The Real Deal

mel58 mel87mel69 mel79

bob-dylan4

bela-rosin10Proposal 005

I hate it when I am not taken seriously. This appears to be the case with Alex Cippola and Jill Hartz. I sent these women a post on Virginia Hambley, who is mistakenly given a different father. And, prey-tell, what is in that cafe menu I am holding? My fiance is reading the document I carried inside, and…… presented it to her.

Virginia has slept in this castle – and others!

mel72

The family of La Tour-Landry and, later, the Maillé de La Tour-Landry, held the lands of Bourmont from the 14th century. Through an alliance in 1691 between Marie-Hélène de Maillé de La Tour-Landry (1670-1752) and Marie-Henry, Count of Ghaisne (1662-1710), it passed to the family of Ghaisne de Bourmont, who still own it.[2]

In 1771, the Château de Bourmont was the birthplace of Louis-Auguste-Victor, Count de Ghaisnes de Bourmont, architect of the French conquest of Algeria in 1830. The conquest led to him being appointed Maréchal de France (Marshal of France).[2]

 Parents

 Union(s) et enfant(s)

The Duchess of Berry was compelled to follow Charles X to Holyrood after July 1830, but it was with the resolution of returning speedily and making an attempt to secure the throne for her son. From Britain she went to Italy, and in April 1832 she landed near Marseille with Louis Comte de Chaisne de Bourmont ex-General-in-Chief of the French Army,

bea88

Did they heave a sigh of relief – believing that I am mad? Did Alex show more evidence to Jill Hartz, the Director of the Jordon Schnitzer Museum that I am pixilated, and, they met for high tea?  Virginia is kin to Princess Charlotte who I suspect the daughter of the Duke and Dutchess of Cambridge was named after. Charlotte is kin to the King Georges.

Princess Elisabeth Charlotte was born on 27 May 1652 in Heidelberg Castle, to Charles I Louis, Elector Palatine of the Simmern branch of the House of Wittelsbach, and Landgravine Charlotte of Hesse-Kassel.[2] Her grandmother Elizabeth of Bohemia was a Scottish and later English princess, daughter of James I of England and granddaughter of Mary, Queen of Scots. Her first cousin became George I, the first Hanover King of England. In childhood she became known as Liselotteportmanteau of her names

Virginia’s great, great grandfather tried to restore Madame de Berry to the throne of France. Charlotte is a very close relative of Empress Zita. Her exploits have been made into movies. She is kin to Marie Antoinette, who is kin to Zita. These women lived at Versailles, a place that the President Elect, and his beautiful wife compare their penthouse to. Are they serious?!! Do WE THE PEOPE have to take them seriously?

“Trump’s extravagant décor appears to take inspiration from the luxurious Palace of Versailles in France, designed by French king Louis XIV. A grand marble fountain sits at the rear of the room while ivory-coloured sofas provide a luxurious touch.”

Here’s the complaint of one of Virginia’s kindred as she is about to be guillotined. I find it remarkable that Breitbart writers, and Steve Bannon, have not warned the Trumps about comparing themselves to those who lived in THE REAL DEAL, and not the Faux Versailles. They do not know their history, like I do. I am genealogist of renown. I will send my card to………THE GUARDED TOWER OF BEAUTY ……THE BASTILLE!

“Rosebud!”

How can Mike Pence go to a play about Hamilton and King George – and not know who the players are? Does Steve,Bannon, and Richard Spencer, know who the Wittelsbach family is? Google ‘The Battle for White Mountain’ and weep over thy ignorance, knave! These royals lose their land, their titles, their heads – and their minds – all the time!  They try to do so with dignity and grace, but, some of them were adult-babies – innocents in the world. Many were patraons of the arts, as was the case of the Madame de Berry , who is not this du Barry. What became of her art?

On 8 December 1793, Madame du Barry was beheaded by means of the guillotine on the Place de la Révolution (nowadays, Place de la Concorde). On the way to the guillotine, she collapsed in the tumbrel and cried “You are going to hurt me! Why?!” Terrified, she screamed for mercy and begged the indifferent crowd for help. Her last words to the executioner were: “One more moment, Mr. Executioner, I beg you!” She was buried in the Madeleine Cemetery, like many other victims of the Terror—including Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette.

Donald Trump says his favorite movie is Citizen Kane. “Rosebud”. Donald has made a very expensive FANTASY WORLD for himself and his Beautiful Model. Now, they have to wake up and GRASP THE TRUTH they are the most powerful couple in the world, and in eight years they are going to have to – GET OUT!

“All power is fleeting!”

