My Boston Dream Home

Here is my dream home. It is located in Charleston Mass next the Bunker Hill Monument. You can see it out several of the windows.

On November 2, 2020, I had a computer conference with my therapist, Barbara. We talked about my reading at the Berkeley Psychic Institute where I was told I had died. I told Hillary – the head of Serenity Lane – about this reading and she said;

“You may be a walk-in!”

The next day, America voted. Today, our nation is deeply divided – and perhaps on the brink of another Civil War. Democrats admonished Graham of South Carolina for encouraging Georgia to toss out mail-in ballots. I am a prophet, and came seeing into the future as Uncle Samaclaus, a manifestation of Uncle Sam.

Last night I chose Phoebe Blume to be in my book and movie – and idea she rejects! I scare her. I believe she understood that I was using Myriam Starfish to read her. In listening to Boris sing that perfect Persian love song, I had visions of speaking to Meghan and caressing her face. We had talked about embracing her church, her version of Jesus in my Bond book. Dottie Witherspoon wanted me to become Christian. I saved her in Boston and we went to California. Her great grandfather is Signer John Witherspoon. In doing my genealogy I discovered John Wilson is my 9th. grandfather. When I awoke I knew I am his walk-in. There is no escaping this truth – and the truth I died and came back. I have been walking a very lonely road. I have been looking for a place to rest my spirit. I was named after John ‘The Baptist’ during a star-shower like the one we had last night.

There is a death-like pall in the air. The silence is deafening. I begin my walk, again, on the path created by our differences. I am the embodiment of John Wilson. I am his Holy Ghost. I am The Spirit of America. There is no other way I can go, any fictional character I can be. I have been summoned. I walk to the wharf where my great grandfather’s ship is docked. I came with the Winthrop Fleet. This time I sail to Avalon. I am after The Dream To Be Free! This quest is always the loneliest road to take because it is the hardest. You say you want to be free, and be with your God at the same time? Be with your God, first of all……and last of all! Walk with God – now! I have seen God – and His Kingdom of Truth! Be there – now!

You will find many videos I made on my facebook.

John Wilson

https://www.facebook.com/greg.presco

https://www.coldwellbankerhomes.com/ma/boston/48-monument-square-3/pid_38680294/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton_Rubinstein

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/democrats-bash-lindsey-graham-over-claims-he-pressured-georgia-to-discard-ballots-morally-reprehensible/ar-BB1b5v2L?ocid=msedgdhp

http://genealogytrails.com/mass/winthropfleet.html

Meetings of the ministers[edit]

Governor Henry Vane was furious over Wilson’s “sad speech,” which cast aspersions on Reverend Cotton.

In October 1636 the ministers, realizing that a theological tempest was forming in the colony, decided to get to the heart of the issue, and held a series of meetings, which also included Hutchinson and some of the magistrates.[34] In order to deal with the theological errors of the Hutchinson group, the ministers first had to come to a consensus about their own positions, and this they were unable to do. Hutchinson’s followers used this impasse to attempt to have Wheelwright appointed as another minister to the Boston church, an expression of their dissatisfaction with Wilson. Winthrop came to Wilson’s rescue, as an elder in the church, by invoking a ruling requiring unanimity in a church vote, and was thus able to forestall Wheelwright’s appointment there. Instead, Wheelwright was sent about ten miles south to Mount Wollaston to preach.[35]

As the meetings continued into December 1636, the theological debate escalated. Wilson delivered “a very sad speech of the condition of our churches,” insinuating that Cotton, his fellow Boston minister, was partly responsible for the dissension.[36] Wilson’s speech was moved to represent the sense of the meeting, and was approved by all of the ministers and magistrates present with the notable exceptions of Governor Vane, Reverend Cotton, Reverend Wheelwright, and two strong supporters of Hutchinson, William Coddington and Richard Dummer.[37]

