Royal Christening and Canon of Windsor

It is a mystery of sort why the Wilson line became leaders of the Church of England. In a few days a Royal Christening will take place. My angel gives Tyler Hunt Permission to enter the church of his choice. When I publish my book in three weeks, Christianity will change. I will show that the first church was founded by women who took the oath of the Nazarite. This is why I named my unborn granddaughter, Elizabeth.

Above is my grandson in the clutches of The Ventriloquist Witch. The best royal stories have a witch in them. This is the opening door that Peterson mentioned. Patrice is more like a man, than a woman. I am certain she told me she had Gypsy blood. Here is a story about Gypsies stealing children to turn them into pickpockets. The look on Patrice’s face says;

“This is my asset that will pay dividends someday, when John wants an Heir!”

Consider the witch Morgana in the story of King Arthur. Many modern women associate with the mother of Mordred. As for the Kimites, the Anglian Church never believed in the Rapture that is also hocus-pocus!

There is real history of my Puritan ancestors trying women as witches. It is family tradition verses fake witchery. Dark Daughters has a chance to make money for my famous family legacy. Tyler and I look alike. He does not look like Granny Candy-Cake House.

It’s time to turn that witch out to make money for my Royal Art and Literature Dynasty in order to help take care of Vicki and my nieces. If Heather has a baby, then she is going to need another source of income.

I see Patrice playing the role of a gallery manager. She sells Satanic S&M art for a Satanist she never meets. Two nights a week she works graveyard and deals with fans who wilt roses as they pass. We see Granny coming out of the gallery with a watering can.

“What is happening with my roses? I used to have a green thumb.”

I want Clint Eastwood to play a old fashioned radio evangelist, who keeps getting requests from Dark Daughter. All the Eastwoods will be in my movies. Christine and Shannon conversed with Clint in a restaurant. Note Evelyn shredding a painting.  The Duchess of Sussex starred in a soap opera.

John Presco

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/08/07/return-of-the-scarlet-letter/

https://rosamondpress.com/2018/09/15/tales-of-the-dark-daughters/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Play_Misty_for_Me

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/romania/8027694/Romanian-gipsy-gang-snatched-200-children-from-homes-to-use-them-as-beggars.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ventriloquism

https://www.express.co.uk/news/royal/1141400/archie-harrison-christening-queen-prince-philip-royal-baby-christening

Rev. William Wilson. Born ca 1542 at England.116 William died in May 1615.65 Buried on 15 May 1615 in St George’s Chapel, Windsor.116 Education: Merton College, Oxford, B.A. 1564, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607.116 William was prebendary of St Paul’s and Rochester Cathedral, Rector of Cliffe, Kent, and in 1584 became Canon of Windsor. From Bartlett:116 William was “rector at Islip, Oxfordshire, 1578; rector of Cliffe, co. Kent, 1579; rector of Caxton, co. Kent, 1593, prebendary of St. Paul’s, London, 1595-1615, and of Rochester Cathedral, 1594-1614. About 1580 he became chaplain to Edmund Grindall, Archbishop of Canterbery, and in 1583 became canon of Windsor, holding this position for thirty-two years, until his death May 15, 1615, aged 73, and was buried in the chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, where a monumental brass to his memory states that he was ‘beloved of all in his Life, and much lamented in his Death.’” Ca 1570 William first married Isabel Woodhall (4978) , daughter of John Woodhall Esq (ca 1519-) & Elizabeth Grindall (1341) (ca 1520-bef Apr 1583). Born ca 1546. Isabel died at England bef 1615. Buried in Rochester Cathedral, Kent.65

Rosamond Clifford and Reverend William Wilson

When Princess Diana’s sons got married, the bones of my grandfather were not too far away, they buried in the floor of Saint George’s Cathedral. Sarah Wilson was the wife of John Roseman. Sarah is kin to Reverend William Wilson, who is Royal Rosamond’s 10th. grandfather. This line goes to Rosamond Clifford. Alas I have found her! We are in the same rosy family tree, and is the famous Puritan, John Wilson. I was destined for the church. It is in my blood. I have been saying this all along.

William, his son John, and I have the long faces with aquiline noses. This is the oldest image of a relative. Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor, should have played Fair Rosamond. The wife of Ralph de Toney was said to have had purple eyes.

