I Restored The Holy Roman Empire

I restored the Holy Roman Empire in America at 6:20 A.M. February 14, 2022.

I believe Emperor Wilhelm saw the light in the Order of Saint Francis when he awarded them the Iron Cross. This Order fled to America when Bismark began his culture war against Catholics. There is evidence an Angel came to America with the Sisters. My sisters saw this Angel standing at the foot of their bed when they were ten and six.

When a Great Light is oppressed, a great darkness comes to surround this light. I have overcome the darkness that surrounded my family and I. I am in The Light.

John Gregory Presco

“When the call came for nurses on the battlefields of the Austro-Prussian and Franco-Prussian wars the sisters responded, earning the Iron Cross from Empress Augusta and Emperor Wilhelm in 1872 for their service.  Two sisters died of infection while nursing the soldiers.  


Political changes resulted in the passage of laws in 1875 which called for religious communities to either disband or go into exile unless they were strictly nursing orders. The entire community of 18 professed sisters, seven novices and four postulants chose exile.  But where to go?  A nephew of the elderly couple mentioned above, a pastor in Iowa City, had visited the sisters to express his gratitude for their kindness. On learning of their choice to emigrate he offered them refuge in Iowa City.  On September 8, 1875 they arrived in their new home.”

To many intellectuals, the coronation of William was associated with the restoration of the Holy Roman Empire. Felix Dahn wrote a poem, “Macte senex Imperator” (Hail thee, old emperor) in which he nicknamed William Barbablanca (whitebeard), a play on the name of the medieval emperor Frederick Barbarossa (redbeard). According to the King asleep in mountain legend, Barbarossa slept under the Kyffhäuser mountain until Germany had need of him. William I was thus portrayed as a second coming of Barbarossa. The Kyffhäuser Monument portrays both emperors.[14]

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClPA-uNgXMlgepbcVHwXH4Q

http://madmonarchist.blogspot.com/2017/06/how-about-restoring-holy-roman-empire.html

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/augusta-victoria-wife-of-kaiser-wilhelm-was-a-broken-woman-at-the-end-of-wwi/news-story/9547e8e9c83723f472d9409da4e08d73

Mother Mary Dominica Wieneke

Posted on February 5, 2014 by Royal Rosamond Press

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Here lies the hoarded love the key
To All the treasure that shall be
Come fated heart the gift to take
And smite the sleeping world awake.”

Here is a video that contains a photo of Mother Mary Dominica Wieneke, Major Superior of the Sisters of Saint Francis of Dubuque. Her cousin, Mary Magdalene Wieneke-Rosamond, was my grandmother, the mother of Rosemary Rosamond.

Above is an amazing photo of the groundbreaking ceremony for Briar Cliff College that is located on the Missouri River overlooking the states of South Dakota and Nebraska. I might do a painting of this scene because more than likely there are more than twenty of my kindred in it. My grandmother Mary is above in white.

Look at those beautiful children who want their shot at life even though they know they are crippled. They are filled with hope. How can anyone who claims they are a Christian, talk about taking away hope from any child who suffers?

Jon Presco

In March 1929, Mother Mary Dominica Wieneke, Major Superior of the Sisters of Saint Francis of Dubuque, along with the Most Rev. Edmond Heelan, Bishop of the Sioux City Diocese, co-founded Briar Cliff College after meeting with members of the Sioux City community, who committed to raising $25,000 to support the establishment of a Catholic women’s college in Sioux City. The twelve foundresses of the College were carefully chosen by Mother Dominica. They were led by Sister Mary Servatius Greenen, who was named the first president.[2]

http://www.osfdbq.org/history.php

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Order_of_Saint_Francis

Congregation with Motherhouse at St. Francis’s Convent, Dubuque, Iowa. Founded in 1876 by Mother Xaveria Termehr and Sisters from the House of Bethlehem, Herford, Germany, who, on account of the infamous “May laws”, were compelled to leave Germany. Sisters, 399; novices, 34; postulants, 20; orphan asylums, 2; industrial school, 1; academy, 1; home for aged, 1; schools, 43; pupils, 6829.

