Evangelicals Are A Armed Political Animal

A nice, smiling, couple came to my door an hour ago. The woman tried to hand me a invite to their cake sale. I asked her if this sale was at their church. She said yes. I asked her if she believes in the Rapture? She broke out in rapturous glow.

“Oooh! Ahh! Gooey-God above, bless His Chewy Chocolate Candied Rapture!”

Yuk! I told her I just titled her church a Terrorist Cult that is involved in politics, and thus should lose their tax exempt status. Her man-meet jumped in and said he does not believe in politics.

“Who did you vote for?”

“That’s none of your business!”

Yes it is! You come and knock on my door, to get me engaged in your religion, and your liars’ politics, and then you say you are not political. I don’t buy it!”

“I voted for Trump. Who did you vote for?”

“I voted for Hillary!”

All of sudden they broke out in over-glowing fake blissful smiles!”

“That explains everything!” the D-Evil-Van said, he pleased as punch that I was going to hell where I will burn for an eternity – because I did not vote for, who almost all D-Evil-Bans vote for!

I give you permission to entrap these Demon Liars. Pretend that you are glad to see them, because you want to be one of them. However, you are a Democrat, and your family has been loyal to that party for three generations.

I told D-Evil my ancestor was a leader of the Puritans- who never heard of the Rapture – because it did not exist yet. Here is a D-Evil-Van using my families real and valid religious history, to give credence to his fairytales.

John

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/09/27/john-wilson-and-judgement-day/

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2018/06/a-history-of-evangelical-fear/563558/

A history of evangelical fear might begin with the 17th-century Puritans in Salem, Massachusetts, who feared that there were witches in their midst threatening their “city upon a hill” and their status as God’s new Israel. They responded to this fear by hanging 19 people.

But other evangelical options were available. As Puritans began to lose control over Massachusetts Bay, they might have turned to their sovereign God for guidance and trusted in his protection to lead them through a new phase in the history of the colony. Or they could have heeded the warnings put forth by those—such as Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, or the growing number of Baptists in the colony—who saw potential problems with such a close relationship between church and state.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/08/17/politics/workers-trump-speech-attend-pto-no-pay/index.html

ngton (CNN)Workers at the Pennsylvania petrochemical plant where President Donald Trump spoke Tuesday were told that if they didn’t attend the event, they either had to use paid time off or receive no pay for the day.

At least some of the workers who attended the speech were instructed not to protest the President, who told the crowd of workers at the Royal Dutch Shell plant he would be imploring their union leaders to support his reelection.
The instructions to the workers came in a memo, a copy of which was obtained by CNN’s Polo Sandoval from a congressional source. That source was given the memo by a person in Beaver County, Pennsylvania — the site of the plant.

 

President Trump, speaking from the nearby White House, addresses attendees of the March for Life rally on January 19, 2018. Eric Thayer / Reuters
White conservative evangelicals in America are anxious people. I know because I am one.Our sense of fear, perhaps more than any other factor, explains why evangelicals voted in such large numbers for Donald Trump in 2016 and continue to support his presidency.

The Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and essayist Marilynne Robinson once wrote, “Fear is not a Christian habit of mind.” The great poet of the Jersey shore, Bruce Springsteen, sings, “Fear’s a dangerous thing, it can turn your heart black, you can trust. It’ll take your God-filled soul and fill it with devils and dust.”

Robinson and Springsteen echo verses in nearly every book of the Bible, the sacred text that serves as the source of spiritual authority in evangelical life. Moses told the Israelites to “Fear not, stand firm, and see the salvation of the Lord, which he will work for you today.” The Hebrew God told Job: “At the destruction and famine you shall laugh, and shall not fear the beasts of the earth.” The Psalmist wrote: “Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff they comfort me.”

The Gospel of John teaches Christians that “there is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear.” St. Luke writes: “Fear not, little flock, for it is your Father’s good pleasure to give you the kingdom.

Despite all these scriptural passages, it is still possible to write an entire history of American evangelicalism as the story of a people failing miserably at overcoming fear with hope, trust, and faith in their God. But it is also possible to find evangelicals, drawing deeply from Christian theological resources, who sought to forge an alternative history.A history of evangelical fear might begin with the 17th-century Puritans in Salem, Massachusetts, who feared that there were witches in their midst threatening their “city upon a hill” and their status as God’s new Israel. They responded to this fear by hanging 19 people.But other evangelical options were available. As Puritans began to lose control over Massachusetts Bay, they might have turned to their sovereign God for guidance and trusted in his protection to lead them through a new phase in the history of the colony. Or they could have heeded the warnings put forth by those—such as Roger Williams, Anne Hutchinson, or the growing number of Baptists in the colony—who saw potential problems with such a close relationship between church and state.

Our history of evangelical fear might also include a chapter on the early 19th-century Protestants who feared the arrival of massive numbers of Catholic immigrants to American shores. They translated their panic into political organizations such as the nativist Know-Nothing Party and religious tracts cautioning fellow believers of the threat that such “popery” posed to their Christian nation.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to Evangelicals Are A Armed Political Animal

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    I AM A CHURCH! I am protected by FREEDOM OF RELIGION! I am not a common hater. I am a thealogian who opposes all churches that back Trump.

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