Puritan Sex Madness

George Santos officially became a member of Congress in the early hours of January 7, 2023.

George Santos officially became a member of Congress in the early hours of January 7, 2023. AP Photo/Alex Brandon

On January 12th. I created the character, Cecil Wigglesworth, for my novel ‘The Royal Janitor’. I based Cecil on George Santos ‘The Man Who Doesn’t Have To Tell The Truth’……..because? Some pundits are saying, the Speaker of the House NEEDS Santos’ vote to get Republican Congressional proposals in made into LAWS – and even change the Constitution!

The first vote the Republican Congress, took, was the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act. The old and new testament does not say abortion is murder – or a crime. If a new law declares it is MURDER, then there will be a trial. Witnesses – will be sworn in. A Bible will be provided for this Secular Ceremony that bids witnesses TO TELL THE TRUTH – SO HELP YOU GOD!

Right-wing Republican Christians are making Religious Cases that Democrats, and Non-Believers are conducting warfare against the practice of Christianity. Why hasn’t any Liberal tried to get a law passed – forbidding the use of the Bible in court? Have I looked? In thousands of Court Owned Bibles, is written the Ten Commandments. In Matthew 19:12 is the sexual suggestion devout men CASTRATE THEMSELVES. This is a VERY PERSONAL DECISSION AND ACT. Is there a law against doing this? Consider the children that will not be born.

“Origen devoted himself to study and self-denial. When he was continually plagued by lust for women, he had himself castrated, an act known as an orchiectomy. Eusebius, the first and greatest Early Church historian, says of this young man’s act:”

After creating Cecil Wigglesworth (a name I saw in a graveyard) I googled this name, and found Michael Wigglesworth, a Puritan Minister, who was plagued by nocturnal emissions, that concerned Origen – and other church leaders. Saint Paul – castrated himself. Wigglesworth admits he was sexually attracted to men.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Wigglesworth

Because America’s Religious Party (who looks to the Puritans for permission to make the United States – a Christian Nation) bids fellow Christians to ignore THE LIES of Santos, and allowed him to take the Oath of Office, I do hereby swear…..God makes all oaths of office – WORTHLESS! In HIS NAME, I will work hard to FORBID THE USE OF THE BIBLE IN ALL COURTS!

While I am at it, I will work hard to – end the practice of orchiectomy. To sustain separation of church and state, there should be a law that requires all candidates for public office – submit a photograph of their INTACT testicles – signed by a Public Notary! Only candidates blessed by Pope Francis, and Franklin Graham, can be castrated, ending the Holy Flow of semen to the Womb of Woman. All photographic evidence will be kept in a Top Secret file at the National Archive, lest they fall into the wrong hands, and candidates be subjected to shaming and blackmail – which is not – The American Way! Those who are born with one testicle must go before a Board of Inquiry in order to determine if the loss was due to a religious act, or, the result of belonging to a Satanic Church.

So be it!

John Presco

“For there are some eunuchs, which were so born from their mother’s womb: and there are some eunuchs, which were made eunuchs of men: and there be eunuchs, which have made themselves eunuchs for the kingdom of heaven’s sake. He that is able to receive it, let him receive it.” Matthew 19:12 (KJV)

https://www.businessinsider.com/inside-congress-house-republicans-uneasy-reckoning-george-santos-lies-mccarthy-2023-1

Wigglesworth was plagued by his attraction to his male students, many of whom were his close contemporaries in age. The passages in his diary about these attractions are written in a secret code, allowing him to be explicit about his feelings and his fears.

On April 5, 1653, Wigglesworth wrote, “I find my spirit so exceedingly carried with love to my pupils that I can’t tell how to take up my rest in God.”[4] On July 4, 1653, he struggled with “filthy lust” inspired by “my fond affection for my students while in their presence.” Wigglesworth married in 1655, but his attraction to men continued. The day after his marriage Wigglesworth confessed to his diary: “I feel stirrings and strongly of my former distemper even after the use of marriage –which makes me exceeding afraid.”[5]

Wigglesworth believed that he was essentially not worthy of believing in God as a result of his depraved humanity. When he underwent a series of nocturnal emissions in his early life, he was thereafter convinced of his damnation. Through his diaries, he recounts his struggle to remain pure and good, despite continually relapsing into what he viewed as man’s natural depravity.[3]

Other works by Wigglesworth include God’s Controversy with New England,Meat out of the Eater, and “God’s Controversy with New England,” (1662). The latter poem was unpublished, yet provides a lengthy commentary on the fears of Puritans that they would be stricken by God for their sin, and persecuted by House of Stuart.[7]

Origen devoted himself to study and self-denial. When he was continually plagued by lust for women, he had himself castrated, an act known as an orchiectomy. Eusebius, the first and greatest Early Church historian, says of this young man’s act:

https://www.constitutionfacts.com/us-supreme-court/history-of-oaths-of-office/

The text now reads:

“I, ________, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter. So help me God.”