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/07/29/the-maze-and-grail-at-blenheim-palace-2/

I will now be using my full name so my Rosamond kindred and I can be found.

John Gregory Presco

http://www.jacksonsweb.org/wilson.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilson_(minister)

Reverend William Wilson born 1542 Doctorate of Divinity and graduate of Merton College, Oxford BA in 1564, MA in 1570, BD in 1576, DD 1607. Rector of Islip, Oxfordshire, 1578; rector of Cliffe, co. Kent 1579, rector of Caxton, co. Kent, 1593, prebendary of St. Paul’s London 1595-1615, and of Rochester Cathedral 1591-1614. About 1580 he became chaplair to Edmund Grindll, Archbishop of Canterbury, and in 1583 became the canon of Windsor, holding his position for thirty two years until his death Mary 15, 1615 at age 73, he was buried in the chapel of St.George, Windsor Castle, where a monumental brass to his memory states that he was “beloved of all in his Life, and much lamented in his Death.” (Alumni Oxoniensis, vol. iv, p. 1657; Ashmole’s ‘History and Antiquities of Berkshire’ p. 305; register, ante, vol. xxxviii, pp 306-308, and vol. lii, p. 144). He married first about 1575, Isabel, daughter of John Woodhall, Esq., of Walden, co Essex, by Elizabeth his wife, sister of Rev. Edmund Grindall, the celebrated Puritan Archbishop of Canterbury, described by Lord Bacon as ‘the gravest and greatest prelate of the land.” (Register, ante, vol. xxxviii,pp.301-308). He married second, Anne, sister of Rev. Erasmus Webb, canon of Windsor, who died in 1612, without issue.(Register, ante, vol. lii,pp 143-4). He was a prebend of St. Paul’s of Rochester and of Windsor, and rector of Cliffe. Notes from the Antiquities of Berkshire, by Elias Ashmole, Esq (Reading, 1736) give the inscriptions found by that famous antiquary in the Chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, relating to this family. On the North side lied a grave stone, on which, in Brass Plates, is the figure of a Man, and this Inscription “To me to live is Christ, and to dye is Gain.” Phillip I.21. Here underneath lied interr’d the Body of William Wilson, Doctour of Divinitie, and Prebendarie of this Church by the space of 32 years. He had issue by Isabell Woodhall Wilson six sons and six daughters. He dy’d the 15th of May, in the year of our Lord 1615, of his age of 73. ‘Who thinke of Death in lyfe, can never dye, but mount through Faith, from Earth to heavenly pleasure, weep then no more, though her his body lye, his Doul’s possest of never ending Treasure.” On another small brass plate on the same grave stone, is the following inscription. ‘Neere unto this place lyes buried William Willson, the third son, who after along trial of grievous sickness, did comfortably yield up his spirit in the yeare of our Lord 1610, of his age of 23. On a brass plate, on a grave stone northward of the last is this inscription, ‘William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in the County of Lincolne, Gent, departed this Lyfe, within the castle of Windosre, in the yeare of our Lord 1587, the 27 day of August, and lyeth buried in this place.’ p. 309. Arms of Will’m Wilson of Welborne, per Norroy flower, 1586. ‘Per pale argen and azure three lion’s gambs barways, erased and counterchanged. Crest:-a lion’s head erased argent guttee de sang. Harleian Coll., No. 1550, Fol. 192, British Museum: Richard Mundy’s copy of the Visitation of Lincolnshire, 1564 and 1592.

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/70589734/william-wilson

John Wilson (c.1588–1667), was a Puritan clergyman in Boston in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and the minister of the First Church of Boston from its beginnings in Charlestown in 1630 until his death in 1667. He is most noted for being a minister at odds with Anne Hutchinson during the Antinomian Controversy from 1636 to 1638, and for being an attending minister during the execution of Mary Dyer in 1660.

Born into a prominent English family from Sudbury in Suffolk, his father was the chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, and thus held a high position in the Anglican Church. Young Wilson was sent to school at Eton for four years, and then attended the university at King’s College, Cambridge, where he received his B.A. in 1610. From there he studied law briefly, and then studied at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he received an M.A. in 1613. Following his ordination, he was the chaplain for some prominent families for a few years, before being installed as pastor in his home town of Sudbury. Over the next ten years he was dismissed and then reinstated on several occasions, because of his strong Puritan sentiments which contradicted the practices of the established church.

