Will I Be Next Mayor of Springfield?

“I went to Safeway on Friday and said hello to employees who had bonded with my late friend, Hollis Williams. I was told there was a photograph of H in the office, behind customer service. I did not know this. I was moved. There stood three of us, like family, sharing fond memories.”

From my archives.

 

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I just found out on the radio that there is going to be a election to see who the next Mayor of Springfield will be. I’m considering running as….

THE REPUBLICAN WHO NEEDS TO BE LOCKED UP THE MOST!

Kris McAlister appears to be one of the “gadflies” that provoked Lundberg to resign. Does he know Alley Valkyrie? I will point out the HUGE failures of homeless advocates – and condemn their tactics – in their face! If I run and become Mayor, I swear – every time one of McAlister’s gadflies comes before me – or the Lord of the Gadflies Himself – I will read another THREAT from Alley Valkyrie, and another slander from her ex-lover, John Monroe.

Stay tuned!

John Presco

gadflies

  1. a fly that bites livestock, especially a horsefly, warble fly, or botfly.
    • an annoying person, especially one who provokes others into action by criticism. “always a gadfly, he attacked intellectual orthodoxies”

But she also targets “a small group” who spend their time to influence City Council decisions. “At one time we called these gadflies; their opinions matter, but they do not speak for the entire community,” she writes.

Longtime homeless advocate who ran for Ward 3’s council seat in May 2020 in Springfield Kris McAlister was among residents who criticized Lundberg’s statement. “This failure to honor the people’s voice speaks to the silent cries over the past decade,”

McAlister has a wealth of expertise in engaging topics like homelessness and housing policies on a state, county and local level, and has been part of the Egan Warming Shelter and the Shelter Manager for the COVID-19 response shelter. 

“I believe that Springfield has a chance to identify itself as independent and a team player as we move past this current situation,” he said, “and I really think that we need to look beyond what’s going on at the national front and really focus on what it means to be Springfield.”

Springfield Councilors Appoint New Mayor

But anger during public comment over former mayor’s ‘gadflies’ statement about small group of active residents

BLOGNEWSBY HENRY HOUSTONPOSTED ON 

A SCREENSHOT FROM A JUNE 25 CITY COUNCIL MEETING

After several months, the city of Springfield has a mayor. At a Jan. 19 City Council meeting, councilors voted 4-2 to appoint Sean VanGordon as mayor. Before the appointment, he served for nine years as a councilor, representing Ward 1. During the meeting, the council accepted a letter of resignation for the upcoming term from Christine Lundberg. But the letter provoked anger from the public. 

During “Business from the Audience,” the city’s public comment period, Springfield residents spoke out over Lundberg’s resignation letter. In the letter, she says she is proud of Springfield’s legacy because it’s a city that recognizes the needs of the whole community. But she also targets “a small group” who spend their time to influence City Council decisions. “At one time we called these gadflies; their opinions matter, but they do not speak for the entire community,” she writes. 

In the past, Springfield’s City Council has had large groups show up to raise awareness on issues such as the city’s contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, to acknowledge Indigenous Peoples Day and more. 

Longtime homeless advocate who ran for Ward 3’s council seat in May 2020 in Springfield Kris McAlister was among residents who criticized Lundberg’s statement. “This failure to honor the people’s voice speaks to the silent cries over the past decade,” he said. “It is ironic that our people are referred to by this reference that originated in a writing called The Apology [by Plato], but there is no apology for the inaction of this body until we have bodies and then maybe we’ll have action.” 

He added that people do not show up to be contrarians. “Our people cry because they are harmed without due process and are not honored in their sacrifice to speak against the cultural systemic abuse that happens here.” 

Many residents also requested the council to condemn white supremacy, especially after one Springfield resident has been identified as a participant of the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection and Dec. 21 Salem Legislature invasion. Eugene City Council unanimously passed a resolution condemning white nationalism, seditious activities and extremist groups. 

After the public comment, councilors each took a turn to reassure residents that their input is necessary for them to do their jobs. 

Before appointing a new mayor, the council had to vote to accept Lundberg’s letter of resignation from the 2021-2014 term. The debate for the mayoral appointment was short, and the council voted within 15 minutes of introducing the action item. 

