The Lilly

[Top: Henry Brevoort, Washington Irving. Erasmus]

The Dutch scholar and historian, Teimen De Vries, suggested Washing Irving plagiarized  Erasmus’s story ‘Tale of Epimenides’ when he wrote Rip Van Winkle.

http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/t-tiemen-de-vries/dutch-history-art-and-literature-for-americans-lectures-given-in-the-universit-rve/page-17-dutch-history-art-and-literature-for-americans-lectures-given-in-the-universit-rve.shtml

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epimenides

Is it possible Henry Brevoort owned this tale, it part of his rare book collection that ended up in the John Astor Library in New York City? Did some of these books come from Holland from where Irving suggests the ‘Rip Van Winkle’ story hail? Is Erasmus penning a letter to Godschalk Rosemondt in the painting above done by Hans Holbein? The portrait of Henry was done by Rembrandt Peale who painted George Washington.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rembrandt_Peale

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrait_of_Erasmus_of_Rotterdam

My Quest moves me closer to the epicenter of the archetypes. I am surrounded by the giants of Art, Literature, Religion, and History. I am the King of the Knickerbockers – in absentia. I live in a bat cave in Gotham. I know the way to the New Haarlem Renaissance. I am a Poet and Prophet! I am the embodiment of Epimenides who peruses Folly into the Labyrinth! Yes, I have a right to feel heady, in the clouds, knowing my Roover and Rosemondt ancestors took their reserved seat around a great table at the House of the Swan Brethren.  Note the cotes of arm on the back of the chairs. Today, only the kin of the monarchs of the House of Orange can be Brothers and Sisters of the Swan.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_monarchs_of_the_Netherlands

“To Thomas More Louvain November? 1520
This letter give a spirited account between Erasmus and Nicolas
Baechem Egmondanus before the rector of the of the university of Louvain,
Godschalk Rosemondt. Printed in the Epistle ad diverse, it was no
doubt composed with a wider public in mind; Thomas More, to whom it
is addressed, need not have been told at length an episode of which
he was himself a protagonist. Erasmus also described the
confrontation with Baecahmen in Ep 1173:29-109

Speak to us, Epimnenides!

“He once, when he was sent by his father into the
fields to look for a sheep, turned out of the road at mid-day
and lay down in a certain cave and fell asleep, and slept there
fifty-seven years ; and after that, when he awoke, he went on
looking for the sheep, thinking that he had been taking a short
nap; but as he could not find it he went on to the field and
there he found everything changed and the estate in another
person’s possession and so he came back again to the city in
great perplexity, and as he was going into his own house he
met some people who asked him who he was, until at last he
found his younger brother who had now become an old man,
and from him he learnt all the truth.”

I have not read all the correspondence between Henry and Irving. I have read the letters of Erasmus sent to my ancestor, Gottschalk Rosemond, the master of Leuven University, thus there exist a triangle of letter that came together when the law firm of Heisinger, Morris, Rose, and Buck mishandled the creative legacy of the world famous woman artist, Christine Rosamond Presco, who signed her work by her middle name.

Robert Brevoort Buck, with many legal letters, helped establish the Beryl Buck foundation that is worth a billion dollars. He did not know he was dealing with the Dutich Renaissance and Reformation – as well as the founding of Greenwich Village where the Brevoort mansion was located. Now add the artist, Heironums Bosch, who knew my kindred as fellow members of The Swan Brotherhood, then you are looking at something Paul Getty would like to get his hands on. I will apply for a grant thru the Getty Foundation for my cup runneth over! I need a team of students to help me with all these fabulous projects. Such students exist at the Buck foundations. But, they have not corresponded with me since I talked to them two months ago. How can they ignore Henry Miller? Instead of c0ncentrating on the poor of Marine, they are concerned about OLD PEOPLE OF THE FUTURE……..THE RIP VAN WINKLES!

If I do not personally hear from Robert Brevoort Buck, in seven days, then I, the official ‘Caretaker’ of the Buck Family History, will hand over Bob’s history to his enemy, Gordon Getty, who founded PlumpJack, a winery that Alcohol Justice sued, employing Beryl Buck’s legacy. There is Justice in the world – after all!

