The Death of Creative Siblings by the Sea

rayers6 rayes2 rayes6 rayes7 rayes9 rayes10

Marilyn Reed bid me to see a woman, a Seer, and alas own a picture of how my late sister died. She asked me if I would abide by her findings. This is to say, what if I am wrong, and the written version by the hired ghost writers is correct?

Several days later, I remind Marilyn she asked me to get a reading at the Berkeley Psychic Insititute back in 1987 where a woman said this at the beginning of my two hour reading;

“You own your own creation. You died!”

In the second hour of the reading I got to ask questions. I began this reading as a skeptic, but, I did own a picture of where possibly my death took place.

“If it is true what you told me, where was I when I died?”

“You were on these beautiful rocks by the sea. You were in much pain. You had to let that pain go.”

http://www.berkeleypsychic.com/

My fall on a dramatic rock that buttressed into the sea at McClure’s Beach came to mind. My feet were hanging over the edge of a hundred foot drop. There was a bad gash in the palm of my hand. I could see my bone.

Yesterday I read Julie Lynch has sold an idea for a Televison series that might come out next year. She claimed a famous director bought her script about Christine Rosamond, several year ago.

“Before the Wave: The Life Story of Christine Rosamond
Drama
Not yet released
When the idealistic artist known as Rosamond defiantly emerges from a dark childhood, suppressed by abuse and alcoholism, and rockets to worldwide fame, becoming the world’s most published painter, she discovers that her road into the light is twisted, wrought with sabotage, and at the tips of her reach.”

Christine and I – DIED! I am dead to my family because they keep competing with one another and me in order to get close to the Fame & Money they hope outsiders will give them. I will never lay eyes on a family member again. You got to let us go. You got to stop feeding off us, feeding off the dead! Alcoholism is a disease. My sister died on her first sober birthday. I will be sober twenty-nine years in April. Christine and I do not want to see Julie Lynch exploiting our disease – for money!  Go do your own paintings. Try writing a poem. Leave us alone!

Here is a good view of the house Christine stayed in. Look how steep it is to the water. Shamus Dundon claimed he was jogging here to get warm because it was a “blustery” morning. Christine is free of your lies! Stop feeding off our energy.

Jon Presco

rayes56

rayes32 rayes33 rayes34 rayes45Greg 1975 Christine

 

Point Reyes is a prominent cape and popular Northern California tourist destination on the Pacific coast of northern California. It is located in Marin County approximately 30 miles (50 km) west-northwest of San Francisco. The term is often applied to the Point Reyes Peninsula, the region bounded by Tomales Bay on the northeast and Bolinas Lagoon on the southeast. The headland is protected as part of Point Reyes National Seashore.

http://www.mercurynews.com/ci_7973168

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxLJ7CE8zv4

They are sudden, they are remorseless and they can suck their victims into the sea to an almost certain death. Summoned by wind and tide, these “sneaker waves” hurl themselves far beyond the foam line on the beach then forcefully go in reverse. In the past week alone, they are blamed for the drowning deaths of three people on Bay Area beaches.

Charles Quaid of Richmond was strolling with his wife and dog at North Beach in Point Reyes National Seashore on New Year’s Day when what apparently was a sneaker wave claimed his life. Quaid, 59, was a sailor and familiar with the ocean but still disappeared into a churning sea. Quaid’s dog emerged from the water unharmed.

 

A similar tragedy occurred Dec. 28, when 37-year-old Juan Escamillo-Rojas of San Francisco died trying to save his 9-year-old son Juan Carlos Escamillo-Monroy, after a wave swept the boy into San Francisco Bay as they fished off the Marin Headlands. The boy also died.

In the aftermath of those tragedies, Bay Area families that once frolicked in the foam at places like Monastery Beach near Carmel and Pleasure Point in Santa Cruz, retreated from the threat of killer waves with the malevolent recoil of a bullwhip. Yet as unusual as the deaths were, sneaker waves are not uncommon at this time of year. “Everyone is talking about these waves that run up on the beach and snatch dogs and families and drowns everyone,” said Mark Massara, who has surfed Northern California waters for more than 40 years. “And the dog always survives.”