This is why Melania is not moving into the White House. From her Tower, she is…..La Belle Mundi. And, when she die, and when her husband, is no more……Barron, will ascend to the throne. Trump claims he has a cote of arms. I spent four hours to day trying to find the name of the artist who filled Melania’s ceilings with Greek gods…to no avail!

My French readers you know what this name means “La Tour” But, do you know what tower it refers to?

The Bardo Museum was once the home of the Beys, the Sultans of the Caliphate. When the Bey of Algiers struck the king’s diplomat with a fly-swatter,  King Charles sent Virginia’s ancestor to take Algiers. My great grandfather sailed the U.S. Enterprise to Tripoli to do battle with the Bey there, who lived in the Bardo Museum.

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/03/25/attack-upon-the-bardo-museum/

“The conquest of Algeria was initiated in the last days of the Bourbon Restoration by Charles X as an attempt to increase his popularity amongst the French people, particularly in Paris, where many veterans of the Napoleonic Wars lived. He believed he would bolster patriotic sentiment and turn eyes away from his domestic policies.”

I wish all the Habsburgs, and members of the House of Bourbon, a Happy Thanksgiving……from the New World

Jon Presco

Copyright 2016

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/07/31/pontus-and-sidonia/

http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/06/donald-trump-2016-citizen-kane-213943

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis-Auguste-Victor,_Count_de_Ghaisnes_de_Bourmont

Born in Florence, Robert was the son of Charles III, Duke of Parma and Louise Marie Thérèse d’Artois, daughter of Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry and granddaughter of King Charles X of France. He succeeded his father to the ducal throne in 1854 upon the latter’s assassination, when he was only six, while his mother stood as regent.

Bourbon Restoration[edit]

After the Battle of Waterloo and Napoleon’s fall, Bourmont gave evidence that led to Ney’s execution. After the Second Restoration, he was given command of the 16th infantry division in Besançon and took part in the Spanish campaign of 1823. King Charles X of France made him minister of war in 1829 and Marshal of France in 1830. He was commanding the Invasion of Algiers in 1830 when the July Revolution broke out in 1830. Bourmont refused give his allegiance to the new King Louis Philippe and was dismissed from service.

In 1832 Marshal Bourmont took part in the rising of Caroline Ferdinande Louise, duchesse de Berry and on its failure fled to Portugal. He commanded the army of the absolutist monarch King Miguel during the Liberal Wars and after the victory of the constitutional party he retired to Rome. At the amnesty of 1840 he returned to France, where he died on 27 October 1846 at Freigné in Maine-et-Loire.

Virginia Muriel Hambley was born February 3, 1963 in New York City to: Elisabeth Ann de GHAISNE de BOURMONT, and Clarke Toleman HAMBLEY. Elizabeth’s parents are: Mary Agnès CRAVEN and Joseph de GHAISNE de BOURMONT.

https://rosamondpress.com/2013/09/30/genealogy-for-virginia-hambley/


She intends to return to France to raise the Vendee in favor of her son Henry against Louis-Philippe. 

After crossing Holland, Germany, Tyrol, Milan, Genoa and Rome, she stopped some time in Naples, Modena and Massa and captivated the hearts of the Genoese sailors who admired her as a Madonna. She contacted Mr. De Ferrari, one of the most powerful families in Genoa, owner and shipowner of a steamer: the “Carlo Alberto”, which placed it at the disposal of the Duchess for her hazardous expedition. On April 24, 1832, the departure of Livorno took place at eleven o’clock in the evening, and the Duchess embarked with a handful of faithful. She was disguised as a bourgeois, and was accompanied by the Marshal de Bourmont.


Marie Antoinette, the 15th child of Holy Roman Emperor Francis I and the powerful Habsburg empress Maria Theresa, was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1755–an age of great instability for European monarchies. In 1766, as a way to cement the relatively new alliance between the French and Habsburg thrones, Maria Theresa promised her young daughter’s hand in marriage to the future king Louis XVI of France. Four years later, Marie Antoinette and the dauphin were married by proxy in Vienna. (They were 15 and 16 years old, and they had never met.) On May 16, 1770, a lavish second wedding ceremony took place in the royal chapel at Versailles. More than 5,000 guests watched as the two teenagers were married. It was the beginning of Marie Antoinette’s life in the public eye.