Give me twelve good men and women, Bob, so I can finish my Quest, and get my finding and books – published! Who knows, there might be a movie about – all this – about a David who took on Goliath – and won! This is what Rosamond’s Fans want, Bob – REVENGE! What your law firm did to ‘Rosamond’ – is insidious! I would be for the rounding up of all copies of ‘When You Close Your Eyes’ – and burning them – but that would be censorship! I might put Snyder’s book in a container full of piss, and title this work ‘Piss Chris’. Snyder pillaged my youthful tale about sending captured mic aloft in toilet paper capsules tied to plastic cleaners bag filled with gas.

“It is interesting to read the opinion of Erasmus, whose portrait I saw in
more than one hall of American Universities and in the homes of several
American scholars, about literary pillage. We find his opinion in a letter
written four months before his death, when complaining of some people who
published some of his manuscript, which he had not destined for publicity, people
who even published their own thoughts adorned with his name. He says: ”But
literary pillage is extenuated in reality with no better face than the tailors
excuse a theft of cloth, the carriers a theft of wine, the millers of flour.”

What is needed is a WARNING and enlightening preface (with addendum) that will take sane lovers of art thru a modern-day hell where the protagonist is not the subject, but the victim of mental and physical torture: for what reason, is handed to the reader, one poisoned rose at a time, lest thee flee from this nightmarish dance of the macabre.

“Oh please! Just one more cruel rose. Be careful of the thorns!”

I declare Bosh the main artist of my tale, that I titled ‘Capturing Beauty’ but, now change to ‘Rosemondt’. My kindred, Elizabeth Rosemond Taylor would be honored. Her son married Aileen Getty, thus all the Gettys are in my Rosy Tree.

The Phantom of the Opera has captured the letters of Henry Brevoort, Erasmus, Washington Irving, and Sir Walter Scott. There is a chance he read the work of John Knox, whose kin, John Witherspoon, was a Signer of the Constitution.

Christine Rosamond’s autobiography was disappeared! Snyder says her writing were “the ideations of a woman who was not well when she wrote them.” The same thing was said about Bosch, who I consider a friend of the Rosemondts.

http://www.ebooksread.com/authors-eng/t-tiemen-de-vries/dutch-history-art-and-literature-for-americans-lectures-given-in-the-universit-rve/page-17-dutch-history-art-and-literature-for-americans-lectures-given-in-the-universit-rve.shtml

https://books.google.com/books?id=q9vYL3eFvlcC&pg=PA60&lpg=PA60&dq=epimenides+erasmus&source=bl&ots=kPewtSRdmn&sig=kC-JhgCOCuDZJlpPNN5o6ny5p_U&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjpxffR25rWAhUJyGMKHdb3C64Q6AEIMTAD#v=onepage&q=epimenides%20erasmus&f=false

Rosemondt

by

Jon Presco

The Lily

Lillian was very traumatized when her mother asked her father not to come after he failed to sell his book to Homer Croy. There had been talk about a movie script being written based on Royal’s book, just like there is talk about a movie being made about Rosamond, Lillian’s niece. Sydney Morris gave the go-ahead on this idea. Did he see himself sitting in a movie theatre with the wife and kids – taking some credit?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homer_Croy

When I was ten years old, I took an airplane to see my aunt Lillian who lived in Van Nuys. Lillian wanted me to form a bond with her son, Randy. Lillian was very beautiful, and her husband, Dick Molnar, was very handsome.

On Lillian’s coffee table was a large art book containing the complete works of  Hieronymus Bosch. When home alone, I opened this book, and fell into a very erotic world. In a year I would have my first erection. My divine sexual curiosity was born, which was severely punished when I came down with a severe case of whooping cough. If it were not for Dick holding me by my ankles to get the flem out of my throat, I would have died.

When I went to Bullhead City the first time,  My sister Vicki and I went to pick Lillian up at the airport. She agreed to give me a taped interview for my biography of Christine and our family. When she got in the car, and turned to say hello to me, she gasped!

“Oh my God! He looks just like Vic!” Lillian cried.

My father had been dead four years. Lillian loved my father dearly and was spooked. It was like Victor had risen from the dead.

“I told you Vic was lying when he said Greg was not his son!” said Tricky Vicki.

I quickly surmised Vic had gone out of his way to convince Christine this was the God’s truth. Vic knew my sister had an identity crisis most of her life, but, never more so after she became famous. With her mentor out of the way, and labeled ‘The Dark Pretender’ one would think things would go easier for Rosamond. Contrare’. Rosemary reported this to me in 1987.

