Ben Toney and The Kings of Jeruslem

There are millions of people all over the world that are looking in their family trees to see who their ancestors, were, and, who their people – are! This morning, I did more research on the ancestors of my friend, Ben Toney. I found Godfey de Boulogne, the Crusader King, and his brother Baldwin, the first King of Jerusalem. His direct ancestor is credited with creating the Bayeux Tapestry. Here is Ben’s family tree. I missed the Kentucky Derby that ran at the same time I am looking at the knit horses of the Bayeux tapestry. Ben’s kindred were there, putting their warrior horses on boats, they queued up on the rail, looking out to sea……..wondering whither they are bound!

http://www.angelfire.com/pe/shirleyspage/toney.html

Putin is very interested in genealogies because he is restoring the royal houses of Russia. Some historians claim ‘Beatlemania’ toppled the Soviet Union. I concur.  Russian soldiers were on the hunt for Beatle records, and, American blue jeans. Trump is relishing in the idea he would be a Messiah by putting the U.S. Embassy near the Holy Sepulcher. Who do ‘We The People’ got? Who is like us, and who is humble? Who shares with us his full being, never tells a lie, and has been generous in sharing his music, and his connections to the World of Music. A good King is amongst his people, all his people, and does not rule as a egocentric figurehead. He empowers all the people to the best of his ability, and is all inclusive.

The is not Ben Toney’s eulogy. It is his pre-eulogy – a hornoring. The trouble with eulogies, the person who is the subject of them, is not hearing, or reading them. They are missing out. As a person who loves genealogies, the royal subjects I look at are probably aware of their ancestors, but, they do not see all the illustrious people that spring from them, who have made so much of our Western History, and put so much Art in the World. The seeds they have planted, are broadcast all over the world…………..like a Radio!

Ben Toney is like the King of the Radio. His ship and Radio London, invaded the British Isles. Ben helped put together the British Invasion of America. He conquered by Attraction and by Following our passion. Music binds us to…………The Heart of the World!

Ben has made a great contribution to the Greatest Form Of Democracy the World has thus far known. Ben sent out Sounds & Songs, and, if We ‘The Ears of the World’ did not like what we we’re hearing, we let those at The Top – know…..and we heard no more – of that!

“We want better! We demand – better!”

And, better we got. We got the best!

Thank you Ben. May you recover from what ails you, and continue to send your waves over the land, the sea, and the air!

Jon Presco

https://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Clifford-Family-Tree-58

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kings_of_Jerusalem_family_tree

The death of our heroes, king, and his court play a huge part of Western History. The music that sprang from our Holy Conquests, our search for the Grail, is, and has long been, respected by Islam who send their holy knights, on Jihad. Wagner has made a long tapestry of music which have taken millions to another time, another land.

Kings of Jerusalem (1099–1291)[edit]

The Kingdom of Jerusalem had its origins in the First Crusade, when Godfrey of Bouillon, after refusing a crown and the title of King “upon the plea that he would never wear a crown of gold where his Saviour had worn a crown of thorns“,[2] took the title Advocatus Sancti Sepulchri (Protector of the Holy Sepulcher) in 1099 and was inaugurated as ruler of Jerusalem in the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem.

The following year, his brother Baldwin I was the first to use the title king and the first to be crowned king in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem itself.

The kingship of Jerusalem was partially elected and partially hereditary. During the height of the kingdom in the mid-12th century there was a royal family and a relatively clear line of succession. Nevertheless, the king was elected, or at least recognized, by the Haute Cour. Here the king was considered a primus inter pares (first among equals), and in his absence his duties were performed by his seneschal.

Adelise (Huntingdon) de Tony (abt. 1074 – abt. 112

Adelise (Alice) “Alice of Northumberland” de Tony formerly Huntingdon aka Tosny
Born about in Flamstead, Hertfordshire, Englandmap

Ancestors ancestors

Wife of Radulph (Toeni) de Tony — married [location unknown]

Descendants descendants

Died about in St Albans, Hertfordshire, Englandmap

https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Normandie-98

Adelais (Normandie) de Lens (bef. 1035 – bef. 1096

https://www.wikitree.com/genealogy/Clifford-Family-Tree-58

Lambert II, Count of Lens (died 1054) was a French nobleman.