The Duchess of Berry was compelled to follow Charles X to Holyrood after July 1830, but it was with the resolution of returning speedily and making an attempt to secure the throne for her son. From Britain she went to Italy, and in April 1832 she landed near Marseille with Louis Comte de Chaisne de Bourmont ex-General-in-Chief of the French Army, but receiving little support, she made her way towards the loyal districts of Vendée and Brittany. Her followers, however, were defeated, and, after remaining concealed for five months in a house in Nantes, she was betrayed to the government and imprisoned in the castle of Blaye, freed in July 1833 after the discovery of her recent marriage to an obscure Italian nobleman, Count Ettore Lucchesi-Palli, an act that exempted her from the French throne.

http://gw.geneanet.org/soleil15?

lang=fr&pz=hugues&nz=soleil&ocz=0&p=elisabeth+ann&n=de+ghaisne+de+bourmont

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Charlotte,_Princess_of_the_Palatinate

Elisabeth Charlotte had apartments at Versailles, use of the Palais-Royal in Paris, and her favourite residence, the beautiful Château de Saint-Cloud on the outskirts of Paris,

Zita of Bourbon-Parma (Zita Maria delle Grazie Adelgonda Micaela Raffaela Gabriella Giuseppina Antonia Luisa Agnese; 9 May 1892 – 14 March 1989) was the wife of Emperor Charles of Austria. As such, she was the last Empress of AustriaQueen of Hungary, and Queen of Bohemia.

Born as the seventeenth child of the dispossessed Robert I, Duke of Parma and his second wife Infanta Maria Antonia of Portugal,

  Joseph de GHAISNE de BOURMONT

   Imprimer son arbre

 Parents

 Union(s) et enfant(s)

http://gw.geneanet.org/pierfit?lang=fr&p=claire&n=de+lancrau+de+breon

https://rosamondpress.com/2013/01/04/tale-two-de-bourmonts/

https://rosamondpress.com/2013/01/03/illustrious-kindred-of-virginia-hambley/

http://gw.geneanet.org/pierfit?lang=fr&p=claire&n=de+lancrau+de+breon


Zita of Bourbon-Parma (Zita Maria delle Grazie Adelgonda Micaela Raffaela Gabriella Giuseppina Antonia Luisa Agnese; 9 May 1892 – 14 March 1989) was the wife of Emperor Charles of Austria. As such, she was the last Empress of AustriaQueen of Hungary, and Queen of Bohemia.

Born as the seventeenth child of the dispossessed Robert I, Duke of Parma and his second wife Infanta Maria Antonia of Portugal, Zita married the then Archduke Charles of Austria in 1911. Charles became heir presumptive to the Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria in 1914 after the assassination of his uncle Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria, and acceded to the throne in 1916 after the old emperor’s death.

After the end of World War I in 1918, the Habsburgs were deposed when the new countries of AustriaCzechoslovakiaHungary and the State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs were formed. Charles and Zita left for exile in Switzerland and later Madeira, where Charles died in 1922. After her husband’s death, Zita and her son Otto served as the symbols of unity for the exiled dynasty. A devout Catholic, she raised a large family after being widowed at the age of 29, and never remarried.

Robert I (Italian: Roberto I Carlo Luigi Maria di Borbone, Duca di Parma e Piacenza; 9 July 1848 – 16 November 1907) was the last sovereign Duke of Parma and Piacenza from 1854 to 1859, when the duchy was annexed to Sardinia-Piedmont during the unification of Italy. He was a member of the House of Bourbon, descended from Philip, Duke of Parma the third son of King Philip V of Spain and Elizabeth Farnese.

Born in Florence, Robert was the son of Charles III, Duke of Parma and Louise Marie Thérèse d’Artois, daughter of Charles Ferdinand, duc de Berry and granddaughter of King Charles X of France. He succeeded his father to the ducal throne in 1854 upon the latter’s assassination, when he was only six, while his mother stood as regent.

When Duke Robert was eleven years old he was deposed, as Piedmontese troops annexed other Italian states, ultimately to form the Kingdom of Italy.

Despite losing his throne, Robert and his family enjoyed considerable wealth, traveling in a private train of more than a dozen cars from his castles at Schwarzau am Steinfeld near Vienna, to Villa Pianore in northwest Italy, and the magnificent château de Chambord in France.

Trump’s extravagant décor appears to take inspiration from the luxurious Palace of Versailles in France, designed by French king Louis XIV. A grand marble fountain sits at the rear of the room while ivory-coloured sofas provide a luxurious touch

he dazzling ceilings are delicately painted with scenes from classical Greek myths that would give Michelangelo a run for his money, while an ornate marble fountain sits at the back of one of the living rooms.

Photos of his family, including older children TiffanyEricDonald Jr and Ivanka, sit proudly on a marble-topped golden side-table, while the Trump family coat of arms hangs proudly from the wall of a lounge area.