Cotton, normally of a very placid disposition, was indignant over the proceedings and lead a delegation to admonish Wilson for his uncharitable insinuations.[37] On Saturday, 31 December 1636, the Boston congregants met to prefer charges against Wilson. Governor Vane launched the attack, and was joined by other members of the congregation.[37] Wilson met the onslaught with a quiet dignity, and responded soberly to each of the accusations brought against him.[38] The crowd refused to accept his excuses, and demanded a vote of censure. At this point Cotton intervened, and with more restraint than his parishioners, offered that without unanimity a vote of censure was out of order.[38] While the ultimate indignity of censure was averted, Cotton nevertheless gave a grave exhortation to his colleague to allay the temper of the congregants.[38] The next day Wilson preached such a conciliatory sermon that even Governor Vane rose and voiced his approval.[38]

“Dung cast on their faces”[edit]

The Boston congregants, followers of Hutchinson, were now emboldened to seize the offensive and discredit the orthodox doctrines at services throughout the colony. The saddened Winthrop lamented, “Now the faithfull Ministers of Christ must have dung cast on their faces, and be not better than legall Preachers.”[39] As Hutchinson’s followers attacked ministers with questions calculated to diminish confidence in their teachings, Winthrop continued his lament, “so many objections made by the opinionists…against our doctrine delivered, if it suited not their new fancies.”[38] When Wilson rose to preach or pray, the Hutchinsonians boldly rose and walked out of the meeting house. While Wilson was the favorite butt of this abuse, it was not restricted just to the Boston church, and similar gestures were being made toward the other ministers who preached a covenant of works.[40]John Winthrop, after lamenting the attacks on the ministers, was buoyed by the results of the 1637 election

In hopes of bringing the mounting crisis under control, the General Court called for a day of fasting and repentance to be held on Thursday, 19 January 1637. During the Boston church service held that day, Cotton invited Wheelwright to come forward and deliver a sermon. Instead of the hoped-for peace, the opposite transpired. In the sermon Wheelwright stated that those who taught a covenant of works were Antichrists, and all the ministers besides Cotton saw this as being directed at them, though Wheelwright later denied this.[41] During a meeting of the General Court in March Wheelwright was questioned at length, and ultimately charged with sedition, though not sentenced.[42]

Election of May 1637[edit]

The religious division had by now become a political issue, resulting in great excitement during the elections of May 1637. The orthodox party of the majority of magistrates and ministers maneuvered to have the elections moved from Boston to Newtown (later Cambridge) where the Hutchinsonians would have less support. The Boston supporters of Hutchinson wanted a petition to be read before the election, but the orthodox party insisted on holding the election first. Tempers flared, and bitter words gave way to blows as zealots on both sides clamored to have their opinions heard.[43] During the excitement, Reverend Wilson was lifted up into a tree, and he bellowed to the crowd below, imploring them to look at their charter, to which a cry went out for the election to take place.[43] The crowd then divided, with a majority going to one end of the common to hold the election, leaving the Boston faction in the minority by themselves. Seeing the futility of resisting further, the Boston group joined in the election.[44]

The election was a sweeping victory for the orthodox party, with Henry Vane replaced by Winthrop as governor, and Hutchinson supporters William Coddington and Richard Dummer losing their positions as magistrates.[45] Soon after the election, Wilson volunteered to be the minister of a military unit that went to Connecticut to settle the conflict with the Pequot Indians. When he returned to Boston on 5 August, two days after Vane boarded a ship for England, never to return, Wilson was summoned to take part in a synod of all the colony’s ministers.[46] Many theological issues needed to be put to rest, and new issues that arose during the course of the controversy had to be dealt with.[47]

Trials of Hutchinson[edit]

While Wilson had little to say during Hutchinson’s civil trial, he delivered the final pronouncement at her church trial.

