Seawolf-Class Submarine

Why the name Seawolf?

John John

Seawolf-class submarine – Wikipedia

The story begins with a United States Navy submarine, the USS Seawolf (SSN-21), on a mission to spy on the new Chinese nuclear missile submarine. The mission is successful until the submarine’s second-in-command, the president’s son Linus Clark makes a fatal error, and the submarine collides with a sonar array from a Chinese ship that is searching for them. The crew is imprisoned and tortured while the Chinese begin to strip the captured submarine for its secrets. Desperately, Arnold Morgan, the National Security Advisor, plans a mission to get the crew back, safeguard the sub’s secrets, and punish the Chinese. He sends Navy SEALs to the island where survivors are being held and an American FA-18 Hornet to destroy the USS Seawolf which is being held in Canton harbor.

U.S.S. Seawolf (novel) – Wikipedia

The Seawolf-class nuclear-powered attack submarine USS Connecticut collided with an unidentified object on October 2, the Navy said five days after the incident. Investigators have determined the submarine ran aground on an undersea mountain, the location of which was previously unknown, USNI News said.

The 7th Fleet confirmed the USNI News report to Insider, with its spokesperson Cdr. Haley Sims saying: “The investigation determined USS Connecticut grounded on an uncharted seamount while operating in international waters in the Indo-Pacific region.”

The earlier Navy statement on the incident left a lot to the imagination. It said the submarine struck something while operating in international waters, there were no life-threatening injuries, the submarine was in stable condition, and the nuclear-propulsion systems were not damaged.

The US Navy has figured out what a nuclear-powered attack submarine ran into in the South China Sea (msn.com)

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