John and Christine Presco

Rosamonds 1917 June & Bonnie 2 Rosamonds 1917 June & Bonnie as Nurses Rosamonds 1917 June & BonnieLEW2 LEW3 LEW4 LEW5 LEW6 LEW7 LEW8 LEW9

Linda Woolverton is a award winning writer for Disney studios. She wrote ‘Beauty and the Beast’ and both Alice in Wonderland movies. Lewis Carroll was a good friend of the Rossettis, and took numerous photographs of this gifted family that produced two poets, a artist, and the publisher of a Pre-Raphaelite magazine titled ‘The Germ’. In 1969 I declared myself a New Pre-Raphaelite and considered if my siblings and I might emulate them. Christine heard me, and took up art in 1972. Then there are our muses and models, some of them our children.

http://preraphaelitesisterhood.com/lewis-carroll-pre-raphaelites/

According to my aunt Lillian, her father, Royal Rosamond, taught Earle Stanley Gardener the rudiments of writing. In a taped interview Lillian told me she would fall asleep in the Rosamond home in Ventura to the sound of Roy and Earl pecking away on the Royal typewriter. Gardener is the creator of Perry Mason, an old television series about an attorney who never fails to win a case.

According to my mother, Rosemary, Royal used to sail out to the Channel Islands with his friend, Dashiell Hammett, and camp overnight. I found old photographs of my grandmother and Roy camping on one of these islands, and will post them later.

Henry Meade Bland was the Poet Laureate of Santa Clara County ad a friend of Joaquin Miller ‘The Poet of the Sierras’. Miller would come down from his poet and artist’s retreat called ‘The Heights’ and carry my father on his lap as he rode with my grandmother on the trolley to catch a ferry to San Francisco. My German kinfolk owned a orchard in the city of Fruit Vale that later became incorporated into the city of Oakland where I was born. I assume they sold their fruit to the canneries located in what is now called Jingletown, a community of Bohemians and Artists.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jingletown

Meade wrote a piece about George James in the same edition of Out West magazine that Royal Rosamond’s story ‘Camping on Ananapa’ is found. Below is Meade’s history written by Eugene T. Sawyers who was titled ‘The King of Dime Novelists’. Eugene authored the Nick Carter series. Hammett was titled “The dean of the hard-boiled’ school of detective fiction”. Royal wrote several love stories for early California Romance magazines. Rosamond’s poems are found next to George Sterling’s and Joaquin Millers.

When you remove the extras and the troubles others have brought to the creative endeavors of two abused siblings – who against all odds performed a miracle – then alas the light they shared come forth without cunning and destructive obstructions. Step back from the decaying fray and fraudulent claims, and behold the beautiful women Christine Rosamond Presco, rendered, and the New Pre-Raphaelite Newspaper, John Gregory Presco, has been publishing for twenty years! Royal Rosamond Press is named after my grandfather who self-published stories and poem in his magazine ‘Gem’.

The world wants to know how we did it, a high school drop out, and a single mother raising her daughter on welfare. Our abusive alcoholic parents contributed nothing to our miracle. Instead, they put before us what appeared to be insurmountable obstacles. Then, there are the bad business people who bankrupted this important artistic legacy, and took Garth Benton’s side in the divorce – before Christine mysteriously drowned – and after!

Christine would bless this post on Royal Rosamond Press, verses the ‘The Final Divorce’  that a ghost writer published in order to posthumously blame everything on Rosamond – and her mother, Rosemary, who is in contention for the role of the Evil Queen.

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I would love to paint everyone in a wonderful light, but, they will not cease crawling around in the dark trying to manipulate the outcome. After my own daughter disqualified me, in yet another elimination round, I trust no living member of my family. They are unredeemable. However, Belle and her Sleepy Street Urchins, are going to play a big role, and are redeemable, because they wanted to help the Homeless.

Above are three photos of my aunt Bonnie and June Rosamond. They fit with Carroll’s images, one being the demise of Fair Rosamond by Queen Eleanor. Grimm named his Sleeping Beauty ‘Rosamond’. We are the Living Tale.

“Life imitates art.”