As with many other Puritan divines, Wilson came to New England, and sailed with his friend John Winthrop and the Winthrop Fleet in 1630. He was the first minister of the settlers, who established themselves in Charlestown, but soon crossed the Charles River into Boston. Wilson was an encouragement to the early settlers during the very trying initial years of colonization. He made two return trips to England during his early days in Boston, the first time to persuade his wife to come, after she initially refused to make the trip, and the second time to transact some business. Upon his second return to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1635, Anne Hutchinson was first exposed to his preaching, and found an unhappy difference between his theology and that of her mentor, John Cotton, who was the other Boston minister. The theologically astute, sharp-minded, and outspoken Hutchinson, who had been hosting large groups of followers in her home, began to criticize Wilson, and the divide erupted into the Antinomian Controversy. Hutchinson was eventually tried and banished from the colony, as was her brother-in-law, Reverend John Wheelwright.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/0/history-royal-weddings-st-georges-chapel-windsor-castle/

https://www.townandcountrymag.com/society/tradition/g15881437/royal-weddings-history-windsor-castle-st-georges-chapel/?slide=1

https://metro.co.uk/2018/05/19/who-else-has-married-at-st-georges-chapel-in-windsor-castle-before-prince-harry-and-meghan-markle-7556503/

 

Rosamond de Clifford

This is the Master Profile for Rosamond de Clifford.
Curator Note from Terry Jackson (Switzer) (1/12/2016):d/o Walter FItzRichard de Clifford & Margaret de Toëny
discussions determined did NOT marry: Ralph de Baskerville
Partner of Henry II “Curtmantle”, king of England
Mother of (Unconf.) Rosamond FitzHenry

William Thomas Rosamond is connected to Rosamond de Clifford.

William Thomas Rosamond
 

How are they related?

Path search in progress. If we find a path, we will notify you.

Rosamond de Clifford
his relative?

Rosamond de Clifford MP

Gender: Female
Birth: 1136
Clifford Castle, Clifford, Herefordshire, England
Death: 1176 (40)
Woodstock Castle, Oxfordshire, England
Place of Burial: Godstow Nunnery, Wolvercote, Oxfordshire, England
Immediate Family: Daughter of Walter FitzRichard de Clifford, 1st Baron Clifford and Margaret de Toëny
Partner of Henry II “Curtmantle”, king of England
Mother of Rosamond FitzHenry
Sister of Henry Clifford; Amicia De Clifford; Lucia de Say (de Clifford); Walter de Clifford, 2nd Baron Clifford; Richard de Clifford, Sr., Lord Frampton Severn and 5 others; Roger de Clifford; Simon de Clifford; Hugh de Clifford; William de Clifford and Gilbert de Clifford « less
Added by: Unknown on June 14, 2007
Managed by: Francis Gene Dellinger and 96 others
Curated by: Terry Jackson (Switzer)

About

Rosamund Clifford

Note: her place in the birth order is highly uncertain but was probably not as early as the 1130s. She must have been a pretty young thing to catch Henry II’s roving eye.

From Wikipedia

Rosamund Clifford (before 1150 – c. 1176), often called “The Fair Rosamund” or the “Rose of the World”, was famed for her beauty and was a mistress of King Henry II of England, famous in English folklore.

Rosamund was the daughter of the marcher lord Walter de Clifford and his wife Margaret Isobel de Tosny (referred to as “de Toeni” on the Page of her husband, Walter de Clifford). Walter was originally known as Walter Fitz Richard, but his name was gradually changed to that of his major holding, first as steward, then as lord. This was Clifford Castle on the River Wye. Rosamund had two sisters, Amice and Lucy. Amice married Osbern fitz Hugh of Richard’s Castle and Lucy Hugh de Say of Stokesay. She also had three brothers, Walter II de Clifford, Richard and Gilbert.

Rosamund probably first met the King when he passed by Clifford Castle in 1163 during one of his campaigns in Wales against Rhys ap Gruffydd.

Her name, Rosamund, may have been influenced by the Latin phrase rosa mundi, which means “rose of the world.”

Sarah Wilson Rosamond is William Thomas Rosamond’s second great grandmother.

