Rose of The Grateful Dead

Here is an article linking The Davinci Code to the Grateful Dead. I do not subscribe to all of it. I post it as proof I am not deluded and insane – and all by myself! This is The Desired State of several people who got close to me. I sent a letter to Executor Sydney Morris  giving him a tastes, a scent, of my study, and my book – yet to be! I write in order to leave a legacy to all members of my family. Why they fought me – is the real mystery!

https://www.gigslist.info/editorial/2019/3/19/the-grateful-dead-and-thenbspda-vinci-code?fbclid=IwAR1lkUOrbrG9YOUeiyWqYUX5-Fx2m_Ly-XOBuEXl2sdsgFomVhaYJJPBszY

When the Dark Children of Ignorance go after you, the first thing they do is make you out to be insane! Here is a list of the people who claimed I am insane – for their own good!

Heather Hanson. Patrice Hanson. Linda Comstock. Bill Cornwell. Alley Valkyrie. Kim Hafner. Krista and others.

Here is a essay that resembles my study. A group of us put forth most of these ideas on yahoogroups back in 1998. Randall Delpiano is a part of this myth. He was depicted as the father of my daughter. He walked around Oakland and Berkley with my child, claiming it was his. His wife knew better. I believe he did too. Randy had brown eyes.

When alas we saw each other, Rosemary’s Granddaughter came on the radio, and Heather sang along. After the song ended, she said;

“Wait a minute! I am really Rosemary’s Granddaughter!

I own the story! I own the history! I am – the family! I need not sweat a thing! These mentally ill people may have found a way to unborn me, but, they can not unborn Rosemary Rosamond, daughter of Mary Magdalene Rosamond, because – they will be unborn in so many ways!

One can say The Davinci Code’ was the greatest MISINFORMATION that appear on earthy. This was the theme of several groups I belonged to that the Brown’s eavesdropped in on. I had cornered the “Rose Line”. I am going to suggest to the City Manager of Springfield that he fund ‘The Rose Line Equestrian College’ a group of America Cyber Warriors to do battle with Russian Trolls out to undermine our fair elections. I am a Master of Misinformation and Mind Games! I am kin to Ian Flaming. I am talking about a grassroot groups of Patriots. We can form our own band ‘The Bond Brothers’.

In the end, it is Rosemary who is Heather’s biggest fan – and they never met! Rosemary dated movie actors, and wanted to be a star! My daughter and my mother has much in common. The other fakes………………fade away!

John Presco

Copyright 2019

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/06/17/the-equestrian-college-of-knights-and-ladies/

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/08/20/i-mentioned-the-roza-mira/

https://www.gigslist.info/editorial/2019/3/19/the-grateful-dead-and-thenbspda-vinci-code?fbclid=IwAR1lkUOrbrG9YOUeiyWqYUX5-Fx2m_Ly-XOBuEXl2sdsgFomVhaYJJPBszY

When I found myself pregnant, I felt the father could have been
either John’s or my husband’s, but I had to convince the husband
that it was his baby or life would have been unbearable and the
chances of my baby’s survival would have been slim. I knew this baby
was meant to be, and be with me, and that was important. From there
moment she was born, I could see that she looked like John, but it
was the husband’s name that went on the birth certificate.”

Patrice Hanson falsified a birth certificate by putting Randall Delpiano’s name as the father, instead of me. Heather Hanson is MY daughter. Patrice admits she knew this in a letter she composed to send Oprah Winfrey. Randy is famous! He appears in two books as “Bogus Bobby”. Patrice says she was married to BB, but, I have my doubts. Patrice has never had a grasp on reality. She suffers from mental illness due to her severely mentally ill mother being violently beaten by Patrice’s father. This may have caused this poor mother of three to jump off a cliff, and kill herself. Patrice describes herself as being the surrogate mother to her siblings.

Tonight I read on Heather’s facebook that she had a $63 session with psychic, Karen Petterson, who contacted Heather’s grandmother – who MY daughter never met – who relayed a message to her that said;

“I’m proud of you!”

The rose is one of the symbols of Mary Magdalene. It is from the Bible, Song of Songs II.

