Tina Sworn in as ‘First Lesbian Governor of Oregon’

Oregon's new governor sworn in, declares homeless emergency - Los ...

Congratulations Governor Kotek!

The headline Yahoo News puts on the internet gives Tina Kotek a official title, a unique title. Is this something she and her wife – WANTED? As an original Hippie we loathed that name assigned to us by the media – who for the most part WANTED us to – FAIL! Why?…..we wondered. We assumed we were a threat to….The Protestant Work Ethic. Many of us went to college, and were dropping out of college. Timothy Leary, an ex-professor at Harvard, was Our Guide on how we could successfully do this. Had such a thing been tried before? Yes!. My blog is dedicated to recording The Attempts that went before. Being poor at the beginning of the Industrial Age, created The Bohemian Class. The opera, La Boheme, celebrates this Lower Class that hovered on the bring of homelessness – and IMPRISONMENT!

Prisoners and Ex-Cons are given New Identities. This is true of people who find themselves Homeless. In 1966 the Berkeley Police were raiding homes – with vacuum cleaners! Once they got inside (illegally) they vacuumed your floor. If they found a marijuana seed, everyone in the house was arrested and put in jail. They wanted Hippies to own – A RECORD. They wanted us to get – Mug Shots. They WANTED to destroy – our lives! This was supposed to be – A DETERENT! Shaming and Destroying People – has never worked. Why? Would you like to be Shamed and Destroyed for your choices you made – to enhance your identity? Election Deniers and Trumpites are poised to put the FBI on trial claiming they “weaponized” our Government. Are these the same Republicans’ that pushed Ed Meese and James Coakley to destroy Mario Savio?

In 1969, my kin, Howard Taylor got thirteen Berkleyites out of jail, and invited them to live on his land – free of charge! Huts were built, and streets laid out. In every major city there are thousands of homeless citizens who are having a extreme Identity Crist – that they can do very little about. I graduated from the New Hope Program ast Serenity Lane in Eugene Oregon. We were required to go to AA Meetings – and introduce ourselves, thus’

“Hello! My name is John….and I am an alcoholic!”

On April 7th. I will be thirty-six years clean and sober. It has been fifty-seven years sine the Vacuum Cleaner Cure – FAILED! We live in a very rich and powerful Nation where the word SUCCESS is the National Deity. Governor Kotek has promised the State of Oregon – SUCCESS! I suggest she start with doing a fearless inventory of The Homeless to discover who they think they are, and how they fit into Society. How many feel they are contributing to the wellbeing of our Cities? How about The Housed? Where would we be right now, if elected people had not declared war on the Hippies? We buried Hippie in 1967. Why not declare the War on the Hippies – over! May I suggest a theme song?

John Presco

Down around the corner
Half a mile from here
See them long trains runnin’
And you watch ’em disappear
Without love
Where would you be now?
(Without love)

Know I saw Miss Lucy
Down along the tracks
She lost her home and her family
And she won’t be coming back
Without love
Where would you be right now?
(Without love)

“As Elizabeth wrote in her 1956 memoir, “He [Howard] is a nonconformist in the true sense, because he doesn’t conform to nonconformity. He’s Howard Taylor.” He became an activist and social icon in his own right. In 1969, Howard bailed 13 students who had been arrested for vagrancy while seeking refuge from the ongoing campus riots and police brutality in the United States out of jail and invited them to take residency on his beach property in Kauai, Hawaii. As a result, “Howard Camp” was born. For many years, Howard offered safety and community for those unhappy with the trajectory of the political and social landscape. At its peak, the seven acres of Taylor Camp was home to 120 residents. That number dwindled over the years as campers returned to their lives on the mainland until 1977, when the camp was raided by the local authorities and remaining residents were evicted by the state. The camp and all its structures were demolished and turned into a state park which remains undeveloped.”

. The new governor was accompanied by her wife, Aimee Wilson, and gave her a shout-out after taking the oath, calling Wilson “the first lady of Oregon” and adding, “Thank you, my love, for your support.”

“Imagine an Oregon where no one has to live in a tent on a sidewalk,” she said. “Where Oregonians who need help for a mental health concern or a substance use issue can find and afford the support they need. Imagine an Oregon where every child has a safe place to receive a high-quality public education and every working family has access to affordable child care. And imagine an Oregon where everyone has financial stability and pathways to greater opportunities. And all Oregonians feel safe in their homes and communities.”

