Jesus Was A Nazarite

shroud4

Jesus was a Nazarite. Jesus died a Nazarite. Queen Helena of Adiabene took the Vow of the Nazarite – for life. She and her HEATHEN husband were converts to Judaism. Heathens are not allowed to take the Nazarite Vow. Paul took the vow, and may have caused a commotion when he brought HEATHENS to the temple to complete the Nazarite Vow they took, I suspect in Greece, or, Rome.

Being a Jew and being a part of the Judaic Religion, was very desirable, even amongst the powerful and rich. Paul invents HIS OWN RELIGION in order to OPEN THE DOOR WIDER. Are people paying Paul for admittance, he employing his Pharisistic training in Judaic Law to bypass Mosaic restrictions?  There was a DEBT REBELLION! The debt archives were burned – by INDENTURED SLAVES. Rome sent an army to crush the ABOLITIONIST REVOLT. The war with Rome, was on!

Simon held the upper city, and the great walls as far as Cedron, and as much of the old wall as bent from Siloam to the east, and which went down to the palace of Monobazus, who was king of the Adiabeni, beyond Euphrates; he also held the fountain, and the Acra, which was no other than the lower city; he also held all that reached to the palace of queen Helena, the mother of Monobazus; but John held the temple, and the parts thereto adjoining, for a great way, as also Ophla, and the valley called “Valley of Cedron;”

Judaism in Adiabene survived the death of Izates and Helena. History indicates that the Jewish religion continued to play a part in the kingdom of Adiabene; non-royal Adiabenians converted. “The names of the Adiabenite [sic] Jews Jacob Hadyaba and Zuga (Zuwa) of Hadyab,”33 indicate a non-Hebrew origin and possible conversion to Judaism.

Mindful of the events which in her view were of a positive nature, Helena journeyed with her retinue to Jerusalem and the Great Temple to worship and offer thank-offerings while the throne in Arbela had been safeguarded. Queen Helena offered items of blessing including a special addition to the Kodesh, or Inner Sanctuary of the Great Temple:
The doorway of the Kodesh was 10 cubits wide and 20 cubits high. Over the doorway was a carving of a golden menorah donated by Queen Helena, a convert to Judaism. The morning service could not begin before sunrise. The Temple was surrounded by high walls, and it was not possible to see the rising sun, so priest had to be sent outside to see if it was time for the service to begin. After Queen Helena donated the Menorah, it was no longer necessary to send a priest outside the Temple. As the sun rose in the east it shone against the menorah and the reflected light was cast into the Azarah. The priests then knew that the morning service could begin.18

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/09/24/sermon-on-hill-jubilee/

John 19:28-30

Later, knowing that all was now completed, and so that the Scripture would be fulfilled, Jesus said, “I am thirsty.” A jar of wine vinegar was there, so they soaked a sponge in it, put the sponge on a stalk of the hyssop plant, and lifted it to Jesus’ lips. When he had received the drink, Jesus said, “It is finished.” With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.

Jesus is offered the WINE – twice! He refuses the first offering because he is not ready to die, not ready to give up the Holy Spirit he received from John, who was the embodiment of Elijah, thus THE MESSIAH OF THE JEWS. Jesus knew this, as did the people who gave him the wine IN ORDER TO END HIS NAZARITE VOW. The spirit of John-Elijah was expected to come AND TAKE JESUS UP.

Mary knows Elizabeth is going to give birth to THE MESSIAH, the EMBODIMENT OF ELIJAH, and wants her son in her womb to come in contact with the Messiah of the Jews, and, wants her UNBORN SON to be filled with the HOLY SPIRIT – TOO!

There were two very Holy Nazarites in the world. Jesus was destined to be THE KING OF JUDAH, and sit on David’s throne.  I know this, because a Nazarite expecting the arrival of the Messiah “the son of David” drank only on certain days. When John was beheaded, Jesus was a candidate for the Messiah. His refusal to drink the first offering of WINE – not vinigar – was before sunset, and thus, before THE SABBATH. 