“ I am the rose of Sharon, and the lily of the valleys. As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters…”

Song of Songs II, also called the Song of Solomon, is a love poem written by the historical Mary Magdalene to the historical Jesus.  The historical Mary Magdalene was of Greek descent and a Roman Citizen. Roses in ancient times were associated with Venus who was a goddess of love. The real life mortal Venus was an ancient ancestor of the historical Mary Magdalene, which is how the rose became one of Mary Magdalene’s heraldry symbols and Christian icons.

To confirm that the rose and Mary Magdalene connection is not by chance, there other symbols relating to Mary Magdalene and Holy Grail lore in the Poem Song of Songs. The relating symbols include: apples, deer, windows, foxes, figs, vines, grape vines, turtles, doves, shadows, and trees.  It would be kind of difficult to not make the connection.

In Stanley Mouse and Anton Kelley’s skull and roses design the head wreath and ribbons are connected to the real identity and ancestry of Mary Magdalene of the Bible. Floral and leaf wreaths and wreaths with ribbons are ancient Greek and Roman headwear and syncretistic with Gods and Goddesses. Ancient gods and goddess were syncretistic with deified monarchs.

 

In the context of Masonic and Knights Templar iconography, both institutions with clearly visible large ornate buildings in Haight Ashbury, the symbols are history books.  Not the histories taught in school, histories very different to mainstream records.  And at the risk of disappointing all the new age guru and space alien fans there is nothing mystical or extraterrestrial in any of it.  And at the risk of disappointing the Bible believers, there is also a lack of Bible miracles and winged angels and demons with superpowers. Step away from the remote… like now…

In Masonic and Knights Templar lore the skull, 3 point lightning bolt, circle, and roses all relate to both the Bible and the histories of the Holy Grail Bloodline.  A tradition of the Holy Grail Bloodline, or San Graal in French, being to record their histories in symbols.   If Jesus was a King of Kings he was a royal and royals have always recorded their family histories in a form of pictorial hieroglyphs that in the 21st century we call heraldry.

Heraldry is designed from an event or career in a royal’s life, such as a ship for a navigator; a skull for being beheaded; a tower featured from a land that an ancestor once ruled; a flower from a poem an ancient ancestor wrote in the Bible.   Each symbol is not an isolated abstract. Each symbol is rich with history and back stories and the people those back stories are about.

When we line symbols up multiples other symbols they form whole libraries of history that are not in mainstream history books of modern day.  Histories of very different versions of what we know as history.  Histories with kickass women rulers, scholars, and priests who didn’t use Bible miracles or extraterrestrial super powers.

St. Stephen and Rosemary

Capturebb2 flax8 CaptureB7CaptureB31 CaptureB40 Capturesant8grateful3 grateful4 grateful22Yesterday I found this blog about the song ‘Rosemary’ by the Grateful Dead. It reads like this blog. I am amazed. In the video of my meeting of Belle Burch a Deadhead is singing ‘Saint Stephen’ who comes and goes in a garden. Rosemary is a song about a secret garden. Roses and the Dead go hand in hand. When I revealed Belle’s identity as a anarchist, her friends wanted to stone me. Now, they are part of Grateful Dead lore. At the end of my video I tell Belle there is a family legend around the name ‘Rosamond’. My mother was born Rosemary Rosamond.

My childhood friend, Nancy Hamren, dated Stanely Augustus Owsley who made the sound system for the Dead. I met Owsley on several occasions when he came over to our house.  We saw the Dead at the Fillmore in 1966. When they played at Autzen stadium with Dylan in 1987, Nancy got me a backstage pass. She also got me on Kesey’s bus in the Eugene Celebration. The Dead also played a benefit concert to keep the Springfield Creamery afloat. Nancy was aware Amalie was my muse, she a friend of Kevin who is a friend of Belle Burch and Ambrose Holtham-Keathley, the son of Anand Holtham-Keathley who is on the board of a the new Festival Eugene Celebration, headed by Krysta Albert who bid me to be on the board.