By late 1637, the conclusion of the controversy was beginning to take shape. During the court held in early November, Wheelwright was finally sentenced to banishment, the delay caused by the hopes that he would, at some point, recant. On 7 November the trial of Anne Hutchinson began, and Wilson was there with most of the other ministers in the colony, though his role was somewhat restrained.[48] During the second day of the trial, when things seemed to be going in her favor, Hutchinson insisted on making a statement, admitting that her knowledge of things had come from a divine inspiration, prophesying her deliverance from the proceedings, and announcing that a curse would befall the colony. This was all that her judges needed to hear, and she was accused of heresy and sentenced to banishment, though she would be held in detention for four months, awaiting a trial by the clergy.[49] While no statements made by Wilson were recorded in either existing transcript of this trial, Wilson did make a speech against Hutchinson at the end of the proceedings, to which Hutchinson responded with anger four months later during her church trial.[50]

Her church trial took place at the Boston meeting house on two consecutive Thursdays in March 1638. Hutchinson was accused of numerous theological errors of which only four were covered during the first day, so the trial was scheduled to continue the following week, when Wilson took an active part in the proceedings. During this second day of interrogation a week later, Hutchinson read a carefully written recantation of her theological errors. Had the trial ended there, she would have likely remained in communion with the church, with the possibility of even returning there some day.[51] Wilson, however, did not accept this recantation, and he re-opened a line of questioning from the previous week. With this, a new onslaught began, and when later given the opportunity, Wilson said, “[The root of]… your errors…is the slightinge of Gods faythfull Ministers and contenminge and cryinge down them as Nobodies.”[52] Hugh Peter chimed in, followed by Thomas Shepard, and then Wilson spoke again, “I cannot but reverence and adore the wise hand of God…in leavinge our sister to pride and Lyinge.”[52] Then John Eliot made his statement, and Wilson resumed, “Consider how we cane…longer suffer her to goe on still in seducinge to seduce, and in deacevinge to deaceve, and in lyinge to lye!”[52]

As the battering continued, even Cotton chided her, and while concerns from the congregation brought pause to the ministers, the momentum still remained with them. When the final points of order were addressed, it was left to Wilson to deliver the final blow: “The Church consentinge to it we will proced to excommunication.”[53] He then continued, “Forasmuch as you, Mrs. Hutchinson, have highly transgressed and offended…and troubled the Church with your Errors and have drawen away many a poor soule, and have upheld your Revelations; and forasmuch as you have made a Lye…Therefor in the name of our Lord Je[sus] Ch[rist]…I doe cast you out and…deliver you up to Sathan…and account you from this time forth to be a Hethen and a Publican…I command you in the name of Ch[rist] Je[sus] and of this Church as a Leper to withdraw your selfe out of the Congregation.”[53]

Later years[edit]

Hutchinson left the colony within a week of her excommunication, and following this conclusion of the Antinomian Controversy, Wilson worked with Cotton to reunite the Boston church.[9] Following Cotton’s death in 1652, his position was filled, following four years of campaigning, by John Norton from Ipswich. Norton held this position until his death in 1663.[54]

Wilson was an early advocate of the conversion of Indians to Christianity, and acted on this belief by taking the orphaned son of Wonohaquaham, a local sagamore into his home to educate.[9] In 1647 he visited the “praying Indians” of Nonantum, and noticed that they had built a house of worship that Wilson described as appearing “like the workmanship of an English housewright.”[55] During the 1650s and 1660s, in order to boost declining membership in the Boston church, Wilson supported a ruling known as the Half-Way Covenant, allowing parishioners to be brought into the church without having had a conversion experience.[9]

In 1656, Wilson and John Norton were the two ministers of the Boston church when the widow Ann Hibbins was convicted of witchcraft by the General Court and executed in Boston. Hibbins’ husband died in 1654, and the unhappy widow was first tried the next year following complaints of her neighbors about her behavior. Details of the event are lacking, because the great Boston journalist, John Winthrop was dead, and the next generations of note takers, Increase Mather and Cotton Mather had not yet emerged. A 1684 letter, however, survives, written by a Reverend Beach in Jamaica to Increase Mather in New England. In the letter Beach stated that he, Wilson and others were guests at Norton’s table when Norton made the statement that the only reason Hibbins was executed was because she had more wit than her neighbors, thus implying her innocence. The sentiments of Wilson are not specifically expressed in the letter, though several writers have inferred that his sentiments were the same as Norton’s.[56]

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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