The End of Jesus’ life is a Nazarite Argument that has nothing to do with the pagan converts to Christianity, accept in the case of Helen. Then there is the Judging of the Sotah. But here is what is extremely interesting. Slave could take the Nazarite Vow with the consent of their owners.

This is so key!  The Laws of the Jubilee had been abolished a hundred years before Jesus was born. When he announced he had come to restore these laws, some Jews were elated, while others, were threatened. Some Jews owned slaves, while others did not. Consider our Civil War.

 “The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me,
Because He has anointed Me
To preach the gospel to the poor;
He has sent Me to heal the brokenhearted,
To proclaim liberty to the captives
And recovery of sight to the blind,
To set at liberty those who are oppressed;
19 To proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord.”

“Women and slaves, who did not have full rights before the religious law, could take the Nazarite vow, but only with the consent of their husbands or owners, while the vow was not valid among the heathen (Naz. iv. 1-5, ix. 1, et passim). Fathers were allowed to dedicate minors, but mothers were forbidden to do so (ib. iv. 29b)”

Slaves all over the Diaspora could now be elevated in their station in life – including women! If tens of thousands of slaves wanted to become Nazarites, then you have a revolution on your hand – a slave revolt! Of course an owner would consent.

Simon held the upper city, and the great walls as far as Cedron, and as much of the old wall as bent from Siloam to the east, and which went down to the palace of Monobazus, who was king of the Adiabeni, beyond Euphrates; he also held the fountain, and the Acra, which was no other than the lower city; he also held all that reached to the palace of queen Helena, the mother of Monobazus; but John held the temple, and the parts thereto adjoining, for a great way, as also Ophla, and the valley called “Valley of Cedron;”

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/09/24/sermon-on-hill-jubilee/

 

Jesus ‘The Goel-El Redeemer’ restored the Jubilee Laws of God and purchased slaves so he could set them free. This led to the burning of the debt archives and the War with Roman Slave Masters.  The Jews recognized Jesus as their Goel. It is a egregious lie – that he didn’t! Paul took the Vow of the Nazarite who was bid by James the Nazarite to redeem Jews in the Diaspora, and bring them to Jerusalem to complete their vow.

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/08/10/judging-the-adulteress/

Jon Presco

‘The Nazarite’

Copyright 2016

Some said: “I shall not die before I have become a Nazarite” (Ned. 3b), or, “Let me be a Nazarite on the day when the son of David [the Messiah] shall come.” Such a Nazarite was allowed to drink wine only on the Sabbath and on feast-days, since the Messiah will not appear on these days (‘Er. 43a).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goel

https://rosamondpress.com/2015/03/19/the-liberation-of-all-humanity-on-the-jubilee/

Luke 1:39-45New International Version (NIV)

Mary Visits Elizabeth

39 At that time Mary got ready and hurried to a town in the hill country of Judea, 40 where she entered Zechariah’s home and greeted Elizabeth.41 When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the baby leaped in her womb, and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit. 42 In a loud voice she exclaimed: “Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the child you will bear! 43 But why am I so favored, that the mother of my Lord should come to me? 44 As soon as the sound of your greeting reached my ears, the baby in my womb leaped for joy. 45 Blessed is she who has believed that the Lord would fulfill his promises to her!”

And when Zacharias saw him, he was troubled, and fear fell upon him. 13But the angel said unto him, Fear not, Zacharias: for thy prayer is heard; and thy wife Elisabeth shall bear thee a son, and thou shalt call his name John. 14And thou shalt have joy and gladness; and many shall rejoice at his birth. 15For he shall be great in the sight of the Lord, and shall drink neither wine nor strong drink; and he shall be filled with the Holy Ghost, even from his mother’s womb. 16And many of the children of Israel shall he turn to the Lord their God. 17And he shall go before him in the spirit and power of Elias, to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children, and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just; to make ready a people prepared for the Lord. 18And Zacharias said unto the angel, Whereby shall I know this? for I am an old man, and my wife well stricken in years.