 


Pattern waves

Massara, who is general counsel for the wetsuit manufacturer O’Neill, thinks the term “sneaker waves” was concocted to make people feel better about their own ill-advised daring. “If it helps the public be more sensitive to the inherent dangers of the ocean in Northern California in the winter, I suppose it’s OK,” he said. “But if you’re trying to describe what goes on in the ocean, it’s entirely misleading. There aren’t sneaker waves. There’s regular, routine, predictable giant surf in January in Northern California.”

The cold-weather phenomenon claimed most of a family in November. They were playing fetch with their dog on Big Lagoon Beach in Humboldt County, when they were swept into the ocean by a sneaker wave while their teen daughter helplessly watched from the shore. Howard Kuljian ran into the churning surf to save the family dog, Fran, and he was followed by his wife and their son, Gregory. All three drowned; the dog survived.

Despite popular mythology that has sprung up about the predictability of waves — it’s not true that every seventh wave will be a big one — they do often arrive in sets that follow a pattern. Generally, sneaker waves occur when two large peaks converge and suddenly create a monster, such as the one that swept ashore during the Mavericks surf competition three years ago, injuring 16 spectators.

“On a steep beach, that wave will run up and rush back pretty quickly,” said Gary Griggs, director at UC Santa Cruz’s Institute of Marine Sciences. “If the tide’s coming in, that’s going to act in concert with those converging waves.”

Sneaker waves sometimes claim victims standing in relatively calm water, which is what happened to environmental activist Rebecca Tarbotton, 39, of Oakland. She died Dec. 26 after being tossed around by a big wave not far from a beach north of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. And as Tarbotton’s death demonstrated, knowing the tremendous power that nature can release in an instant offers little protection. One of Northern California’s most popular diving spots is Monastery Beach near Carmel, which the expert divers who flock there refer to as Mortuary Beach because it has taken so many lives.

Surprising ocean

While oceanographers tend to dispute the notion that killer waves are consistently rising out of the sea and dragging innocent strollers to a watery grave, even they are sometimes caught off guard by the unanticipated arrival of an extremely large wave. “I think it’s a pretty good description,” said Oregon State University oceanographer Robert Holman, referring to the phenomenon’s unusual name. “They lie well out of the statistical expectation of what the next wave should be.”

He ought to know. A few years ago, Holman and his wife were standing on a rocky point by the sea in Italy when they were suddenly consumed by a wall of water that he never saw coming. “I got totally drenched,” he recalled. “That was a surprising moment.”

It can happen to anybody.

“In general, some people are not very good observers,” Griggs said, “or they’re not really thinking carefully about what they’re being exposed to. If you’re walking on the wet sand, you’re probably walking where the water has been a few minutes before. If the sand is dry, it’s unlikely you’re going to be swept out to sea. But we’ve all seen people who put their towels down on the beach, and as the tide comes in, all of a sudden their towel is underwater.”

Griggs once went to the home of an elderly woman in Santa Cruz, hoping to reassure her that the waves pounding just off her rear deck wouldn’t wash her home away. “Just as I turned around, this wave came up and just covered me,” he said. “As I walked into her house, soaking wet, she said, ‘Never turn your back on the ocean.”’

Contact Bruce Newman at 408-920-5004; follow him at Twitter.com/BruceNewmanTwit.

beach safety rules

  • Never turn your back on the water.
  • Be mindful of upcoming weather conditions.
  • Be aware of potentially dangerous waves in areas of strong currents that are near shore or shallow banks.
  • Remember that sneaker waves are hard to predict.
  • Remain aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not play on the rocks.
  • Do not overestimate your swimming abilities.
  • Do not underestimate the power of the sea.

 

 

 

 

 

Surprising ocean

While oceanographers tend to dispute the notion that killer waves are consistently rising out of the sea and dragging innocent strollers to a watery grave, even they are sometimes caught off guard by the unanticipated arrival of an extremely large wave. “I think it’s a pretty good description,” said Oregon State University oceanographer Robert Holman, referring to the phenomenon’s unusual name. “They lie well out of the statistical expectation of what the next wave should be.”

He ought to know. A few years ago, Holman and his wife were standing on a rocky point by the sea in Italy when they were suddenly consumed by a wall of water that he never saw coming. “I got totally drenched,” he recalled. “That was a surprising moment.”