 

LEW10 LEW11 LEW12 LEW13 LEW19 LEW21 LEW23scan0008scan0012rosamondpress2rosamondsimoneanna9Prescos 1975 Greg, Christine, Shannon, Vicki & RosemaryGreg 1975 Christine

 

https://rosamondpress.com/2014/04/03/to-the-rossettis/

https://rosamondpress.com/2016/03/26/the-death-of-creative-siblings-by-the-sea/

http://preraphaelitesisterhood.com/lewis-carroll-pre-raphaelites/

Two years ago I received in the mail a book I ordered on E-Bay. I quickly scanned it to see if their were any illustrations or photographs. Then, I found it, what amounts to my personal Holy Grail. Joaquin Miller dedicated his book of poems ‘Songs of The Sun-Land’ to the Rossetti family that includes Gariel, Michael, and, Christine. Gabriel was a artist and poet, Michael, a publisher, and Christine, a poet.

“TO THE ROSSETTIS”

There is controversy over this dedication. Michael is against it. He is critical of Miller’s poems that takes the reader to the Holy Land. Joaquin is describing a personal relationship with the Savior that reminds me of how Bohemians and Hippies would view Jesus, he a Nature Boy of sorts.

Gabriel, who had Joaquin over to his house for dinner, where he met several members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood seems to address his brother’s objections in a letter, and gives a tentative go ahead. He talks about Miller sending him a photograph of himself and bids him to say a word or two at the bottom of it, that does not exist. This photo may be the famous one taken by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, who is better known as Lewis Carrol the author of ‘Alice in Wonderland’. If Joaquin had glued this portrait to a piece of paper, then we might have seen it on the dedication page.

What is going on here is extremely profound. Miller has exported his vision and lifestyle to the England, where he wrote Song of the Sierras, and now he is importing to America a cultural brand that contains Grail and Arthurian subject matter that was at the epicenter of the work of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.

The Rossettis may not have been too happy with Miller attaching himself to their star because the British are very protective of their culture. I wish I could say the same thing about the University of Oregon that is about to tear down homes that were once in the city limits of Fairmount, the city founded by Joaquin’s brother, George Miller.

The homes the Miller brothers lived in are registered and protected as Monuments. There is a Joaquin Miller State Park near Florence that was founded by George who also promoted the Winnemucca to the Sea Highway. There needs to be a Monument for George. I suggest the homes on Columbia Terrace be spared, and this city block declared a National Monument. I have suggested these homes be used to house homeless Vets going to college, but now I see a Free College on this site due to the student loan crisis.

This college will teach alternatives to prospective students of the UofO, such as having parents of students purchase a home in Eugene. In many cases a mortgage is cheaper than rent. Teaching your children how to get a job rather then attend college, will produce more home ownership that the UofO who promises jobs – that don’t exist!

The Miller Brothers were born on a farm near Coburg. They went into the world and achieved much. They are a cultural icon too Oregon and California. On page ten of the prelude, we read;

“By unnamed rivers of the Oregon north’
That roll dark-heaved into turbulent hills,
I have made my home….The Wild heart thrills
With memories fierce, and world storms forth.”

I once read that many college students didn’t know there was a Oregon, and if they did, they didn’t know where it is. The Rossettis more than likely read these words. Did they go to a globe to see where Joaquin and George live?
How many students at the UofO know who the Miller brothers were, and the Brotherhood.

Jon Presco

Copyright 2016

Maleficent (/məˈlɛfɪsənt/ or /məˈlɪfɪsənt/) is a 2014 American epic dark fantasy film directed by Robert Stromberg from a screenplay by Linda Woolverton and starring Angelina Jolie, Sharlto Copley, Elle Fanning, Sam Riley, Imelda Staunton, Juno Temple, and Lesley Manville. Loosely based on Charles Perrault’s original fairy tale, the film is a live-action re-imagining of Walt Disney‘s 1959

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christina_Rossetti

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Carroll

Alice Through the Looking Glass is an upcoming American fantasy adventure film directed by James Bobin, written by Linda Woolverton and produced by Tim Burton. It is based on Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll and is the sequel to the 2010 film Alice in Wonderland. The film stars Johnny Depp, Anne Hathaway, Mia Wasikowska, Rhys Ifans, Helena Bonham Carter, and Sacha Baron Cohen and features the voices of Alan Rickman, Stephen Fry, Michael Sheen, and Timothy Spall. The film is set to be released by Walt Disney Pictures on May 27, 2016.