 

http://www.biblestudytools.com/commentaries/gills-exposition-of-the-bible/luke-1-15.html

Jesus’ drink of vinegar

Matthew 27:34

There they offered Jesus wine to drink, mixed with gall; but after tasting it, he refused to drink it.
Matthew 27:47-50

When some of those standing there heard this, they said, “He’s calling Elijah.”

Immediately one of them ran and got a sponge. He filled it with wine vinegar, put it on a stick, and offered it to Jesus to drink. The rest said, “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to save him.”

And when Jesus had cried out again in a loud voice, he gave up his spirit.
Mark 15:23

Then they offered him wine mixed with myrrh, but he did not take it.

Mark 15:35-37

When some of those standing near heard this, they said, “Listen, he’s calling Elijah.”

One man ran, filled a sponge with wine vinegar, put it on a stick, and offered it to Jesus to drink. “Now leave him alone. Let’s see if Elijah comes to take him down,” he said.

With a loud cry, Jesus breathed his last.
John 19:28-30

Later, knowing that all was now completed, and so that the Scripture would be fulfilled, Jesus said, “I am thirsty.” A jar of wine vinegar was there, so they soaked a sponge in it, put the sponge on a stalk of the hyssop plant, and lifted it to Jesus’ lips. When he had received the drink, Jesus said, “It is finished.” With that, he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.


Did Jesus drink the wine or not?

Matthew 27:34 and Mark 15:23 are referring to a separate event from the other passages (this is evident from the fact that both Matthew and Mark describe Jesus refusing the blended wine at the start of his crucifixion, but later accepting wine vinegar from a sponge and stick). In that instance, Jesus tasted the wine but didn’t drink it (i.e. he took a sip but not a mouthful).

Concerning the latter offer of wine vinegar, Matthew and Mark don’t explicitly state that Jesus drank the vinegar, but that doesn’t mean that he didn’t. We sometimes use “offered” to imply both an offer and its acceptance in everyday conversation. Someone might say, “Joe came by and I offered him a drink, and we talked for a while,” meaning that Joe accepted the drink. Also, some translations (NASB, RSV) use “gave” instead of “offered.”
Who said to leave Jesus alone and wait for Elijah: the crowd, or the man offering the vinegar?

Both the crowd and the man could have said it. One possible scenario is that the man gave Jesus vinegar to drink, then said to the crowd, “Okay, now let’s leave him alone and see if Elijah comes,” and the crowd agreed with him and said, “Yes, let’s do that.” Another possibility is that someone in the crowd suggested it first, and the man offering the vinegar agreed and addressed his agreement to the whole crowd.
Did Jesus ask for the vinegar, or did the man decide to offer it after hearing him call Elijah?

Again, Matthew and Mark don’t record Jesus’ question, but that doesn’t mean that Jesus couldn’t have asked for a drink. Combining the three accounts gives us this sequence of events:

  1. Jesus called out to God
  2. The crowd said, “He’s calling Elijah”
  3. Jesus said, “I am thirsty.”
  4. Someone in the crowd ran and got the drink of vinegar, and offered it to Jesus
  5. Jesus drank the vinegar
  6. Jesus said, “It is finished,” and died

Was the first wine mixed with gall or myrrh?

Responses (offsite):

 

The Term Nazarene Is Counterfeit!

As a geographical place, Nazareth did not exist

The references in the Gospels are to a spiritual Nazireth — the Nazirene Vow

The evidence for a 1st century town of Nazareth does not exist – not literary, not archaeologically, and not historically.

Biblical scholars and clergy alike have always had difficulty accepting the possibility that at the time of Jesus there was no city called “Nazareth.” They have always resisted this possibility and sometimes, quite vigorously.

The Encyclopaedia Biblica, a work written by theologians, and perhaps the greatest biblical reference work in the English language, says: “We cannot venture to assert positively that there was a city of Nazareth in Jesus’ time.” 

