The Great Erasmus

How easy my life would be if I claimed I was a Born Again Christian, and say;

“Let’s go to the mall and count the Demonic Baby Killers!”

Not only was my ancestor a good friend of a Pope, he was a friend of the Great Erasmus – whom he defended! Pope Adrien’s papal papers were probably thrown out in the trash by the Medici, along with Gottschalk’s papers? They were at the cusp of the Reformation and, and the center of Dutch Renaissance. Note the wallpaper behind Erasmus, that is like the work of Kehinde Wily, that took me to the very feet of Erasmus and his Habsburg backer – unknowingly!

Members of the Rosemont family were interred in the Minderbroedersklooster that was founded by the Franciscan Monks. Above are my Wieneke kindred who were members of the Order of Saint Francis. This is the real Rose Line. I was destined for the Church.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2018

Renaissance Castle

falcon15 falconc2 falconc3 falconc4 falconc5 falconc6 falconc10

Ghisburtus van Roesmont was a Dutch nobleman of some importance. His mother was jonkvrouw Adriana Theodorici Rover, the daughter of Dirk Edmondszn Roover. The Roover family appears to descend from one of the Radbot rulers of Holland who was given the name Roover, or Rover due to conquest of the Netherlands. Arnoldus Rosemont also descends to Radbot,  who was employed by the Franks to fight the Normans, the Vikings, who were called Rovers. The elder Radbot was allied with the Franks to fight the Viking, many who carried a banner with the image of a wolf. Was their  marriage with a Merovingian princess, and thus a marriage union to carry on this line?

The Rosemonts are mentioned in the genealogical book, Taxandria, an extinct province that was replaced by ‘s-Hertogenbosch that had no rulers, or Papal interference, which is rare. The Swan Brethren appear to have owned Saint John’s Church, and ran its affairs as a guild.

Ghisburtus Rosemont was the church warden of Saint John, and later sat in the ships chair. The chances her knew the Renaissance Artist, Hieronymus Bosch, and his father, is very high for his job to was to hire artists and craftsman.

“Only in 1454thin 1455 were Van Aken and his wife a member of the Brotherhood of Our Lady . In 14611462 kreeg he was commissioned damaged (by fire) altarpiece of the Brotherhood in the former St. John’s Church in collaboration with the master painter Claes Schoonhoven.

This is a remarkable discover. It puts my kindred at the heart of the Dutch Renaissance, for starters.

Here is a translation of a event, a miracle. There is a box. What is the object. What is “Cloth Hall”?

 “On March 16, 1384, Ghijsbrecht Rosemont, witnessed a miracle with Jacob Mertensz. [No. 322 Miracles of Our Lady at ‘s-Hertogenbosch 1381-1603].
Henrick Painter, ships from Den Bosch in 1383 shared in 1397 with Chris Ruffle Mont Tijn a box in the Cloth Hall, which had been the case. Late Godscalck Roes Mont. In 1430 Godschalk Roes Mouth, buy the high sheriff of Den Bosch and Meierij castle Maurick. In 1442 he sold it back to Henry of Vladeracken.

The emblem worn by the Swan Brethren depicts a a rose, or lily,
amongst thorns. At the root of the rose is the Latin word SICUT which
is the first word from a line from Song of Songs.

2:2. As the lily among thorns, so is my love among the daughters.
Sicut lilium inter spinas sic amica mea inter filias

https://rosamondpress.com/2012/01/10/what-they-say-about-rose-line/

http://bossche-encyclopedie.nl/personen/roesmont,%20ghiselbertus.htm

ers, who were then still underage, will have been legal children of Ghijsbrecht and Lady Margriet. Master Godschalc was born in Eindhoven around 1483, studied artes in Leuven in 1499 and was promoted there in 1502 as the third of 99 students to magister artium . In 1510 he was nominated by the OLV fraternity for a benefice in the Bossche St.Jan and since 1515 he was also canon of the St.Petrus church in Leuven. He also always resided in Leuven where he was a professor in theology from 1515 and wrote a number of popular tracts.

