The Bohemian Rose Against the Ottoman Empire

When Trump was elected, I volunteered to be his Art Buddy. Some of my artist friends thought I had gone over to him. I told them he doesn’t own one original work of art, but, is surround by our best National Art that was rendered by Artists. I thought I could give our President – art lessons – and thus he would know something about history, or, would care to know SOME history!

Royal Rosamond Press……….is a Newspaper for the Arts! Above is a photograph of me standing before Habsburg Royalty, who ruled the Austrian Empire, and held the titles King and Queen of Bohemia. Empress Zita fled from Hitler with her family, and came to live in America. Hitler put a price on her head. He knew his history. Erdogan, and his cabinet, can tell you much about their Arch Enemy! You could say ‘I am the man of the hour’.  I saw that this history was coming around again. I wish it was not!

Above my head is the Coalition Flag I designed for the Kurd of Kobane in 2014. I am wearing a rose scarf to show solidarity. I am sure this image caused my evil neighbors to gather at my door and call me a lunatic. They know no history. They pride themselves on being ignorant. Now WE ALL must pay!

John Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ottoman–Habsburg_wars

The Ottoman–Habsburg wars were fought from the 16th through the 18th centuries between the Ottoman Empire and the Habsburg Monarchy, which was at times supported by the Holy Roman Empire, Kingdom of Hungary, Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, and Habsburg Spain. The wars were dominated by land campaigns in Hungary, including Transylvania (today in Romania) and Vojvodina (today in Serbia), Croatia and central Serbia.

By the 16th century, the Ottomans had become a serious threat to the European powers, with Ottoman ships sweeping away Venetian possessions in the Aegean and Ionian seas and Ottoman-supported Barbary pirates seizing Spanish possessions in the Maghreb. The Protestant Reformation, the French–Habsburg rivalry and the numerous civil conflicts of the Holy Roman Empire served as distractions to the Christians from their conflict with the Ottomans. Meanwhile, the Ottomans had to contend with the Persian Safavid Empire and to a lesser extent the Mamluk Sultanate, which was defeated and fully incorporated into the empire.

Initially, Ottoman conquests in Europe made significant gains with a decisive victory at Mohács reducing around one third (central) part of Kingdom of Hungary to the status of an Ottoman tributary.[5] Later, the Peace of Westphalia and the Spanish War of Succession in the 17th and 18th centuries respectively left the Austrian Empire as the sole firm possession of the House of Habsburg. After the Siege of Vienna in 1683, the Habsburgs assembled a large coalition of European powers known as the Holy League, allowing them to fight the Ottomans and to regain control over Hungary.[6] The Great Turkish War ended with the decisive Holy League victory at Zenta. The wars ended after Austria’s participation in the war of 1787-1791, which Austria fought allied with Russia. Intermittent tension between Austria and the Ottoman Empire continued throughout the nineteenth century, but they never fought each other in a war and ultimately found themselves allied in World War I, in the aftermath of which both empires were dissolved.

Historians have focused on the second siege of Vienna of 1683, depicting it as a decisive Austrian victory that saved Western civilization and began the fall of the Ottoman Empire. Recent historians have taken a broader perspective, noting that the Habsburgs at the same time resisted internal separatist movements and were fighting Prussia and France for control of central Europe. The key advance made by the Europeans was an effective combined arms doctrine involving the cooperation of infantry, artillery and cavalry. Nevertheless, the Ottomans were able to maintain military parity with the Habsburgs until the middle of the eighteenth century.[7] Historian Gunther E. Rothenberg has emphasized the non-combat dimension of the conflict, whereby the Habsburgs built up military communities that protected their borders and produced a steady flow of well-trained, motivated soldiers.[8]

Karl Schwarzenberg and The Habsburg Audience

For several years I have been trying to bring to the attention of the Austrian Government the existence of the large canvas at the University of Oregon Museum titled ‘The Last Audience of the Habsburgs’ that was smuggled out of Austria. Alas, I have found just the right person. He is my kindred, Karl Schwarzenberg, who himself had to flee a oppressive regime. Karl opposes Putin, and backs Britain. I will contact him and see if he would like to come give a talk on this painting. His relative, Prince Felix Schwarzenberg, restored the Habsburg Empire.