William Thomas Rosamond
 

The Maze and Grail At Blenheim Palace

maze5mazeblenromann2

The estate given by the nation to Marlborough for the new palace was the manor of Woodstock, sometimes called the Palace of Woodstock, which had been a royal demesne, in reality little more than a deer park. Legend has obscured the manor’s origins. King Henry I enclosed the park to contain the deer. Henry II housed his mistress Rosamund Clifford (sometimes known as “Fair Rosamund”) there in a “bower and labyrinth”; a spring where she is said to have bathed remains, named after her. It seems the unostentatious hunting lodge was rebuilt many times

The Spencer family is one of Britain’s most illustrious aristocratic families. This noble family descended in the male line from Henry Spencer, claimed to be a descendant of the cadet branch of the ancient House Le Despencer (died c. 1478), male-line ancestor of the Earls of Sunderland, the Dukes of Marlborough, and the Earls Spencer. Two prominent members of the family were Winston Churchill and Diana, Princess of Wales.

The Spencers later joined the Churchills upon the marriage of Charles Spencer, 3rd Earl of Sunderland and Lady Anne Churchill, daughter of the most celebrated Duke of Marlborough. From them descends the current line of the Spencer family which was divided into two branches. The senior line are currently the ducal line of the Spencer family who holds the Dukedom of Marlborough. The 5th Duke of Marlborough later changed their surname to Spencer-Churchill to emphasize their descent from the first duke. The junior line are currently the comital branch of the family who holds the title Earl Spencer.

The comital branch of the Spencer family can trace their ancestry to most of Britain’s nobility as well as to most of Europe’s royal houses. The Spencers are direct descendants albeit illegitimate of the House of Stuart, with the family boasting at-least five line of direct descendancy from the Stuarts, and from them, the Spencers can trace their ancestry to other royal houses such as the Bourbons, the Medicis, the Wittelsbachs, the Hanovers, the Sforzas, and the Habsburgs. More-so, the Spencers are one of the very few British noble families to be the heirs body of a once sovereign family, being the senior female-line descendants of John Churchill, the once sovereign Prince of Mindelheim.

Children of Winston Churchill and Mary Caroline d’Erlanger
Lieutenant Randolph Leonard Churchill+1 b. 22 Jan 1965
Jennie Spencer Churchill+1 b. 25 Sep 1966
Marina Spencer Churchill+1 b. 11 Sep 1967
John Gerard Averell Spencer-Churchill+1 b. 27 Aug 1975

Samuel Rosamond
his father

Benjamin Rosamond
his father

James Rosamond
his father

Sarah Wilson Rosamond
his mother

Confirm this relationship with DNA

Sarah Wilson Rosamond (Willson) MP

Gender: Female
Birth: 1726
County Antrim, Ireland
Death: 1790 (64)
Abbeville County, South Carolina, United States
Immediate Family: Daughter of Thomas Wilson and Elizabeth Willson
Wife of Pvt. John Roseman
Mother of Margaret Weems; James Rosamond; Jean Rosamond; Capt Samuel Rosamond and Sarah F Hodges
Sister of Capt Matthew Willson; Samuel Willson; Rebekah Willson; Elizabeth Musgrove; Nathaniel Willson and 2 others; Martha Willson and Rhoda Willson « less
Added by: Jimmy Dale Rosamond on March 21, 2009
Managed by: Marsha Gail Veazey (Kamish) and 4 others
Curated by: Marsha Gail Veazey

 

Immediate Family

Showing 12 of 15 people Showing 15 people

William Wilson is William Thomas Rosamond’s 8th great grandfather.

William Thomas Rosamond
 

Samuel Rosamond
his father

show 7 relatives

Benjamin Rosamond
his father

James Rosamond
his father

Sarah Wilson Rosamond
his mother

Thomas Wilson
her father

Robert Wilson, Sr
his father

John Willson
his father

James Willson
his father

Robert Willson
his father

Rev. Dr. William Wilson is William Thomas Rosamond’s 9th great grandfather.