On September 18, 1467, Ghijsbrecht Roesmont, counselor of Den Bosch and widower of Mabelia , added a codicil to this will in the presence of Rembout Vilt (no.403). Ghijsbrecht, who previously lived in the Orthenstraat (1422), then stayed – exhausted by his old age – in his house at the Zijle. As witnesses, the codicil includes the secretary Rutgher van Arkel (no.14), Ghijsbrechts servant and clerk Sander Pyeck van Batenburg (no.313) and his servant Lysbeth Goyart Goebelens from Eindhoven. In addition to the latter two, Ghijsbrecht also left goods to the St. Lambert church in Liege, the Bossche St. Jan, the St. Peter’s church in Vught, the parish church of Uden and the Bossche OZ brotherhood, as well as Katherijn, widow of the goldsmith. Arnt vander Weyden, to Goetscalc and Jan, sons of his late cousin Jan Goetscalcs Roesmont, and to “the other heirs”. Ghijsbrecht is mentioned in the obitus fratrum of the OLV fraternity under the year 1469/70, together with Rutgher van Arkel, secretary, and master Gerit Boest, counselor and secretary (see no.57). Ghijsbrecht probably died in the beginning of 1470. He was provided with the last sacraments by Brother Alart Alartss, Minderbroeder, and will be buried in the Minderbroedersklooster, just like some other members of his family. As far as he knows, he did not leave children behind. Still, he must have had a son Goyart because on September 12, 1422, Ghijsbrecht drew up a concept in the Bosch ‘protocol in which Henric Heyme promised to pay 50 Arnoldus guilders to ” michi ad opus Godefridi, filii May “. 9)

Minderbroedersklooster (‘s-Hertogenbosch)

The Minderbroedersklooster in ‘s-Hertogenbosch was the first monastery founded by the Franciscans in the present Netherlands . The monastery stood on the corner of the current Pensmarkt and Minderbroedersstraat and continued until the current Snellestraat . The Franciscans settled in ‘s-Hertogenbosch in 1228 . This is only two years after the death of the founder of order Francis of Assisi . On a site that Henry I of Brabant had given to the Franciscans, they would establish a monastery and a church . In 1256 the church is demolished to build a new, larger monastery church. In 1263 this church is dedicated by Henricus van Vianden , the Bishop of Utrecht .

Jon Presco

https://rosamondpress.com/2011/08/16/sealed-letters-from-the-rose-fox/

The Rose Wolf and Erasmus

Erasmus wrote letters to Rosemondt. One letter has the Rosemondt wolf seal on it. This is about the Spanish Inquisition. and of great interest to the history of Haarlem. This is one of the greatest genealogical studies of all time.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2017

 

1153/ To Godschalk Rosemondt Louvain 18 October 1520

Gottschalk Rosemondt of Eindhoven in Northern Brabant, matriculated
at the University of Louvain on 1499 and remained there until his
death in 1526. A doctor of divinity in 1516, he succeeded in 1520 to
the chair o f theology formerly held by Jan Briart. Like Briart he
was a personal friend of the future Pope Adrian V1. His prominent
position in the theological faculty notwithstanding , he retained an
open mind towards humanists studies and a measure of sympathy for
Erasmus. This letter is addressed to him in his capacity as rector
of the university for the winter term of 1520-21 (cf Matricule de
Louvain 111-1963) It was published in the Epistolae ad diverse. In
preparation for a confrontations with the theologian Nicolass
Baechem  Egmondanus, to be held in the presence of the rector,
Erasmus launches an elaborate protest against his opponent, who had
attacked him from the pulpit of St, Peter’s church on 9 and 14
October,

https://www.washingtoncitypaper.com/arts/museums-galleries/blog/20994378/what-makes-the-obama-portraits-so-good

What’s unmistakable about the two pieces is that they aren’t simply works of portraiture: They are works of 21st century art. Built on centuries of what precede them, they break traditions, and barriers, and encourage new generations to tread in their wake. I’m talking about the portraits, but the same applies to the people who sat for them, too.