Nazareth is not mentioned in any historical records or biblical texts of the time and receives no mention by any contemporary historian. Nazareth is not mentioned in the Old Testament, the Talmud (the Jewish law code), nor in the Apocrypha and it does not appear in any early rabbinic literature.

Nazareth was not included in the list of settlements of the tribes of Zebulon (Joshua 19:10-16) which mentions twelve towns and six villages, and Nazareth is not included among the 45 cities of Galilee that were mentioned by Josephus (37AD-100AD), a widely traveled historian who never missed anything and who voluminously describes the region. The name is also missing from the 63 towns of Galilee mentioned in the Talmud.

The first reference to Nazareth is in the New Testament where it can be found 29 different times. However, there is still cause for speculation as to whether or not the city existed at the time of Jesus. It is mentioned only in the Gospels and Acts. These books do refer to Nazareth, but they did not originate at this time, they are later writings. The earlier writings of the NT (Paul etc) mention Jesus 221 times – but never mention Nazareth.  

In The Armageddon Script, a book by Peter Lemesurier, we read: “… historical evidence that it (Nazareth) existed at the time is entirely lacking. The tradition almost certainly goes back to the fact that the family were members of the Nazarene sect of the Essenes. This group seems to have become the dominant one on Carmel, to the point where the word ‘Nazarene’ came to be applied to the Northern Essenes in general. It is possible, of course, that the Essenes had a camp in the vicinity of the modern Nazareth.”

The early Christian writer Epiphanius admits that the Nazarenes “eat no meat”, and modern scholars concur; Hugh Shonfield, in The Passover Plot:

“There has been emerging ever clearer evidence that in the Galilean region an ancient Israelitish type of religion persisted in the time of Jesus, defying Judean efforts to obliterate it…. The name he bears, Jesus the Nazorean, has northern sectarian implications…. The name borne by the earliest followers of Jesus was not Christians: they were called Nazoreans (Nazarenes)…. They were vegetarians and rejected animal sacrifices.”

In regard to Schonfield’s reference to the Nazarenes as “an ancient Israelitish type of religion… defying Judean efforts to obliterate it”, it is important to note that the term “Judean” refers to southern Israel and especially the orthodox Jewish temple at Jerusalem. Like Schonfield, H.P. Blavatsky demonstrates that the northern Nazarene-Essene religion was much more ancient and authentic than the orthodox Judaism that held power in Yahshua’s day, pre-dating even the authentic versions of the several books of Moses (Moses was attempting to reestablish the Essene Nazarene religion after the captivity) and certainly pre-dating the falsified versions; in her Isis Unveiled:

“The Nazireate [her spelling] sect existed long before the laws of Moses, and originated among… the people of Galilee… where was built Nazara, the present Nazareth. It is in Nazara that the ancient Nazoria or Nazireates held their “Mysteries of Life….”

In reference to Epiphanius charge that the Nazarenes believed the books of Moses had been falsified — modern scholarship again concurs; Schonfield writes:

“The old Nazareans (“Nazarenes”), like the Samaritans, were opposed to the Judean traditions, holding that the southerners had falsified the Law of Moses.”

Nazarite vs. Nazarene

Jesus is rightly called a Nazarene, as he grew up in the town of Nazareth. But a Nazarene is not the same as a Nazarite. Being a Nazarite had nothing to do with a location, race or nationality, but was the title given to those who maintained a specific code of conduct as a way to demonstrate dedication to God. A Nazarite had to fulfill at least three main requirements: abstain from drinking alcohol or any product of the grapevine, and from eating grapes in all their forms; abstain from cutting the hair on the head; and avoid touching dead bodies.

Becoming a Nazarite

A person became a Nazarite in at least three ways: by making a voluntary Nazarite vow to God, to be maintained for a specific period of time; by one of his parents offering him to God, to be a Nazarite from birth onward; and by God appointing a person as a lifetime Nazarite. The Bible character Samson, for example, was a Nazarite from birth because an angel appeared to his parents before he was conceived and told them that he would be a Nazarite. The boy Samuel was promised to God as a Nazarite by his mother before he was conceived. Although John the Baptist was never directly called a Nazarite, it’s likely that he was one because God directed him, via his parents, to abstain from wine and other liquor.