William Thomas Rosamond
 

Samuel Rosamond
his father

show 8 relatives

Benjamin Rosamond
his father

James Rosamond
his father

Sarah Wilson Rosamond
his mother

Thomas Wilson
her father

Robert Wilson, Sr
his father

John Willson
his father

James Willson
his father

Robert Willson
his father

William Wilson
his father

Rev. Dr. William Wilson
his father

Reverend William Wilson, D.D. MP

Gender: Male
Birth: 1542
Wellsbourne, Lincolnshire, England
Death: May 15, 1615 (73)
Windsor, Berkshire, England
Place of Burial: Windsor,Berkshire,England
Immediate Family: Son of William Wilson, of Wellborn and Isabell Helen Wilson
Husband of Ann Wilson and Isabel Alice Wilson
Father of Robert Wilson; Reverend Thomas Wilson; Maria Sheaffe; NN Wilson; Isabel Gibbs and 6 others; Elizabeth Wilson; Edmund Wilson; Rev. John Wilson; Rev. Thomas Wilson; Margaret Rawson and William Wilson « less
Brother of Alexander Wilson; Mary Wilson and Hamon Wilson
Added by: Richard Robertson on April 25, 2007
Managed by: Jose Vicente Alberdi and 37 others
Curated by: Margaret (C)

About

• Rev. William WILSON

• Birth: ABT 1542

• Death: 15 MAY 1615

• Burial: St. George’s Chapel, Windsor, Berkshire, England

He was also said to have been born 1545.

He was also said to have married Isabel Woodhall about 1575.

“Arms of ‘Wil’m Wilsonn, of Welborne, per Norroy flower, 1586.’

Per pale argent and azure three lions’ gambs barways, erased and counterchanged.

Crest: – A lion’s head erased argent guttee de sand.

Harleian Coll., No. 1550, Fol. 192, British Museum; Richard Mundy’s copy of the Visitations of LIncolnshire, 1564 adn 1592.”

“The Wilson arms (Harleian Manuscript 1507):

A confirmacon of ye Armes & guifte of ye Crest of Wm Wilson of Welborne in ye County of Lincolne son of William Wilson of ye Town of Perith [i.e. Penrith] in ye County of Cumber And to allhis issue & offspring for ever under ye hand & seale of Wm Flower alias Clarenc. king of Armes Dated ye 24 of March 1586 ye 19th of Queen Elizabeth.

Now 1594 Barneby Wilson of ye prebends of wildsor sonn of ye Aforesd Wm Wilson of Wilborne.

Arms: Per pale argent and azure, three lions gambs erased fessways in pale counterchanged.

Crest: A lion’s head argent guttee de sang.” Photo on file

“William Wilson was Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Prebendary of Rochester, Rector of Cliffe, near Rochester, etc. and for 32 years, Prebendary of St. George’s Chapel at Windsor where he was buried.”

“He was educated at Merton College, Oxford which he left in 1575 on his acceptance of a living from the Earl of Pembroke. . .He became Prebendary of Saint Paul’s and Rochester Cathedrals, and held the rectory of Cliffe, Kent. In 1584 he became a Canon of Windsor in place of Dr. William Wickham.”

“He was a Prebendary of St. Paul’s and Rochester Cahtedral, and also rector of Cliffe, Kent. He was chaplain of Archbishop Grindall of Canterbury, and was made Canon of Windsor in 1584. He married Isabel, daughter of John and Elizabeth Woodhall of Walden, Essex, a niece of Bishop Grindall. He died in 1615, and was buried next his father at Windsor.”

“Rev. William Wilson, D.D., of Merton College, Oxford, was also a prebendary of st. Paul’s and Rochester cathedrals, and held the rectory of cliffe, in the county of Kent. In 1584 he became canon of Windsor in place of dr. Will. Wickham promoted to the see of Lincoln, being about that time chaplain to Edmund (Grindall), Archbishop of Canterbury. He married Isabel Woodhall, daughter of John and Elizabeth Woodhall of Walden in Essex, and niece of Archbishop Grindall. He was buried in St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, near the body of his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in Lincolnshire, Gent.”,

With Isabel he had six sons and six daughters.

He was “Rev. William Wilson, D.D., Canon of Windsor.”

“John Wilkinson, of London, gentleman, 3 May, 1614, . .. I do give and bequeath unto the Right Worshipfull my lving uncle William Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, five pounds and to every one of my loving cosens, his children, twenty shillings apiece.”

“Dame Mary Rowe, widow of Sir Thomas Row, Knight, late citizen and alderman of London . . by her will of 21 March, 1579, proved in the year 1582-3, bequeathed to William Wilsonn, parson of Cliff, als Clyve, in Kent, a ring of gold, or three pounds or three pounds in money, and to his wife a ring of gold or its equivilent in money. Rowe, 1.”