My friend and art patron made LSD with Owsley and Tim Scully, and worked on the Dead sound system. My sister Christine, the famous artist known as ‘Rosamond’ lived with us at the ‘Idle Hands’ commune in San Francisco and went on a double date with Nancy, Stanley, and Nick Sands. There is a Dead album titled ‘American Beauty’ which is the name of a rose. The attempts to silence me, ban me, and keep deny me public forums in the City of Eugene, are evil, full of bad vibes promoted by frauds and wanna-bes.  But, I own ‘The Rose’ and the ‘Key to the Garden of the Dead’.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2014

http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2012/02/rosemary.html

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxrllF9ea4c

Gabriele Tergit also has quite a bit to say about rosemary:

“To wake the Sleeping Beauty, she had to be touched by rosemary, a plant of many legends and ancient beliefs, and of many uses– curative, ornamental, culinary, as a love potion and a symbol of mourning.” (p. 48)

“The name, Ros marinus, dew of the sea, was given to it because it was supposed to thrive best within sound of the ocean. …Where rosemary flourishes, so goes the tradition, the mistress rules.” (p. 301)

“Rosemary” is one of my favorite songs, even though it’s quite short and…odd.
I came across this poem, and it’s strikingly similar to the lyrics of “Rosemary”—-

“Rosemary” is one of my favorite songs, even though it’s quite short and…odd.
I came across this poem, and it’s strikingly similar to the lyrics of “Rosemary”—-

DEATH IS A DOOR
by Nancy Byrd Turner

Death is only an old door
Set in a garden wall;
On gentle hinges it gives, at dusk
When the thrushes call.

Along the lintel are green leaves,
Beyond the light lies still;
Very willing and weary feet
Go over that still

There is nothing to trouble any heart;
Nothing to hurt at all.
Death is only a quiet door
In an old wall.

St. Stephen” is a song by the Grateful Dead, written by Jerry Garcia, Phil Lesh and Robert Hunter and originally released on the 1969 studio album Aoxomoxoa. The same year, a live version of the song was released on Live/Dead, their first concert album. Unlike the studio version, live versions usually included a section of the song called the “William Tell Bridge,” which was used to segue into “The Eleven.” After being played frequently in live concerts from the late 1960s to the early 1970s, the song fell out of regular performance; subsequent live performances of St. Stephen were thus considered a special event by Deadheads. The song also makes reference to the last days and trial of the 1st century AD saint, Stephen, the first martyr of the New Testament of the Bible, who was stoned to death.

“St. Stephen”

 

Saint Stephen with a rose, in and out of the garden he goes,
Country garden in the wind and the rain,
Wherever he goes the people all complain.Stephen prospered in his time, well he may and he may decline.
Did it matter, does it now? Stephen would answer if he only knew how.
Wishing well with a golden bell, bucket hanging clear to hell,
Hell halfway twixt now and then,
Stephen fill it up and lower down and lower down again.Lady finger, dipped in moonlight, writing “What for?” across the morning sky.
Sunlight splatters, dawn with answer, darkness shrugs and bids the day goodbye.Speeding arrow, sharp and narrow,
What a lot of fleeting matters you have spurned.
Several seasons with their treasons,
Wrap the babe in scarlet colors, call it your own.
Did he doubt or did he try? Answers aplenty in the bye and bye,
Talk about your plenty, talk about your ills,
One man gathers what another man spills.Saint Stephen will remain, all he’s lost he shall regain,
Seashore washed by the suds and foam,
Been here so long, he’s got to calling it home.Fortune comes a crawlin’, calliope woman, spinnin’ that curious sense of your own.
Can you answer? Yes I can. But what would be the answer to the answer man?
Here’s the craziest story I have to go with “Saint Stephen.” At my first Dead show, in October 1976, when the band played the first, ringing, opening notes of the song, the sun blinked. I mean, there was a moment of complete darkness in the middle of an outdoor, sunlit Day on the Green show at the Oakland Coliseum, and then the sun came back on. Believe it if you need it…but I did go on to become a reference librarian, and what is a reference librarian if not an answer man?

A final connection to note here, although I am certain there are many more. Garcia’s memorial service was held at Saint Stephen’s Episcopal Church in Belvedere, Marin County, California, with Mathew Fox presiding.

http://www.dead.net/features/greatest-stories-ever-told/greatest-stories-ever-told-saint-stephen

And who was this martyr? He was the first deacon ordained by the apostles, one of seven deacons. “Stephen” is derived from the Greek for “crown,” (“country garland”?) and his career is documented in the biblical book of The Acts of the Apostles, chapters 6-8. (“And Stephen, full of grace and fortitude, did great wonders and signs among the people.”) He was stoned to death for preaching that Israel had deviated from God’s word, around the year 34. His feast day is celebrated on December 26.