Tina Kotek Sworn in as First Lesbian Governor of Oregon

Trudy Ring

Mon, January 9, 2023 at 3:33 PM PST·3 min read

Tina Kotek
Tina Kotek

Tina Kotek was sworn in as Oregon’s governor Monday, becoming, with Massachusetts’s Maura Healey, one of the first two out lesbian governors in the nation. Healey took her oath of office last week.

Kotek, a Democrat, was sworn in by Oregon Supreme Court Chief Justice Meagan Flynn shortly before 2 p.m. at a joint session of the Oregon House and Senate at the state’s capitol. The new governor was accompanied by her wife, Aimee Wilson, and gave her a shout-out after taking the oath, calling Wilson “the first lady of Oregon” and adding, “Thank you, my love, for your support.”

Kotek defeated Republican Christine Drazan and independent Betsy Johnson in November. Kotek was previously speaker of the Oregon House, the first lesbian to hold such a position in the U.S., and she was also the longest-serving speaker in Oregon history. As governor, she succeeds fellow Democrat Kate Brown, who was the first out bisexual governor in the nation.

In her inaugural address, Kotek thanked Brown for leading the state through a difficult time and went on to cite Oregon’s last Republican governor, Victor G. Atiyeh, who served from 1979 to 1987. He, like Kotek, pledged to visit every county in Oregon and listen to people’s concerns. It might be surprising for her to invoke a Republican as an inspiration, she said, but she pointed out what they have in common: He was also a former legislator, and they were both firsts — he was the first governor of Arab descent in the U.S., and she and Healey are the first out lesbian governors.

Kotek began her listening tour a few weeks ago in Yamhill County in western Oregon. “I want to hear directly from people who are doing the hard work every day to serve their communities, especially on issues of shared concern across our state,” she said.

She promised to address the most pressing issues facing Oregon, including homelessness, a lack of affordable housing, and the need for access to behavioral health care. “We won’t be perfect, but we will improve every year, so Oregonians can proudly say their state government was there for them,” she said.

She said that Tuesday, her first day in office, she will issue an order setting ambitious goals for creation of new housing. It will establish a statewide housing target of more than 36,000 new homes per year, an 80 percent increase over recent construction rates, she said. She will also declare a homelessness state of emergency, she said. “Our state’s response must meet the urgency of the humanitarian crisis we are facing,” she noted. She will propose at least a $130 million investment to help at least 1,200 unhoused Oregonians move off the streets within a year. “This is only the first step,” she added.

She is delivering a new set of expectations to all state agencies, calling for improved customer service and increased accountability. “Our job is to make things work as efficiently as possible,” she said.

She concluded by calling on all Oregonians to join in making these goals a reality, starting with the upcoming weekend of service to commemorate the life and legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. “It will take all of us, doing what we can, to build the Oregon we want to live in,” she said.

“Imagine an Oregon where no one has to live in a tent on a sidewalk,” she said. “Where Oregonians who need help for a mental health concern or a substance use issue can find and afford the support they need. Imagine an Oregon where every child has a safe place to receive a high-quality public education and every working family has access to affordable child care. And imagine an Oregon where everyone has financial stability and pathways to greater opportunities. And all Oregonians feel safe in their homes and communities.”

“That’s an Oregon worth fighting for,” she finished. “And today is a new beginning.”

https://www.healthline.com/health/mental-health/identity-crisis#symptoms

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/mar/15/berkeley-california-homeless-identity-crisis

Symptoms of an identity crisis

Having an identity crisis isn’t a diagnosable condition, so there aren’t typical “symptoms,” as with a cold or flu. Instead, here are the signs you may be experiencing an identity crisis:

  • You’re questioning who you are — overall or with regards to a certain life aspect such as relationships, age, or career.
  • You’re experiencing great personal conflict due to the questioning of who you are or your role in society.
  • Big changes have recently occurred that have affected your sense of self, such as a divorce.
  • You’re questioning things such as your values, spirituality, beliefs, interests, or career path that have a major impact on how you see yourself.
  • You’re searching for more meaning, reason, or passion in your life.

It’s completely normal to question who you are, especially since we change throughout our lives. However, when it begins to affect your daily thinking or functioning, you may be having a crisis of identity.

