the new township on Black River and practically every acre of land had been taken up by these settlers within a year after the township had been surveyed. Every man settling here was granted a half acre town lot and fifty acres of land in the township for himself, his wife, and each one of his children.”

p. 22

“These original settlers in Williamsburg Township came from England, Ireland, Scotland, Germany, Holland, and from the New England States, Pennsylvania and Virginia. They were all about the same class of men. They were people who had been non-conformists as to State-Church religion, and nearly all of their families had lost their property in the religious conflicts of the seventeenth century. The greater number of them had lived in Ireland for many years before coming to America. They had migrated from England and from Scotland to Ireland on account of fair promises on the part of the English King. These failing them, they sought refuge in America.”

p. 30-31

“Jon Witherspoon settled on Boggy Swamp in Williamsburg in 1734, and died in 1737. He was the first person buried at the Williamsburg Meeting House. He was born near Glasgow in 1670, moved to County Down, Ireland, in 1695, from whence he came to this country.

He was the great grandson of John Knox and his second wife, Margaret Stuart. From his Stuart great grandmother, he drew some of the blood of Robert Bruce as well as that of other Scotsmen of great strength and power-even from the Laird who became Shakespeare’s Banquo’s Ghost.

Witherspoon is an old Scottish name and is frequently mentioned in accounts of ancient battles. A description of the coat of arms may be found in Burke’s Armory. The cross and crescents thereon indicate crusader ancestry and the engrailed cross denotes possession of landed estates.

Dr. John Witherspoon, President of Princeton, member of the Continental Congress, and signer of the Declaration of Independence, was a nephew of the John Witherspoon, original settler in Williamsburg.”

p. 44-47

“While the original settlers of Williamsburg came to the township on Black River primarily for economic reasons, yet the congregational religious principle, which had grown in the majority of them for centuries and which was largely responsible for their temporary impoverished condition, was, in fact, the cause of their migration into this wild country.”

“Practically all of the original settlers in Williamsburg Township were of the Congregational or Presbyterian faith and their exceeding enthusiasm was shown in the promotion of Presbyterian principles. Although many of them inclined to the Church of Scotland as ‘reformed’ by John Calvin and John Knox, yet in heart they were adherents of the untouched ancient doctrines.

On July 2, 1736, the following ‘indwellers in Williamsburg’ met and formed the Williamsburg Presbyterian Congregation, which congregation has maintained its organization continuously until the present day: John Witherspoon, John Fleming, William James, David Wilson, James Bradley, Robert Wilson, John Porter, David Pressley, Robert Ervin, William Pressley, John Henderson, William Frierson, Thomas Frierson, William Syms, David Allen, John James, James McClelland, and David Witherspoon.

This congregation petitioned for a grant of land for erecting thereon their Meeting House, but the Colonial Governor did not act promptly on their petition. Two years later, in 1738, they secured from Captain Roger Gordon two acres of land on the eastern boundary of the platted ‘Town of Williamsburg’, and there built the Williamsburg Meeting House. On this spot, the congregation worshipped continuously until 1890, when the church was moved to Academy Street in the town of Kingstree. The lot was then devoted exclusively to the use of the white people of the vicinity as a burying ground.

The first Williamsburg Meeting House was built of logs and was used until 1746, when the log structure was replaced by an excellent house of worship. William Swinton, a prominent member of Prince George’s Church, left a legacy of one hundred pounds in his will for aiding the erection of this second Meeting House.

This was the largest building in the township until the War of the Revolution. It faced the East and was located in the Western part of the present Williamsburg cemetery. As one entered he came first to the Deacons’ seats. Elevated about six inches above the floor of the aisle. Back of the Deacons’ seats, and elevated twelve inches higher, was the pew for the Ruling Elders, larger than that of the Deacons’, and about square. Back of the Elders’ pew and three feet higher and up against the wall was the pulpit. The pews were all high-backed. The head of each family owned a pew and the Church and the Minister were supported by a tax on these pews. Some of the pew owners were not members of the Church, yet each pew owner had an equal voice and vote in the congregational meetings. This rule resulted in serious conditions in later years.

In 1770, on account of the rapid growth of the colony, both by birth and by new immigrants from Ireland, this house of worship was doubled in size, which was done by extending the side opposite the pulpit.”