An 1833 hymn, “Saint Stephen Was a Holy Man” (credited to “traditional”) contains this verse, bringing to mind the line: “Wherever he goes, the people all complain:

But when they heard him so to say,
Their hearts in sunder clave,
And gnashing on him with their teeth,
Like madmen they did rave;
And then they all so sharp and shrill,
With violence gan ran,
That there, without the city-walls,
They ston’d this holy man.

(This hymn’s chorus bears some resemblance to “Mason’s Children.” Hmmm….another time.)

Interestingly, both Stephens were preachers, in a way. I love the line, “Wherever he goes, the people all complain.” No one enjoys being told difficult truths. They can get you killed.

The music accompanying all of this imagery, all these questions without answers, can be at times grandiose, at times, rollicking in its initial verses, but then it melts into the bridge: “Lady finger, dipped in moonlight…” These lines were characterized by the writer Ed McClanahan, in his piece about the Dead in Playboy magazine, “Grateful Dead I Have Known,” “…the sweetest, tenderest, loveliest thing anybody had ever said to her, ever in her life.” (McClanahan was relating a speculative story about a young woman’s experience while in the act of conceiving a child she later claimed was Garcia’s own “true” child. You have to read the piece to get it.)

The artwork for the front and back covers of the album was created by John Van Hamersveld. The back cover depicts three men playing cards, with a globe in the center of the table. The futuristic Dymaxion car designed in 1933 by U.S. inventor and architect Buckminster Fuller is parked outside in the background. The three men appear as Marlon Brando from The Wild One, a long-haired bearded man in a graduation cap and gown and Cesar Romero as The Cisco Kid. The front cover features the Roman goddess of fertility, Venus, from the painting by Sandro Botticelli, The Birth of Venus.

grate5 grate7 grate8 grate9 grate11 grate12 grate13

http://festivalofeugene.com/

https://www.facebook.com/FestivalofEugene

http://www.imagineweddingsandevents.net/#!aboutus/cjg9

https://rosamondpress.com/2014/05/19/25716/

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxrllF9ea4c

 

http://www.kezi.com/county-to-address-sleeps-concerns/

  1. “The Golden Road (To Unlimited Devotion)” (Jerry Garcia, Bill Kreutzmann, Phil Lesh, Ron “Pigpen” McKernan, and Bob Weir) – 2:07
  2. Truckin’” (Garcia, Robert Hunter, Lesh, and Weir) – 5:09
  3. “Rosemary” (Garcia and Hunter) – 1:58

    • Originally released on the album Aoxomoxoa.
  4. Sugar Magnolia” (Hunter and Weir) – 3:15
    • Originally released on the album American Beauty.

  5. St. Stephen” (Garcia, Hunter, and Lesh) – 4:26
    • Originally released on the album Aoxomoxoa.

  6. Uncle John’s Band” (Garcia and Hunter) – 4:42

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skeletons_from_the_Closet:_The_Best_of_Grateful_Dead

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2mUem7RLNM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xa8ImA_wSKI

“Rosemary”

Boots were of leather, a breath of cologne
the mirror was a window she sat by alone.
All around the garden grew scarlet and purple and crimson and blue.
She came dead and she went, and at last went away, the garden was sealed when the
flowers decayed.
On the wall of the garden a legend did say, no one may come here since no one may
stay.

http://www.dead.net/features/greatest-stories-ever-told/greatest-stories-ever-told-rosemary

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owsley_Stanley

Stanley met the members of the Grateful Dead during 1965,[11] financing them and working with them as their first soundman.[12] Along with his close friend Bob Thomas, he designed the Lightning Bolt Skull Logo,[13] often referred to by fans as “Steal Your Face”, “Stealie” or SYF (after the name of the 1976 Grateful Dead album featuring only the lightning bolt skull on the cover, although the symbol predates the namesake album by eight years). The 13-point lightning bolt was derived from a stencil Stanley created to spray-paint on the Grateful Dead’s equipment boxes (he wanted an easily identifiable mark to help the crew find the Dead’s equipment in the jumble of multiple bands’ identical black equipment boxes at festivals).

 

guide

http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2012/02/rosemary.html

“It Must Have Been The Roses”

Annie laid her head down in the roses.
She had ribbons, ribbons, ribbons, in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

I don’t know, it must have been the roses,
The roses or the ribbons in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

Ten years the waves roll the ships home from the sea,
Thinkin’ well how it may blow in all good company,
If I tell another what your own lips told to me,
Let me lay ‘neath the roses, till my eyes no longer see.