The Diocese of Sioux City was inducted into Briar Cliff University’s Mother Dominica Society this past weekend. The induction took place during the Alumni Awards Dinner at the St. Francis Center at the university.
The Mother Dominica Society is a group that recognizes the top lifetime benefactors of Briar Cliff University. The society is named for the founder of Briar Cliff University, Mother Mary Dominica Wieneke.
Receiving the award on behalf of the diocese was Bishop R. Walker Nickless. Briar Cliff University’s president, Bev Wharton, presented the award.
Bishop Nickless was pleased to recognize the connection of the diocese and the university.
“It’s a wonderful chance for us to be noticed, what the connection between the diocese and the university is all about,” said Bishop Nickless. “Bishop Heelan, the first bishop of the Diocese of Sioux City, graciously gave the land for which the university was built. So, since the first day, there has been a connection between Briar Cliff and the diocese.”

Location Briar Cliff University is located at the edge of urban development, yet it is just minutes from Downtown Sioux City (population 80,000). Located where Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota meet, Sioux City is connected with other metro areas by Interstate Highway 29 and is about an hour away by air from Minneapolis, Chicago, St. Louis and Denver.

http://www.catholicglobe.org/archive/2006/0906/14/stories/story5.htm

In March 1929, Mother Mary Dominica Wieneke, Major Superior of the Sisters of Saint Francis of Dubuque, along with the Most Rev. Edmond Heelan, Bishop of the Sioux City Diocese, co-founded Briar Cliff College after meeting with members of the Sioux City community, who committed to ar program was extended to four years. Fifty-five men were admitted to Briar Cliff in 1965 and co-education was formalized in 1966 with the admission of 150 full-time male students.
Our congregation originated in Herford, Germany where the plight of many homeless and hungry children touched the heart of the young woman we know as our foundress, Mother Xavier Termehr.  Soon other young women asked to join her in this work of compassion and our congregation was born in November 1864.  From its beginning, the congregation has been committed to serving human needs and are not limited to one apostolate. The sisters cared for the orphans at Haus Bethlehem and also nursed the elderly in their homes.  A destitute elderly couple was cared for in the orphanage until their death.
    
When the call came for nurses on the battlefields of the Austro-Prussian and Franco-Prussian wars the sisters responded, earning the Iron Cross from Empress Augusta and Emperor Wilhelm in 1872 for their service.  Two sisters died of infection while nursing the soldiers.  
Political changes resulted in the passage of laws in 1875 which called for religious communities to either disband or go into exile unless they were strictly nursing orders. The entire community of 18 professed sisters, seven novices and four postulants chose exile.  But where to go?  A nephew of the elderly couple mentioned above, a pastor in Iowa City, had visited the sisters to express his gratitude for their kindness. On learning of their choice to emigrate he offered them refuge in Iowa City.  On September 8, 1875 they arrived in their new home.
In Iowa City the sisters opened the first Catholic orphanage in the state and nursed the sick, much as they had in Herford.  A new apostolate opened for them as they were requested to take charge of parochial schools.  Within a year of their arrival in Iowa, the congregation began to accept postulants.
Archbishop Hennessy of Dubuque, Iowa requested that the congregation move to Dubuque to open and staff an orphanage in that city.  They arrived in Dubuque in December 1878, lodging at first in an abandoned stone church.  The orphanage opened in fall of the next year. (The sisters staffed it until it closed in 1968.)  As in Iowa City, the sisters were also called upon to staff and often to establish Catholic schools.
New apostolates were added as the years progressed including  the domestic department of the local seminary, a home for the aged, a second  orphanage (in Sioux City, IA), a home for working girls in Dubuque, hospitals, the only Catholic college (now University) in the Sioux City, IA diocese and a mission in China.
Our commitment to community and ministry among those in need is still vibrant.  We have ministered in Chile, Guatemala, and El Salvador, in Tanzania and Zimbabwe and currently in Honduras and the island of St. Lucia.  With fewer sisters in classroom teaching, we also educate though ESL classes and after-school tutoring programs. We are pastoral associates, chaplains, spiritual directors and social workers, workers in health care and alternate health therapies, and volunteers in many organizations. We partner with other religious congregations and civic organizations to respond to those whose needs are greatest in this country and abroad.