“Christine called me last week, from New York. ‘Mother. I am calling you from the Getty home where I am spending the night. I have it all, fame, fortune, and praise. But, mother, I don’t know who I am anymore!”

One evening I call Lillian to get a clarification, and she tells me Tom Snyder was on his way over to get more family information from her. I was shocked. I told she just gave me an exclusive interview, and this was a breach of a verbal contract. She brushed this truth aside. I was not a real member of Vic’s family again. Dark Mark, the Neo-Nazi, took Lillian’s side, and I cursed them both. Dark Mark excommunicated me from the family. I see the smirk on my older brother’s face whenever he heard the lie I am the product of Rosemary’s infidelity, she betraying her husband and receiving the Dark Seed of the Backstabber into her womb. And, so it goes!

When alas I read all of ‘When You Close Your Eyes’ by Tom Snyder, I read that Scott Hale, Tom Snyder, and Aunt Lillian, were neighbors. This picture popped into my mind. Tom and Scott are smoking dope in Snyder’s trailer, they getting ready to go to Lillians house – and blow sugar up her ass! They knew she gave me a five hour interview, and Tom has that infamous Nondisclosure Agreement in his back pocket, next to his flaming asshole!

The truth is, my kindred, Michael Dundon, encouraged Christine to take up art, and bought her two hundred dollars of art supplies. Rosamond was taking art classes at UCLA when she met Scott who exploited my sister, he too wanting to be the lover of a rich and famous woman.

The Dundons lived and worked up near Blue River that was in danger because of a forest fire until it rained yesterday. Shamus and Kasandra Dundon are in Snyder’s book. Frank Buck logged this forest.

Christine Wandel told me about the shocking art show she attended a night ago. A man posing as a statue would take a pee in a jug now and then. She swore she would never go to another show. Chris went to fine schools in Boston and majored in theology at Mill’s College. I told her about the shocking images Bosch rendered, with encouragement of the Church that has puzzled scholars. I might have some answers.

Stefan Eins took Chris to the Ronald Feldman Gallery. Stefan is the founder of Fashion Moda. The more things change, the more they remain the same.

“They need you, Chris. You are the missing ‘Shock Value’. They have become jaded – and sleepy!

That’s Chris standing to a building that was torn down. This photo looks like a Bosch. I want to do a painting of it. I hereby found ‘The Boschonian Art Movement’.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fashion_Moda

Fashion Moda was founded in 1978 by Stefan Eins. He was soon joined by artist Joe Lewis and William Scott, a young teenager from the neighborhood as co-directors.[1] Defining itself as a concept, Fashion Moda quickly became a strong voice in the New York art world during the late 1970s and the 1980s.[2] Fashion Moda crossed boundaries and mixed metaphors. It helped redefine the function of art in a post-modernist society.

Yesterday, the City of Eugene announced they are taking another survey. They spent a hundred thousand dollars trying to save Downtown from the Homeless Scourge. Belle Burch was a member of SLEEPS when we met. Nothing has changed. The City is considering spending another hundred thousand, but, they will never get rid our homeless Rip Van Winkle. Ken Kesey wrote a family tale. I connect Ken with Henry Miller.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2017

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/09/15/i-infiltrated-sleeps/

 

Eugene Police officers keep an eye as visitors to Kesey Square enjoy new picnic tables and umbrellas that have been added to the area as part of an effort to make the downtown core more enticing to visitors. (Chris Pietsch/The Register-Guard) 

 

 

179

Erasmus created it or as Irving imitates it, is too remarkable
in its whole conception and contains too many elements, found
in both the representations to be believed to be twice construct-
ed. Erasmus must have taken it from Irving or Irving from
Erasmus. And as Erasmus lived unfortunately 300 years
before Irving, we are compelled to believe that Irving indeed
purloined the whole tale from Erasmus. And if so, what
has to be our judgment about it. If Irving himself had told
us in a footnote, that he found this story in the works of
Erasmus, nobody ever should have made any complaint ; every-
body had admired the tale as a creation of the author of the
Praise of Folly, and Irving was never given credit for it. But
could Irving tell that he had taken the story from Erasmus
without changing his whole plan and even without giving up
the whole story? No sir, he could not. If he had told this,
he could not have told, that the inhabitants of the Kaatskill
valleys, the “old Dutch inhabitants almost universally,” 1)
believed that it really happened in their neighborhood and