Taylor Camp: The Hawaiian Hippie Utopia That Never Was

HANNAHDECEMBER 6, 2020

AMERICAN HISTORY0 COMMENTS 0

We all have our own picture of what paradise might look like. While most of us can only imagine living in the place of our dreams, others have realized all of their fantasies and stepped foot into their very own utopia. The problem with seeing your dream in reality, however, is that it can never live up to the lofty expectations that you put on it. Such was the case for Taylor Camp, an envisaged hippie commune that never really realized its potential.

(source: slate.com)

In the 1960s and ‘70s, the concept of communal living was very much on the rise. While the thought of an idyllic utopia away from the constrictions of real life seemed very much tempting, the reality was a whole lot different, leading many to break down before they had even really come to life. One community, however, had an idea that they were sure they could make work, going against all of the stereotypes that had already been put in place.

Pulled together by a group of like minded people, Taylor Camp was formed under the belief that there should never be one sole leader in a society. The inhabitants vowed not to follow maniacal laws or religious doctrines, living simply apart from society, in a new place that they would call home. Set in the Hawaiian jungle, the camp was as close to paradise as a society might ever get, giving its inhabitants the chance to live peacefully in the jungle and on the beaches. Given form thanks to the donation of Howard Taylor, brother of Elizabeth Taylor, the camp initially consisted of 13 hippies who were allowed to live on the beachfront grounds.

(source: slate.com)

Despite Howard’s personal donation, however, the local government were not happy with the beach front’s new inhabitants. Wanting themselves to use the land for public use, the government denied Howard’s proposals to build on the area, leading him to expand the hippie commune instead. Needless to say, the local government were not pleased with the developments and not before long, things had become a whole lot more complicated.

Meanwhile, life continued as normal on the camp. Living on their own stretch of paradise, the inhabitants took to building their own makeshift constructions, making the use of the natural materials they had to hand. Daily life included tasks such as gardening, fishing, harvesting fruit and surfing on the nearby beach. The inhabitants took to the land from the off, making themselves very much at home.

(source: buzzfeed.com)

Tensions between the locals, the government and the new camp, however, couldn’t be held off forever. After months of frustrations and failures, the local Hawaiian community decided to take matters into their own hands, taking destructive action against the camp. Wanting to make a change, the government officially seized the property and the locals took to burning down the makeshift community, one building at a time.

Despite the fate with which Taylor Camp was met, the inhabitants of the community continued to look back on their time in Hawaii with wholly positive memories. Documentaries at the time followed core members of the group, capturing their optimism on the project at large. Would the camp have lasted a long time into the future? That will always be questioned. For a brief moment in time, however, Taylor Camp really was a utopia on earth, bringing happiness to a whole group of people.

Featured—July 2022

Elizabeth Taylor and Her Beloved Brother, Howard Taylor

While a joint upbringing would suggest that siblings carry fundamental similarities, many sets of brothers and sisters would probably agree that they could not be more opposite. The classic nature versus nurture debate can be observed between Elizabeth Taylor and her brother Howard Taylor – the two adored each other and shared many of the same values, however, they traveled down different paths in their lives which led both to places no one would expect.

The two began as many siblings do: inseparable. Howard was the eldest, born in 1929, the same year the Taylor family moved to London and opened an art gallery. Elizabeth was born three years later. Growing up in London, the brother and sister were exposed to their parents’ lofty social circles. Filled with brilliant minds like artists Augustus John and Laura Knight and politician Colonel Victor Cazalet, the children were introduced to the art world at a young age. In 1939, when Elizabeth was seven years old and Howard ten, the Taylors moved to the United States due to fear of impending war across Europe. Howard and Elizabeth were then enrolled in the Hawthorne School in Beverly Hills. This move across the pond brought the siblings closer together, creating a bond that would not be broken despite the challenges they faced throughout their lives.

Elizabeth began developing her professional acting career after the family settled in Los Angeles, the home of the American film industry. While Elizabeth went on to become the most famous actress in the world, Howard played minor roles – sometimes acting beside his sister, such as his role as a Journalist in “Boom!” (1968). His compassionate nature led him to realize that connecting with people would become a major part of his life, and he began to stray away from acting and focused more on building personal relationships.

As Elizabeth wrote in her 1956 memoir, “He [Howard] is a nonconformist in the true sense, because he doesn’t conform to nonconformity. He’s Howard Taylor.” He became an activist and social icon in his own right. In 1969, Howard bailed 13 students who had been arrested for vagrancy while seeking refuge from the ongoing campus riots and police brutality in the United States out of jail and invited them to take residency on his beach property in Kauai, Hawaii. As a result, “Howard Camp” was born. For many years, Howard offered safety and community for those unhappy with the trajectory of the political and social landscape. At its peak, the seven acres of Taylor Camp was home to 120 residents. That number dwindled over the years as campers returned to their lives on the mainland until 1977, when the camp was raided by the local authorities and remaining residents were evicted by the state. The camp and all its structures were demolished and turned into a state park which remains undeveloped.