Though we speak a different language and dress in different attire from that of Mother Xavier and the founding sisters, we are truly their daughters in faith and in commitment.
Our strength, our hope and our joy flow from our commitment to prayer, to each other, and to the people God calls us to serve in love.  We believe the words of Mother Xavier “God is with us still.”
http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ia/county/linn/news/wienfamreunion.htm

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14637b.htm

The general idea of lay people affiliated to religious orders, as seen in the Benedictine Oblates or confraters (Taunton, “Black Monks of St. Benedict”, London, 1897, I, 60-63; for Norbertines cf. Hurter, “Papst Innocenz III”, Schaffhausen, 1845, IV, 148), is too natural for there to be any need to seek its origin. Founders and benefactors of monasteries were received in life into spiritual fellowship, and were clothed in death in some religious habit. So too the Templars had a whole system whereby layfolk could partake in some sort in their privileges and in the material administration of their affairs (English Hist. Rev., London, April, 1910, 227). But the essential nature of the tertiary is really an innovation of the thirteenth century.

Primarily the work of the Third Order and its definite spirit may be summed up by saying that it was established first to help in reform of church discipline. Its initial purpose was the preaching of penance; but under Dominican influences it rather leaned to the intellectual aspect of the Faith and based its message to the world on the exposition of the Creed; it was to reform church discipline by the more wide-spread knowledge of the mysteries of faith. Secondly, to defend the Church. Originally this was a military necessity, demanding physical force with which to restrain equally material opposition. Thirdly, to develop the communion of prayer. The medieval ideal of Christ’s Mystical Body which has captivated all spiritual-minded people implies a harmony of prayer. To achieve this end the contemplative and monastic orders were begun; and the Third Order of St. Dominic endeavours to link pious souls to this great throng of religious (Proctor, “The Dominican Tertiary’s Daily Manual”, London, 1900, 15-20).

The Third Order as it exists today can be divided into two categories: regular, i.e. comprising Tertiaries, whether men or women, who live in community and wear the habit externally; and secular, i.e. whether married or single, cleric or lay, who live their lives like others of their profession, but who privately take up practices of austerity, recite some liturgical Office, and wear some symbol of the Dominican habit. The origin of the conventual women Tertiaries has never been very clearly worked out. It is usual to trace them back to Bl. Emily Bicchieri, about the year 1255 (“Manual of Third Order of St. Dominic”, London, 1871, 9). But if the view taken above of the origin of the Third Order in the Ordo de Poenitentia be correct, we are forced to the conclusion that the communities of women established by St. Dominic at Prouille, S. Sisto, etc. were really of this Third Order. Their constitutions, approved first for S. Sisto, though previously observed at Prouille, expressly speak of the nuns as “de Poenitentia S. Mariae Magdalenae” (“Analecta Ord. Praed.”, Rome, 1898, 628 sqq.). It would seem then that the Ordo de Poenitentia did not exclude convents of enclosed nuns from its ranks, and this was due probably to St. Dominic himself. Very much later came a conventual order of men, originated by the genius of Père Lacordaire. He considered that the democratic spirit of the Dominican Order fitted it especially for the task of training the youth. But he knew how impossible it was for his preaching associates to tie themselves down to schoolwork among boys; as a consequence, he began, in 1852, a Third Order of men, wearing the habit, living in community yet without the burdens of monastic life. The rule was approved provisionally in 1853 and definitely in 1868 (for the rule cf. “Acta Capituli Generalis Ord. Praed.”, Rome, 1904, 106 sqq.). But by far the greatest portion of the Third Order consists of secular Tertiaries. These are of every rank of society, and represent the old Ordo de Poenitentia and the old Militia. In certain countries they are grouped into chapters, having a lay prior and sub-prior or prioress and sub-prioress, and hold monthly meetings. Since the Rule of Muñon de Zamora (1285), they have always been subject to a Dominican priest appointed by the Dominican provincial. For the actual reception of the habit, the master-general can give faculties to any priest. The full habit is the same as that of the members of the First and Second Orders, but without the scapular (granted, however, to communities since 1667). Though the habit is not worn during life many procure it so that they may be buried in the recognized dress of St. Dominic’s children.