Jesus Drank Wine

Avoiding wine drinking is one factor that disqualifies Jesus Christ from having been a Nazarite, since Jesus not only miraculously turned water into wine, according to the Bible book of John, but also drank it. In Luke’s scriptural record, Luke quotes Jesus saying to his accusers: “The Son of Man [Jesus] has come eating and drinking, and you say, behold, a man who is a glutton and a wine drinker, a friend of tax collectors and notorious sinners.” The fact that Jesus acknowledged that he drank wine shows clearly that he was not a Nazarite.

Jesus’ Physical Appearance

Not being a Nazarite has implications regarding Jesus’ appearance. The stereotypical portrayal of Jesus is the thin, long-haired, white-robed man, seen commonly in Christian artwork. But some, such as Jehovah’s Witnesses, believe that since Jesus was not under a Nazarite vow, he was not required to grow out his hair. Therefore, according to some, it’s likely that Jesus’ hair was neatly trimmed in a style similar to other Jewish men of the day.

Nazarite vs. Nazarene

Jesus is rightly called a Nazarene, as he grew up in the town of Nazareth. But a Nazarene is not the same as a Nazarite. Being a Nazarite had nothing to do with a location, race or nationality, but was the title given to those who maintained a specific code of conduct as a way to demonstrate dedication to God. A Nazarite had to fulfill at least three main requirements: abstain from drinking alcohol or any product of the grapevine, and from eating grapes in all their forms; abstain from cutting the hair on the head; and avoid touching dead bodies.

Becoming a Nazarite

A person became a Nazarite in at least three ways: by making a voluntary Nazarite vow to God, to be maintained for a specific period of time; by one of his parents offering him to God, to be a Nazarite from birth onward; and by God appointing a person as a lifetime Nazarite. The Bible character Samson, for example, was a Nazarite from birth because an angel appeared to his parents before he was conceived and told them that he would be a Nazarite. The boy Samuel was promised to God as a Nazarite by his mother before he was conceived. Although John the Baptist was never directly called a Nazarite, it’s likely that he was one because God directed him, via his parents, to abstain from wine and other liquor.

Jesus Drank Wine

Avoiding wine drinking is one factor that disqualifies Jesus Christ from having been a Nazarite, since Jesus not only miraculously turned water into wine, according to the Bible book of John, but also drank it. In Luke’s scriptural record, Luke quotes Jesus saying to his accusers: “The Son of Man [Jesus] has come eating and drinking, and you say, behold, a man who is a glutton and a wine drinker, a friend of tax collectors and notorious sinners.” The fact that Jesus acknowledged that he drank wine shows clearly that he was not a Nazarite.

Jesus’ Physical Appearance

Not being a Nazarite has implications regarding Jesus’ appearance. The stereotypical portrayal of Jesus is the thin, long-haired, white-robed man, seen commonly in Christian artwork. But some, such as Jehovah’s Witnesses, believe that since Jesus was not under a Nazarite vow, he was not required to grow out his hair. Therefore, according to some, it’s likely that Jesus’ hair was neatly trimmed in a style similar to other Jewish men of the day.

http://peopleof.oureverydaylife.com/jesus-nazarite-3013.html

https://pppministries.wordpress.com/2012/03/27/was-jesus-a-nazarite-the-nazareth-and-priestly-connections/

http://idahobaptist.com/matthew/matt025.htm

The word Nazirite is a general designation rather than a name. It denotes men and women (Numbers 6:2) who made a special vow to the Lord, or whose parents did (in the case ofSamuel, for instance; Samuel 1:11). What that vow exactly entailed is not clear, but it could either be temporary or permanent, and the rules of behavior for people who were under that vow were set out precisely (Numbers 6). The Nazirite could not drink alcohol or eat any fruit of the vine, or touch a dead person, or cut their hair. The famous life-long Nazirite Samson managed to break every single one of these statutes (Judges 13-16).