“gave it full credit;” he could in that case never have passed
it off as a tale living in that neighborhood 2) and adequate to
the stupidness of those people, which he made the subject of
his humor. If he had confessed that he introduced the tale and
took it from Erasmus and — O humor in history ! — that he pur-
loined it from a son of that Dutch nation, at whose stupidity
he tried to make everybody laugh; if he had confessed that
he aimed at the Dutch people like Erasmus aimed at the Scotist-
theologians; if he had confessed that there was such inten-
tional aim in his humor, a great part of its charm would have
disappeared and the whole conception would have been a fail-
ure. In such triumph of his honesty he would have given up
the whole story. A naked and shameless show of prejudices
and ignorance even when dressed with the smile and the humor
of Washington Irving should not have been accepted with
sympathy. And yet, nobody better than Irving himself gives
us the right to suppose that he indeed purloined the tale from
Erasmus. In a footnote on the last page of his Rip Van
Winkle he says that “one would suspect that the tale had been
suggested to Mr. Knickerbocker by a little German superstition
about the Emperor Frederick derRothhart and the Kypphauser
mountain.” Now in allowing and justifying such a suspicion

1) Washington Irving in his Rip Van Winkle.

2) ibid.

180

Irving indeed makes an important confession. The story of
Frederick der Rothbart, as you can read it in the appendix of
this lecture, has only one point 1) of comparison with the
tale of Rip Van Winkle, while the story told by Erasmus con-
tains not less than ten points of striking resemblance with Irv-
ing’s Rip Van Winkle. And if Washington Irving justifies —
as he really does — the suspicion that his Rip Van Winkle
could have been suggested by the tale of Frederick den Roth-
bart, how much more must he justify our suspicion, that he
purloined from the tale of Erasmus. He himself gives us here
the full — I might say the tenfold right to suppose that his
Rip Van Winkle is nothing but an imitation of Erasmus’ tale
about Epimenides and the Scotists. But suppose indeed that
Irving purloined the story from Erasmus and passed it off as
his own creation, did he make an earnest fault in doing so?
To answer this question I remember what one time a doctor
of philosophy said to me when we were talking about plagiar-
ism or theft of literary products. He said : “I rather like to
be robbed of all my furniture of my house and of all my books
and money than to be robbed of the products of my literary
labor. I can buy new furniture, my friends can give me
some money or new books, but my Hterary products, nobody
can give them to me ; they are part of myself ; for them I have
studied and lived my whole life; for them I have spent all my
time and all my money, and when they take them away from
me and put on them another man’s name, I will feel as if murd-
ered more than robbed.” Now this certainly is pretty strong
language, but nobody will deny that there is a great deal of
truth in it, and the easy way in which often plagiariasm is
treated among every nation in the world, certainly gives rea-
son enough to warn our young men and ladies with literary
ability, in whom we have to respect the authors of our future
national literature, to keep themselves honest, clean and pure
from such demoralizing and shameless habits. Our love
and admiration for Washington Irving for his manifold treas-
ures of literary beauty which his genius gave us to enjoy,

1) Even that one point has not what we can call a striking resemblance.
The old Emperor was dead and later was supposed to be sleeping, while Rip
Van Winkle or Epimenides was sleeping and later supposed to be dead.

It is interesting to read the opinion of Erasmus, whose portrait I saw in
more than one hall of American Universities and in the homes of several
American scholars, about literary pillage. We find his opinion in a letter
written four months before his death, when complaining of some people who
published some of his manuscript, which he had not destined for publicity, people
who even published their own thoughts adorned with his name. He says: ”But
literary pillage is extenuated in reality with no better face than the tailors
excuse a theft of cloth, the carriers a theft of wine, the millers of flour

181

never may seduce us to approve a so serious fault of his
youth. Let us never forget that only his History of New
York and his Rip Van Winkle were published as written by
Diedrich Knickerbocker ; all the other works of this pioneer of
American literature were published as written by Washington
Irving. He himself made the strong separation of these two
pieces and all his other works, and I think he did it not with-
out good reason.

and other tradespeople find a special defence for what Is done in their own
trade”. . . . “How others may feel, I do not know; but for my own part
I should be more willing to put up, as I often have done, with a theft of
money from my cash-box. And yet, those who do that are sent to the gallows
and the other people are called men of literature. I think for my own part
these literary persons deserve not to be hung but like Thurinus, to be suffocated
with burned paper.” The Epistles of Erasmus by Francis Morgan Nichols,
London and New York, 1901. Introduction, p. 89.

APPENDIX I.