Origin, development, and present state of the secular Third Order
It has been believed for some time that the Third Order of St. Francis was the oldest of all Third Orders, but historical evidence is against such an opinion. For, besides similar institutions in some monastic orders in the twelfth century, we find, before the foundation of St. Francis, a Third Order, properly so called, among the Humiliati, confirmed together with its rule by Innocent III in 1201 (see text in Tiraboschi, “Vetera Humiliatorum monumenta”, II, Milan, 1767, 128). But if the Third Order of St. Francis was not the first of its kind, it was, and still is, undoubtedly the best known and most widely distributed and has the greatest influence. About its origin there are two opposite opinions. According to Karl Müller, Mandonnet, and others, the Secular Third Order is a survival of the original ideal of St. Francis, viz. a lay-confraternity of penitents, from which, through the influence of the Church, the First and Second Orders of the Friars Minor and the Poor Clares have been detached. According to others, St. Francis merely lent his name to pre-existing penitential lay-confraternities, without having any special connection with or influence on them.

Soon after the Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel was established in Europe in the thirteenth century, lay persons, not bound by religious vows, seem to have attached themselves to it more or less closely. There is evidence of the existence of a “Confrairie N.-D. du Mont-Carmel” at Toulouse in 1273, and of a “Compagnia di Santa Maria del Carmino” at Bologna in 1280, but the exact nature of these bodies is uncertain owing to a lack of documents. Somewhat later mention is frequently made of trade-guilds having their seat in churches of the order, members of which acted as their chaplains. Thus the master-bakers, innkeepers and pastry-cooks at Nîmes, the barbers and surgeons of the same town, who were also connected with the Dominicans, the goldsmiths at Avignon. Benefactors of the order received letters of fraternity with the right of participation in the privileges and good works of the friars. Others, under the name of bizzoche and mantellatoe, wore the habit and observed the rule, e.g. “M. Phicola nostra Pinzochera” at Florence in 1308. Others again became recluses in the anchorages attached to Carmelite churches, and made profession under the form: “Ego frater N. a Spiritu Sancto ad anachoreticam vitam vocatus offero me, coram Deo, Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto, et promitto me in servitio Dei secundum Scripturam sacram Novi et Veteris Testamenti more anchoreticae vitae usque ad mortem permansurum.” Among the tertiaries not living in community must be mentioned Blessed Louis Morbioli of Bologna (d. 1495).

William in a hussar’s uniform, in a painting by Emil Hünten

During the Franco-Prussian War, the South German states joined the North German Confederation, which was reorganized as the German Empire (Deutsches Reich). The title of Bundespräsidium was amended with the title of German Emperor (Deutscher Kaiser). This was decided on by the legislative organs, the Reichstag and Bundesrat, and William agreed to this on 8 December in the presence of a Reichstag delegation. The new constitution and the title of Emperor came into effect on 1 January 1871.[11]

William is proclaimed German Emperor in the Hall of Mirrors in Versailles, France flanked by his only son, Frederick and son in law – Frederick I, Grand Duke of Baden. Painting by Anton von Werner

William, however, hesitated to accept the constitutional title, as he feared that it would overshadow his own title as King of Prussia. He also wanted it to be Kaiser von Deutschland (“Emperor of Germany”), but Bismarck warned him that the South German princes and the Emperor of Austria might protest.[12][13] William eventually—though grudgingly—relented and on 18 January, he was formally proclaimed as emperor in the Hall of Mirrors in the Palace of Versailles. The date was chosen as the coronation date of the first Prussian king in 1701. In the national memory, 18 January became the day of the foundation of the Empire (Reichsgründungstag), although it did not have a constitutional significance.[13]

To many intellectuals, the coronation of William was associated with the restoration of the Holy Roman Empire. Felix Dahn wrote a poem, “Macte senex Imperator” (Hail thee, old emperor) in which he nicknamed William Barbablanca (whitebeard), a play on the name of the medieval emperor Frederick Barbarossa (redbeard). According to the King asleep in mountain legend, Barbarossa slept under the Kyffhäuser mountain until Germany had need of him. William I was thus portrayed as a second coming of Barbarossa. The Kyffhäuser Monument portrays both emperors.[14]

In 1872 he arbitrated a boundary dispute between the United Kingdom and the United States, deciding in favor of the U.S. and placing the San Juan Islands of Washington State within U.S. national territory, thus ending the 12-year bloodless Pig War.[15]

Am I The Embodiment of St. Francis?

Posted on March 28, 2017 by Royal Rosamond Press

Sister Mary Dominca is my grandmother’s cousin. Many people in these images, and in the video, are my kindred.

The Third Order of Saint Francis, historically known as the Order of Penance of Saint Francis,[1][2][3] is a third order within the Franciscan movement of the Catholic Church. It includes both congregations of vowed men and women and fraternities of men and women living standard lives in the world, often married.