He was the son of Eustace I, Count of Bologne and of Maud de Leuven (daughter of Lambert I of Leuven).[1] c. 1053 he married Adelaide of Normandy, Countess of Aumale, daughter of Robert I, Duke of Normandy and sister of William the Conqueror.[2] Adelaide was the widow of Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu who died in 1053.[3] c. 1054 Lambert and Adelaide had a daughter, Judith of Lens, although Lambert would scarcely have seen her; he was killed at the battle of Lille in 1054.[4] Lambert was supporting Baldwin V, Count of Flanders against Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor when he was killed in battle.[5] His widow, Adelaide, married thirdly, Odo, Count of Champagne.[6]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eustace_I,_Count_of_Boulogne

Eustace I, Count of Boulogne, was a nobleman and founder of the Boulogne branch of the House of Flanders. He held the county of Boulogne from 1042 until his death in 1049.

Life[edit]

He was the elder son of Count Baldwin II of Boulogne and Adelina of Holland.[1] Eustace succeeded his father as count of Boulogne in 1042.[2] Eustace I was also the count of Lens.[3] In 1028 Eustace I confirmed the foundation of a college of canons in his castle at Lens[3] and despite accounts of Lens passing to Baldwin V of Flanders circa 1036 it was still held by Eustace I and was passed to his son Lambert at his death.[4]

During the minority of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, Eustace’s grandfather, Arnulf III, Count of Boulogne had broken free of Flanders and operated as an independent prince, as did Eustace’s father and Eustace himself.[5] In 995, having attained his majority, Baldwin IV attempted to recover several of the independently held castles and to expand the Flemish borders.[5] This had caused considerable animosity between Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders and Eustace’s father, but when Baldwin IV’s son Baldwin V succeeded him in 1035 Eustace I and Baldwin V of Flanders cooperated on several ventures including several charters and in limiting the powers of the Castellan-advocates of several abbeys including the Abbey of Saint Bertin in Flanders.[6]

Eustace I was allied to the ducal house of Normandy by the marriage of his son Eustace II to Goda, niece of Richard II.[7] This had far reaching alliances to other branches of these families including that of Edward the Confessor, King of England.[7] Under Eustace I the counts of Boulogne rose to great prominence in Northern France.[8] Eustace I died in 1049.[2]

He was apparently a patron of Samer Abbey near Calais and he is said to have been buried there.[9

Family and children[edit]

He was married to Matilda of Leuven,[a] daughter of Lambert I, Count of Leuven and Gerberga of Lower Lorraine and had four children:[2]

He was the elder son of Count Baldwin II of Boulogne and Adelina of Holland.[1] Eustace succeeded his father as count of Boulogne in 1042.[2] Eustace I was also the count of Lens.[3] In 1028 Eustace I confirmed the foundation of a college of canons in his castle at Lens[3] and despite accounts of Lens passing to Baldwin V of Flanders circa 1036 it was still held by Eustace I and was passed to his son Lambert at his death.[4]

During the minority of Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders, Eustace’s grandfather, Arnulf III, Count of Boulogne had broken free of Flanders and operated as an independent prince, as did Eustace’s father and Eustace himself.[5] In 995, having attained his majority, Baldwin IV attempted to recover several of the independently held castles and to expand the Flemish borders.[5] This had caused considerable animosity between Baldwin IV, Count of Flanders and Eustace’s father, but when Baldwin IV’s son Baldwin V succeeded him in 1035 Eustace I and Baldwin V of Flanders cooperated on several ventures including several charters and in limiting the powers of the Castellan-advocates of several abbeys including the Abbey of Saint Bertin in Flanders.[6]

Eustace I was allied to the ducal house of Normandy by the marriage of his son Eustace II to Goda, niece of Richard II.[7] This had far reaching alliances to other branches of these families including that of Edward the Confessor, King of England.[7] Under Eustace I the counts of Boulogne rose to great prominence in Northern France.[8] Eustace I died in 1049.[2]