Linda Woolverton (born December 19, 1952) is an American screenwriter, playwright, and novelist, whose most prominent works include the screenplays and books of several acclaimed Disney films and stage musicals. She became the first woman to write an animated feature for Disney by writing the screenplay of Beauty and the Beast,[1] the first animated film ever to be nominated for Best Picture at the 64th Academy Awards. She also wrote the screenplay of The Lion King, and adapted her own Beauty and the Beast screenplay into the book of the Broadway adaptation of the film, receiving a Tony Award nomination for this.[2]

Her most recent works include the screenplay of Alice in Wonderland, a huge box office success, making her the first and only female screenwriter with a sole writing credit on a billion-dollar film,[3] and the screenplay of Maleficent.

Upon the completion of her master’s degree, she formed her own children’s theater company. She wrote, directed and performed all over California in churches, malls, schools, and local theaters. She also began to work as a coach to children acting in commercials in 1979.[4] In 1980, she began working as a secretary for CBS, where she eventually became a programming executive concentrating on both children’s and late-night programming. During her lunch breaks, Woolverton wrote her first novel, the young-adult Star Wind. Eventually quitting the job in 1984, she began to work as a substitute teacher when she wrote her second novel, the also young-adult Running Before the Wind.[5] Released in 1986 and 1987, respectively, both were published by Houghton Mifflin.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_Woolverton

 

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In the interim between his early published writing and the success of the Alice books, Dodgson began to move in the pre-Raphaelite social circle. He first met John Ruskin in 1857 and became friendly with him. He developed a close relationship with Dante Gabriel Rossetti and his family, and also knew William Holman Hunt, John Everett Millais, and Arthur Hughes, among other artists. He also knew fairy-tale author George MacDonald well – it was the enthusiastic reception of Alice by the young MacDonald children that convinced him to submit the work for publication.[25][27

He also found photography to be a useful entrée into higher social circles.[53] During the most productive part of his career, he made portraits of notable sitters such as John Everett Millais, Ellen Terry, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Julia Margaret Cameron, Michael Faraday, Lord Salisbury, and Alfred, Lord Tennyson.[27]

 

Photograph (Albumen Print) of Annie Rogers and Mary Jackson as Queen Eleanor and Fair Rosamund, by C. L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll), July 3, 1863

Photograph of Annie Rogers and Mary Jackson as Queen Eleanor and Fair Rosamund, by C. L. Dodgson (Lewis Carroll), July 3, 1863

Little girls befriended and photographed by Charles Dodgson (otherwise know as Lewis Carroll, author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland) included Ellen Terry, who went on to become one of the finest actresses of her generation; Sarah Angelina Acland, who became the most skilled early practitioner of colour photography in its pioneering years, and was awarded honorary fellowship of the Royal Photographic Society for it; Annie Rogers, who became Oxford’s first female don and a leading figure in establishing equality of opportunities for women in higher education; and most famous of all, Alice Liddell, who went on to become … Mrs Hargreaves.

A good few of the victims of his camera grew up to be strong and independently-minded women, and none of them ever needed psychotherapy; though at the age of 80 Mrs Hargreaves confessed to being “tired of being Alice in Wonderland”.

Women’s education was something Lewis Carroll believed in and pressed for, as well as proportional representation and a fairer political voting system …

AVS

The image is of Annie Rogers and Mary Jackson as Queen Eleanor and the Fair Rosamund, 1863. Carroll sent Annie a copy of the photograph along with this poem:

My dear Annie,

I send you

A picture, which I hope will

B one that you will like to

C. If your Mamma should

D sire one like it, I could

E sily get her one.

Your affectionate friend,

http://fannycornforth.blogspot.com/2015/02/rose-of-world.html

http://hrc.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15878coll18#nav_top

Born in London, he was a son of immigrant Italian scholar Gabriele Rossetti and his wife Frances Rossetti née Polidori, and the brother of Maria Francesca Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Christina Georgina Rossetti.