It has been believed that the Third Order of Saint Francis was the oldest of all third orders, but historical evidence does not support this. Similar institutions are found in documentation of some monastic orders in the 12th century. In addition, a third order has been found among the Humiliati, confirmed together with its rule by Pope Innocent III in 1201.[4]

In 1978, the Third Order of Saint Francis was re-organised and given a new Rule of Life by Pope Paul VI. With the new rule, the name used by the secular branch of the order was changed to the Secular Franciscan Order.[5]

There also are Third Order, Society of St. Francis within the Anglican & Episcopal Church.[6]

Above is a photo of the real cave of Saint Francis that Meher Baba entered in 1933. I am very curious when the Order of Saint Francis went to Assisi. The world needs a Champion of the Poor. Who better than Saint Francis? I suspect Eutropia Maude, and Mary Magdalene, were ordained to go into the world and born children. The death of the Kellys, was devastating. B. Stark needs to post the rest of Mary’s book, for, we may have a appearance of Mother Mary to my sisters, and Kay Coakley.

Jon Presco

It has been believed that the Third Order of Saint Francis was the oldest of all third orders, but historical evidence does not support this. Similar institutions are found in documentation of some monastic orders in the 12th century. In addition, a third order has been found among the Humiliati, confirmed together with its rule by Pope Innocent III in 1201.[4]

In 1978, the Third Order of Saint Francis was re-organised and given a new Rule of Life by Pope Paul VI. With the new rule, the name used by the secular branch of the order was changed to the Secular Franciscan Order.[5]

There also are Third Order, Society of St. Francis within the Anglican & Episcopal Church.[6]

Don Stevens asked, “Baba, you have explained in the Discourses, God Speaks and elsewhere that an individual cannot attain God-Realization without the aid of a living Perfect Master. Since there was no Perfect Master in Europe at that time, how did Saint Francis achieve Realization?”
Baba turned to Ivy and asked, “Have you heard of the ancient Sufi prophet, Khwaja Khizr?” She replied that she had heard Rabia Martin speak of him. Baba explained: “Khwaja Khizr now and then takes on a physical body if there is some spiritual situation that absolutely demands it. The Realization of Francis was such a case, because he had no Perfect Master to give him Realization. So, on the night we read about on Mount La Verna, near Assisi, during which St. Francis also received the stigmata [wounds of the Crucified Christ], Khwaja Khizr, in his temporary human form, gave this beloved Western saint the touch of grace which made him a Perfect Soul – a Qutub or Perfect Master.”

https://www.meherbabatravels.com/location-gallery/italy/assisi-italy/

  • Seclusion in a cave in Assisi; moments of anguish when Baba’s internal worked caused him intense suffering; and a dramatic meeting of the spiritual hierarchy; Baba said: “Spiritually, a big meeting of spiritual personages took place here the likes of which has never before been held. It is due to the greatest upheaval that is coming for the world. It will be the greatest upheaval of all times.”

http://kendrasnotebook.blogspot.com/2009/03/meher-baba-in-italia.html

http://kendrasnotebook.blogspot.com/2007/05/tales-of-drunkenness-and-cruelty-does.html

Meher Baba and Saint Francis

Posted on February 10, 2014by Royal Rosamond Press

Greg 1974 Vicki
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“Saint Francis of Assisi was the only one of the very few saints in Europe to become a Perfect Master.”

Just before Jesus died, he said; “I am thirsty.” The first thing I said when I came back to life, after seeing the Lord, was; “I’m thirsty.”

Consider Mary Dominica Wieneke and the Order of Saint Francis. In searching for the Blue Angel that appeared to my sisters while they slept, and Kay Coakley, I look to my aunt, June Rice, who took care of me while I had the hooping cough. I almost died several times. I was eleven. I had turned blue and my fingers were contorted when I came into the living room where my aunt Lillian and uncle Dick were sitting. Lillian screamed, and Dick started hitting me on my back.

When June would come to my bed in her nightgown, I saw a blue glow coming from her abdomen. She could not have a child due to some operations. She and Vinnie treated me like their child, and were my patrons. June was a devout Catholic.
I suspect this blue angel is associated with Mother Mary. I wondered if it was her ghost. But, I believe it is the Angel that came to Saint Francis when he died during a terrible illness, and came back.