He was apparently a patron of Samer Abbey near Calais and he is said to have been buried there.[9]

Family and children[edit]

He was married to Matilda of Leuven,[a] daughter of Lambert I, Count of Leuven and Gerberga of Lower Lorraine and had four children:[2]

Eustace II, (c.1015c.1087), also known as Eustace aux Gernons (with moustaches) [1][2][3] was Count of Boulogne from 1049–1087. He fought on the Norman side at the Battle of Hastings, and afterwards received large grants of land forming an honour in England. He is one of the few proven companions of William the Conqueror. It has been suggested that Eustace was the patron of the Bayeux Tapestry.[4]

Marriage and progeny[edit]

Eustace married twice:

By his second wife, Eustace may also have had a daughter, Ida, wife of Conon, Count of Montaigu.

Godfrey of Bouillon (French: Godefroy de Bouillon, Dutch: Godfried van Bouillon, German: Gottfried von Bouillon, Latin: Godefridus Bullionensis; 18 September 1060 – 18 July 1100) was a Frankish knight and one of the leaders of the First Crusade from 1096 until its conclusion in 1099. He was the Lord of Bouillon, from which he took his byname, from 1076 and the Duke of Lower Lorraine from 1087. After the successful siege of Jerusalem in 1099, Godfrey became the first ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. He refused the title of King, however, as he believed that the true King of Jerusalem was Christ, preferring the title of Advocate (i.e., protector or defender) of the Holy Sepulchre (Latin: Advocatus Sancti Sepulchri). He is also known as the “Baron of the Holy Sepulchre” and the “Crusader King”.

Godfrey of Bouillon was born around 1060 as the second son of Eustace II, Count of Boulogne, and Ida, daughter of the Lotharingian duke Godfrey the Bearded by his first wife, Doda.[1]

His birthplace was probably Boulogne-sur-Mer, although one 13th-century chronicler cites Baisy, a town in what is now Walloon Brabant, Belgium.[2] As second son, he had fewer opportunities than his older brother and seemed destined to become just one more minor knight in service to a rich landed nobleman. However his maternal uncle, Godfrey the Hunchback, died childless and named his nephew, Godfrey of Bouillon, as his heir and next in line to his Duchy of Lower Lorraine. This duchy was an important one at the time, serving as a buffer between the kingdom of France and the German lands.

Walloon Brabant (French: Brabant wallon, Dutch:  Waals-Brabant (help·info), Walloon: Roman Payis) is a province of Belgium, located in Wallonia. It borders on (clockwise from the North) the province of Flemish Brabant (Flemish Region) and the provinces of Liège, Namur and Hainaut (Wallonia). Its capital is Wavre.

The provincial population was recorded at 347,423 in January 1999, giving a population density of 318 inhabitants / km².

Adelais “Alice of Normandy, Countess of Aumale” de Lens formerly Normandie aka de Normandie, de Ponthieu, de Champagne, d’Aumale
Born before in Falaise Castle, Falaise, Basse-Normandie, Francemap

Ancestors ancestors

Wife of Enguerrand (Ponthieu) de Ponthieu — married about [location unknown]
Wife of Lambert (Boulogne) de Boulogne II — married [location unknown]
Wife of Eudes (Champagne) de Troyes — married [location unknown]

Descendants descendants

Died before in Gournay Sur Marne, Seine Saint Denis, Ile De France, Francemap
Profile last modified | Created 3 Sep 2012
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European Aristocracy
Adelais (Normandie) de Lens is a member of royalty, nobility or aristocracy in Europe.
Join: European Royals and Aristocrats 742-1499 Project
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Contents

[hide]

Biography

Adelais, the daughter of Robert, married three times:[1]

m firstly ENGUERRAND [II] Comte de Montreuil

m secondly ([1053/54]) LAMBERT de Boulogne Comte de Lens

m thirdly ([1060]) EUDES III Comte de Troyes et d’Aumâle

Sources

  • Royal Ancestry by Douglas Richardson Vol. V page 488
  1. FMG
  • Royal Ancestry 2013 D. Richardson Vol. I p. 208-211

[2]

Acknowledgements

This page has been edited according to Style Standards adopted January 2014. Descriptions of imported gedcoms for this profile are under the Changes tab.