I don’t know, it must have been the roses,
The roses or the ribbons in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

One pane of glass in the window,
No one is complaining, no, come in and shut the door,
Faded is the crimson from the ribbons that she wore,
And it’s strange how no one comes round any more.

I don’t know, it must have been the roses,
The roses or the ribbons in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

Annie laid her head down in the roses.
She had ribbons, ribbons, ribbons, in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jAUqnAmegU

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_’American_Beauty

https://archive.org/details/gd87-07-19.sbd.fishman.13023.sbeok.shnf

Rosemary

Rosemary is one of the simplest, shortest songs to appear on a Grateful Dead album. A graceful tune, accompanied by only a couple acoustic guitars, it tells the mysterious, atmospheric tale of a solitary lady in an ominous garden.
The actual narrative is left out, and we’re left with a few lines that allude to some unknown story. Rosemary herself is only indirectly described – “boots were of leather, a breath of cologne” – as she sits by her mirror and leaves her garden. She’s given the name of an herb that was long associated with mourning and remembrance, strewn on people’s graves, but was also a love charm worn at weddings. (Hunter very likely had these folkloric associations in mind when he wrote the song.)
http://www.ourherbgarden.com/herb-history/rosemary.html
The song has a wistful, lonesome setting, starting with one person “quite alone” and ending with an empty sealed garden where “no one may stay;” but nothing is explained. We’re left only with questions – is she waiting for someone? pining for a lover? in mourning? – that the song doesn’t answer.
Blair Jackson wrote that “lyrically, Rosemary feels almost fragmentary, as if it’s just a part of some larger song.” This was deliberate. As a song consciously written in ‘the folk tradition’ (though not, as far as I know, based on any particular song), ambiguity was key to Rosemary for its writers.
Garcia told Jackson in an ’88 interview, “I love it when a song is ambiguous… Hunter is able to leave just enough out… He actually writes more clearly than I let him; he explains things if I let him… Sometimes it doesn’t have to mean anything and it can still evoke a great something.” Jackson observed that Garcia would even “deliberately cut out verses of songs if they seem to be explaining things too much.”Hunter told Jackson in ’88, “Jerry favors a certain type of folk song. He loves the mournful death-connected ballad, the Child Ballad stuff. This is a venerable source which has always spoken to him, and to me as well, which is one reason we got together writing songs – because of that haunting feel certain traditional songs have… I’m generally deep-sea diving in imagery and getting things that sometimes, as in folk music, you don’t know quite what it means, but it’s resonant. Like that line in that folk song, ‘ten thousand was drownded that never was born.’ It makes the hair stand up on your arms.”
In a 1991 interview with Garcia, Hunter brings up the same line: “You know, Jerry, you once said something to me about a lyric that really impressed you when you were young, and it impressed me the same way, and I almost feel that line is where we took off.” Garcia agrees: “That line really scared me. It’s from a tune called ‘The Mummer’s Song,’ that Jean Ritchie used to sing. It’s an a capella song with only two verses, and they’re nonsense insofar as that if they have any sense, it’s so deeply symbolic we don’t know what it’s actually about… Not knowing, though, is part of what makes it so evocative. The mystery is part of what makes it interesting to me.”
(Garcia was slightly off: the tune was Nottamun Town, which was sung in medieval English mummers’ plays.)
http://blog.allmusic.com/2008/06/27/when-down-is-up-2/
(the story of Nottamun Town)
“Sat down on a hard hot cold frozen stone
Ten thousand stood round me and yet I’s alone
Took my hat in my hand for to keep my head warm