“He made his will on 23 August 1613, then, two years later, apparently sick and expecting to die, he added two codicils and died a few days later on 15 May 1615, aged 73. He was buried in the chael of Saint George by Windsor Casle as was his father. On the north side was a grave stone on which, in brass plates, was the figure of a man and this inscription. It is now gone. The inscription to his memory, now gone, was:” Inscription and will to be entered.

“Rev. William Wilson, in his will proved 27 May, 1615, mentions his godson William Sheafe when twenty-one; and in the codicil he mentions his son-in-law Mr. Dr. Thomas Sheafe.”

“two of New England’s greatest Divines, Hooker and Wilson, the latter of them, says Cotton Mather, ‘having for his mother a niece of Dr. Edmund Grindal;’ and the same veracious chronicler makes honorable mention, in his life of Wilson, of the ‘good kinsman of his, who deserves to live in the same story, as he now lives in the same Heaven, with him, namely, Mr. Edward Rawson, the honored Secretary of the Massachuset Colony.’ ”

“William Wilson was educated at Merton College, Oxford, was prebendary of St. Paul’s and Rochester Cathedral, Rector of Cliffe, Kent, and in 1584 became Canon of Windsor. He and his wife Anne’s wills are printed in Henry F. Waters, Genealogical Gleanings in England (Boston, 1901), 1:54, 55, 1397. Elias Ashmole in History and Antiquities of Berkshire (Reading, 1736) recorded monumental inscriptions to them once located in St. George’s Chapel but now lost. The shielf of arms to him and his wife, however, is still extant. the illustration below is from a rubbing [photo on file] ”

“Rev. William Wilson, D.D., ‘prebend of St. Paul’s, of Richester and of Windsor, and rector of Cliff [-at-Hoo, Kent], with his wife Isabel Woodhall, a niece of Edmunc Grindal, Archbishop of Canterbury. Rev. William Wilson, the father, was in contact with Henry Hastings, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon (the patron of John Mansfield) as shown by a surviving letter from Rev. Wilson to the Earl. As previous writers have been unaware of the Wilson-Huntingdon connection, it may be helpful to print the abstract of this letter.

‘1592/3], Jan. 29. Windsor. – I have made the abstract of the chantries of Windsor Chapel plainer and send than to you. It seems your chantry was appointed by the will of William, Lord Hastings, but was not perfected till after his death, by Dme Katheren, his wife, and his son Edward, Lord Hastings and Hungerford, which was the cause of the error in the abstract exhibited to you on Saturday last. I pray your purpose and our desires may take effect. Mr. Dean and my brethren have sent the late Lord Chancellor’s robe by the bringer hereof, Mr. Wulward, one of our brethren, for your to see. If you like it, please send word what you will give for it. Endorsed: ‘Wylson, a prebendary of Wynsor, J. 29.’ ”

“The career of William Wilson, D.D., appointed Canon of St. George’s, Windsor 10 Dec. 1584, is related in S.L. Ollard, Fasti Wyndesorienses: The Deans and Canons of Windsor (Historical Monographs Relating to St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, 8), 76. He was born 1545, attended Merton College, oxford (Fellow 1565, B.A. 1564, M.A. 1570, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607), rector of Islip, do. Oxford, 1578, Chaplain to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Prebendary of Rochester [Kent] 1591, 1614, Rector of Cliffe [near Rochester], Chancellor of St. Paul’s 1596-1615, died 15 May 1615, and was buried in St. George’s Chapel near his father (there was a monumental inscription (now lost) to his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, co. Lincoln., gentleman, who died at Windsor Castle 27 Aug. 1587]). The sketch of Edmund Wilson, M.D. (1583-1616) is given in the same source. The endorsement – ‘Wylson, a prebendary of Wynsor’ – identifies the writer of this letter as Rev. William Wilson, the father of Rev. John Wilson. Mather states that Rev. William Wilson was ‘a prebend of . . . Windsor,’ and William’s brass in St. George’s, Windsor, also calls him ‘Prebendarie of this Church.’ The contact between William Wilson and the Earl of Huntingdon may indicate that they shared similar Puritan (or Proto-Puritan) religious views, although in this instance they were discussing the distinctly un-Puritan matter of a chantry. The marriage of John Wilson, a great-nephew of the Archbishop of Canterbury, into the family of one of Huntingdon’s gentlemen, is not terribly unusual. Wilson’s father has been called ‘a man of deep erudition, a scholar and a courtier . . . we must suppose him to have been a persona grata in the eyes of Queen Elizabeth.’ ”

“See J. Garnder Bartlett’s article on Wilson, Register [note 99]. William Wilson, John Mansfield, John Ewry alias Every [Eure] and William Vessey ere defendants in Chancery concerning woods called ‘Byrkell,’ ‘Rigg,’ ‘Bentley Park,’ land in Walington and Bentley, parcel of the manor of Bentley, Yorks., 42 Elizabeth I [PRO E134/42Eliz/East8).”