Desiderius Erasmus, (born October 27, 1469, Rotterdam, Holland [now in the Netherlands]—died July 12, 1536, Basel, Switzerland), humanist who was the greatest scholar of the northern Renaissance, the first editor of the New Testament, and also an important figure in patristics and classical literature.Using the philological methods pioneered by Italian humanists, Erasmus helped lay the groundwork for the historical-critical study of the past, especially in his studies of the Greek New Testament and the Church Fathers. His educational writings contributed to the replacement of the older scholastic curriculum by the new humanist emphasis on the classics. By criticizing ecclesiastical abuses, while pointing to a better age in the distant past, he encouraged the growing urge for reform, which found expression both in the Protestant Reformation and in the Catholic Counter-Reformation. Finally, his independent stance in an age of fierce confessional controversy—rejecting both Luther’s doctrine of predestination and the powers that were claimed for the papacy—made him a target of suspicion for loyal partisans on both sides and a beacon for those who valued liberty more than orthodoxy.

Early life and career

Erasmus was the second illegitimate son of Roger Gerard, a priest, and Margaret, a physician’s daughter. He advanced as far as the third-highest class at the chapter school of St. Lebuin’s in Deventer. One of his teachers, Jan Synthen, was a humanist, as was the headmaster, Alexander Hegius. The schoolboy Erasmus was clever enough to write classical Latin verse that impresses a modern reader as cosmopolitan.

After both parents died, the guardians of the two boys sent them to a school in ’s-Hertogenbosch conducted by the Brethren of the Common Life, a lay religious movement that fostered monastic vocations. Erasmus would remember this school only for a severe discipline intended, he said, to teach humility by breaking a boy’s spirit.

Having little other choice, both brothers entered monasteries. Erasmus chose the Augustinian canons regular at Steyn, near Gouda, where he seems to have remained about seven years (1485–92). While at Steyn he paraphrased Lorenzo Valla’s Elegantiae, which was both a compendium of pure classical usage and a manifesto against the scholastic “barbarians” who had allegedly corrupted it. Erasmus’ monastic superiors became “barbarians” for him by discouraging his classical studies. Thus, after his ordination to the priesthood (April 1492), he was happy to escape the monastery by accepting a post as Latin secretary to the influential Henry of Bergen, bishop of Cambrai. His Antibarbarorum liber, extant from a revision of 1494–95, is a vigorous restatement of patristic arguments for the utility of the pagan classics, with a polemical thrust against the cloister he had left behind: “All sound learning is secular learning.”

Erasmus was not suited to a courtier’s life, nor did things improve much when the bishop was induced to send him to the University of Paris to study theology (1495). He disliked the quasi-monastic regimen of the Collège de Montaigu, where he lodged initially, and pictured himself to a friend as sitting “with wrinkled brow and glazed eye” through Scotist lectures. To support his classical studies, he began taking in pupils; from this period (1497–1500) date the earliest versions of those aids to elegant Latin—including the Colloquia and the Adagia—that before long would be in use in humanist schools throughout Europe.

The wandering scholar

In 1499 a pupil, William Blount, Lord Mountjoy, invited Erasmus to England. There he met Thomas More, who became a friend for life. John Colet quickened Erasmus’ ambition to be a “primitive theologian,” one who would expound Scripture not in the argumentative manner of the scholastics but in the manner of Jerome and the other Church Fathers, who lived in an age when men still understood and practiced the classical art of rhetoric. The impassioned Colet besought him to lecture on the Old Testament at Oxford, but the more cautious Erasmus was not ready. He returned to the Continent with a Latin copy of St. Paul’s Epistles and the conviction that “ancient theology” required mastery of Greek.

