Civil War Was Bad For Blacks

I am walking about in slow-motion, in a stupefied state. Five hours ago I read this statement by my old nemesis, Ed Ray.

Oregon State President Ed Ray said the Civil War name “represents a connection to a war fought to perpetuate slavery.”

“While not intended as reference to the actual Civil War, OSU sports competition should not provide any misconstrued reference to this divisive episode in American history,” Ray said in a statement. “That we did not act before to change the name was a mistake. We do so now, along with other important actions to advance equal opportunity and justice for all and in recognition that Black Lives Matter.”

Above is a photograph of a Union Soldier standing guard over his fellow soldiers who gave their lives believing BLACK LIVES MATTER. These Union soldiers, along with a half million men in arms, who fought the Civil War in order to free slaves, have been forgotten by the Lane County Commissioners and the Presidents of  two of Oregon’s major universities. Who amongst the living will champion their cause – they did not lose? They won! They cared! Black lives mattered much to them, and their widows and children. They got in harms way, so black people can be free! Didn’t these black athletes who signed off on the most ignorant declaration in human history – read any American History? Someone did not do their job, and thus must return all the wages they earned – as alleged educators!

Here is my letter to Ed Ray – that I know he did not read! I have never read such ignorant statement regarding our Nation’s most critical crisis! And he has nothing at stake! Or, does he. I am calling for an investigation. I want UofO football players – questioned! Is it any wonder we have rioting and looting. There has to be a conspiracy to have it appear no white man ever cared for a black man in the last three hundred years. These Veterans – ACTED! They died in – ACTION! Have you lost your mind!

https://rosamondpress.com/2019/05/28/my-letter-to-ed-ray/

John Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

The move to drop the ‘Civil War’ name for rivalry was made after discussions between officials at both schools and current and former student-athletes. (Source: University of Oregon)
By KAREN MATTHEWS, Associated Press |

(AP) — Oregon and Oregon State have agreed to drop the name “Civil War” for their rivalry games.

The move Friday was made after discussions between officials at both schools and current and former student-athletes. The change also comes amid ongoing protests following the death of George Floyd while in police custody.

Oregon State President Ed Ray said the Civil War name “represents a connection to a war fought to perpetuate slavery.”

“While not intended as reference to the actual Civil War, OSU sports competition should not provide any misconstrued reference to this divisive episode in American history,” Ray said in a statement. “That we did not act before to change the name was a mistake. We do so now, along with other important actions to advance equal opportunity and justice for all and in recognition that Black Lives Matter.”

Oregon athletic director Rob Mullins said former Oregon quarterback Dennis Dixon raised the issue of the name.

“We must all recognize the power of words and the symbolism associated with the Civil War,” Mullins said in a statement.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugene_Pioneer_Cemetery

https://www.battlefields.org/learn/articles/civil-war-casualties

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_draft_riots

New York City draft riots (July 13–16, 1863), sometimes referred to as the Manhattan draft riots and known at the time as Draft Week,[3] were violent disturbances in Lower Manhattan, widely regarded as the culmination of white working-class discontent with new laws passed by Congress that year to draft men to fight in the ongoing American Civil War. The riots remain the largest civil and most racially-charged urban disturbance in American history.[4]

U.S. President Abraham Lincoln diverted several regiments of militia and volunteer troops after the Battle of Gettysburg to control the city. The rioters were overwhelmingly white working-class men, mostly Irish or of Irish descent, who feared free black people competing for work and resented that wealthier men, who could afford to pay a $300 (equivalent to $6,200 in 2019[5]) commutation fee to hire a substitute, were spared from the draft.[6][7]

Initially intended to express anger at the draft, the protests turned into a race riot, with white rioters, predominantly Irish immigrants,[4] attacking black people throughout the city. The official death toll was listed at either 119 or 120 individuals. Conditions in the city were such that Major General John E. Wool, commander of the Department of the East, said on July 16 that, “Martial law ought to be proclaimed, but I have not a sufficient force to enforce it.”[8]

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.