It can happen to anybody.

“In general, some people are not very good observers,” Griggs said, “or they’re not really thinking carefully about what they’re being exposed to. If you’re walking on the wet sand, you’re probably walking where the water has been a few minutes before. If the sand is dry, it’s unlikely you’re going to be swept out to sea. But we’ve all seen people who put their towels down on the beach, and as the tide comes in, all of a sudden their towel is underwater.”

Griggs once went to the home of an elderly woman in Santa Cruz, hoping to reassure her that the waves pounding just off her rear deck wouldn’t wash her home away. “Just as I turned around, this wave came up and just covered me,” he said. “As I walked into her house, soaking wet, she said, ‘Never turn your back on the ocean.”’

Contact Bruce Newman at 408-920-5004; follow him at Twitter.com/BruceNewmanTwit.

beach safety rules

  • Never turn your back on the water.
  • Be mindful of upcoming weather conditions.
  • Be aware of potentially dangerous waves in areas of strong currents that are near shore or shallow banks.
  • Remember that sneaker waves are hard to predict.
  • Remain aware of your surroundings.
  • Do not play on the rocks.
  • Do not overestimate your swimming abilities.
  • Do not underestimate the power of the sea.
Never turn your back on the ocean.

Don’t close your eyes for any length of time, whether to contemplate the beach experience or take a nap.

Don’t put yourself in a position you can’t quickly move from (such as a complicated yoga pose or standing on your head).

Stay well back from where waves are breaking.

Supervise children all the time.

Wave Kills Woman Posing for Pictures

December 25, 2000 | Associated Press

A San Jose woman died Sunday after being swept away by a large wave while posing for photographs on the shore, Monterey County coroner investigators said. The 26-year-old is the second person killed by rogue waves in three days. On Friday, a 13-year-old boy was yanked from the beach and is presumed dead by San Francisco police after two days of searches. The woman was standing on some rocks with friends at Garrapata State Beach, south of Carmel, when she was carried away about 11:20 a.m.

March 27, 2000

The U.S. Coast Guard recovered the body of a drowned woman but gave up on a search for two teenagers, all of whom were swept into the Pacific Ocean while on a high school sightseeing trip from Canada. The woman, believed to be a chaperon, slipped into the surf and was pulled out to sea Saturday near Shelter Cove, about 200 miles north of San Francisco, said U.S. Coast Guard mission controller Michael Burgess. He said the Coast Guard gave up hope for the two missing teens Sunday.

At a scenic Big Sur beach in 1997, a rogue wave and its out-flowing rip current snatched an 11-year-old Kansas girl wading and playing on the shoreline. Her mother and grandmother swam to the rescue — all three drowned in minutes.

The drowning of the three Kansas family members at Big Sur’s Pfeiffer Beach — also in national parkland — sparked a landmark ruling by the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Jose.

A trial judge had rejected a lawsuit by the victims’ family, invoking legal precedent that holds landowners are not responsible for hazards off their property — especially something as uncontrollable as the ocean.

Defense attorneys also cited a legal doctrine that landowners have no responsibility to issue warnings about “open and obvious” natural hazards — such as rough currents — that all “reasonable” people should recognize.

But in a passionate opinion, the appellate court ruled in 2000 that park managers, by giving visitors toy plastic buckets — including one with a perforated bottom “apparently to let sea water drain out” — had “actually invited the children to play” by the waterside.

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/Warning-about-waves-Parents-continue-search-for-2676781.php

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to The Death of Creative Siblings by the Sea

  1. Reblogged this on rosamondpress and commented:

    Outsiders have been exploiting the death of my late sister, Christine Rosamond Benton. They have done much DAMAGE to her estate and the family creative legacy. So called friends, have also damaged this legacy. https://rosamondpress.com/2016/03/26/julie-lynch-sexpot-2/
    Before the Wave: The Life Story of Christine Rosamond
    Drama
    Not yet released
    When the idealistic artist known as Rosamond defiantly emerges from a dark childhood, suppressed by abuse and alcoholism, and rockets to worldwide fame, becoming the world’s most published painter, she discovers that her road into the light is twisted, wrought with sabotage, and at the tips of her reach.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.