He was one of the seven founder members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1848, and became the movement’s unofficial organizer and bibliographer. He edited the Brotherhood’s literary magazine The Germ which published four issues in 1850 and wrote the poetry reviews for it.

It was William Michael Rossetti who recorded the aims of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood at their founding meeting in September 1848:

  1. To have genuine ideas to express;

  2. To study nature attentively, so as to know how to express them;

  3. To sympathize with what is direct and serious and heartfelt in previous art, to the exclusion of what is conventional and self-parading and learned by rote;

  4. And most indispensable of all, to produce thoroughly good pictures and statues.

Although Rossetti worked full-time as a civil servant, he maintained a prolific output of criticism and biography across a range of interests from Algernon Swinburne to James McNeill Whistler. He edited the diaries of his maternal uncle John William Polidori (author of The Vampyre and physician to Lord Byron), a comprehensive biography of D. G. Rossetti, and edited the collected works of D. G. Rossetti and Christina Rossetti.

Rossetti edited the first British edition of the poetry of Walt Whitman, which was published in 1868; however, this edition was bowdlerized.[1] Anne Gilchrist, who became one of the first to write about Whitman, first read his poetry from Rossetti’s edition, and Rossetti helped initiate their correspondence.[2]

In 1874 he married Lucy Madox Brown, daughter of the painter Ford Madox Brown. They honeymooned in France and Italy. Their first child, Olivia Frances Madox, was born in September 1875, and her birth was celebrated in an ode of Swinburne’s. A son, Gabriel Arthur, was born in February 1877, followed by another daughter, Helen Maria, in November 1879, and twins, Mary Elizabeth and Michael Ford, in April 1881. Their son Michael died in infancy. Rossetti and his wife did not have the children baptized, nor were they raised in a Christian household. The children were schooled at home by their mother and governesses. In 1897, Olivia married an Italian anarchist refugee, Antonio Agresti. They later moved to Italy, where Olivia became a translator and writer. After she was widowed in 1926, she became an associate of Ezra Pound, and the two corresponded frequently.

Gabriel Arthur, known as Arthur to the family, became a scientist, married Dora Lewis, and had several children. Helen became a painter of miniatures, and in 1903 married Gastone Angeli. He was in fragile health and died only a few months later. Helen gave birth to his posthumous daughter, Imogen Lucy, in 1904.

William Michael Rossetti was a major contributor to the 1911 edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica; his contributions on artistic subjects were criticised by many reviewers at the time and since, as showing little evidence of having absorbed the mounting body of work by academic art historians, mostly writing in German. Below is a quotation from his article on Fra Angelico demonstrating his literary and art historical style.

“The “pietistic” quality of Fra Angelico’s work is in fact its predominant characteristic. The faces of his figures have an air of rapt suavity, devotional fervency and beaming esoteric consciousness, which is intensely attractive to some minds …… the faces becoming sleek and prim, with a smirk of sexless religiosity which hardly eludes the artificial or even the hypocritical; because of this, there are some who are not moved by his work. Even so, Fra Angelico is a notable artist within his sphere,…….” [3]

 

It was William Michael Rossetti who recorded the aims of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood at their founding meeting in September 1848:

  1. To have genuine ideas to express;

  2. To study nature attentively, so as to know how to express them;

  3. To sympathize with what is direct and serious and heartfelt in previous art, to the exclusion of what is conventional and self-parading and learned by rote;

  4. And most indispensable of all, to produce thoroughly good pictures and statues.

Although Rossetti worked full-time as a civil servant, he maintained a prolific output of criticism and biography across a range of interests from Algernon Swinburne to James McNeill Whistler. He edited the diaries of his maternal uncle John William Polidori (author of The Vampyre and physician to Lord Byron), a comprehensive biography of D. G. Rossetti, and edited the collected works of D. G. Rossetti and Christina Rossetti.