I suspect I am the embodiment of Saint Francis. When I read about Baba coming to the true cave of Saint Francis, all of a sudden I had a vision. I was sitting in that cave. I heard the dry summer grass being stepped upon. Suddenly Baba’s face is beaming at me. I reached out my wounded hand and cried;

“Father!”

Not the energy around me (click on photo to enlarge) Christine and Brian took photos of me because Christine wanted to do her first portrait of a male. She developed both rolls, and was shocked to see this energy in every image of me. she did not do my portrait because of it.

Baba told his disciples not to touch him when he came out of the cave. Above is Vicki mocking me while I am doing my secret work. She is reaching out with her finger to touch me while I have my eyes closed.

Jon Gregory

Beloved Avatar Meher Baba’s Comment on Saint Francis of Assisi:

{1}. On another occasion, Baba revealed to Filis and Adele his four favorite Christian saints,
“My two favorite women saints are Saint Theresa of Avila and Catherine of Siena; my two favorite men, Francis of Assisi and Saint Augustine.”
[LordMEHER 11-3818]

{2}. Do you know how St. Francis of Assisi loved Jesus and became one with him? He loved him as Jesus ought to be loved; but in Francis’s group there was one who was a glutton.
Juniper loved Francis most, though he did not sit in meditation or think of anything. He gave more trouble to Francis than anyone, yet he loved Francis dearly. When we love from the bottom of our hearts we give all our good and bad, even our troubles; the lover gives everything and demands nothing. I give everything and demand nothing.
Love me like that and Baba is your slave. Even if you can’t do that, don’t worry. As long as you are mine, you need not worry. You are mine, that is why I have drawn you such long distances. If you can’t picture me, don’t worry; if you don’t love me, don’t worry; I love you.
-Avatar Meher Baba
[The God-Man Pg.257]

{3}. If you have the love for Me that Saint Francis had for Jesus, then not only will you realize Me but you will please Me.” -Avatar Meher Baba “Saint Francis of Assisi was the only one of the very few saints in Europe to become a Perfect Master.”
*** Meher Baba said Saint Francis was a Perfect Master.
AFTERWARDS he spoke with Ivy Duce, Don Stevens and others about Saint Francis:
Don Stevens asked, “Baba, you have explained in the Discourses, God Speaks and elsewhere that an individual cannot attain God-Realization without the aid of a living Perfect Master. Since there was no Perfect Master in Europe at that time, how did Saint Francis achieve Realization?”
Baba turned to Ivy and asked, “Have you heard of the ancient Sufi prophet, Khwaja Khizr?” She replied that she had heard Rabia Martin speak of him. Baba explained: “Khwaja Khizr now and then takes on a physical body if there is some spiritual situation that absolutely demands it. The Realization of Francis was such a case, because he had no Perfect Master to give him Realization. So, on the night we read about on Mount La Verna, near Assisi, during which St. Francis also received the stigmata [wounds of the Crucified Christ], Khwaja Khizr, in his temporary human form, gave this beloved Western saint the touch of grace which made him a Perfect Soul – a Qutub or Perfect Master.”
[LordMEHER 14-5011]

{4}. BABA WISHED to stay in seclusion for twenty-four hours somewhere in Italy and chose Assisi for the purpose because it was the homeland of Saint Francis. Baba sent Herbert there on August 1st in search of a cave for the seclusion [LordMEHER 5-1688]

{5}.As you know, I need none of you. I can work my will independently, but I have chosen, for my own reasons, a few to help me in that work. But these few need a love and faith as rare as that of Saint Francis [of Assisi]. Let that same love of his for Christ be your goal, and love me as he loved his Master.
-Avatar Meher Baba [LordMEHER 7-2332]
{6}.12th Way -LOVE…If you have that love for Me that St. Francis had for Jesus, then not only will you realize Me, but you will please Me.
[12 ways of realizing me -Meher Baba]

My reason* for believing there is a significant kernel of truth to these theories of Jesus living in India and being buried in Kashmir, is that my master, Meher Baba, said that was the case.

However, Meher Baba was also clear that Jesus was the Avatar of that era. The Avatar is God descended into our realm of cosmic illusion as a man, the ideal or perfect man. Thus he is both God and man simultaneously.