A bronze statue of Eros and Psyche, one of the great Greek love stories, flanks a picture of his father on the glass coffee table in this sitting room, while Barron’s toy Mercedes is parked by the window

Interior designer Angelo Donghia, renowned for his A-list cliental that included the likes of Barbara Walters and Liza Minelli, was responsible for the stylings of the penthouse. Donghia passed away in 1985.

http://www.faceofmalawi.com/2016/11/take-a-look-inside-the-president-elects-100-million-trump-tower-penthouse-complete-with-gold-rimmed-candy-bowls-and-ceiling-murals-of-the-greek-gods/

Charles Ferdinand d’Artois, Duke of Berry (24 January 1778 – 14 February 1820) was the third child and youngest son of the future King of FranceCharles X, and his wife, Princess Maria Theresa of Savoy. He was assassinated at the Paris Opera in 1820 by Louis Pierre Louvel, an anti-royal Bonapartist. In June 1832, two years after the overthrow of his father, Charles X, his widow, Marie-Caroline de Bourbon-Sicile, duchess de Berry, led a royalist insurrection in the Vendée in a failed attempt to restore their son, Henri V, to the French throne.

Marie-Caroline de Bourbon-Sicile, duchess de Berry[1] (Maria Carolina Ferdinanda Luise; 5 November 1798 – 17 April 1870) was an Italian princess of the House of Bourbon who married into the French royal family, and was the mother of Henri, Count of Chambord, the last serious Bourbon pretender to the crown of France.

Even as member of the royal family, the Duchess of Berry was an exceptional theatre-goer. She was the patron of the Théâtre du Gymnase, which changed its name, for a time, to the théâtre de Madame, in her honor. She attended the Odéon at least nine times during 1824 to 1828. She contributed to benefit performances, such as that of Giacomo Rossini‘s La dame du lac (1826), for victims of the fire at Antonio Franconi‘s Cirque Olympique; she contributed 500 francs.[7]

La moisson (1822) by Auguste-Xavier Leprince, oil on canvas, 24.2 x 32.1 cm, featured in her 1822 sale

The Duchess of Berry and her first husband, Charles-Ferdinand d’Artois, were enthusiastic art collectors. Her sale of 1822 was novel for its catalogue which contained lithographic reproductions of all the works.[8][9] Lithography, invented by Alois Senefelder, had only been fully described in 1818 in Vollstandiges Lehrbuch der Steindruckerei, translated into French in 1819. The lithographs, produced by Isidore Laurent Deroy[10] sparked an interest in the technique as a means for reproducing art.[11]

She was a collector of landscapes; her collection featured at least three by Ruisdael.[12] She had several genre scenes by Auguste-Xavier Leprince[10] and she owned works by Jan van der Heyden,[13] Michel Philibert Genod,[14] François Marius GranetPauline AuzouJean-Claude BonnefondCharles Marie BoutonMartin DrollingHortense Haudebourt-Lescot, and Achille Etna Michallon, among many others.[8]

The Duchess was known to patronise the Sèvres Porcelain Manufactory, commissioning notable works by Jean-Charles-François Leloy.[15]

Francis I (GermanFranz StefanFrenchFrançois Étienne; 8 December 1708 – 18 August 1765)[2] was Holy Roman Emperor and Grand Duke of Tuscany, though his wife effectively executed the real powers of those positions. With his wife, Maria Theresa, he was the founder of the Habsburg-Lorraine dynasty

Élisabeth Charlotte d’Orléans (13 September 1676 – 23 December 1744) was a French petite-fille de France and by marriage to Leopold, Duke of Lorraine, duchess and later regent of Lorraine and Bar. She was also suo jure Princess of Commercy. Among her children was Francis I, Holy Roman Emperor, a co-founder of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine.

Princess Elisabeth Charlotte was born on 27 May 1652 in Heidelberg Castle, to Charles I Louis, Elector Palatine of the Simmern branch of the House of Wittelsbach, and Landgravine Charlotte of Hesse-Kassel.[2] Her grandmother Elizabeth of Bohemia was a Scottish and later English princess, daughter of James I of England and granddaughter of Mary, Queen of Scots. Her first cousin became George I, the first Hanover King of England. In childhood she became known as Liselotteportmanteau of her names. Her parents were in an unhappy dynastic marriage and in 1653 her father began an affair with Marie Luise von Degenfeld, one of his wife’s attendants. He purported to marry her motu proprio as a prince-elector of the Empire, without benefit of a judicial divorce, and claimed to have done so to legitimise the bastard children. Liselotte was five years old when she was sent to live with her father’s sister, Sophia, wife of Ernest Augustus, Elector of Hanover.[2]