Rossetti edited the first British edition of the poetry of Walt Whitman, which was published in 1868; however, this edition was bowdlerized.[1] Anne Gilchrist, who became one of the first to write about Whitman, first read his poetry from Rossetti’s edition, and Rossetti helped initiate their correspondence.[2]

In 1874 he married Lucy Madox Brown, daughter of the painter Ford Madox Brown. They honeymooned in France and Italy. Their first child, Olivia Frances Madox, was born in September 1875, and her birth was celebrated in an ode of Swinburne’s. A son, Gabriel Arthur, was born in February 1877, followed by another daughter, Helen Maria, in November 1879, and twins, Mary Elizabeth and Michael Ford, in April 1881. Their son Michael died in infancy. Rossetti and his wife did not have the children baptized, nor were they raised in a Christian household. The children were schooled at home by their mother and governesses. In 1897, Olivia married an Italian anarchist refugee, Antonio Agresti. They later moved to Italy, where Olivia became a translator and writer. After she was widowed in 1926, she became an associate of Ezra Pound, and the two corresponded frequently.

Gabriel Arthur, known as Arthur to the family, became a scientist, married Dora Lewis, and had several children. Helen became a painter of miniatures, and in 1903 married Gastone Angeli. He was in fragile health and died only a few months later. Helen gave birth to his posthumous daughter, Imogen Lucy, in 1904.

William Michael Rossetti was a major contributor to the 1911 edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica; his contributions on artistic subjects were criticised by many reviewers at the time and since, as showing little evidence of having absorbed the mounting body of work by academic art historians, mostly writing in German. Below is a quotation from his article on Fra Angelico demonstrating his literary and art historical style.

“The “pietistic” quality of Fra Angelico’s work is in fact its predominant characteristic. The faces of his figures have an air of rapt suavity, devotional fervency and beaming esoteric consciousness, which is intensely attractive to some minds …… the faces becoming sleek and prim, with a smirk of sexless religiosity which hardly eludes the artificial or even the hypocritical; because of this, there are some who are not moved by his work. Even so, Fra Angelico is a notable artist within his sphere,…….” [3]

The Germ (1850) was a periodical established by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood to disseminate their ideas. It was not a success, only surviving for four issues between January and April 1850

 

The Germ published poetry by William Michael Rossetti (who also edited the magazine) and other members of the Brotherhood, including his brother Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Thomas Woolner and James Collinson. It also printed contributions of verse and essays on art and literature by associates of the Brotherhood, including Ford Madox Brown and Coventry Patmore, as well as occasional book reviews.

Illustrations were provided by members of the brotherhood. Every issue began with an original etching. Hunt provided an illustration to Woolner’s poem My Beautiful Lady in the first issue. Collinson illustrated his own poem The Child Jesus in the second issue. Madox Brown created a two page illustration of the King Lear and his daughters for the third issue, accompanying his article on the mechanics of a history painting. Walter Deverell depicted Viola and Olivia from Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night in the last issue.

Title[edit]

The title The Germ refers to the Pre-Raphaelite belief in the importance of nature (a germ is a seed) and of the human imagination, as implied by the phrase “the germ of an idea”. They hoped that the magazine would be a seed from which new creative ideas would grow. It was subtitled thoughts towards nature in art and literature to emphasise the editors’ belief that poetry and art should be closely intertwined.

In the hope of improving the magazine’s poor sales, it was renamed with the less ambiguous title Art and Poetry, being Thoughts towards Nature, conducted principally by Artists for its final two issues.

My Lady’s name, when I hear strangers use,
Not meaning her, to me sounds lax misuse;
  I love none but my Lady’s name;
  Moud, Grace, Rose, Marian, all the same,
    Are harsh, or blank and tame.

 

http://www.bartleby.com/246/717.html

The name Nazarene was adopted by a group of early 19th century German Romantic painters who aimed to revive honesty and spirituality in Christian art. The name Nazarene came from a term of derision used against them for their affectation of a biblical manner of clothing and hair style.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to John and Christine Presco

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    In April I posted this prophetic post. I hereby found the Mary White Branch of the NAACP due to the lack of transparency and rigorous honesty. Trump is esteeming white people in the most dishonest way possible. I intend to educate and esteem the white race in a sane and non-racist manner. “Mary White Ovington was inspired by William Morris and the Pre-Raphaelites and became a Socialist. This led to he being a co-founder of the NAACP. Jane Morris was the Muse to several Pre-Raphaelites.

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