Hopewell: 250 tons. June 16 advertised arrival in England from South Carolina; a minister urgently needed. Advertised Master, J. Ash; agent, Wm. Beatty, merchant; sailed from Belfast, with Capt. Martin, Master, Oct. 19, 1772

John Fleming, 2nd Lord Fleming

  • Chamberlain of Scotland1,2,3,4
  • Born: 1465
  • Died: 1 November 1524. Cause: killed by John Tweedie of Drummelzier.
  • Father: Malcolm Fleming, Master of Fleming d. c 1477
  • Mother: Eupheme Livingston d. a 1 Jun 1493

John Fleming was the second son to Sir Malcolm Fleming, of Monycabock, the heir to Robert, 1st Lord Fleming, and his wife Euphemia Livingston.[1]

His father died in 1477 and his brother David died in 1482 and he was served heir to his brother, in the lands of Dunbulls, on 2 May 1482. For some reason, likely his actions against the King, other lands were delayed and he was served heir to his brother for Auchtermony 30 Mar 1490. … By 1521 he was one of the most influential nobles at court, a feat not without its enemies. By Parliament he was appointed one of the three noblemen to abide with the King, each for three months. …

By 1520 the estate of Fruid had fallen to an Heiress. The estate was once part of the Fraser estates of Oliver Castle which had become Fleming lands after the marriage of Patrick Fleming, Lord of Biggar, although held to them by a family of Tweedie. John Fleming held the superiority to Fruid and as such the ward and marriage of the Heiress. He would, no doubt, be anxious to ensure his borders and he contracted to marry his illegitimate son, Malcolm to the Heiress, thus ensuring his borders and providing his illegitimate son with lands. It is not clear that the marriage occurred. Hunter believes so as there is evidence[12] to suggest she styles him her husband.

This incensed the Tweedies, presumably as they saw advantage to a marriage with her and one that was likely promised by Lord Fleming when she was not an Heiress. The Tweedies waited until Lord Fleming was hawking with a small party and attacked him. Lord Fleming was killed by John Tweedie of Drumelzier and Fleming’s party, including his son and heir, Malcolm, imprisoned. In order to obtain his liberty, he had to grant the ward and marriage of Fruid to Tweedie and as a pledge that he would fulfil the agreement which he had made, he put into the custody of the Tweedies, Malcolm Fleming his brother, Robert Stewart of Minto, and William Fleming of Boghall; these being retained for some time in Drummelzier. … On the 22 October 1528, the Tweedies were declared to be fugitives from the law, and were put to the horn, and their goods forfeited and conferred as a gift, under the Privy Seal, on Malcolm, Lord Fleming. In a hearing by the Privy Council in March 1530, the matter still not fully resolved, James Tweedie, heir-apparent of Drummelzier, was banished from Scotland and England for a period of three years or until such time as the King agreed. The courts required Tweedie to grant to Lord Fleming the land of old extent of Mossfennan, the land of old extent of Smallhopes and the mill thereof and the land called Urisland, in compensation for the loss of Ward of Fruid.[13]


Family

Disputed Family

It is not certain which wife is the mother of the children, and how many children there were.

  • Balfour Paul in the Scots Peerage lists 6: 5 by Eupheme Drummond; 1 by Agnes Somerville.
  • Clan MacFarland, citing Stirnet & “House of Lennox,” lists 8: 1 by Elizabeth Ross; 4 by Eupheme Drummond; 3 by Margaret Stewart.
  • Wikitree (retrieved 20 April 2022) lists 7: 3 by Eupheme Drummond; 1 by an unknown woman; 1 by Margaret Stewart

Unsourced children

Marriages & children

(Disputed) John Fleming married (1) Elizabeth Ross circa 1491 at Scotland.4,5. There is a record of a divorce by Lord Fleming in 1496, after which he married Eupheme Drummond.

1 child of John Fleming and Elizabeth Ross:

  • (Disputed) 1. Jean Fleming 4 b. c 1492, d. 1538. Married James Muirhead, 5th of Lauchope, b. 1490, Lauchope, Lanarkshire, Scotland. ” It seems far more likely that she was a Hamilton. If there is any original source please provide.” (Wikitree). (‘Jean Fleming, here treated, is reported to have been the daughter of John, Lord Fleming, ancestor of the present Earl of Wigton.’ A System of Heraldry etc. By Alexander Nisbet. Volume II: p. 262)

John Fleming married (1/2) bef. 5 May 1496 Eupheme Drummond, 5th dau. of John [Drummond], 1st Lord Drummond, by his wife Lady Elizabeth Lindsay, only dau. of Alexander [Lindsay], 4th Earl of Crawford. On 3 May 1502 she died, by poisoning, along with her sisters Margaret, one of four mistresses of James IV, and Sybella (d. unm.).

Euphemia Drummond, married, in 1495, to John, 2nd Lord Fleming, by “whom he had two sons and five daughters.” [SIC] (“Genealogical memoir of the most noble and ancient house of Drummond” by David Malcolm pub. 1808).