Ten thousand got drownded that never was born.”
Hunter & Garcia brought this sensibility to Rosemary: what Hunter called “the notion of evocativeness,” or Garcia, “the lack of specificness, the power of the almost-expressed. It seemed to speak at some level other than the most obvious one, and it was more moving for that reason., since you don’t know what it’s about.”
Garcia talked about the Lord Randall ballad as an instance: “The versions that made it to Appalachia were two hundred years after the fact for those English ballads – they got sung from father to son or mother to daughter so much that eventually nobody remembered who Lord Randall was, but they did remember the guy’s head rolling down the stairs in that verse. (Hunter added, “You’ve got all those incredibly evocative lines like ‘black eel and black broth, mother’ and ‘I fain would lie doon.’”) You get these little hunks of good stuff and you don’t need all 29 verses to get the feeling of it. You only get three or four verses, but they’re so rich in weirdness because they’re the ones that made enough of an impression that they could last…through the generations.”Though it has the timeless feel common to many of Hunter’s songs, Rosemary has a particularly medieval tone. The lyrics seem reminiscent of ancient Arthurian ballads: “On the wall of the garden, a legend did say, ‘No one may come here, since no one may stay.’” (The acoustic setting and medieval-inspired lyrics are also shared by Mountains of the Moon, which is kind of a sister song to Rosemary.)The annotated GD lyrics site speculates on some of the literary influences that may have been floating around Hunter’s head:
http://artsites.ucsc.edu/GDead/agdl/rosemary.html
The lady in her private walled garden is a staple of medieval literature, for instance in the famous Romance of the Rose and many of Chaucer’s poems:
http://englishhistoryauthors.blogspot.com/2011/10/boundaries-medieval-women-in-medieval.html
http://www.teamsmedieval.org/scientia_scholae/0308/garden.html
One historical reference is Rosamund, the mistress of Henry II in the 12th century, who became famous in English romance and folklore. The story goes that Henry hid her in a bower garden surrounded by a forest labyrinth, so only he could find the way in; but his jealous queen Eleanor used a thread to discover the path, and poisoned Rosamund. This is one old ballad on the subject:
http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/boeb/boeb06.htm
One possible inspiration for Rosemary is Hawthorne’s story “Rappaccini’s Daugher,” about an alluring but toxic young lady in a garden of poisonous plants:
http://www.shsu.edu/~eng_wpf/authors/Hawthorne/Rappaccini.htm “All around her the garden grew scarlet and purple and crimson and blue.”
(This story was also featured in a Vincent Price movie, Twice-Told Tales, in 1963.)
Another parallel is Tennyson’s poem “Lady of Shalott,” about a lady who pines alone in her walled isle while gazing in a mirror, and comes to a solitary end:
http://charon.sfsu.edu/tennyson/tennlady.html “Her mirror was a window, she sat quite alone.”
(Hunter in the 1991 interview even mentions that the British folk tradition he admires “reaches its culmination with Alfred Lord Tennyson, things like Morte d’Arthur. Certainly I liked that sort of writing.”)
There may also be an echo of Shelley’s poem “The Sensitive Plant,” about a lady who tends a garden – when she dies, the garden dies with her:
http://www.kalliope.org/digt.pl?longdid=shelley2003060601 “She came and she went and at last went away; the garden was sealed when the flowers decayed.”
And so on. There are many such literary pieces about women in gardens that could be found; but which exactly Hunter might have been thinking of, is uncertain. It’s possible he had particular old folk songs in mind, though in general Hunter seemed to take inspiration more from poetry and literature than from older songs.
(Oddly enough, he had recently written another song with a prominent garden: “Saint Stephen with a rose, in and out of the garden he goes.” But Hunter’s later songs would tend to leave English gardens for more American themes.)