John Presco

President: Royal Rosamond Press

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/lan-anh-vu/how-i-got-there-karel-sch_b_9043274.html

Prince Felix of Schwarzenberg (German: Felix Prinz zu Schwarzenberg; 2 October 1800 – 5 April 1852) was a Bohemian nobleman and an Austrian statesman who restored the Habsburg Empire as a European great power following the Revolutions of 1848. He served as Minister-President of the Austrian Empire and Foreign Minister of the Austrian Empirefrom 1848 to 1852.

2016-01-26-1453769582-4125568-DSC_0847.JPG

Karel Schwarzenberg is the Prince of Schwarzenberg, Duke of Krumlov, former first Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic and honorary Chairman of Top 09 party. Schwarzenberg was also a Member of the Senate of the Czech Parliament and a candidate for the President of the Czech Republic in the 2013 presidential election. He is noted as a pro-European member of the center-right governing coalition.

Schwarzenberg’s family, who once ranked among the oldest and wealthiest aristocrats in Central Europe, had to leave the Czechoslovakia after the Communist coup of 1948. He spent most of his adult life in Austria to plot against communism. He is a great proponent of human rights and has been for his entire life. In 1989, he was awarded, together with Lech Wałesa, the Council of Europe’s Human Rights Award. Lan Anh Vu sat down with Schwarzenberg to learn more about his political life, the challenges he faced and his advice for young people across the world when it comes to pursuing a career in politics.

As told to Lan Anh Vu

My Career in Politics

In my early childhood, I was an observer of politics. In 1948, when the Communists took over, I was ten years old when I had to leave the Czechoslovakia and move to Austria. When I went to the school in Vienna to study law, I engaged in some political activities and became active in promoting human rights. At Munich university where I studied Graz and forestry, I was elected to student government. Due to the early death of my adoptive father, Jindrich Schwarzenberg, I had to cut my studies short and start managing the family properties.

From 1984 to 1991, I became president of the International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights. I pushed for human rights in Europe and was negotiating the question of human rights in the former USSR, Bulgaria, Kosovo and the Czech Republic.

When the Communist regime fell in 1989 , I returned to live in the Czechoslovakia and work for the late President Vaclav Havel. In 1990, I was appointed as the Chancellor of the Office of the President.

Some people told me I should become a senator. I first ran in the senate elections in 2002 and was unsuccessful, and in 2004 I ran again, succeeded and was elected a senator. Three years later, I became the foreign minister of the Czech Republic. Politics has been a constant part of my life ever since childhood.

My whole life I fought for liberty and democracy. I always thought that if you had opportunities ahead, you have responsibilities and should do something for your country.

http://daughternumberthree.blogspot.com/2013/12/the-girl-in-last-audience-of-hapsburgs.html

When this unfinished canvas was first exhibited in Eugene fifty years ago, it was described as a “painting with a history as romantic as old Vienna.” Given that it was smuggled into the United States in a carpet roll by a political refugee, this claim is not unfounded.

The artist began the work in October of 1918 at Schönbrunn Palace, where the young Empress Zita (1892 – 1989) received an audience of war orphans and a group of wealthy noblewomen, the Organization of War Godmothers, who had “adopted” them. Within hours, Empress Zita (shown seated on her throne), her husband, and their own eight children were forced to flee across the Swiss border because of the contentious political climate. Despite several attempts, they were never able to reestablish themselves on their thrones; both the Emperor and Empress died in exile.

The unsettlingly incomplete canvas mirrors the frustrated desires of both the artist, who spent the rest of his life wandering the globe, and the people pictured in it, many of whom were displaced in the aftermath of the First World War. Yet the audience members wear placid, even bored expressions as the children present their flowers, betraying no portent that one of the oldest dynasties in Europe would crumble within a matter of days.