RIP VAN WINKLE IN EMBRYONE

VIZ.

LIFE OF EPIMENIDES.

BY DIOGENES LAERTIUS.

I. Epimenides, as Theopompus and many other writers
tell us, was the son of a man named Phaedrus, but some call
him the son of Dosiadas ; and others of Agesarchus. He was
a Cretan by birth, of the city of Gnossus ; but because he let
his hair grow long, he did not look like a Cretan.

II. He once, when he was sent by his father into the
fields to look for a sheep, turned out of the road at mid-day
and lay down in a certain cave and fell asleep, and slept there
fifty-seven years ; and after that, when he awoke, he went on
looking for the sheep, thinking that he had been taking a short
nap; but as he could not find it he went on to the field and
there he found everything changed and the estate in another
person’s possession and so he came back again to the city in
great perplexity, and as he was going into his own house he
met some people who asked him who he was, until at last he
found his younger brother who had now become an old man,
and from him he learnt all the truth.

III. And when he was recognized he was considered by
the Greeks as a person especially beloved by the Gods, on
which account when the Athenians were afflicted by a plague,
and the priestess of Delphi enjoined them to purify their city,
they sent a ship and Micrias the son of Niceratus to Crete to
invite Epimenides to Athens ; and he, coming there in the
forty-sixth Olympiad, purified the city and eradicated the
plague for that time ; he took some black sheep and some
white ones and let them go wherever they chose, having
ordered the attendants to follow them, and whenever any one
of them lay down they were to sacrifice him to the God who
was the patron of the spot, and so the evil was stayed ; and
owing to this, one may even now find in the different bor-

183

oughs of the Athenians altars without names which are a
sort of memorial of the propitiation of the Gods that then
took place. Some said that the cause of the plague was the
pollution contracted by the city in the matter of Cylon, and
that Epimenides pointed out to the Athenians how to get rid
of it, and that in consequence they put to death two young
men, Cratinus and Cesilius, and that thus the pestilence was
put an end to.

III. And the Athenians passed a vote to give him a
talent and a ship to convey him back to Crete, but he would
not accept the money, but made a treaty of friendship and
alliance between the Gnossians and Athenians.

IV. And not long after he had returned home he died,
as Phlegon relates in his book on long-lived people, after he
had lived a hundred and fifty-seven years; but as the Cretans
report he had lived two hundred and ninety-nine ; but as Xeno-
phones, the Clophonian, states that he had heard it reported,
he was a hundred and fifty-four years old when he died.

V. He wrote a poem of five thousand verses on the Gen-
eration and Theogony of the Cretes and Corylantes, and an-
other poem of six thousand five hundred verses on the build-
ing of the Argo and the expedition of Jason to Colchis.

VI. He also wrote a treatise in prose on the Sacrifices
in Crete, and the Cretan Constitution and on Minos and Rho-
damanthus, occupying four thousand lines. Likewise he built
at Athens the temple which is there dedicated to the venerable
goddesses, as Lohon the Rugur says in his book on Poets;
and he is said to have been the first person who purified
houses and lands and who built temples.

VII. There are some people who assert that he did not
sleep for the length of time that has been memtioned above,
but that he was absent from his country for a considerable
period, occupying himself with the anatomisation and examina-
tion of roots.

VIII. A letter of his is quoted, addressed to Solon, the
lawgiver, in which he discusses the constitution which Minos
gave the Cretans. But Demetrius the Magnatian, in his treat-
ise on Poets and Prose writers of the same name as one an-
other attempts to prove that the letter is a modern one, and is
not written in the Cretan but in the Attic dialect, and the new
Attic too.

184

IX. But I have also discovered another letter of his
which runs thus:

Epimenides to Solon:

Be of good cheer, my friend : for if Pisistratus had im-
posed his laws on the Athenians, they being habituated to
slavery and not accustomed to good laws previously, he would
have maintained his dominion forever, succeeding easily in en-
slaving his fellow countrymen: but as it is, he is lording it
over men who are no cowards, but who remember the precepts
of Solon and are indignant at their bonds, and who will not
endure the supremacy of a tyrant. But if Pisistratus does
possess the city to-day, still I have no expectation that the
supreme power will ever descend to his children. For it is
impossible that men who have lived in freedom and in the en-
joyment of most excellent laws should be slaves permanently ;
but as for yourself, do not you go wandering about at random,
but come and visit me, for here there is no supreme ruler to be
formidable to you; but if while you are wandering about any
of the friends of Pisistratus might fall in with you I fear you
might sufifer some misfortune.