The word Nazirite occurs much more frequently in the early Old Testament than in the later books. But that the practice hadn’t died out until the New Testament era is shown by Acts 18:18, which reads that Paul had his head shaven because he was previously under a vow. In Acts 21:27-26 Paul seeks to appease the Jews and declares that he has four Nazirites among his following and goes in for another stint himself (see v 23).

Since John the Baptist was probably a Nazirite (Luke 1:15), it is often supposed that Jesus was a Nazirite as well, but that is by no means certain, and actually highly unlikely. If He had been a Nazirite, He would have sinned as He touched the coffin of the widow’s dead son (Luke 7:14) and as He called into Lazarus‘ grave (John 11:43, compare with Numbers 6:6), and also when He drank wine, although it isn’t clear if He ever did (Matthew 11:19, compare with Numbers 6:3).

Jesus was not a Nazirite but a Nazarene, meaning: someone from NazarethMatthew explains the move of Jesus and His parents to Nazareth as something that was predicted by the prophets (Matthew 2:23) but the name Nazareth does not occur in the Old Testament and there is no canonized reference to the Messiah having to be a Nazarene. The disciple Nathanael seconds this when he declares that he has no knowledge of any prediction of something good having to come from Nazareth (John 1:46). Judging from the little discussion of John 1:43-51, it seems likely that Nathanael didn’t just sneer but reviewed his knowledge of Moses and the prophets and concluded that they contained no reference to anything good coming from Nazareth (and ‘good’ is a very big word; see Matthew 19:17).

Still, even though some claim it from an Aramaic word meaning ‘watchtower,’ it’s sort of half-defendable that the name Nazareth came from the same root as the word Nazirite (but see our article on the name Nazareth for a rebuttal and an alternative).

http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/11395-nazarite

ns for the Vow.

There were different reasons for taking the Nazarite vow. “It is usual with those that had been afflicted either with a distemper, or with any other distress, to make vows; and for thirty days before they are to offer their sacrifices, to abstain from wine, and to shave the hair of their heads” (Josephus, l.c.). The vow was taken also for the fulfilment of a wish, such as for the birth of a child (Naz. i. 7; comp. 9 and 10). “The pious in ancient times took such a vow, that they might have an opportunity to make a sin-offering” (Ned. 10b). “If one sees a woman suspected of adultery and convicted by the water of jealousy [Num. v.] let him become a Nazarite, since the law of Nazariteship follows immediately in Num. vi.” (Ber. 63a). Some said: “I shall not die before I have become a Nazarite” (Ned. 3b), or, “Let me be a Nazarite on the day when the son of David [the Messiah] shall come.” Such a Nazarite was allowed to drink wine only on the Sabbath and on feast-days, since the Messiah will not appear on these days (‘Er. 43a). A shepherd who saw a lock of his own beautiful hair reflected in the water, and was tempted thereby to sin, took a Nazarite vow (Tosef., Naz. iv. 7; Ned. 9b). Although Nazariteship was marked by asceticism, many abstained from wine and meat even without taking the vow (B. B. 60b; Shab. 139a). Because of this some prominent rabbis who were opposed to asceticism regarded as sinners those who fasted or became Nazarites or took any vow whatsoever, and held that the person in question was an evil-doer, even if the vow was fulfilled (Ned. 9a, b, 20a, 77b; Naz. 4a; Ta’an. 11a).

Persons and Duration.