Susanne Renate Granitsch MP

Gender: Female
Birth: May 21, 1869
Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Death: December 02, 1946 (77)
Vienna, Vienna, Austria
Immediate Family: Daughter of Georg Granitsch and Auguste Antonie Granitsch
Sister of Georg Granitsch; Editha Isabella v. Schickh; Marzell Granitsch and Dr. Robert August Granitsch
Added by: Rafi Kornfeld (c) on May 19, 2014
Managed by: Rafi Kornfeld (c)

Die akademische Malerin Susanne Renate Granitsch wurde am 21. Mai 1869 in Wien geboren und verstarb am 2. Dezember 1946 in Wien. Ihre Großeltern waren Georg Ignaz Granitsch und Susanne Granitsch, geb. Schmidutz. Ihr Vater, Dr. Georg Granitsch (1833 – 1903), verheiratet mit Augusta Antonia Granitsch, geb. Panstingel, war in Wien als Advokat tätig. Neben Susanne Renate Granitsch, ihrer ältesten Tochter, hatte das Ehepaar Dr. Georg und Augusta Granitsch noch zwei weitere Kinder, Edith Granitsch, verh. von Schickh und Dr. Robert Granitsch, der bereits 1937 verstorben ist. Da Dr. Robert Granitsch nach der NS-Gesetzgebung mit einer „Halbjüdin” verheiratet war, wurden seine drei Kinder, Susanne, geb. 1899, Dora, geb. 1904 und Lorle, geb. 1912, nach der Machtergreifung der Nationalsozialisten in Österreich verfolgt, wobei Dr. Susanne(!) Konirsch, geb. Granitsch, und Lorle Kornfeld, geb. Granitsch, in die USA flüchten mussten. Dora Granitsch heiratete den Rechtsanwalt Dr. Franz Hiller und überlebte in Wien. Bei Susanne Renate Granitsch deutet hingegen aktenmäßig nichts darauf hin, dass sie während der NS-Zeit aus rassistischen oder politischen Gründen verfolgt worden wäre. Sämtliche Anfragen, sowohl beim Matrikenamt der Israelitischen Kultusgemeinde, beim Bundesdenkmalamt, als auch im Österreichischen Staatsarchiv (Bestände der Vermögensverkehrsstelle, der Finanzlandesdirektion Wien, des „Hilfsfonds”, des „Abgeltungsfonds” und der „Sammelstellen”) verliefen negativ. Auch wurden von den Erben von Susanne Granitsch nach 1945 keine Rückstellungsverfahren angestrengt. Auch ihre 81jährige Großnichte, die einzige Verwandte, die Susanne Renate Granitsch noch zu Lebzeiten gekannt hatte, bestätigte, dass Susanne Renate Granitsch während der NS-Zeit weder als Jüdin noch aus politischen Gründen verfolgt worden ist. Im Februar 1938, knapp vor der Machtübernahme der Nationalsozialisten in Österreich, erwarben die Städtischen Sammlungen, die zu diesem Zeitpunkt schon einige Werke der renommierten Künstlerin Susanne Renate Granitsch besaßen, von dieser das Porträt eines Universitätsprofessors: Susanne Renate Granitsch verstarb am 2. Dezember 1946 in Wien. Mit Einantwortungsurkunde des Bezirksgerichtes Innere Stadt-Wien vom 27. März 1947 wurde Edith von Schickh aufgrund des Testamentes der ledigen und kinderlosen Susanne Renate Granitsch vom 30. August 1937, in dem diese ihre Schwester zu ihrer Universalerbin bestimmt hatte, in ihren Nachlass eingeantwortet Edith von Schickh hatte die Jahre 1938 bis 1945 in Wien verbracht.

An den Gemeinderatsausschuss für Kultur und Wissenschaft Stadtsenat Gemeinderat Vierter Bericht des amtsführenden Stadtrates für Kultur und Wissenschaft über die gemäß dem Gemeinderatsbeschluss vom 29. April 1999 erfolgte Übereignung von Kunst- und Kulturgegenständen aus den Sammlungen der Museen der Stadt 3.2.6. Zusammenfassende Darstellung betreffend den Erwerb von Kunstobjekten aus der Sammlung der akad. Malerin Susanne Renate Granitsch durch die Städtischen Sammlungen, 14 8 2003

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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