Jesus the Christ The author of this website appears to have a bias (we all have biases) that Jesus was a man only, and that any suggestion that he was divine or of divine origin is a matter of myth. I think his thesis that Jesus’s memory was embellished to make the new religion more palatable to gentiles who were already familiar with similar myths, is plausible. Again, for my bottom-line evaluation, I personally, as a follower of Meher Baba, turn to his explanations rather than to scholarship. (You of course are welcome to give your own weight to various sources.) According to Meher Baba, Jesus was conceived and was born “the usual way,” i.e., the virgin birth was a myth added later on. Jesus did not die from the crucifixion in the sense we usually think of death, but what he did was also not something possible for an ordinary man–he entered the state of Nirvikalpa Samadhi and then returned after the crucifixion, and went to India. If you study the life of Sri Ramakrishna, you will find that he often entered this State, as for example when something would remind him strongly of some particular attribute of God, or when devotional songs were sung in his presence. Nirvikalpa Samadhi is the state of God-Realization or Self-Realization. Jesus, as Avatar, would have had this state along with his ordinary consciousness of being a man, simultaneously. Nirvikalpa Samadhi is only attained by the real death of the limited mind and ego. Jesus already possessed this state of Realization (having been unveiled from it by John the Baptist). So in a sense, Jesus died the real death on the cross, not the faint shadow of it that we consider to be death. One could also say that Jesus was already “dead” in a sense; or one could equally say that he was already beyond death and in the state of being fully alive, so that it was impossible for him to die in the usual sense.** In this sense, whether Jesus took up his same physical body after the crucifixion or didn’t, would not change who Jesus IS one iota. He could take it up again or not take it up again and he would remain the Avatar. In the same way, he was the Avatar before his incarnation as well–“Before Abraham was, I am.” The entire matter is really beyond words to describe adequately, and it comes as no surprise to me how 2,000 years of interpreting and trying to codify it into a rigid doctrine resulted in what has come down to us.

Meher Baba also makes no mention of Jesus being married, but instead refers to him as being single. Comparing events in the life of Meher Baba, the story in the Tomb of Jesus website of the king insisting on Jesus having a companion, and Jesus finally agreeing to allow a woman to assist him, is plausible. However, his having had sexual relations with the woman is not consistent with the behavior of spiritual teachers who have attained this degree of spiritual advancement. I would guess it was assumed on the basis of gossip, by people who could not conceive of a man living with a woman and not having relations with her. If you study the lives of spiritual masters who have achieved this state of consciousness, you find that some of them marry and some do not, but they never get entangled in casual sexual relations. While it is true that spiritual masters of this calibre may have a significant other, very often even this is a chaste relationship. Such was the case with Sri Ramakrishna and his wife Sarada Devi, and one may interpret that it was also the case with St. Francis (who Meher Baba said achieved this state of Nirvikalpa Samadhi) and his beloved Clare.

My main point here is that one must be careful not to throw the baby out with the bathwater. Though it may turn out that Jesus physically survived the crucifixion, and it may also be true that his history was embellished in the manner of myths that had also been applied to other historical figures, this does not mean that he was not an Incarnation of God. It doesn’t necessarily mean that he was simply a prophet, a man, who lived through the crucifixion and then died later as an ordinary man. It also doesn’t mean that there aren’t important truths embedded in the myths that have been preserved as traditional Christian doctrine. It does mean that these myths contain distortion and embellishment, and that it will be a painful and disorienting process for traditional Christians to sort through it and find the truth of it. When the “dust has settled,” I think they will find that Jesus was and is more than traditional Chuch doctrine has portrayed him to be, not less. (Just as the true goal of religion, God-Realization, is much more than living in paradise forever in linear time.) What will emerge, I believe, is not that Jesus was just an ordinary man; nor that he was the only son of an anthropomorphic God. Jesus will finally be let out of both the little conceptual box of materialism, and the little conceptual box of Christian dogma, in which boxes he has been imprisoned for centuries.

For more information on Meher Baba, see my article, “A Tapestry of Meher Baba’s Connections with the West.”