http://www.oregonlive.com/O/index.ssf/2010/03/sometimes_a_great_yogurt_nancy.html

One lean year, 1972, the Grateful Dead played a benefit concert, which helped keep the creamery in business.

The result: one of those quintessential Oregon events that fueled the state’s happy hippie reputation and cemented its place in the budding natural foods movement. Springfield Creamery, whose practices and products epitomized the pure, healthy goodness the movement yearned to spread, survived, thanks in part to the $12,000 to $13,000 raised that day.

Without it, the business that grew to symbolize a nation’s evolving food tastes might not have stuck around long enough to celebrate its 50th anniversary this year.

Nancy Van Brasch Hamren brought her grandmother’s recipe to Springfield Creamery in the late ’60s when she started as bookkeeper. She still works in 2010 as office manager.

Nancy Van Brasch Hamren had a recipe. Her health-conscious grandmother made yogurt, and so did she during the months she lived on Ken Kesey’s farm near Eugene.

Hamren, a lanky, soft-spoken Californian, ran in circles simply psychedelic with history. She lived in San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district from 1966 to 1968, the bookends to 1967’s Summer of Love. Her boyfriend’s sister was married to Jerry Garcia, the Grateful Dead’s shaggy-haired lead guitarist. And they all knew Ken Kesey — from his books, “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” and “Sometimes a Great Notion,” and from the infamous, drug-juiced parties known as Acid Tests, which he hosted and promoted.

When Ken Kesey traveled to Britain to work with the Beatles in 1969, Hamren and her boyfriend moved to Oregon to look after his farm. When Kesey and his family returned, she needed a new pad and a job. Down at the creamery, his brother, Chuck, needed a bookkeeper. He and Sue hired Hamren, and they started talking yogurt.

The time was right. The place, too.

Eugene and Springfield brimmed with hippie bakeries, granola makers, co-ops and natural-food stores. College kids and others living there moved beyond white bread long before the mainstream pondered crafting diets around fresh, local, organic food.

http://www.oregonlive.com/O/index.ssf/2010/03/sometimes_a_great_yogurt_nancy.html

https://rosamondpress.com/2014/09/14/stalkers-and-baby-knappers-2/

One historical reference is Rosamund, the mistress of Henry II in the 12th century, who became famous in English romance and folklore. The story goes that Henry hid her in a bower garden surrounded by a forest labyrinth, so only he could find the way in; but his jealous queen Eleanor used a thread to discover the path, and poisoned Rosamund. This is one old ballad on the subject:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/boeb/boeb06.htm

Yea Rosamonde, fair Rosamonde,
Her name was called so,
To whom our queene, Dame Ellinor,
Was known a deadlye foe.

The king therefore, for her defence
Against the furious queene,
At Woodstocke builded such a bower,
The like was never seene.

Most curiously that bower was built,
Of stone and timber strong;
An hundered and fifty doors
Did to this bower belong:

And they so cunninglye contriv’d,
With turnings round about,
That none but with a clue of thread
Could enter in or out.

http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2012/02/rosemary.html

http://www.dead.net/features/greatest-stories-ever-told/greatest-stories-ever-told-rosemary

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owsley_Stanley

Stanley met the members of the Grateful Dead during 1965,[11] financing them and working with them as their first soundman.[12] Along with his close friend Bob Thomas, he designed the Lightning Bolt Skull Logo,[13] often referred to by fans as “Steal Your Face”, “Stealie” or SYF (after the name of the 1976 Grateful Dead album featuring only the lightning bolt skull on the cover, although the symbol predates the namesake album by eight years). The 13-point lightning bolt was derived from a stencil Stanley created to spray-paint on the Grateful Dead’s equipment boxes (he wanted an easily identifiable mark to help the crew find the Dead’s equipment in the jumble of multiple bands’ identical black equipment boxes at festivals).

 

guide

http://deadessays.blogspot.com/2012/02/rosemary.html

“It Must Have Been The Roses”

Annie laid her head down in the roses.
She had ribbons, ribbons, ribbons, in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

I don’t know, it must have been the roses,
The roses or the ribbons in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

Ten years the waves roll the ships home from the sea,
Thinkin’ well how it may blow in all good company,
If I tell another what your own lips told to me,
Let me lay ‘neath the roses, till my eyes no longer see.

I don’t know, it must have been the roses,
The roses or the ribbons in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

One pane of glass in the window,
No one is complaining, no, come in and shut the door,
Faded is the crimson from the ribbons that she wore,
And it’s strange how no one comes round any more.

I don’t know, it must have been the roses,
The roses or the ribbons in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

Annie laid her head down in the roses.
She had ribbons, ribbons, ribbons, in her long brown hair.
I don’t know, maybe it was the roses,
All I know I could not leave her there.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jAUqnAmegU

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_’American_Beauty

https://archive.org/details/gd87-07-19.sbd.fishman.13023.sbeok.shnf

The Bob Dylan and the Grateful Dead 1987 Tour was a concert tour by Bob Dylan and the Grateful Dead taking place in the summer of 1987 and consisting of six concerts.[1][2] Each concert began with a lengthy set by the Grateful Dead of their own material (sometime broken into a first and second set, per the Dead’s own practice), followed by a roughly 90 minute set of the Dead acting as Dylan’s backup band. The Dead had long performed many Dylan songs in their own concerts, so they were well-versed in Dylan’s repertoire. However, some Dylan fans were not happy with the Dead playing the songs in their own style, or with Dylan going along with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcb_-idT_OA

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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