John Fleming is known to have had two daughters, unnamed by Balfour Paul and likely born before 1502 when Agnes Drummond was poisoned. (Wikitree)

(Possibly) the children of John Fleming and Euphemia Drummond:

(Possibly) the child of John Fleming by an unknown mistress:

  • 1. Malcolm Fleming, Prior of Whithorn (b. abt 1505 – d. bef. 30 Mar 1569). “Although Balfour Paul and Crawford mention he was born to Euphame, his first wife, it seems improbable that he named two sons Malcolm to the same mother. In Letters to Mary, Queen of Scots,[3] he is certainly noticed as Malcolm, Prior of Whithorn and second son to Lord Fleming thus born prior to James, his brother. In the work by Douglas of Glenbervie,[4] he is mentioned as being possibly illegitimate. William Hunter[5] mentions that he was most likely illegitimate. “John, second Lord Fleming, claimed the superiority of Fruid and the ward and marriage of Katherine Fraser, who not only held Fruid, but also Mossfennan and lands in Glenholm. His design was that she should marry his son Malcolm and it has been said that this marriage actually took place. But that is unlikely. …” (Wikitree)

John Fleming mar. (3 & 4, or 4 & 5) bef. 13 Feb 1508/9 (div. c. 1509; remar. after 17 Dec 1509; div. bef. 25 Oct 1515; mar. (2) bef. 1 May 1528 Alexander Douglas of Mains) Lady Margaret Stewart, 1st dau. of Matthew [Stewart], 2nd or 11th Earl of Lennox, by his second wife Elizabeth Hamilton, only dau. of James [Hamilton], 1st Lord Hamilton, by his second wife the Princess Mary, former wife of Thomas [Boyd], 1st Earl of Arran, and 1st dau. of James II, King of Scotland

(Possibly) the children of John Fleming and Margaret Stewart (Stirnet):

  • 1. James Fleming of Henderland (b. 1502 / 1510 – d after 4 Apr 1532). Died unmarried.
  • 2. (daughter) Fleming. Married? James Tweedie, of Drummelzier. (This marriage may have been contracted but never confirmed. Perhaps as a way of defusing the fued between the families.)
  • 3. (daughter)’ Fleming. (b Abt 1508 – d 1580). Married Laird Patrick “of Falahill” Murray

mar. (4/5) Agnes Somerville (mar. (2) betw. Dec 1526 and Jan 1528/9 as his 3rd wife George [Leslie], 4th Earl of Rothes; d. betw. 18 Aug 1541 and 10 Apr 1543), dau. of Sir John Somerville of Cambusnethan

Children of John Fleming and Agnes Somerville:

  • 1.Margaret Fleming, (b abt 1516 – d 1550); mar. after 12 dec 1540 John Cunningham of Glengarnock

John Fleming, 2nd Lord Fleming died 1 Nov 1524 murdered) suc. by son “by first wife” (Malcolm, 3rd Lord Fleming, by Euphame Drummond)

Notes

an opponent of King James III, he proclaimed King James IV, a child, king in 1488; part of embassies to France; Chamberlain of Scotland 1516/7-24; appointed on of the guardians of the King 1523; assassinated by John Tweedie of Drumelzier and others.

There is a record of a divorce by Lord Fleming in 1496, after which he married Eupheme Drummond.


The Scottish Nation: Fleming

John, the younger son, second Lord Fleming, was one of the three lords appointed in July 1515, guardians of King James the Fifth in his infancy. He was sent ambassador to France, and on his return he was, in January 1517, appointed chancellor of Scotland. In 1519, he was sent over to France to urge the regent duke of Albany to return to Scotland; and he was one of the three noblemen appointed by parliament 1523, to abide with King James the Fifth, each for three months. He was assassinated while enjoying the sport of hawking, by John Tweedie of Drummelzier, James Tweedie his son, and others, 1st November 1524. He married, first, Euphemia, fifth daughter of David Lord Drummond, and by her, who was poisoned with two of her sisters in 1501, (see DRUMMOND), he had issue. He married, secondly, Lady Margaret Stewart, eldest daughter of Matthew second earl of Lennox. She got a charter from her husband of the lands of Biggar and Thankertoun March 12, 1508-9. They were soon after divorced, and she resigned the lands in his favour October 26, 1516, and was then designed ‘olim reputatae spousae dicti Johannis.’ She afterwards married Alexander Douglas of Mains. In 1508 he had been denounced rebel at the king’s horn, and fined in the penalty of five hundred merks for not entering John Fleming of Boghall, for whom he had become surety or bail, for trial, charged with art and part of the rape or ravishment of the said Lady Margaret Stewart. Lord Fleming married, thirdly, Agnes Somerville, whose parentage is not stated.