During Councilor Leonard Stoehr’s introduction, he said that the challenge the city is facing is to make its general decision-making process more transparent. “We’re considering a large number of fairly ambitious projects right now,” he added. “I would urge us all to consider the impacts these large projects are going to have and whether it’s going to be positive or negative on the voters — because I guarantee you that they’re paying attention to what’s going on. 

VanGordon said that when a new councilor is appointed in a few months to fill the seat his appointment opens on the council, the body should step back and develop a set of policy goals. “Really form more of a working council so that people are running and working on policy objectives that they want to accomplish,” he said. 

Councilors Joe Pishioneri, Steve Moe, Marilee Woodrow and VanGordon voted for VanGordon. Councilors Kori Rodley and Stoehr voted for Stoehr. 

Rodley spoke out about the mayoral appointment process and to and to an extent the process of appointing the interim councilor. She called the self-selection process “hallmarks of white supremacy and the opposite of accessible, inclusive government that I would like to see and be a part of.” 

She added that when running for her Ward 3 seat, she wasn’t endorsed by councilors. “Had I gone through the application process, I would not have been selected. It was through the will of 12,000 Springfield neighbors that I am in this seat and that I think is how transparency democracy functions.” 

But the Ward 1 vacancy won’t be sent to voters. According to Springfield’s legal counsel during the meeting, the council has to follow the same protocol as for filling the mayoral vacancy. Voters have to approve a change to the city charter. 

If you live in Ward 1, the city of Springfield is now accepting applications for the vacant office through Feb. 1. The application form is available at http://bit.ly/SpfldInterimCouncilor.

The Democratic Party of Lane County is holding a So You Want to Run for Office panel 6 pm Friday, Feb. 5 via Zoom. Panelists include Lisa Fragala, member of the LCC Board of Directors; Brandon Jordan, former board member of the Emerald People’s Utility District; and Maya Rabasa, former candidate for Eugene 4J School Board. The link for folks to sign up to receive the Zoom login info is: bit.ly/dplcpanel

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Kris McAlister seeking ‘RELIEF’ for Springfield‘s most needy

Chronicle staff writer Aliya Hall spoke with the three candidates running for the Ward 3 Springfield City Council seat.

By Aliya Hall

May 8, 2020 at 4:57pm

Kris McAlister

A history of working with unhoused, displaced or laid-off members of the community makes him uniquely qualified for the Ward 3 seat, said Kris McAlister.

He said he wants to bring that experience to the council and help support and that population into the city’s decision making. 

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“How better to do that than be part of the system that makes ordinances and articulates policies, taking goals to the next level,” he asked. 

Learn how we do our work at The Chronicle – read our principles.

He said he is interested in making change that sets the foundation for further growth and inclusion, which is why his platform is focused on RELIEF, which stands for reform, education, local-base, inclusion, engagement and future focus. 

“All concepts go through that filter so we’re taking into consideration all the things we have to think about as we govern, through a people and system focus,” he explained, adding that he wants to support inclusion measures that engage with the whole community and make the council more accessible. 

One example of that would be adding “inclusion days” where residents can have access to more resources in languages other than English and give English as second-language learners more time to meet with city staff to discuss their needs or specific issues.

McAlister also supports broadening the urban growth boundary to enfold more residents into Springfield. 

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Housing is the No. 1 concern for McAlister, who said that the city needs to build out its housing base because there is a lack of housing stock. 

“We don’t have any low-income housing being replaced at a rate to keep up with demand,” he said.

He suggested looking at alternatives like The Commons on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard in Eugene, and utilizing both Springfield’s vocational training program and local products to help mitigate housing issues.

 If elected, McAlister said he would take diverse perspectives into consideration. “I need to always challenge my thoughts and how I got to a certain decision,” he said. 

“By listening and seeing what the community needs while checking it against my checklist: Does this help the community? Is this a proper reform? Is it going to relieve the people’s needs?”

 McAlister has a wealth of expertise in engaging topics like homelessness and housing policies on a state, county and local level, and has been part of the Egan Warming Shelter and the Shelter Manager for the COVID-19 response shelter. 

“I believe that Springfield has a chance to identify itself as independent and a team player as we move past this current situation,” he said, “and I really think that we need to look beyond what’s going on at the national front and really focus on what it means to be Springfield.”

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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