On a visit to Artois, France (1501), Erasmus met the fiery preacher Jean Voirier, who, though a Franciscan, told him that “monasticism was a life more of fatuous men than of religious men.” Admirers recounted how Voirier’s disciples faced death serenely, trusting in God, without the solemn reassurance of the last rites. Voirier lent Erasmus a copy of works by Origen, the early Greek Christian writer who promoted the allegorical, spiritualizing mode of scriptural interpretation, which had roots in Platonic philosophy. By 1502 Erasmus had settled in the university town of Leuven (Brabant [now in Belgium]) and was reading Origen and St. Paul in Greek. The fruit of his labours was Enchiridion militis Christiani (1503/04; Handbook of a Christian Knight). In this work Erasmus urged readers to “inject into the vitals” the teachings of Christ by studying and meditating on the Scriptures, using the spiritual interpretation favoured by the “ancients” to make the text pertinent to moral concerns. The Enchiridion was a manifesto of lay piety in its assertion that “monasticism is not piety.” Erasmus’ vocation as a “primitive theologian” was further developed through his discovery at Park Abbey, near Leuven, of a manuscript of Valla’s Adnotationes on the Greek New Testament, which he published in 1505 with a dedication to Colet.

Erasmus sailed for England in 1505, hoping to find support for his studies. Instead he found an opportunity to travel to Italy, the land of promise for northern humanists, as tutor to the sons of the future Henry VIII’s physician. The party arrived in the university town of Bologna in time to witness the triumphal entry (1506) of the warrior pope Julius II at the head of a conquering army, a scene that figures later in Erasmus’ anonymously published satiric dialogue, Julius exclusus e coelis (written 1513–14). In Venice Erasmus was welcomed at the celebrated printing house of Aldus Manutius, where Byzantine émigrés enriched the intellectual life of a numerous scholarly company. For the Aldine press Erasmus expanded his Adagia, or annotated collection of Greek and Latin adages, into a monument of erudition with over 3,000 entries; this was the book that first made him famous. The adage “Dutch ear” (auris Batava) is one of many hints that he was not an uncritical admirer of sophisticated Italy, with its theatrical sermons and its scholars who doubted the immortality of the soul; his aim was to write for honest and unassuming “Dutch ears.”

De pueris instituendis, written in Italy though not published until 1529, is the clearest statement of Erasmus’ enormous faith in the power of education. With strenuous effort the very stuff of human nature could be molded, so as to draw out (e-ducare) peaceful and social dispositions while discouraging unworthy appetites. Erasmus, it would almost be true to say, believed that one is what one reads. Thus the “humane letters” of classical and Christian antiquity would have a beneficent effect on the mind, in contrast to the disputatious temper induced by scholastic logic-chopping or the vengeful amour propre bred into young aristocrats by chivalric literature, “the stupid and tyrannical fables of King Arthur.”

The celebrated Moriae encomium, or Praise of Folly, conceived as Erasmus crossed the Alps on his way back to England and written at Thomas More’s house, expresses a very different mood. For the first time the earnest scholar saw his own efforts along with everyone else’s as bathed in a universal irony, in which foolish passion carried the day: “Even the wise man must play the fool if he wishes to beget a child.”

http://mary-magdalene-wifeofchrist.blogspot.com/2008/01/rose-line-of-mary-magdalene.html

You are the Rose. You are the Flower of Life, the Divine Feminine essence in her fullest. As you start honoring yourself as the most sacred rose, the Divine Bride, and as you enter into the world as a High Priestess, you are embodying the most pure Magdalene Frequency. As you do so, you will begin to manifest a life of harmony, peace, Divine Love, and Twin Flame Love.  Stepping into Her, you step into yourself. Vibrating at the Magdalene Frequency is the same as vibrating at the Divine Feminine essence of your soul whilst attracting in (by the Law of Opposites Attract) your Divine Masculine Energies.

http://dramandanoelle.com/you-are-the-flower-of-life-the-rose-line-and-the-reflection-of-mary-magdalene/

https://www.shmoop.com/the-da-vinci-code/rose-symbol.html

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/asenseofplace/2013/04/living-on-the-roseline-and-other-spiritual-fantasies/

http://internationalopulence.com/knights-templar/

http://www.returnofthechrist.org.uk/magdalene-flame/the-roses-of-the-magdalene.html

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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