While both took different routes in inspiring change, Howard and Elizabeth were utopian thinkers. They both envisioned a world where everyone is treated with respect and provided with what they need to live prosperous lives. “I worshiped Howard as a child — and still do,” Elizabeth continued in her memoir. “He’s totally unsuperficial, totally unmaterialistic, the most real person I’ve ever known. In our kind of world that’s like a breath of fresh air. I would love to talk a lot about his life, but I have to be very careful not to inflict my fame on him because he has a wonderful sense of his own privacy.” Whether in or out of the spotlight, the Taylor siblings stood by each other and shared a strong moral fiber, perfectly balanced by their unique personalities and proximity to fame.

Next Up

Activism—July 2022

Elizabeth Taylor and Women’s Reproductive Rights

Elizabeth Taylor was always someone who fought for herself and others. Leaning into her strong intuition and sense of empathy, she led her life in action, one personal decision at a time. Her career as an actress followed this trend as Elizabeth dove headfirst into characters and films that handled complex subjects for the time. Unafraid of public backlash and criticism, she lived a courageous life.

In Elizabeth’s life, she received an abortion in Mexico when it was illegal in the United States. She had the privilege and ability to do so, but not all women did then or will now. Criminalizing abortions won’t stop them from happening – it will only make them more dangerous.

Abortion access is a critical form of healthcare for women. In line with the work of The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation, it’s important to note that the procedure can serve as an entry point into care for HIV, as many women are not tested for the virus before pregnancy. Prenatal care and HIV prevention and treatment for women are inextricably linked causes that Elizabeth held a deep connection to throughout her life as a mother and AIDS activist. Click here to learn more about how you can protect reproductive rights in your state today, and click this link for resources from The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation on HIV testing and care.

Whether as a direct means of healthcare or otherwise, safe abortion access is a fundamental right that must be protected. As the reversal of Roe v. Wade has forced our country to take a step backwards, it is essential to focus on the future and to defend the permanence of our personal freedoms.

Just as Elizabeth raised her voice against regressive practices in the fight against AIDS, we are confident she would not stay silent in the face of the practices and the ongoing threats facing our society today.

In keeping with Elizabeth’s values, House of Taylor and The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation unequivocally support a woman’s right to choose.

Next Up

Activism—July 2022

Elton John on Elizabeth Taylor as an LGBTQ+ Ally

Elizabeth Taylor became known for many things throughout her life: her love of jewels, her many husbands, her adoration for her children, and of course her riveting acting performances. But perhaps the most iconic legacy she leaves behind is the one that no one saw coming. When Elizabeth first spoke out against HIV/AIDS discrimination, she shed a harsh light on the shortcomings of the American government. Taking matters into her own hands forcefully and continuously, from lobbying Congress for money for research to shaming President Ronald Reagan until he finally addressed the issue, Elizabeth shifted the spotlight that had been on her from the age of 12, to fighting the injustice around HIV/AIDS. At the time, many did not expect this from the famous English actress who was often painted as vain and materialistic by the media, but Elizabeth surpassed expectations as always.

She stood up when no one was prepared to stand up and be counted against AIDS.

Elton John

AIDS activism often worked in tandem with LGBTQIA+ activism, and Elizabeth was outspoken on both fronts. Having many gay friends throughout her life, Elizabeth understood where these causes were intertwined and where they were separate, a balance which enabled her to speak on both issues clearly and compassionately. Becoming an AIDS activist early on in the pandemic, she co-founded amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research in 1985. However, her heart and compassion compelled her to want to make the lives of the individuals suffering from the disease feel loved, taken care of and as comfortable as possible, so in 1991 she formed The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation for direct patient care.

Later in her career as an activist, she joined forces with fellow star Elton John on these issues. Both had AIDS foundations and used their massive platforms to raise money and awareness for the movement. Elton spoke of her often as a source of inspiration, noting in the 2007 Elizabeth Taylor themed special edition of Interview Magazine that she had been the single most influential voice to speak on the issue in the early 80s. “She was saying to the world that people are dying from this disease; that no one seems to be taking any notice; and how can we be so uncompassionate?” Elton said., “At the time AIDS was assumed to be a “gay” disease and she was angry about that. And she was angry about the total lack of compassion shown by the American government – the indifference was shocking.”