This office, much more specific and lengthy than the original, is now used by every federal office investiture except for the office of the President.

The Second Oath

Appointees to the Supreme Court Bench must not only take the oath listed above, but a second oath. This statement is called The Judicial Oath. The Judiciary Act of 1789 established the federal judiciary. The Act set the number of Supreme Court Justices at six (five Associate Justices and one Chief Justice). It also mandated that for the Supreme Court Justices to begin serving, they must swear a second Oath of Office. The original text of this was:

“I, _________, do solemnly swear or affirm that I will administer justice without respect to persons, and do equal right to the poor and to the rich, and that I will faithfully and impartially discharge and perform all the duties incumbent upon me as _________, according to the best of my abilities and understanding, agreeably to the constitution and laws of the United States. So help me God.”

This oath was used until 1990 when the Judicial Improvements Act replaced the phrase beginning with “according to the best of my abilities…” to “under the Constitution.” This language proved reasonably more effective in tying the decisions of the judiciary to the authority of the United States Constitution.

Frequently, Supreme Court Justices have elected to take a Combined Oath which brings the two affirmations together in one statement.

Section 90.605, Florida Statutes (2013)

Oath or affirmation of witness –

(1)   Before testifying, each witness shall declare that he or she will testify truthfully, by taking an oath or affirmation in substantially the following form: “Do you swear or affirm that the evidence you are about to give will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth?”

Jan. 12 (UPI) — The Republican-led House of Representatives has passed its first major abortion bill of the 118th Congress, requiring infants born alive during or following an attempted abortion to receive medical attention.

The bill titled the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act passed the House on Wednesday in a 220-210-1 vote along party lines. Rep. Henry Cuellar of Texas was the only Democrat to jump the aisle and vote in favor of the bill with his Republican counterparts.

Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, D-Ore., lambasted the bill for being “extremist, dangerous and unnecessary.”

“Many of my Republican colleagues talk about keeping big government out of people’s lives, but when it comes to one of the hardest, most intimate decisions that should be made between patients and their healthcare providers, these same colleagues think the government knowns better,” she said.

“Republicans in Congress and conservative extremists on the Supreme Court are waging a war on reproductive healthcare, a war on bodily autonomy and a war on the medical community and the doctor-patient relationship.”

Michael Wigglesworth (1631–1705) was a Puritan minister, physician, and poet whose poem The Day of Doom was a bestseller in early New England.

Contents

Family[edit]

Michael Wigglesworth was born October 18, 1631 in YorkshireEngland. His father was Edward Wigglesworth, born 1603 in Scotton, Lincolnshire, and his mother was Ester Middlebrook of Wrawby (born in Batley), who married on October 27, 1629 in Wrawby. The family moved to New England in 1638. They originally lived in Charlestown, Massachusetts, then soon moved to New Haven, Connecticut. When Wigglesworth was ten years old his father became bed-ridden, forcing him to leave school to help maintain the family farm.

He graduated from Harvard in 1651 and taught there as a tutor until 1654, sometimes preaching in Charlestown and Malden, Massachusetts. He became a minister at the First Parish in Malden in 1654 but was not actually ordained until 1656.[1]

A daughter Mercy Wigglesworth was born February 21, 1655. With his second wife he had six children, including Samuel Wigglesworth born circa 1689. His youngest son, with his third wife, Sybil (Avery) Sparhawk, was clergyman Edward Michael Wigglesworth (c. 1693–1765), who had several namesakes.[2] His son, Samuel, had 12 children, including one also named Edward Wigglesworth (1741–1826) who was a colonel in the American Revolutionary War.

Work[edit]

Wigglesworth believed that he was essentially not worthy of believing in God as a result of his depraved humanity. When he underwent a series of nocturnal emissions in his early life, he was thereafter convinced of his damnation. Through his diaries, he recounts his struggle to remain pure and good, despite continually relapsing into what he viewed as man’s natural depravity.[3]

At one point, Wigglesworth was overcome with a psychosomatic disorder in which he felt he should not preach. His confused and disappointed congregation elected to find a replacement for Wigglesworth, an unnamed preacher who went on to embezzle funds from the church. Thereafter, Wigglesworth was reinstated and encouraged to take up preaching again.

