French Carrier Bombs ISIS

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My friend’s great grandfather led the invasion of Algiers against the Caliph, Hussein Dey, who took French and American Merchantmen prisoner and sold them into slavery. France sent a aircraft carrier to bomb ISIS, who seek to own what Dey, had, proving;

“Every Dey has his day!”

Military jets from France’s Charles de Gaulle aircraft carrier on Monday flew their first missions over Islamic State-controlled territories in Syria and Iraq and carried out their first airstrikes against ISIS

The jets have hit two Islamic State targets in Iraq, the French military said on Twitter.

The presence of 26 military aircraft aboard the Charles de Gaulle triples French forces in the region, adding to the 12 planes already stationed in the UAE and Jordan: six Rafale and six Mirage 2000 aircraft.

The Charles de Gaulle, France’s only aircraft carrier, was deployed in the Mediterranean on Saturday.

The start of the carrier’s military mission comes 10 days after a series of coordinated terrorist attacks in Paris left 130 people dead and some 360 others injured.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/12012021/France-deploys-the-Charles-de-Gaulle-aircraft-carrier-in-pictures.html

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Auguste_Victor_de_Ghaisne_de_Bourmont

The Invasion of Algiers in 1830 was a large-scale military operation by which the Kingdom of France, ruled by Charles X, invaded and conquered the Ottoman Regency of Algiers. Algiers had been a province of the Ottoman Empire since the Capture of Algiers in 1529 by Hayreddin Barbarossa.

A diplomatic incident, the so-called Fan Affair, served in 1827 as a pretext to initiate a blockade against the port of Algiers. After three years of standstill and a more severe incident in which a French ship carrying an ambassador to the dey with a proposal for negotiations was bombarded, the French determined that more forceful action was required. Charles X was also in need of diverting attention from turbulent French domestic affairs that culminated with his deposition during the later stages of the invasion in the July Revolution.

The invasion of Algiers began on 5 July 1830 with a naval bombardment by a fleet under Admiral Duperré, and a landing by troops under Louis Auguste Victor de Ghaisne, comte de Bourmont. The French quickly defeated the troops of Hussein Dey, the Ottoman ruler, but native resistance was widespread. This resulted in a protracted military campaign, lasting more than 45 years, to root out popular opposition to the colonisation. The so-called “pacification” was marked by resistance of figures such as Ahmed Bey, Abd El-Kader and Lalla Fatma N’Soumer.

The invasion marked the end of several centuries of Ottoman rule in Algeria and the beginning of French Algeria. In 1848, the territories conquered around Algiers were organised into three départements, defining the territories of modern Algeria.

French troops landed at Sidi Ferruch on 14 June 1830 against minimal opposition. Within a few days, however, troops of Algerian caids started to rise against the invaders. On 18 June, Hussein Dey assembled a 10,000-man army, comprising 1,000 Janissaries, 5,000 Moors and 3,000 Arabs and Berbers from Oran, Titteri and Medea. Bourmont merely kept the counter-attacks at bay until 28 June, when siege weapons were landed, making it possible to attack Algiers itself.

About Royal Rosamond Press

I am an artist, a writer, and a theologian.
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1 Response to French Carrier Bombs ISIS

  1. Reblogged this on Rosamond Press and commented:

    The West is on the verge of losing it power – everywhere!

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