She always remembered her time with her aunt as the happiest of her life, although she became close enough to her younger half-sisters to correspond with them at least weekly after she married. In 1663, Liselotte had to move back to Heidelberg where she lived with her stepmother, fifteen half-siblings, and brother, the future Charles II, Elector Palatine. She had purportedly desired to marry her cousin William III of Orange, who would later become King of England, though her family believed that sacrifices needed to be made in order to make a more beneficial marriage with the recently widowed brother of the King of France, formerly married to her father’s first cousin, Princess Henrietta Anne of England.[2]

Elle the Elder, 1673: Elisabeth Charlotte, Duchesse d’Orléans, in hunting dress, Deutsches Historisches Museum Berlin

Elisabeth Charlotte, Duchesse d’Orléans, with a moorish page

Marriage[edit]

On 16 November 1671, she was married by proxy at Metz to Philippe I, Duke of Orléans. By prearrangement, after leaving her father’s realm but prior to arriving in France, she formally converted to Roman Catholicism.[1] The arranged marriage was conceived by the bride’s aunt, Anna Gonzaga, a close friend of her future husband and his deceased first wife, who negotiated the marriage contract, including the secret Catholic instruction and subsequent public conversion of the fiancée.[1] At the French court, her husband Philippe was known by the traditional honorific of Monsieur.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Charlotte,_Princess_of_the_Palatinate

Elisabeth Charlotte had apartments at Versailles, use of the Palais-Royal in Paris, and her favourite residence, the beautiful Château de Saint-Cloud on the outskirts of Paris,

As the king’s only brother and sister-in-law, the couple were expected to be in usual attendance at court, where her husband’s rank as a fils de France ensured her precedence before all save the queen, the wives of the king’s son and grandsons—and his maîtresse-en-titre. This last position rankled her, and she disliked the king’s illegitimate children, especially Louis-Auguste, Duke of Maine.[citation needed]

Madame de Montespan’s youngest daughter, Françoise Marie de Bourbon, would eventually marry her son. No inducements ever reconciled Elisabeth Charlotte to the marriage. When she discovered that her son had agreed to it at the king’s insistence, she slapped his face in front of the whole court, and turned her back on the king as he greeted her with a bow. Later, writing on the subject she admitted:

If, by shedding my own blood, I could have prevented my son’s marriage, I would willingly have done so; but since the thing was done, I have had no other wish than to preserve harmony.[4]

After the king transferred his affections from La Montespan to La Maintenon, Elisabeth Charlotte became obsessively resentful toward and suspicious of the latter. In her correspondence, Elisabeth Charlotte refers to her as the “King’s old drab”, the “old witch”, and the “old whore”.[4]

Elisabeth Charlotte died at age 70 on 8 December 1722, at the château de Saint-Cloud, near Paris. She and her husband, the Duke of Orléans, were the founders of the modern House of Orléans. Their only surviving son, Philippe II, Duke of Orléans, was the Regent of France during the minority of Louis XV of France. She became the ancestress of emperors Holy Roman Emperor Francis I, Emperor Pedro II of Brazil, and France’s Citizen-King Louis Philippe.[citation needed] Through her daughter, the Duchess of Lorraine, she was the paternal great-grandmother of Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippe_I,_Duke_of_Orl%C3%A9ans

Philippe I, Duke of Orléans (21 September 1640 – 9 June 1701), was the younger son of Louis XIII of France and his wife, Anne of Austria. His older brother was Louis XIVle roi soleil. Styled Duke of Anjou from birth, Philippe became Duke of Orléans upon the death of his uncle Gaston in 1660. In 1661, Philippe also received the dukedoms of Valois and Chartres.[2] Following Philippe’s victory in battle in 1671, Louis XIV added the dukedom of Nemours, the marquisates of Coucy and Folembray, and the countships of Dourdan and Romorantin.[3] During the reign of his brother he was known simply as Monsieur, the traditional style at the court of France for the younger brother of the king.

Unabashedly effeminate and homosexual, he nonetheless fulfilled his dynastic duty by marrying twice and begetting several children. In fact, he was the founder of the House of Orléans, a cadet branch of the ruling House of Bourbon, and thus the direct ancestor of Louis Philippe I, who ruled France from 1830 until 1848 in the July Monarchy. Through the children of his two marriages, Philippe became an ancestor of most modern-day Roman Catholic royalty, giving him the nickname of “the grandfather of Europe“.[4] Philippe’s other achievements include his decisive victory as military commander at the Battle of Cassel in 1677. Through careful personal administration, Philippe greatly augmented the fortunes of the House of Orléans.

Advertisements

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s