“William Wilson, Canon of St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle August, 1613, proved 27 May, 1615. To be buried in the chapel near the plsace where the body of my dear father lies. If I die at Rochester or in the County of Kent, then to be buried in the cathedral church of Rochester, near the bodies of wives Isabel and Anne. To my cousin College prebendary at Rochester. To the Fellows and scholars of Martin College, Oxford. My three sons Edmond, John and Thomas Wilson, daughter Isabel Guibs and daughter Margaret Rawson. My goddaughter Margaret Somers which my son Somers had by my daughter Elizabeth, late wife. To my god-son William Sheafe, at the age of twenty one ye Son Edmund, a fellow of King’s College, Cambridge, eldest son of me, said William. To son John the lease of the Rectory and Parsonage Caxton in the County of Cambridge, which I have taken in his name. Thomas Wilson, my third son. Son Edmond to be executor and Mr Erasmus Webb, my brother-in-law, being one of the Canons of St. George Chapel, and my brother, Mr. Thomas Woodward, being steward of the town of New Windsor, to be overseers.

The witnesses were Thomas Woodwarde, Joh. Woodwarde, Robert Lower & thomas Holl.

In a codicil, dated 9 May, 1615, wherein he is styled William Wilson Doctor of Divinity, he directs his son Edmond to give to his son John forty pounds and to his wife forty marks, he gives to Lincoln College Oxford ten pounds toward a Library, and mentions son-in-law Mr Doctor Sheafe and daughter Gibbes. to this Thomas Sheafe was a witness, among others.

In another codicil, of 12 May, 1615, he says, I have provided for the husband of my daughter Isabel Givves a place in Windsor, in reversion, of some worth. His signature to this codicil was witnessed by David Rawson and William Newman. Rudd, 36.”

“Rev. William Wilson, D.D., of Merton College, Oxford, was also a prebendary of St. Paul’s and Rochester cathedrals, and held the rectory of Cliffe, in the county of Kent. In 1584 he became canon of Windsor in place of Dr. Will. Wickham promoted to the see of Lincoln, being about that time chaplain to Edmund (Grindall). Archbishop of Canterbury. He married Isabel Woodhall, daughter of John and Elizabeth Woodhall of Walden in Essex, and niece of Archbishop Grindall. He was buried in St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, near the body of his father, William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in Lincolnshire, Gent.”

“The following notes, taken from the History and Antiquities of Berkshire, by Elias Ashmole, Esq. (Reading, 1736), give the inscriptions found by that famous antiquary in the Chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, relating to this family.

On the North Side lied a Grave-stone, on which, in Brass Plates, is the Figure of a Man, and this Inscription.

‘To me to live is Christ, and to dye is Gain.

Philip. I.21.

Here underneath lied interr’d the Body of William Wilson, Doctour of Divinitie, and Prebendarie of this Church by the space of 32 yeares. He had Issue by Isabell his Wife six sons and six daughters. He dy’d the 15th of May, in the Year of our Lord 1615, of his Age the 73. beloved of all in his Life much lamented in his Death.

Who thinke of Deathe in Lyfe, can never dye,

But mount through Faith, from Earth to heavenly Pleasure,

Weep then no more, though her his Body lye,

His Doul’s possest of never ending Treasure.’

On another small Brass Plate, on the same Grave-stone, is the following Inscription.

‘Neere unto this Place lyes buried William Willson, the third Son, Who, after a long Trial of grievous Sickness, did comfortably yield up his Spirit in the Yeare of our Lord 1610. of his Age 23.’

On a Brass Plate, on a Grave-Stone Northward of the last, is this Inscripition.

‘William Wilson, late of Wellsbourne, in the County of Lincolne, Gent. departed this Lyfe, within the castle of Windsor, in the Yeare of our Lord 1587. the 27th Day of August, and lyeth buried in this Place.’ P. 309.