In his diaries, Wigglesworth expresses an overwhelming sense of inferiority. First with his refusal to accept the presidency of Harvard due to his lack of self-confidence, and again when he married his cousin because, he claims, he is not good enough to find another woman.

Wigglesworth was plagued by his attraction to his male students, many of whom were his close contemporaries in age. The passages in his diary about these attractions are written in a secret code, allowing him to be explicit about his feelings and his fears.

On April 5, 1653, Wigglesworth wrote, “I find my spirit so exceedingly carried with love to my pupils that I can’t tell how to take up my rest in God.”[4] On July 4, 1653, he struggled with “filthy lust” inspired by “my fond affection for my students while in their presence.” Wigglesworth married in 1655, but his attraction to men continued. The day after his marriage Wigglesworth confessed to his diary: “I feel stirrings and strongly of my former distemper even after the use of marriage –which makes me exceeding afraid.”[5]

Yet he was widowed twice, and married a third time: Mary Reyner in 1655, Martha Mudge in 1679 and Sybil (Avery) Spearhawk in 1691.[1]

In 1662 he published The Day of Doom or a Poetical Description of the Great and Last Judgment, a “doggerel epitome of Calvinistic theology”, according to a later anthology, Colonial Prose and Poetry (1903), that says it “attained immediately a phenomenal popularity. Eighteen hundred copies were sold within a year, and for the next century it held a secure place in New England Puritan households. As late as 1828 it was stated that “many aged persons were still alive who could repeat it, as it had been taught them with their catechism; and the more widely one reads in the voluminous sermons of that generation, the more fair will its representation of prevailing theology in New England appear.”[1] A less polemic analysis of the work might also show its rich use of dramatic imagery, combining a number of references from both Hebrew and Christian scriptures, and note the interlocked complexity of its double-rhymed octasina (8-syllable) lines.[6]

Despite the fierce denunciations of sinners and the terrible images of damnation in The Day of Doom, its author was known as a “genial philanthropist, so cheerful that some of his friends thought he could not be so sick as he averred. Dr. Peabody used to call him ‘a man of the beatitudes’, ministering not alone to the spiritual but to the physical needs of his flock, having studied medicine for that purpose,” according to Colonial Prose and Poetry.[1]

Other works by Wigglesworth include God’s Controversy with New England, Meat out of the Eater, and “God’s Controversy with New England,” (1662). The latter poem was unpublished, yet provides a lengthy commentary on the fears of Puritans that they would be stricken by God for their sin, and persecuted by House of Stuart.[7]

Salem Witchcraft Trials and Accountability[edit]

Cambridge Association[edit]

Rev. Wigglesworth was among the area ministers invited to join the Cambridge Association when it formed in 1690, organized by the twenty-seven-year-old Rev.Cotton Mather and the elder Rev.Charles Morton. The first order of business was to respond to a letter from the minister at Salem Village, Rev.Samuel Parris, and invite him to come down to meet with them a week later in the college library in Cambridge (see photo).

When they joined, ministers signed the book.

During the witchcraft trials in 1692, this group of ministers met often in the library and were solicited for advice regarding witchcraft doctrine.[8] Wigglesworth was in attendance at a number of meetings that year but is not recorded as having had much to say. His famous poem “Day of Doom” published some 30 years prior has only one brief mention of the word “witch.”[9] Unlike the Mathers, witchcraft does not appear to have been a subject of great interest to him.

On October 3, 1692, Wigglesworth signed his name to Rev. Samuel Willard‘s short and forceful introduction (“It is therefore exceeding necessary that in such a day as this, men be informed what is evidence and what is not.“) of Increase Mather’s essay “Cases Concerning Evil Spirits.” Increase Mather himself does not appear to have been in attendance at this meeting and his son Cotton Mather famously refused to sign Willard’s introduction.[10][11]

After the trials were ended, churchmembers in Salem Village who had suffered, or lost loved ones, sought a Church Council to hear grievances against their pastor Parris and they were supported in this effort by Willard.[12] Parris stalled for as long as he could and then sought allies, writing to the Mathers, and also inviting Wigglesworth through his church at Malden.[13] It is unclear why Parris would have considered Wigglesworth a possible ally. In any event, Wigglesworth did not attend the Council which took place April 3, 1695.[14]

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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