Adelaide was a daughter of Robert the MagnificentDuke of Normandy, born c.1030[3] Elisabeth Van Houts, in her article Les femmes dans l’histoire du duché de Normandie (or Women in the history of ducal Normandy) mentions Countess Adelaide as one of those notable Norman women who were known to have exerted a strong influence on their children, especially with regard to passing on their own family history.[4]
Adelaide’s first marriage to Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu potentially gave then Duke William a powerful ally in upper Normandy.[5] But at the Council of Reims in 1049, when the marriage of Duke William with Matilda of Flanders was prohibited based on consanguinity, so were those of Eustace II, Count of Boulogne and Enguerrand of Ponthieu, who was already married to Adelaide.[6]  Adelaide’s marriage was apparently annulled in c.1049/50, and another marriage was arranged for her, this time to Lambert II, Count of Lens, younger son of Eustace I, Count of Boulogne forming a new marital alliance between Normandy and Boulogne.[7] Lambert was killed in 1054 at Lille, aiding Baldwin V, Count of Flanders against Emperor Henry III.[8] Now widowed, Adelaide resided at Aumale, part of her dower from her first husband, Enguerrand, or part of a settlement after the capture of Guy of Ponthieu, her brother-in-law.[9] As a dowager, Adelaide began a semi-religious retirement and became involved with the church at Auchy presenting them with a number of gifts.[10] In 1060 she was called upon again to form another marital alliance, this time to a younger man Odo, Count of Champagne.[11] Odo must have been a disappointment, as he appears in only one of the Conqueror’s charters, receiving no land in England.[12]
In 1082 King William and Queen Matilda gave to the Abbey of the Holy Trinity in Caen, the town of Le Homme in the Cotentin with a provision to the Countess of Albamarla (Aumale), his sister, for a life tenancy.[13] In 1086, as Comitissa de Albatnarla’ ,[14], as she was listed in the Domesday Book, was shown as having numerous holdings in both Suffolk and Essex,[15] one of the very few Norman noblewomen to have held lands in England at Domesday as a tenant-in-chief.[16] She was also given the ‘ Lordship of Holderness  which was held after her death by her 3rd husband, Odo, by then disinherited Count of Champagne. The Lordship then passed on to their son, Stephen.[17]
Adelaide married three times; first to Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu (died 1053)[18] by whom she had issue:

  • Adelaide II, Countess of Aumale, m. William de Bréteuil, Lord of Bréteuil, son of William FitzOsbern, 1st Earl of Hereford.[19]
She married secondly Lambert II, Count of Lens (died 1054),[20] they had a daughter:

  • Judith of Lens, m. Waltheof, Earl of Huntingdon and Northumbria.[21]
Adelaide married thirdly in 1060 Odo, Count of Champagne (d. aft. 1096),[22] by whom she had a son:

  • Stephen, Count of Aumale.[23]
Adelaide died before 1090.[24]

Lambert II, Count of Lens

Lambert II, Count of Lens was a French nobleman, the son of Eustace I, Count of Bologne and of Maud de Leuven (daughter of Lambert I of Leuven).[25] c. 1053. He married  Adelaide of NormandyCountess of Aumale, daughter of Robert I, Duke of Normandy and sister of William the Conqueror.[26] Adelaide was the widow of Enguerrand II, Count of Ponthieu who died in 1053.[27] c. 1054 Lambert and Adelaide had a daughter, Judith of Lens, although Lambert would scarcely have seen her, as he was killed at the Battle of Lille in 1054.[28] Lambert was supporting Baldwin V, Count of Flanders against Henry III, Holy Roman Emperor when he was killed in battle.[29] His widow, Adelaide, married thirdly, Odo, Count of Champagne.[30]
  1. FMG
  2. Source: Robert the Magnificent. Wikipedia. URL: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_the_Magnificent
  3. Source: George Andrews Moriarty, The Plantagenet Ancestry of King

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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