*Another clue is that when Jesus appeared to the disciples, he appears to have had a body with the same wounds. It makes no sense to me that Jesus would have resurrected a body with the wounds. It further makes no sense to me that Thomas would have thrust his hands into the wound in Jesus’s side, literally, as per the Biblical account, simply because no-one who loved Jesus as the disciples did would have caused him excruciating physical pain just to satisfy their own selfish doubts. Therefore the account must be exaggerated (another clear indication of editing in the New Testament). Nonetheless, we are probably safe in assuming that this much is accurate, that Jesus’s body bore the wounds from the crucifixion when he returned. Under those circumstances, it is a much simpler and more logical interpretation that he survived the crucifixion than that his body was supernaturally resurrected.
**My interpretation of the crucifixion, based on studying Meher Baba’s life and teachings, is that Jesus was vicariously taking on the suffering of the world, so as to make the world’s load of karma bearable for us. (Meher Baba said that the Avatar did not take on the karma of the world per se, which I interpret to mean that he took on the suffering that resulted from the karma but not the karma itself.) The external crucifixion of Jesus was thus an outward and visible sign of the real inward crucifixion, of the inner spiritual work that Jesus was doing for humanity and for all of Creation. Thus the real inner crucifixion was much, much more than just the outward event of the physical crucifixion.

“Finally we arrived at Assisi at 5 P.M. to find a rather agitated Herbert waiting for us, because we were three hours late in arriving. After a rather restless and depressing week, he had made most successful arrangements for Baba’s retirement (which he tells in much better words than mine).

“Several kilometers from the town, up in the hills on the slopes of Monte Subasio, lies the famous Hermitage of Carceri built by St. Francis and his fellow monks. Below in the woods are several small caves or retreats where people go for meditation. Herbert discovered one of these half-protected by an outside wall. He had hidden this with branches so that it was difficult to find.

“This was one that was actually used by St. Francis himself. At 6:30 P.M. we had a light meal at the Windsor Hotel and drove in a car most of the way. The last part we walked on foot and, finally, scaled a low wall and plunged into the woods led by Herbert down an intricate winding path.

path.

“The cave we found was an ideal spot and perfectly suited to Baba’s requirements. Herbert had thought out everything with such care that there was nothing left to be desired. Herbert is always very meticulous and careful in all he undertakes. The light was beginning to go a little as we entered the woods. It was just after sunset. I remember the birds and their song dying away gradually.

We settled Baba in and he told us that no one must look at him and, above all, not to touch him.

“It was arranged that Herbert and Chanji were to keep watch outside the cave during the night, to be relieved by Kaka and myself at 9 o’clock the next morning. Baba said that Kaka and I were to go to mass at 7 A.M. the next morning and then we were to kiss the Tomb of St. Francis. We bade them goodnight and found our intricate way out of the woods.

“After mass we shouldered our rucksacks and toiled up the streets through Assisi to the hills of Monte Subasio. As we got out of town, it began to get warmer and warmer.

“Poor Kaka was laden down, and not in such good training as I, so we had to stop from time to time for him to rest and get his breath and cool off. At last we arrived, a little late —about 9:15, and we were glad to reach the cool shade of the wood where we found Herbert and Chanji waiting for as after a wakeful night.

“Nothing had transpired and there had been no interruptions of the calm and peace which pervaded the woods. We settled down to our vigil outside the cave. Herbert and Chanji returned to Assisi to rest.

“The sun rose higher, but we were well shaded from the heat by the trees. An intense calm was everywhere, but the woods were alive with birds whose song was deafening. As if in memory of St. Francis, they seemed to throng around us. Butterflies were often near; several lit on our hands and bodies.

“Gradually it grew warmer, and even in the deep shade, one felt the heat of midsummer.

“Towards midday I heard sounds from inside the cave. Forgetting Baba’s instructions about not looking at him, I saw him stand up with his eyes shut and face the sun. He made strange noises. Not daring to look again, I lay quiet.

“At one o’clock he clapped his hands. We pulled away the branches from the entrance. Taking the board he spelt out directions, telling Kaka to go to Assisi and ask Herbert and Chanji to be with him at 4:30, but that I was to call him there.

“Baba came out of the cave but told us not to come near him or touch him. He walked about alone in the woods for half-an-hour and then went into the cave again.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to I Restored The Holy Roman Empire

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    I am the Holy Roman Emperor. I stood up to Christ-Putin CP. Why isn’t Pope Francis and Franklin Graham on T.V. condemning CP for wiping a sovereign nation – off the map? They know CP met with the robed leaders of the Russian Orthodox church, and they made him kneel and kiss their cross before he invaded.

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