Women and slaves, who did not have full rights before the religious law, could take the Nazarite vow, but only with the consent of their husbands or owners, while the vow was not valid among the heathen (Naz. iv. 1-5, ix. 1, et passim). Fathers were allowed to dedicate minors, but mothers were forbidden to do so (ib. iv. 29b). The proper name “Nazira” may be connected with some such custom (Gen. R. lxxxii. end, et passim). Jesus is said to have been dedicated while still in the womb (Luke i. 15). Tradition regards not only Samson and Samuel, but also Absalom, as Nazarites, the last on account of his long hair (Naz. 4b). The duration of Nazariteship was voluntary, and ranged from one hour to a lifetime. In the former case, however, it really lasted for thirty days, which was also the period when no definite time was set (ib. i. 3; Sifre, Deut. 357). While the usual time was thirty days, two or more additional vows were generally taken, in which case each period was regarded as a separate Nazariteship, to be immediately followed, when duly completed, by the succeeding one (Maimonides, “Yad,” Nezirut, iii. 6). The period was at times measured by the number of days of the solar or the lunar year (Naz. i., end; Yer. Naz. 54b); or one might say: “Let the number of my Nazariteships be as the hairs of my head, or as the dust-particles of the earth, or as the sands of the sea” (Naz. i. 4). A Nazarite for life might cut his too abundant hair once a year, but a Samson Nazarite might not cut his hair under any circumstances, although he might defile himself by touching a corpse (ib. 4a). While no comb was allowed to touch the hair, it might be cleansed and arranged by other means (ib. vi., end). A proverb says, “Let the Nazarite go around the vineyard, but let him not approach it” (Shab. 13a and parallels; Num. R. x.).

Outside of Palestine and in the Middle Ages.

Nazarite vows were taken also outside of Palestine (Naz. v. 4; iii. 6). Besides Helena, Queen of Adiabene, Miriam of Palmyra is mentioned as a Nazarite (Tos. to Naz. iv. 10). While the Law stated that Nazariteship was equally valid in the country and outside it, in the time of the Temple and after its destruction there was a difference of opinion between the followers of Shammai and of Hillel: the former held that one who entered Palestine after the fulfilment of a prolonged period of Nazariteship must live there thirty days longer as a Nazarite, while the latter maintained that he must begin his vow anew (Naz. iii. 6; comp. Maimonides, “Yad,” Nezirut, ii. 20-21). The earlier and more universal custom agreed with the view of the school of Shammai, Josephus referring to the thirty days demanded, as above, in the passage already quoted—”B. J.” ii. 15, § 1. The observance of the Nazarite vow probably continued for many centuries, but was finally lost in asceticism and mysticism. No Nazarites are known in the Middle Ages.

http://messianic.nazirene.org/nazir.htm

Years ago I suggested Nazarite Queen Helena of Abiabene was the Sleeping Beauty Princess, Rosamond. Her sarcophagus lies at rest under the pyramid of the Louvre, the place where Dan Brown’s Fairytale suggests Mary Magdalene, the wife of Jesus is interred. There is not name in the whole internet like that of my grandmother, Mary Magdalene Rosamond, whose granddaughter married a Benton. Jessie Benton and her husband, John Fremont, had Hungarian ex-patriots in their bodyguard, that fought against the Confederated slave masters of the new Roman empire whose false evangelical prophets have taken over Fremont’s party in order to take from the poor, the widow, and the elderly in order to give to the Imperial Billionaires of America.

The Roman swine who pretend to be wolves captured the beuatiful Menorah that Queen Helena gave as a gift to the Jewish people. My story ‘Capturing Beauty’ will bring the Light of God – home! I will overcome the world!

Johanne Wolferose

l
Kevin Brook cites that the Jewish kings of Adiabene were regularly involved in policy and military affairs. In 61 CE, Monobazus II, the king who Izates meant to succeed him, sent troops to Armenia to try to thwart an invasion of Adiabene. Two years later, he was in attendance at a peace settlement between Parthia and Rome. During the war of Judea against the Roman Empire (66-70 CE), the Adiabenian royal family supported the Judean side.34
According to Paul E. Kahle, there were many Jews in the city of Arbela even after the establishment of bishops and the spread of Christianity in Adiabene.35

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Jesus Was A Nazarite

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    What did Jesus write in the dust? If any Christian does not give me an answer by sunrise tommorow, than, all of Christiandom – IS DEAD!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.