He then wrote thus —

X. But Demetrius says that some writers report that he
used to receive food from the nymphs and keep it in a bul-
lock’s hoof; and that eating it in small quantities he never
required any evacuations and was never seen eating. And
Timaeus mentions him in his second book.

XI. Some authors say also that the Cretans sacrifice to
him as a god, for they say that he was the wisest of men ; and
accordingly, that when he saw the poet Munychia, at Athens,
he said that the Athenians did not know how many evils that
place would bring on them : since, if they did, they would tear
it to pieces with their teeth; and he said this a long time be-
fore the event to which he alluded. It is said also, that he at
first called himself Aeacus ; and that he foretold to the Lace-
daemonians the defeat which they would suffer from the Ar-
cadians ; and that he pretended that he had lived several times.
But Theopompus, in his Strange Stories says that when he
was building the temple of the Nymphs, a voice burst from
Heaven : “Oh ! Epimenides, build this temple, not for the
Nymphs, but for Jupiter.” He also foretold to the Cretans
the defeat of the Lacedaemonians by the Arcadians, as has

City wants to know if you have three words to describe downtown Eugene

An online survey through Sept. 25 seeks opinions from residents


Eugene Police officers keep an eye as visitors to Kesey Square enjoy new picnic tables and umbrellas that have been added to the area as part of an effort to make the downtown core more enticing to visitors. (Chris Pietsch/The Register-Guard)


After months of work by the city of Eugene in response to a public outcry about loitering, intimidation and crime downtown­, Eugene officials want to know if Lane County residents now consider the city center any safer.

Residents can fill out an unscientific online city survey at http://bit.ly/eugenesurvey. The deadline is Sept. 25.

City employees also are soliciting feedback in front of grocery stores around Eugene.

The first two survey questions ask residents to use three words to describe downtown and its public spaces.

When a city survey earlier this year posed a similar question, the results were telling. The top three words were “dirty,” “homeless” and “unsafe.”

City spokeswoman Laura Hammond said staff will give the new information to the City Council and use it to help with decision-making.

The survey went live Sept. 7, and so far the city has received nearly 1,700 responses, she said.

Hammond said based on the input so far, residents know about the city’s efforts to improve downtown public spaces.

“People are starting to see downtown differently, and hopefully that will make a difference in the perception,” Hammond said.

Starting last year, the city has budgeted $1 million to improve public safety and attract more visitors to downtown public spaces.

The city launched the effort after it came under growing criticism from residents and business representatives who said they were harassed or felt intimidated by the groups of homeless people and others who congregate downtown during the summer.

In February, a consultant said the public’s sense that the area was unsafe was at a “crisis level” and recommended officials act immediately to make the area safer and more welcoming.

Earlier that winter, Eugene police had beefed up downtown patrols. City officials raised the ante this summer, increasing police and security efforts downtown and in surrounding urban parks and expanding their effort to steer chronic offenders to social services.

The city also greatly expanded activities at downtown public spaces, particularly the Park Blocks at Eighth Avenue and Oak Street and at Broadway Plaza. They hired temporary employees to powerwash downtown alleys and sidewalks, and hired a park host to keep an eye on the Park Blocks.

Many of those initiatives end Sept. 30.

The most controversial move was the council imposing a temporary ban on dogs downtown.

Backers said the move was in response to people who felt menaced by dogs. Critics countered that the ban discriminated against homeless people or others who often have dogs for protection and companionship.

The new survey also asks whether the temporary dog ban has made a difference.

The ban is scheduled to expire Nov. 1, unless city councilors vote to extend it.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The Lilly

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    All this history is going in Beryl Buck’s pile. I am going to put our history in – more than one book, and bequeath it to the Buck Foundation, making sure it is used properly. https://rosamondpress.com/2017/10/03/winkle-bogart/

    On January 5, 1811, Mary Catherine was married to Henry Bergaw Brevoort. They lived on Rouge Farm until 1812. In 1812, during the war while Henry was serving with Commodore Perry in the Lake Erie campaign, Mary Catherine was taken captive by Indians.
    Following her release and the end of the war, they returned to Detroit and had five children.
    Mary Catherine Brevoort Died on December 26, 1868 at the age of 86. She died in the house where she had been born and where she was married—a house that had been built by her father.

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