2nd Lord Fleming, Chamberlain of Scotland

https://www.clanmacfarlanegenealogy.info/genealogy/TNGWebsite/getpe…

John, second Lord Fleming, claimed the superiority of Fruid and the ward and marriage of Katherine Fraser, who not only held Fruid, but also Mossfennan and lands in Glenholm. His design was that she should marry his son Malcolm and it has been said that this marriage actually took place. But that is unlikely. John Tweedie of Drumelzier cherished the same design for his nephew James, and this was quite natural, for the two families were friendly, and in 1521 Elizabeth Douglas, the widow of William Fraser, Katherine’s grand-father, had disponed to Tweedie the rents of Fruid and Mossfennan during the nonage of her bairns. On 1st November, 1524, Lord Fleming, with his eldest son and heir Malcolm, and a small retinue, was hawking in Glenholm, about two or three miles from Drumelzier. There he was met or waylaid by John Tweedie and his relatives and friends to the number of about fifty. Words passed and then blows, and Lord Fleming was killed, and Malcolm, his eldest son, was captured. This Malcolm obtained his liberty by consenting to the marriage of Katherine with James Tweedie; and his brother Malcolm, along with Robert Stewart, younger of Minto, and William Fleming of Boghall, were imprisoned in the ‘Place of Drumelzier’ as pledges for the fulfilment of the contract. Katherine, with the writs of her lands, was handed over, and she was promptly married to James Tweedie. Then the law came into operation, and the Tweedies attempted to pacify the angry Flemings. At first they were so far successful that an ‘assythment’ was arranged on 23rd November under which the Laird of Drumelzier and his accomplices went to the Cross of Peebles in their shirts – ‘sark alane’ – offered their naked swords to Lord Fleming and his kin, and bound themselves to be his servants. But that was not an end of the matter. The Privy Council took it up, and Tweedie was ordained to found a chaplainry in the church of Biggar, with a yearly stipend of ¹40 from his lands, for prayers for the soul of the dead Lord Fleming. James Tweedie, the heir, and other persons guilty of the slaughter, were banished for three years. But still the feud went on, On 8th August, 1525, Malcolm, Lord Fleming, apprised for 8000 merks the greater part of Tweedie’s lands: (1) Easter Drumelzier, with the Place of Tinnies, Hopkailzie, half of Halmyre, and Deanshouses, extending in whole to 210 merks of yearly value; (2) Wester Drumelzier with its Place, extending to ¹40 yearly, which belonged to Tweedie’s son James; and (3) Glenbreck and Glenumford in Peeblesshire, and Clifton in Roxburghshire, extending to 100 merks yearly. Notwithstanding this, John Tweedie did not give up his home, and on 27th September, 1526, Lord Fleming obtained a decree of delivery of the lands and fortalice of Drumelzier. On 6th June of the following year a respite for the crime for nineteen years was granted to Tweedie and thirteen others, and a settlement was finally reached in 1531, when Katherine, the Lady of Fruid, handed over to Lord Fleming all her possessions in the county, with the exception of Fruid itself, and the processes and apprisings against the Tweedies were then withdrawn.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Fleming

Mary Fleming (/ˈflɛmɪŋ/) (1542–fl. 1581) was a Scottish noblewoman and childhood companion and cousin of Mary, Queen of Scots. She and three other ladies-in-waiting (Mary LivingstonMary Beaton and Mary Seton) were collectively known as “The Four Marys”.[1] A granddaughter of James IV of Scotland, she married the queen’s renowned secretary, Sir William Maitland of Lethington.

https://www.geni.com/people/Mary-Fleming/6000000000748079261

https://www.geni.com/people/John-Fleming-5th-Lord-Fleming/6000000002006251563

John Fleming, 5th Lord Fleming

brief biography

Governor of Dumbarton Castle, Scotland in 1565

He was with Queen Mary Stuart in her flight from the Battle of Langside near Glasgow, 13 May 1568, and aided her escape to England. His lands were forfeited by Parliament 18 November 1569

Succeeded his brother, James, 4th Lord Fleming, who died Dec 15, 1558, at age 24 years. John had a charter as second son of Malcom, Lord Fleming, and Janet Stewart, his wife, of the Lands of Sunderland in Selkirkshire and Mossfennan in Peebles on Sept 29, 1541. Appointed Great Chamberlain for Life by commission dated Jun 30, 1565, and had a gift under Privy Seal from Queen Mary of the Office of Master Usher of Her Majesty’s Chambers during his lifetime.

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