Arms of ‘Will’m Wilsonn, of Welborne, per Norroy flower, 1586.’

‘Per pale argent and azure three lions’ gambs barways, erased and counterchanged.

Crest: – A lion’s head erased argent guttee de sang.

Harleian Coll., No. 1550, Fol. 192, British Museum: Richard Mundy’s copy of the Visitations of Lincolnshire, 1564 and 1592.”

“Rev. William Wilson, D.D., born about 1542, graduated at Merton College, Oxford, B.A. 1564, M.A. 1570, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607; rector of Islip, Oxfordshire, 1578; rector of Cliffe, co. Kent, 1579; rector of Caxton, co. Kent, 1593; prebendary of st. Paul’s London, 1595-1615, and of Rochester Cathedral, 1591-1614. About 1580 he became chaplain to Edmund Grindll, Archbishop of Canterbury, and in 1583 became canon of Windsor, holding his position for thirty-two years, until his death May 15, 1615, aged 73, and was buried in the chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, where a monumental brass to his memory states that he was ‘beloved of all in his Life, and much lamented in his Death.’ (Alumni Oxoniensis, vol. iv, p. 1657; Ashmole’s ‘History and Antiquities of Berkshire,’ p. 305; Register, ante, vol. xxxviii, pp. 306-308, and vol lii, p. 144.) He married first, about 1575, Isabel, daughter of John Woodhall, Esq., of Walden, co Essex, by Elizabeth his wife, sister of Rev. Edmund Grindall, the celebrated Puritan Archbishop of Canterbury, described by Lord Bacon as ‘the gravest and greatest prelate of the land.’ (Register, ante, vol. xxxviii, pp. 301-308.) He married second, Anne, sister of REv. Erasmus Webb, canon of Windsor, who died in 1612, without issue. (Register, ante, vol. lii, pp. 143-4.) ”

“Dr. William Wilson, a prebend of St. Paul’s, of rochester and of Winsor, and rector of Cliffe.”

“John Wilkinson, of London, gentleman, 3 May, 1614, acknowledged 27 May, 1628; acknowledged again 18 June, 1634; . . . I do give and bequeath unto the Right Worshipfull my loving uncle William Wilson, Doctor of Divinity, five pounds,, and to every one of my loving cosens, his children, twenty shillings apiece. . . ”

“Dame Mary Rowe, widw of Sir Thomas Row, Knight, late citizen and alderman of London . . . by her will of 21 March, 1579, proved int he eyar 1582-3, bequeathed to William Wilsonn, parson of Cliff, als Clyve, in Kent, a ring of gold, of three pounds of three pounds in money, and to his wife a ring of gold or its equivilent in money. Rowe, 1.”

Father: William WILSON b: ABT 1515

Mother: ?

Marriage 1 Isabel WOODHALL b: ABT 1550


Rector of Cliffe, Kent

Chaplain to Edmund Grindall, Archbishop of Canterbury

Canon of Windsor


Rev. William Wilson. Born ca 1542 at England.116 William died in May 1615.65 Buried on 15 May 1615 in St George’s Chapel, Windsor.116 Education: Merton College, Oxford, B.A. 1564, B.D. 1576, D.D. 1607.116 William was prebendary of St Paul’s and Rochester Cathedral, Rector of Cliffe, Kent, and in 1584 became Canon of Windsor. From Bartlett:116 William was “rector at Islip, Oxfordshire, 1578; rector of Cliffe, co. Kent, 1579; rector of Caxton, co. Kent, 1593, prebendary of St. Paul’s, London, 1595-1615, and of Rochester Cathedral, 1594-1614. About 1580 he became chaplain to Edmund Grindall, Archbishop of Canterbery, and in 1583 became canon of Windsor, holding this position for thirty-two years, until his death May 15, 1615, aged 73, and was buried in the chapel of St. George, Windsor Castle, where a monumental brass to his memory states that he was ‘beloved of all in his Life, and much lamented in his Death.’” Ca 1570 William first married Isabel Woodhall (4978) , daughter of John Woodhall Esq (ca 1519-) & Elizabeth Grindall (1341) (ca 1520-bef Apr 1583). Born ca 1546. Isabel died at England bef 1615. Buried in Rochester Cathedral, Kent.65

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Royal Christening and Canon of Windsor

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    Archie was Christened yesterday.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.