She supported everybody in that with 1,000 percent of her body and her fiber. But most of all she loved people. She fought for the underdog. She was an incredible woman and I was privileged to have known her.

Elton John

Elizabeth set the pace for celebrity activism and activism surrounding AIDS discrimination and research to this day. Continuing in the interview, Elton John noted that while activism among entertainers has stepped up in a big way with more voices joining behind major causes in support, “Elizabeth did something when it required real courage. She didn’t just put her name to a cause or speak from an ivory tower. She lobbied, she got out on the streets…She was out there speaking about it at any opportunity she could get and she rallied people together at a time when no one wanted to mention the word AIDS.”

This Pride Month, we celebrate the achievements of those fighting for LGBTQ+ rights and equality – those who are unafraid to speak their minds in the face of opposition if it means fighting for a better future. Click this link to learn more about how you can support The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation and continue Elizabeth’s legacy of social justice.

Next Up

Fashion & Lifestyle—June 2022

Elizabeth’s 60th Birthday Celebration at Disneyland

On February 27, 1992, the universal “Happiest Place On Earth” became the epicenter of celebration for Elizabeth Taylor’s 60th birthday bash. The festivities required the shutdown of the park, extra security, and of course the usual glamor that came with all of Elizabeth’s parties. While she had initially wanted to celebrate her birthday with a group of friends and family on the Orient Express, juggling travel and work itineraries for such a large group became difficult and a more local idea came to mind. Elizabeth mentioned the potential of a birthday at Disneyland to her friend Carole Bayer Sager, who then called to pull some strings with Disney CEO Michael Eisner who immediately jumped at the opportunity, especially given the extensive free publicity that followed Elizabeth everywhere.

While the press images surrounding Elizabeth and Larry Fortensky’s wedding a few months prior all went to a good cause, as Elizabeth orchestrated that the proceeds be set aside for The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation’s seed funding, her birthday was to be a private event. In addition to tight ground security, Michael Eisner also had company officials petition the FAA to declare the airspace over Disneyland as restricted during the festivities and Federal Aviation officials in Southern California complied with this request. Of course, this did not stop every major television news source from gathering for coverage outside of the event as celebrity guests poured in. The only member of the press green-lit to enter was iconic gossip columnist Liz Smith. The LA Times wrote of the event that “security was rigid but the atmosphere was warm, informal and childlike.” The perfect blend for an evening celebrating Elizabeth.

The iconic home of Cinderella’s castle closed to the public at 6pm the evening of the 27th, and guests started arriving around two hours later after groundskeepers and party organizers hustled to pull off a lavish and seamless jamboree. No one was permitted to enter the park unless they could provide an exclusive invitation to the event which contained a security code that could not be replicated. The cherished, security-code-confirmed company included Carrie Fisher, Cindy Crawford, Richard Gere, David Bowie, Joni Mitchell, and countless others as Elizabeth wanted to share this rare magic with everyone she held dear. Elizabeth arrived at Disneyland in pure princess fashion – on a carriage drawn by white horses. After dismounting, she joined the crowd to enjoy cake, Disney characters abound, musical performances (including one from friend Barry Manilow), and other jovial pursuits. The LA Times illustrated that “Trumpet fanfares and flashing strobe lights greeted the celebrities who preceded her to Sleeping Beauty’s castle,” and once she arrived – “She was wearing sparkling cowboy boots and black quilted jacket with sprays of sequins, and he was wearing a black leather jacket and brown cowboy boots. Mickey Mouse took her arm as she got out and walked with her.” While the boots weren’t quite cowboy style, the sequins on the jacket were extravagant – depicting fish as an ode to Elizabeth’s astrological sign of Pisces.

Every guest, including Elizabeth, marveled at the party many friends along with the Disney team had organized. The night ended in a firework spectacular and loaded up goodie bags for all guests to take home and enjoy.

In an interview with Oprah Winfrey in 1992, Elizabeth admitted a secret about her birthday night. Long after all the guests had cleared, she requested to Michael Eisner that the park be kept open for one additional hour. He obliged, and Elizabeth and Larry went on every last ride in Fantasyland, just the two of them – the perfect way to end an evening of whimsy and wonder.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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